Edward Woodman, II

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Edward Woodman, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Corshamm Village, Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
Place of Burial: 1st Settlers Bur, Newbury, Essex Co., Ma
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward Woodman and Collette Woodman
Husband of Joanna Woodman
Father of Edward Woodman; Jane Woodman; Judge John Woodman; Joshua Woodman; Mary Brown and 3 others
Brother of Marye Woodman and Elizabeth Woodman
Half brother of Archelaus Woodman; Rebecca Woodman; Walter Woodman; Mary Woodman; Edward Woodman and 3 others

Occupation: Arrived on the James in 1635
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Edward Woodman, II

He came from England on the "James" (Southampton to Boston) in 1635 with his wife, three children, and his brother. He was made a freeman in 1636.

--------------------

Edward Woodman, baptized Dec. 27, 1606 in Corsham Village, Wiltshire, England, son of Edward & Collet (Mallett) Woodman; married Joanna Salway, c1630. She was born in 1614; no record of the name of her parents.

Edward and Joanna settled at Corsham before immigrating to Newbury in 1635. She died after 1687. He died about 1690 and is buried in the "1st Burying Ground of the First Settlers", located off Route 1A, Newbury, Massachusetts.

No record exists of the marriage of Edward and Joanna Salway. They were probably married in Joanna's parish, which was the custom, and she was evidently from one of the neighboring towns where Parish Registers do not survive before 1653, 1665, or later.

Edward Woodman was admitted a "freeman" on May 25, 1636 and acknowledged to be a "freeholder" December 7, 1642. A man could be a freeholder and not a freeman, and vice versa. A freeman was one having full political rights and entitled to vote on the nomination of magistrates and choice of duties. A freeholder was one, who either by grant or purchase, was entitled to a share of all the common lands of the town.

On September 8, 1636 Mr. Edward Woodman was chosen Deputy to the General Court, which was located at Boston, a distance of 40 miles. The records of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in the office of the Secretary of State at Boston, show that

Edward Woodman was Deputy from Newbury in 1636, 1637, 1639, 1643, 1659 1660 1664, and 1670.

Edward was appointed by the General Court as Lieutenant of the Newbury Company on March 17, 1637.

Town records show he was one of three commissioner "to end small causes" in 1638, 1641, 1645 and 1646. Mr. Woodman at various times held many other offices of trust in the town and the province. One of these was "to see people marry," of which in 1681 he said: "an unprofitable commission; I quickly laid aside the worke, which cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintance have been concerned."

At the Newbury town meeting, November 29, 1652, the town voted "that Mr. Woodman, Richard Kent, Jr., Lieut. Pike and Nicholas Noyes should be a committee for managing the business of the schoole."

For many years the church in Newbury had been divided, almost equally, between the original pastor, Reverend Thomas parker, and Mr. Edward Woodman, of whom the noted historian Joshua Coffin wrote: "He was a man of influence, decision and energy, and opposed with great zeal the attempt made by the Rev. Thomas Parker to change the mode of Church government from Congregationalism to something like Presbytarianism."

This division of the town was not due to a great difference of theology, but of church government. As early as 1645 the Rev. Parker and his party maintained the churce should be governed by the pastor, his assistants, and a ruling elder. Mr. Woodman's party believed it was the right of the members of the church, and government should be by the congregation. In a letter to the church council, Mr. Edward Woodman stated, "As for our controversy it is whether God hath placed the power in the elder, or in the whole church, to judge between truth and error, right and wrong, brother and brother, and all things of church concernment."

These ecclesiastical problems, which grew more violent and partisan each year, plagued the town for over 25 years and became known throughout New England as the "Parker-Woodman War." By 1669 difference of opinion had grown to such proportions that an appeal was made to the civil authorities. The court proceedings began March 13th at Ipswich and continued on and off for over two years. The decision of the court, on May 29, 1671, found in favor of Rev. Parker's part and levied fines against the members of Mr. Woodman's party.

Edward Woodman was fined 20 nobles*. Mr. Richard Dummer, Richard Thorlay, Stephen Greenleaf, Richard Bartlet and William Titcomb, fined 4 nobles each. Francis Plumer, John Emery, Sr., John Emery,

Jr., John Merrill and Thomas Browne, a mark** each. All others (27), one noble. However, the judgement of the court did not bring an end to the controversy, and the conflict continued for several years.

A Baptist Church was formed in Newbury with the consent of the First Baptist Church of Boston on February 6, 1681/2. The chruch was formed by eight residents of the town, which included Mr. Edward Woodman and wife.

March 25, 1681, Edward Woodman conveyed to his youngest son, Jonathan, "My now dwelling house, houses and barns and orchard and pasture, and all my plow land lying by and adjoining to the said houses, as also all the plow lands upon the northwest side of the street lying upon the westward side of my house, the said street being vulgarly called the New Street***." The consideration for this conveyance was "natural and fatherly love and affection" and "twenty pounds of which is yearly to be paid during the time of my own and my wife's natural life."

In the genealogy "The Woodmans of Buxton, Maine" Cyrus Woodman wrote: "This was in his old age, and was evidently an arrangement under which he and his wife were to have a home with, and be provided for, by their son Jonathan during their lives."

The date of Edward's death is some time in 1692. There was no record of a will being filed or proved.

  • A noble is six shillings and eight pence.
    • A mark is thirteen shillings and four pence.
      • New Street, later called "Woodman Lane" is now Kent Street in the town of Newburyport.

-------------------- From: Descendants and Ancestors of Lt. Edward Woodman April 4, 1998, by Rob Roy

LT. EDWARD1 WOODMAN was christened on 27 December 1606 in St. Bartholomew's Church, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. He married Joanna Salway, daughter of Aurthur Salway and Mary Searle, in England. He died circa 1690 in Newbury, Massachusetts,.There is much speculation on the date of his death, some giving a date as late as 1694. The gravestone, erected long after his death in First Burying Ground, Newbury, Massachusetts, reads: In memory of MR. EDWARD WOODMAN who came from England and settled in Newbury in 1635. "A man of talents, influence, firmness and decision." He served faithfully for many years as Selectman, Deputy to the General Court and Commissioner He died about 1690.

He and Joanna Salway emigrated circa 1635 from England. He served as Selectman of Newbury, Massachusetts. This was Newbury's first board of Selectman, then called "the seven men" in 1636. He was usually styled "Mr." indicating a good position in the community. Only fifteen of the original 91 grantees of Newbury were entitled to be called "Mr" in 1636. He became a freeman on 25 May 1636 in Newbury, Massachusetts. He served on 8 September 1636 as Deputy to the General Court from Newbury. He served again in 1636, 1637, 1639, 1643, 1659, 1660, 1664, and 1670. He began military service on 17 May 1637; to Lieutenant in the Newbury Militia Company, the date being recorded as 12 (1) 1637/1638.1 He was licenced to sell strong drink, the date being recorded as 17 (3) 1637 on 12 March 1637/38. He served on 6 July 1638 as a Selectman of Newbury. He served on 6 September 1638 as Commissioner to End Small Causes. He held this office again in 1638, 1641, and 1650. He was on 6 September 1638 applied to aid the magistrates in execution of court decrees. He served on 1 April 1647 as Moderator of Newbury. He served on 29 November 1652 as School Committee. He was was the leader of the opposition to the Rev. Thomas Parker's attempt to change the church government from Congregationalism to something akin to Presbyterianism in 1669. He served on 11 May 1670 as Deputy to the General Court from Newbury. He and Joanna Salway were Members of the Church in Newbury, Massacusetts in 1674. He took the oath of allegiance giving his age as 60 years in 1678. He was in 1681 as commissioned by the state to see people marry. In 1681 he wrote: "An unprofitable commission; I quickly laid aside the worke, which has cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintances have been concerned." It may be noted that in that period in Massachusetts, people were not married by ministers in the church. He deeded land on 25 March 1681 in Woodman's Lane, Newbury, Massachusetts, to his son, Sgt. Jonathan Woodman, "My now dwelling-house, houses and barns and orchard and pasture, and all my plow land lying by and adjoining to the said houses, as also all the plow lands upon the northwest side of the street lying upon the westward side of my house, the said street being vulgarly called the Newstreet." The consideration for this conveyance was "natural and fatherly love and affection" and "twenty pounds which is yearly to be paid during the time of my own and my wife's natural life." This street is now called Kent Street in Newbury. He and Joanna Salway were living in February 1687/88 in Newbury, Massachusetts. -------------------- Edward Woodman (1606 - 1692)

Edward Woodman, son of Edward Woodman and Callet Mallet, was christened 17 December 1606 in Corsham, Wilshire, England. He had two sisters, Mary and Elizabeth.

After his mother died 5 July 1611, his father married Edith (surname unknown) and had six more children: Archelaus, Rebecca, Walter, Jonathan, Anne, and David. Edward Woodman married Joanna Salway about 1628. He and his half-brother, Archelaus Woodman, born 1613/1614, arrived in Newbury aboard the "James" in 1635. Both brothers lived in Newbury on Woodman Lane, now Kent Street.

In Coffin's History of Newbury, Edward Woodman is called "a man of talents, influence, firmness, and decision." The title "Mister" usually preceded his name, which implies he was a prominent citizen. Edward was one of the ninety-one grantees who settled Newbury, MA.

Edward Woodman, a mercer and wine merchant, was licensed 12 January 1637/1638 to sell wine and strong drink. He is also listed as "husbandman" in some records. He became a Freeman 25 May 1636 and was active in the affairs of the Congregational Church in Newbury. On 8 September 1636, he was chosen deputy from Newbury to the General Court, and he served as representative there in 1636, 1637, 1639, and 1643. At various times, he held other offices of profit and trust in Newbury and the state. Among his commissions from the state was "to see people marry" which he later resigned saying "An unprofitable commission: I quickly laid aside the works, which has cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintances have been concerned."

Archelaus Woodman married first Elizabeth (surname unknown) and second Dorothy Chapman. He had two daughters, but no male heirs. So all area descendants, with the Woodman surname, are from the Edward Woodman line. Newbury records show Archelaus, a lieutenant, served as representative in 1674 and 1675. He died 14 October 1702, aged about ninety.

Edward and Joanna Woodman were parents of eight children: Edward, Jane, John, Joshua, Mary, Sarah, Jonathan, and Ruth. Ruth Woodman, born 28 March 1646, married Benjamin Lowell, son of John Lowell and Elizabeth Goodale of Newbury. Joanna Salway Woodman died in 1688 and Edward Woodman died in the summer of 1692. Both are likely buried in the cemetery opposite the old Coffin mansion. A monument to Edward Woodman stands in the First Settlers Burying Ground in Newbury, MA.

Lt. Birth Bef 27 Dec 1606 Corsham, Wiltshire, England Gender Male _UID 6D966C9EE72F40DA8C109D2B399E379443A0 Died Between 1688 and 1694 Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts [1, 2] Buried First Settlers Burying Ground, Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts [3] Person ID I744 GriffinCunningham Last Modified 10 Oct 2008 Family Joanna Salwey, b. Abt 1610, Malford, Wiltshire, England , d. Aft Feb 1688, Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts Married 1628 Malford, Wiltshire, England [4, 5, 6] Children 1. Joshua Woodman, b. 1629, Corsham, Wiltshire, England , d. 30 May 1703, Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts 2. Jane Woodman, b. 1630, Corsham, Wiltshire, England , d. Bef 4 Jul 1633, Corsham, Wiltshire, England 3. John Woodman, b. Abt 1634, Corsham, Wiltshire, England , d. 17 Sep 1706, Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire 4. Sarah Woodman, b. 12 Jan 1642, Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts 5. Ruth Woodman, b. 28 Mar 1646, Newbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts , d. Aft 2 Feb 1724 Last Modified 10 Oct 2008 Family ID F205 Group Sheet Notes Savage 4:640 - *EDWARD, Newbury, elder br. of Archelaus, came, says Coffin, with him, bring. w. and s. Edward, b. 1628, and John; had here Joshua, the first Eng. male ch. of the town, b. 1636 or 7; Sarah, 12 Jan. 1642; Jonathan, 5 Nov. 1643; Ruth, 28 Mar. 1646; and, Coffin adds, perhaps others; was freem. 25 May 1636, rep. Sept. foll. and 7, and sev. yrs. later. His wid. or w. Joanna is ment. 9 Nov. 1653 in the rec. but the time of his d. is not ment. [:ITAL] The gravestone, erected long after his death ... reads: In memory of MR. EDWARD WOODMAN who came from England and settled in Newbury in 1635. "A man of talents, influence, firmness and decision." He served faithfully for many years as Selectman, Deputy to the General Court and Commissioner. He died about 1690. aboard the "James" from London, having departed 06 Apr served in Newbury's first board of Selectmen, then called "the seven men" Edward Woodman appears on the first known list of the settlers of Newbury, compiled in 1642, as does his brother Archelaus -- they were among the original 91 grantees. The Woodmans of Buxton ME, pp 3-5: In 1855, Mr. Joshua Coffin, of Newbury, prepared and caused to be printed for me, "A list of some of the descendants of Mr. Edward Woodman," the immigrant ancestor. I follow his list for the names of the children of Edward,1 Joshua,2 and Benjamin3; adding, however, such facts as I have elsewhere obtained, and especially noticing any discrepancies that there may be between his list and the information which I have derived from other sources. EDWARD.1 MR. COFFIN prefaced his list with the following statement: "The town of Newbury, Mass., was settled and incorporated in 1635. In that year came Mr. Edward Woodman, his wife Joanna, and Archelaus Woodman, to Newbury, where they resided till their death. Archelaus came from a place called Christian Malford, a parish in Wiltshire, in the North-west part of the county, about six miles from Malmesbury, the chief town of that part of the country. He came passenger in the ship James, of London, which sailed from Southampton for New England in April, 1635. His name may be found in Vol. VII. of the Third Series of the Mass. Historical Society's Collections, page 319. He is there called Hercules Woodman. A few weeks later than the James came the Abigail, bringing a Richard Woodman, only 9 years old. Whether Mr. Edward Woodman, who was probably brother to Archelaus Woodman, came in the James or Abigail, or some other vessel, no record informs us. Both of them came to Newbury at the same time. Richard died in Lynn in 1647, aged 21. Archelaus, in 1635, is styled a 'mercer.' His first wife, Elizabeth, died 17th December, 1677. His second wife, Dorothy Chapman, whom he married 12th November, 1678, died in 1706. In the Newbury records he is styled Lieutenant, and died 14th October, 1702, aged about 90. He left no children. Of the ninety-one grantees who settled Newbury, fifteen were entitled to the appellation of 'Mr.' One of these fifteen was Mr. Edward Woodman. He was a man of influence, decision and energy, and opposed with great zeal the attempt made by the Rev. Thomas Parker to change the mode of church government from Congregationalism to something like Presbyterianism. [See History of Newbury, under the years 1669, 1670, &c.] Mr. Woodman was a deputy to the General Court in 1636, '37, '39 and '43. In 1638, '41, '45 and '46, he was one of the three commissioners to end small causes in Newbury, and at various times held other offices of profit and trust in town and State. Among his other commissions he had one from the State, 'to see people marry,' of which, in 1681, he thus speaks: 'An unprofitable commission; I quickly laid aside the worke, which has cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintances have been concerned.' He and his wife Joanna were living in February, 1687-8. She was then 74. He died prior to 1694. His age is not known." He was mistaken if he meant to say that Lieut. Archelaus1 had no children. From a deed made by Archelaus1 to Archelaus Adams, dated Jan. 6, 1698-9, it appears that this Adams was his grandson, and that he had other grandchildren. From the will of John Brocklebank, of Rowley, dated Nov. 30, 1665, it appears that his wife Sarah was a daughter of Archelaus1 Woodman. They were married Sept. 26, 1657. Mr. Brocklebank, at his death (April, 1666), left two children, daughters. The birth of the children of Archelaus1 is not recorded in the Newbury records. Mr. Coffin says that he was about 90 when he died, in 1702, and that he and Edward1 came to Newbury in 1635. If Mr. Coffin states his age correctly when he died, then he was born about 1612, and came to this country when he was about 23 years of age. In 1678 he took the oath of allegiance, and is then stated to have been 60 years old, which makes his birth to have been in or about 1618, and his age 17 when he arrived in New England. It thus appears that he had two daughters married. As there is no record found of the birth of his children, I infer that they were few in number, consisting perhaps of two daughters only. There is no evidence that he had any male children. It is probable that all the male children born in Newbury were either sons or descendants of Edward.1 Mr. Coffin says that Archelaus1 came from Christian Malford in England, which is probably correct, though I have not found his authority for the statement. His birth is not found recorded at Christian Malford, for "the registers" there "were all destroyed by lightning at the period required till 1702." Mr. Edward1 Woodman probably came from Corsham, a village in Wiltshire, about eleven miles from Christian Malford. There is on record (Vol. XIV. p. 57) in the Registry of Deeds, a long deed and agreement between Lieut. Archelaus1 and his grandson above mentioned; from which, by tracing down the title to the present day, one may be able to determine, perhaps, where his house stood. The deed is dated Jan. 6, 1698-9. On the 25th of March, 1681, Edward1 conveyed to his son Jonathan, "my now dwellinghouse, houses and barns and orchard and pasture and all my plow land lying by and adjoining to the said houses, as also all the plow lands upon the northwest side of the street lying upon the westward side of my house, the said street being vulgarly called the new street." The consideration for this conveyance was "natural and fatherly love and affection" and "twenty pounds which is yearly to be paid during the time of my own and my wife's natural life." This was in his old age, and was evidently an arrangement under which he and his wife were to have a home with and be provided for by their son Jonathan during their lives. He disposed of his property before his death, for there was no will proved and no letters of administration taken. Where his dwelling-house thus conveyed was situated I do not know; but a mortgage made by Jonathan2 in 1695, conveys "all my housing and land and orchard where I now dwell in Newbury." One of the bounds mentioned in the mortgage is "Woodman's lane," a name which is not yet entirely forgotten in Newburyport; within the limits of which town Edward1 and Archelaus1 both dwelt, as I suppose. I am inclined to the belief that the premises so mortgaged, covered the same or a portion of the same property which was given to him by his father, and that the "new street" and "Woodman's lane" were identical. If so, Edward1 lived in 1681, and probably for years before and at the time of his death, in what was afterwards and for a long time known as "Woodman's lane." The place where his house stood may, perhaps, be ascertained very nearly by any one who will trace Jonathan's title down to the present day.(*) He was one of the first selectmen of Newbury, having been elected in 1636, and his name heads the list as given. by Mr. Coffin. Thereafter, for many years, he was one of the leading men in town. In Coffin's History of Newbury, p. 73, he is called "a man of talents, influence, firmness and decision." I have not ascertained the date of his death nor the place of his burial. He was probably buried in the grave-yard opposite the old Coffin mansion, in Newburyport. The children of Edward,1 according to Coffin's list, were: i. EDWARD,2 b. (???), 1628; m. Mary Goodridge, 20 Dec. 1653. ii. JOHN,2 b. about 1630; m. Mary Field, 15 July, 1656. iii. JOSHUA,2 b. (???), 1636; m. Elizabeth Stevens, 23 Jan. 1666. She died in 1714. iv. MARY,2 b. (???); m. John Brown, 20 Feb. 1660. v. SARAH,2 b. 12 Jan. 1642; m. John Kent, 12 March, 1666. vi. JONATHAN,2 b. 8 Nov. 1643; m. Hannah Hilton, 2 July, 1668.(+) vii. RUTH,2 b. 28 March, 1646; m. Benjamin Lowle, 17 Oct. 1666. This list is correct, so far as I know. Edward and John, it seems, were born before their father came to this country. The date of Joshua's birth is not found in the town records, nor of Mary or Jonathan. The date of Sarah's birth in the records in 1641. It was doubtless 1641-2. He is not known to have had any trade. In a deed dated in 1687, he is styled husbandman. Of his personal appearance nothing is known. (*)Since writing the above, I have learned that Woodman's Lane is now known in Newburyport as Kent Street. (+)1668, in Coffin's list, is misplaced, but here placed correctly. [:ITAL] was usually styled "Mr.," denoting a good position in the community -- only 15 of the original 91 grantees of Newbury were entitled to be called "Mr." in 1636. was licensed to sell strong drink was "conspicuous and active in the affairs of the Newbury Church;" "active in church agitation" applied to aid the magistrates in the execution of court decrees Lieutenant in a company sent against the Pequods served as Selectman of Newbury led the opposition to the Rev. Thomas Parker's attempt to change the church government; Rev. Parker wanted to change the church government from Congregationalism to something akin to Presbyterianism. and his wife Joanna were members of the church in Newbury took the Oath of Allegiance, giving his age as 60 years was commissioned by the state to "see people marry."; In that period in Massachusetts, people were not married by ministers in the church. Edward wrote in 1681: "An unprofitable commission; I quickly laid aside the worke, which has cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintances have been concerned." deeded land to son Sgt. Jonathan Woodman on Woodman's Lane in Newbury; "My now dwelling-house, houses and barns and orchard and pasture, and all my plow land lying by and adjoining to the said houses, as also all the plow lands upon the northwest side of the street lying upon the westward side of my house, the said street being vulgarly called the Newstreet." The consideration for this conveyance was "natural and fatherly love and affection" and "twenty pounds which is yearly to be paid during the time of my own and my wife's natural life." This street is now called Kent Street in Newbury. Seven Hundred Ancestors, p 90: Edward Woodman, bapt. Dec.27, 1606, was one of the 91 grantees who settled Newbury, Massachusetts. He and his younger brother, Archelaus, settled in Newbury in 1635. He married Joanna Salway of Malford in Wiltshire, England. She was born in 1614. On May 25, 1636 Edward became a freeman and was a deputy in the general court in 1636, 1637, 1639 and 1643. In 1638, 1641, 1645 and 1646 he was one of three commissioners to end small causes in Newbury. He held other local and state offices at various times and is not known to have had a trade. In a deed dated 1687 he is referred to as a "husbandman" and was a man of decision, influence and energy. On Jan.12, 1637/8 he was licensed to sell strong drink. He died at Newbury in 1694 and his wife died there in 1687. The children of Edward and Joanna Salway Woodman were: 1. Edward, b. about 1628, Corsham; d. 1694, m. Dec.20, 1653, Mary Goodridge. 2. Jane, b. about 1630, Corsham; d. July 4, 1633 Corsham. 3. John, b. about 1634, Corsham; d. Sept. 17, 1706, m. July 15, 1656, Mary Field, moved to Dover, N.H. 4. Joshua, b. about 1636 in Newbury; d. May 30, 1703, m. Jan.22, 1665, Elizabeth Stevens. 5. Mary, b. about 1640 in Newbury; m. Feb.20, 1659/60, John Browne. 6. Sarah, b. Jan.12, 1641 in Newbury. 7. Jonathan, b. Nov.5, 1643 in Newbury; d. Nov.21, 1706, m. July 2, 1668, Hanna Hilton. 8. Ruth, b. Mar.28, 1646 in Newbury; m. Oct.17, 1666, Benjamin Lowell. [:ITAL] Pope, Pioneers in Massachusetts, p.513 - Edward, mercer, merchant, of Malford, Eng. came in the James April 5, 1635; settled at Newbury frm. May 25, 1636. Licensed to sell wine and strong water 12 March, 1637. App. to aid the magistrates in execution of court decrees 6 (7) 1638. Deputy, town officer; active in church agitation. Wife Joanna. Either he or son Edward arranged with John Hull of Newbury for payment of an annuity. [Es. Files.] Ch. Edward, John, Joshua, Mary, (m. John Brown,) Sarah b. 12 Jan. 1641, (m. John Kent, Jr.,) Jonathan b. 5 Nov. 1643, Ruth b. 28 March, 1646, (m. Benjamin Lowell).[:ITAL] Ancestors of Raymond James Lowell: Edward Woodman came from Southhampton, England 3 June 1635 in the ship "James" of London, England. Edward was a wealthy and prominent man. He and his brother Archelaus came over together and settled at Newbury, MA. (D. R. Lowell. 1899. The Historic Genealogy of the Lowells of America from 1639-1899) D. R. Lowell (1899) showed seven children for Edward and Joanna. Edward Woodman moved to New England and settled at Newbury about 1635, where he was admitted a freeman on 25 May 1636. He was conspicuous and active in the affairs of the Newbury Church, and was usually styled "Mr.", thereby indicating his good position in the community. On 8 September 1636 he was chosen the deputy from Newbury to the General Court, and was thereafter frequently the deputy from that town. On March 17, 1637 he was a lieutenant of the Newbury company; on 6 September 1638 he was a commissioner to end small causes; and thereafter he frequently held these offices. On 12 January 1637/38 he was licensed to sell strong drink. As his name last appears in the Colonial records on 11 May 1670 as the deputy from Newbury, he evidently died not long afterwards. (Moriarty, G. A. English Origins of New England Families) Genserv page1 database says he died May 11, 1670. Genserv rainre1 database has birth before 1606 in Malford, England and death after 1688 Genserv mccc6ba database has death date as 1692 Genserv jarrell database has death date as 1694 Edward came to America on the ship "James", embarking April 6 and arriving June 3, 1635. He settled in Newbury, MA, and was one of the prominent men in the history of that town, representing it several times in the General Court (Genserv mccc6ba database quoting from History of Durham, NH) Mercer, merchant, of Malford, England came in the James April 5, 1635; settled at Newbury; from May 26, 1636. Licensed to sell wine and strong water 12 March, 1637. Applied to aid the magistrates in execution of court decrees 6 (7) 1638. Deputy, town officer; active in church agitation. Either he or his son Edward arranged with John Hull of Newbury for payment of an annuity. He was a wealthy and prominent man; was Lieutenant in a company sent against the Pequods in April, 1637. He and his brother Archelaus d. without issue. Edward was living 1687, but date of d. not known. (Genserv rainre1 database) Genserv jarrell database has birth date as 1614 Marriage Notes: Genserv teague1 database has marriage date as 1628[:ITAL] Allan's Genealogical Index: John Woodman, Genealogy & History of the Descendants of Edward Woodman (1995); bapt. 27 Dec 1606, Corsham, England; d. 11 May 1670, Newbury, MA; ancestor of Robert Frost[:ITAL] The Landing at Parker River (Newbury) [http://engc.bu.edu/~dcm/pr_history/newbhist.htm] From: "Ould Newbury": Historical and Biographical Sketches by John J. Currier (1896), Damrell and Upham, Boston: The settlers of Newbury were much like those of much of what is now northern Essex county. They were not religious enthusiasts or pilgrims who fled from religious persecution in England. They were substantial, law abiding, loyal English tradesmen, of that staunch middle class that was the backbone of England. Those that settled Newbury came at different times and on different ships, between the end of April, 1634 and July, 1635. In one of the first ships arriving in 1635, came Thomas Parker a minister along with a small company of settlers. They went first to Agawam (Ipswich) and later along with their countrymen, who came from Wiltshire, England, to Newbury. On May 6, 1635, before the settlers had moved from Ipswich to Newbury, the House of Deputies passed a resolution that Quascacunquen was to be established as a plantation and its name was to be changed to Newbury. So Newbury was named before the first settlers arrived, interestingly Thomas Parker had taught school in Newbury, Berkshire, England before coming to America. The first settlers came by water from Ipswich, through Plum Island Sound, and up the Quascacunquen River, which was later renamed the Parker River. There had been a few fisherman occupying the banks of the Merrimack and Parker rivers before this, but they were not permanent settlers. These settlers came to Newbury in May or June of 1635. Ships from England began to arrive almost immediately with cattle and more settlers. Governor Winthrop, in his history of New England under the date of June 3, 1635, records the arrival of two ships with Dutch cattle along with the ship "James", from Southampton bringing more settlers. Newbury was, therefore, begun as a stock raising enterprise and the settlers came to engage in that business and to establish homes for themselves. In total fifteen ships came in June and one each in August, November and December bringing still more families to the settlement. There is no record of how many families arrived in the first year. Houses were erected on both sides of the Parker River. The principal settlement was around the meeting house on the lower green. The first church in Newbury could not have been formed before June, as some of those recorded at its formation are not recorded as having arrived until June. In the division of land the first settlers recognized the scripture rule, "to him that hath shall be given," and the wealth of each grantee can be estimated by the number of acres given him. The reason for establishing Newbury, as stated above, was not in fleeing from religious persecution but to utilize vacant lands and to establish a profitable business for the members of a stock-raising company. When they arrived in Massachusetts, the settlers found that the state had established the Congregational form of religion. Everyone was taxed to support the Congregational Society and was commanded to attend worship at the meeting house. The Reverend Thomas Parker was a member of the stock raising company and was also the minister of the settlers. The outlying settlers had a long journey to the meeting house. The congregations were in danger of attacks from Indians and wild beasts on their way to and from worship. There was a constant dread of attack during the time of services and all able bodied inhabitants were required to bring their weapons to church. Sentinels were posted at the doors. In spite of the hardship and danger, the population steadily increased in number and gradually improved its worldly condition. Being cramped for room, the settlers moved up to the upper or training green. This was in order to get tillable land and engage in commercial pursuits. This movement began in 1642. Each had been allotted half an acre for a building lot on the lower green, on the upper green each was to have four acres for a house lot. Also on the upper green a new pond was artificially formed for watering cattle. The new town gradually extended along the Merrimack River to the mouth of the Artichoke River. It appears that all desirable land in this region was apportioned among the freeholders by October 1646. The land beyond was ordered to lie perpetually common. This tract of common land was a part of Newbury and what is now West Newbury. The Indian threat had disappeared as most of the Indians in the region had been exterminated by an epidemic. The first record of an Indian living in Newbury is in January 1644, when a lot was granted to "John Indian." Over the following years some notable, though not earth shaking events occurred in Newbury. In 1639, Edward Rawson began the manufacture of gun powder in what was probably America's first powder mill. Newbury had a trial for witchcraft thirteen years before the trials in Salem. In 1679, Elizabeth Morse was accused. She was condemned three times to die, but was reprieved and spent her last years in her home, at what is now Market square in Newburyport. The first American born silversmith was Jeremiah Dummer of Newbury who apprenticed to John Hull, an Englishman. He practiced his trade in what is now Newburyport. Jeremiah was the father of Governor William Dummer the founder of Gov. Dummer Academy. Jeremiah's brother-in-law, John Coney, engraved the plates for the first paper money made in America. In 1686, when the upper Commons (West Newbury) were divided among the freeholders of the town of Newbury, Pipestave Hill was covered with a dense forest of oak and birch. These trees were cut and used to make staves for wine casks and molasses hogsheads. For many years, this industry, the first of its kind in America, flourished and the place is still called Pipestave Hill. Limestone was discovered in Newbury in 1697. Previous to this all the lime used for building was obtained from oyster and clam shells. Mortar made from this lime was very durable and came, in time, to be almost as hard as granite. This business prospered for many years until a superior quality of lime was discovered elsewhere. The first toll bridge and shipyard in America were also in Newbury. The latter giving rise to the ship building industry which was to determine the prosperity of Newburyport in the coming centuries. (source; NEWBURY - A Brief History [http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4028/history.htm]) "In February, 1633-34 the Council for New England, assembled at Whitehall, England, adopted an order placing certain restrictions on the transportation of passengers and merchandise to the colony of Massachusetts Bay; and before the ship "Mary and John" and eight other vessels, then lying in the river Thames, were allowed to sail, instructions were issued expressly providing that the captains in command of these vessels "shall cause the Prayers contained in the Book of Common Prayers, established in the Church of England, to be said daily at the usual hours of Morning and Evening Prayers, and that they cause all persons on board said ships to be present at the same." In the ship "Mary and John" cam Thomas Parker, James Noyes, John Spencer, Henry Short,Henry Lunt, John Bartlett, and many others, who ultimately settled in Newbury. Upon their arrival in New England most of these passengers went to Agawam, now Ipswich, Mass., where they remained until the spring of 1635. Meanwhile Sir Richard Saltonstall, Henry Sewall, Richard and Stephen Dummer, with others from Wiltshire, England had organized a company for the purpose of stock-raising at a time when the prices for cattle, horses, and sheep were at their highest. They added to their own domestic herds some imported Flemish stock, and persuaded John Spencer, Henry Short, Richard Kent,Thomas Parker, and others to join them in the enterprise, and establish a settlement on the river Quascacunquen, now Parker River. Sept. 3, 1633, the General Court granted "John Winthrop, junior, and his assignes" permission to set up a trading house on the Merrimack River; and under date of May 6, 1635, the House of Deputies passed the following order:- Quascacunquen is allowed by the court to be a plantation, and it is referred to Mr. (John) Humphrey, Mr. (John) Endicott, Captain (Nathaniel) Turner, and Captain (William) Trask, or any three of them, to set out the bounds of Ipswich and Quascacunquen, or so much thereof as they can; and the name of said plantation shall be changed, and shall hereafter be called Newberry. Further, it is ordered that it shall be in the power of the court to take order that the said plantation shall receive a sufficient company to make a competent towne. Previous to this date, undoubtedly, a few venturesome fishermen had built temporary residences on the banks of the Merrimack and Quascacunquen rivers; but they were looked upon as trespassers and intruders, for the General Court had forbidden all persons from settling within their jurisdiction without leave. Rev. Thomas Parker and those associated with him, having obtained permission to begin a plantation "to be called Newberry", made preparations to remove from Ipswich early in the spring. There were no roads through the trackless forest, and the transportation of women and children and household goods overland was impracticable. Tradition asserts that they came by the way of Plum Island Sound, in open boats, and landed, in the month of May or June, 1635, on the north shore of what is now the river Parker, in a little cover about one hundred rods below the bridge; Nicholas Noyes, the brother of Rev. James Noyes, being the first to leap ashore. Near this secluded spot a number of summer cottages have recently been erected, giving to the place a pleasant, home-like look; but two centuries and a half ago the prospect was less agreeable and inviting. "...Eastward, cold, wide marshes stretched away, Dull, dreary flats without a bush or tree, O'ercrossed by winding creeks, where twice a day Gurgled the waters of the moon-struck sea; And faint with distance came the stifled roar, The melancholy lapse of waves on the low shore." Inland hills rising above hills stood like sentinels over the almost unbroken wilderness. Centuries before this memorable landing Indians had hunted in these forests and fished in the placid stream that ebbs and flows to the falls of Newbury; but only a few of that race remained to resist the encroachments of the white-faced strangers. Dismal and gloomy must have been the outlook as these brave pioneers gathered together at the close of the first day, and contemplated the prospect before them. They knew that wild beasts were roaming through the forests, and whether the red men would welcome them as friends or foes was as yet uncertain. "Their descendants can have but a faint idea of the difficulties they encountered, and of the dangers that continually hung over their heads, threatening every moment to overwhelm them like a torrent, and sweep the, with those who they dearly loved, to the silent tomb." Undismayed by these difficulties and dangers, the new settlers instinctively turned their attention to the cultivation of the soil and the development of the resources of nature. Here and there along the winding river they appropriated the few clear spots where the natives had formerly planted corn, and promptly took possession of the neighboring marshes where the growing crop of salt grass promised an abundant harvest. There was no lack of work; no room for idle dreamers. Houses had to be built, land ploughed and tilled, and sheds erected for the protection of cattle before winter set in. House lots, planting lots, and meadow lots were laid out and granted to individual members of the community, and the original entries, giving names and dates, can still be seen on the old records of the town; but how many houses were erected or how many families settled in Newbury during the first year of its existence it is impossible to state with exactness. Governor Winthrop, in his History of New England, under date of June 3, 1635, records the arrival of two ships with Dutch cattle; and the same day the ship "James" arrived from Southampton, bringing, among other passengers, John Pike, father of the famous Robert Pike, of Salisbury, and one Thomas Coleman, who had been employed b the projectors of the stock-raising company to provide food for the cattle and take care of them for a specified term of years.

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"Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of Boston and eastern Massachusetts , Volume 3" (Google eBook) http://is.gd/RM3TlD

Edward Woodman first appears in New England history as a settler in Newbury, Massachusetts, at the incorporation of that town in 1635, and from the fact that he went there in company with Archelaus Woodman it is supposed that they were brothers. One chronicler of the family history says that Archelaus Woodman came from Christian Malford, Wiltshire, England, that he took passage in the "James" of London in April, 1635, but it does not appear whether Edward came with him or arrived in New England in the "Abigail" a few weeks later. All that we know is that Archelaus and Edward W'oodman sat down in the plantation at Newbury in 1635. Edward Woodman was one of ninety-one grantees of Newbury and one of the fifteen persons among the proprietors who were addressed "Mr.," a title indicating social position, influence and character above that of the average colonist. He became prominently identified with affairs of the church and figured as leader of the movement which resulted in setting aside some strict regulations of church government. In 1636 and three times afterward he was deputy to the general court, and in 1638 he was commissioned magistrate "to end small causes." It appears also to have been his office "to see people marry," which he once spoke of as "an unprofitable commission, which has cost me many a bottle of sacke and liquor, where friends and acquaintances have been concerned." He died previous to 1694. and both he and his wife Joanna were living in 1687-8.

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Edward Woodman, II's Timeline

1606
December 27, 1606
Corshamm Village, Wiltshire, England

St. Bartholomew's Church

December 27, 1606
St. Bartholomew's, Corsham, Wiltshire, England
December 27, 1606
Corsham, Wiltshire, Eng.
1627
1627
Age 20
Corshamm Village, Wiltshire, England

"Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of Boston and eastern Massachusetts
, Volume 3" (Google eBook) http://is.gd/RM3TlD

Edward Woodman ... and his wife Joanna were living in 1687-8. Of their children two were born in England and the others in Newbury:

1. Edward, born 1628.

2. John, born in England about 1630, died in Dover, New Hampshire, September 17. 1706; married July 15, 1656, Mary Field.

3. Joshua, born Newbury, 1636, died there Slay 30, 1703 ; married January 23, 1666. Elizabeth Stevens.

4. Mary, born in Newbury: married February 20. 1660, John Brown.

5. Sarah, born January 12, 1642: married March 12, 1666, John Kent.

6. Jonathan, born November 8. 1643, died November 21, 1706: married July 2, 1668, Hannah Hilton.

7. Ruth. born March 28, 1646; married October 17, 1666, Benjamin Lowell.

1628
March 14, 1628
Age 21
Christian Malford, Wiltshire, England
1630
1630
Age 23
England
1634
1634
Age 27
Corsham, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
1636
December 1636
Age 29
Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
1636
Age 29
Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1636
Age 29
Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States of America