Edward 'the Exile', Ætheling of England

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Edward

Also Known As: "The Outlaw"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Anglo Saxon England
Death: Died in London, Middlesex, England
Place of Burial: St Paul Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Edmund II 'Ironside', King of England and Ealdgyth, Queen consort of England
Husband of Ágota - Agatha ÁRPÁD(házi)
Father of Christina of England, Nun at Romsey; Saint Margaret, Queen of Scots and Eadgar "the Uncrowned" Æðeling, King of England
Brother of Edmund of England

Occupation: Prince, prinse, 'THE AETHELING', Roi, de jure, d'Angleterre, Edward Ætheling, Prince of England, Exiled King, Rey de Inglaterra, PRINCE OF ENGLAND, (Edward the Exile), Prinssi, king
Managed by: FARKAS Mihály László
Last Updated:

About Edward 'the Exile', Ætheling of England

About his wife: Agatha's origin possible is questionable but a data from the official website of British Monarchy any other sources deemed most credible.

From the official website of the British Monarchy See: http://www.royal.gov.uk/Home.aspx > http://www.royal.gov.uk/HistoryoftheMonarchy/KingsandQueensofEngland/TheAnglo-Saxonkings/Overview.aspx

KINGS OF WESSEX AND ENGLAND 802–1066 See:

Anglo Saxon Family Tree (PDF)

„Edward the Atheling = Agatha, dau. of STEPHEN, King of Hungary”

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Other possible wifes:

  1. http://www.geni.com/people/1-Agatha-Dght-of-Liudolf-Gertrude-von-Braunschweig/6000000011253928697;
  2. http://www.geni.com/people/1G-Agatha-Dght-of-Bruno-I-Gisella-von-Braunschweig/6000000013183849301;
  3. [ 3G/ Agatha (Dght. of Conrad II&Gisela) von Schwaben];
  4. [  4R1/ Agatha (Dght. of Yaroslav I the Wise&Ingegerd) of Kiev];
  5. [  5R2/ Agafia - Agatha of Kiev];
  6. [  6Pl/ Agatha of Poland];
  7. [  8/ Agatha (Dght. of Christinus&Oda)];
  8. [  9/ Agatha (Dght. of Ernst II) von Schwaben];
  9. [  10/ Agatha (Dght. of Bruno&Christine) von Augsburg];
  10. [  11/ Agatha or Unrecorded];
  11. [  12/ Agatha (Dght. of Salamon&Judith Maria ►Sophia)];
  12. http://www.geni.com/people/13-Agatha-Dght-of-Hardicanute/6000000013202959627
  13. [  Agatha (Dght. of Henry II.&Cunigunda) of Saxon;
  14. [  Agatha (Dght. of Heinrich III)]
  • -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-

Edward the Exile (1016–February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling

Son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, his wife.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Edmunddied1016B

EDWARD ([1016/17]-London 19 Apr 1057, bur London St Paul's).

Maybe twin with his brother Edmund or, as noted above, born posthumously. He is the first prince in the Wessex royal family to have been named after his father, which suggests that he may have been born posthumously which could have justified this departure from the normal naming practice. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, King Canute "banished [him] into Hungary … [where] he grew up to be a good man"[1902].

Orderic Vitalis names "Edward et Edmund" as the two sons of king Edmund II, specifying that King Canute sent them to Denmark to be killed but that his brother "Suenon [error for Harald] roi de Danemark" sent them "comme ses neveux en otage au roi des Huns" where Edward "épousa la fille du roi et regna sur les Huns"[1903].

Florence of Worcester specifies that the infants were first "sent to the king of the Swedes to be killed [but the latter] sent them to Solomon King of Hungary to spare their lives and have them brought up at his court"[1904]. According to Adam of Bremen, the two brothers were "condemned to exile in Russia"[1905].

Geoffrey Gaimar (in an altogether confusing account) names "Li uns…Edgar…li alters…Edelret" as the children of King Edmund, recounting that they were sent first to Denmark and later to "Russie [Susie], e vint en terre de Hungrie"[1906]. Edward´s life in exile is discussed in detail by Ronay[1907]. Humphreys infers from the chronicles of Gaimar, Adam of Bremen and Roger of Hoveden that Edward spent some time at the court of Iaroslav I Grand Prince of Kiev[1908]. Assuming he was in exile in Hungary from childhood, he may have left for Kiev in 1037 with András Prince of Hungary who fled Hungary after the 1037 disgrace of his father, although this is unlikely for the reasons explained above in relation to his brother Edmund. If this is correct, he would have returned with András in [1046/47] when the latter succeeded as András I King of Hungary after King Péter Orseolo was deposed. Aldred Bishop of Worcester, ambassador of King Edward "the Confessor", "proposed to the emperor to send envoys to Hungary to bring back Edward and have him conducted to England"[1909], according to Florence of Worcester to be groomed to succeed to the English throne[1910].

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Edward died "at London soon after his arrival"[1911] before meeting his uncle the king and also states his burial place[1912].

m (Kiev[1913] [1040/45]) AGATHA, daughter of --- ([1025/35]-).

Agatha is named as the wife of Edward in many sources[1914], but her origin has been the subject of lively debate for years. The early 12th century chronicles are contradictory.

The assertion by Orderic Vitalis that she was "daughter of Solomon King of the Magyars"[1915] can be dismissed as impossible chronologically.

One group of chroniclers suggest a German origin, saying that she was "the daughter of the brother of the Emperor Henry". This includes John of Worcester ("filia germani imperatoris henrici"[1916], in a passage which Humphreys speculates was written some time between 1120 and 1131 although possibly based on the earlier work of Marianus Scotus), Florence of Worcester ("daughter of the brother of Emperor Henry"[1917]), the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle ("the emperor's kinswoman"[1918] and, in relation to her daughter Margaret, "descended from the emperor Henry who had dominion over Rome"[1919]).

Ailred Abbot of Rievaulx records that "Edwardo", son of "regem Edmundum" [King Edmund "Ironsides"], married "filiam germani sui Henrici imperatoris…Agatha"[1920]. Matthew of Paris calls Agatha "soror Henrici imperatoris Romani" when recounting the ancestry of Henry II King of England[1921].

A second group of chroniclers propose a Russian origin, suggesting that Agatha belonged to the family of Iaroslav Grand Prince of Kiev. For William of Malmesbury, she was "sister of the [Hungarian] queen", which from a chronological point of view could only refer to Anastasia Iaroslavna, wife of King András I. In a 13th century interpolation in one copy of the Leges Anglo-Saxonicæ (written in [1130]) she was "ex genere et sanguine regum Rugorum"[1922].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agatham regine Hunorem sororem"[1923], the Hungarian Magyars frequently, though incorrectly, being referred to as "Huns" in many other sources. Lastly, Roger of Wendover records that "Eadwardus" married "reginæ Hungariæ sororem…Agatham"[1924]. In considering the German origin theory, the uterine half-brothers ("germani") of Emperor Heinrich III provide a likely candidate. These half-brothers were Liudolf von Braunschweig, Markgraf in Friesland (son of Gisela of Swabia, mother of Emperor Heinrich III, by her first marriage with Bruno Graf [von Braunschweig]), and Ernst von Babenberg Duke of Swabia and his younger brother Hermann IV Duke of Swabia (sons of Gisela by her second marriage). The latter, the Babenberg brothers, born in [1014/16], were both too young to have been Agatha's father so can be dismissed.

Liudolf von Braunschweig was first proposed as Agatha's father in 1933[1925], and has been the preferred candidate for many historians since then[1926]. His birth date is estimated at [1003/05] (see BRUNSWICK) which is consistent with his having been Agatha's father. The marriage taking place in Kiev would not exclude a German origin, as contacts were reported between Kiev and the imperial court in 1040[1927], when Russia was aiming to create a tripartite alliance with England and Germany to weaken Denmark, and also in 1043[1928], when the situation required review following the accession of King Edward "the Confessor" in England. The major drawback to the German origin theory is the total absence of onomastic connections between the Braunschweig family and the descendants of Edward and Agatha, although this is not of course conclusive to prove or disprove the hypothesis.

The Russian origin theory has also found considerable academic support[1929]. Edmund must have had contact with the Russian royal family during his period in Kiev, assuming it is correct, as suggested above, that he spent time there during his exile. There are numerous onomastic connections between the the extended family of Grand Prince Iaroslav and the descendants of Edward and Agatha. For example, the names of Edward and Agatha's own daughters, Margaret and Christina, were both used in the Swedish royal family, to which Grand Prince Iaroslav's wife belonged. In the next generation, among Queen Margaret's own children, the name David is one which seems only to have been used in the Kiev ruling family among all contemporary European royal dynasties. The major problem with the Russian origin theory is the complete failure to explain the source references to Agatha's family relationship with the emperor, which it is unwise to dismiss as completely meaningless. It is of course possible that neither of these theories is correct, and that Agatha belonged to a minor German, Russian or Hungarian noble family the importance of whose family connections were exaggerated in the sources. Edward's relationship to the kings of England may, at the time of his marriage, have seemed remote and unimportant in eastern Europe, especially as England was ruled by Danish kings whose position must then have seemed secure. He may not have provided a sufficiently attractive marriage prospect for a prominent European princess. In conclusion, therefore, there is no satisfactory way of deciding between each of the competing theories concerning Agatha's origin and it appears best to classify it as "unknown". It is unlikely that the mystery of Agatha's origin will ever be solved to the satisfaction of all.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that, after the Norman conquest, Agatha left England with her children in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[1930].

Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[1931]. According to Weir, in old age, possibly after the death of her daughter Queen Margaret, she became a nun at Newcastle-upon-Tyne[1932], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.

Edward & his wife had three children:

a) MARGARET ([in Hungary] [1046/53]-Edinburgh Castle 16 Nov 1093, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, transferred to Escorial, Madrid, her head bur Jesuit College, Douai). Although Margaret's birth is often placed in [1045/46][1933], a later birth would be more consistent with the "German" theory of her mother's origin, as discussed above. Margaret's birth as late as 1053 would still be consistent with her having given birth to four children before her daughter Edith/Matilda (later wife of Henry I King of England), whose birth is estimated to have taken place in [1079/80].

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Margaret left England with her mother in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[1934]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[1935]. Florence of Worcester records that "regina Scottorum Margareta" died from grief after learning of the death of her husband and oldest son[1936]. The Annals of Ulster record that "his queen Margaret…died of sorrow for him within nine days" after her husband was killed in battle[1937]. She was canonised in 1250, her feast day in Scotland is 16 Nov[1938].

m (Dunfermline Abbey 1070) as his second wife, MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland, son of DUNCAN I King of Scotland & his wife Sibylla of Northumbria (1031-killed in battle near Alnwick, Northumberland 13 Nov 1093, bur Tynemouth, later transferred to Dunfermline Abbey, Fife, and later still to Escorial, Madrid).

b) CHRISTINA ([in Hungary] [1050/53]-after 1090). The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that she left England with her mother in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[1939]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[1940].

Florence of Worcester records that "clito Eadgarus…germana Christina" entered Romsey abbey as a nun in [1086][1941]. Eadmer of Canterbury (writing [1093]-[1122]) comments about the religious life of Christina and her strict control in the 1090s over her niece Edith, who later married to Henry I King of England[1942].

c) EDGAR ætheling ([1053/55]-after 1126). After King Harold II's defeat at Hastings 14 Oct 1066, Ealdred Archbishop of York, Earls Edwin and Morcar, and the citizens of London supported Edgar as successor to King Harold II[1943]. However, his support quickly collapsed and he swore allegiance to King William "the Conqueror" at Berkhamsted, before the latter made his way to London. Florence of Worcester records that "clitonem Edgarum" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][1944].

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Edgar left England with his mother and sisters in Summer 1067 and found refuge at the court of Malcolm King of Scotland[1945]. Florence of Worcester records that "clitone Eadgaro et matre sua Agatha duabusque sororibus suis Margareta et Christina" left England for Scotland, in a passage which deals with events in mid-1068[1946]. He marched on York in 1069. He left for Flanders in exile, but returned to Scotland 8 Jul 1074. Florence of Worcester records that "clito Eadgarus" left Scotland for England in [1073], and went to Normandy where he made peace with King William[1947]. Florence of Worcester records that "clito Eadgarus" went to Apulia with 200 knights in [1086][1948].

Florence of Worcester records that Edgar lived in Scotland after being expelled from Normandy by King William I, but was invited back to England by Robert Comte de Mortain in 1091 in order to negotiate peace between Malcolm King of Scotland and King William II after King Malcolm invaded Northumberland[1949]. He led the army sent by King William II to Scotland in 1097 to expel King Duncan II and install his nephew Edgar as king[1950]. "…Edgari aederling…" subscribed the charter dated 30 Aug 1095 under which "Edgarus filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" made grants for the souls of "fratrum meorum Doncani et Edwardi"[1951].

Florence of Worcester records that "clitorem Eadgarum" led an army to Scotland in [1097] to place "consobrinum suum Eadgarum Malcolmi regis filium" on the Scottish throne after expelling "patruo suo Dufenaldo"[1952]. Forces under his command captured Latakia in Mar 1098 before handing it to Robert III Duke of Normandy, according to Orderic Vitalis who calls Edgar "indolent"[1953]. He supported Robert Duke of Normandy in his fight with his brother Henry I King of England in 1106, and was taken prisoner by the king at the battle of Tinchebrai but released soon after. The primary source which records that he was still alive in 1126 has not yet been identified.

[Mistress (1): ---. No record has been found that Edgar ætheling ever married. However, the 1157 Pipe Roll entry quoted below suggests that he may have had descendants. If this is correct, it is probable that it was an illegitimate line as there is no record of their having claimed the throne. [Edgar had one [illegitimate] child by Mistress (1)]:

i) [---. This descent is completely speculative. However, the most obvious explanation for the 1157 Pipe Roll entry quoted below is that Edgar ætheling left descendants, presumably through an illegitimate child as there is no record of their having claimed the throne. m ---.] One child:

(a) [EDGAR "Ætheling" . The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Edgar Ætheling" in Northumberland[1954]. If his descent from Edgar ætheling is correct, it would be consistent from a chronological point of view if Edgar was the senior Edgar´s grandson.]

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He gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Wessex_family_tree

References

Gabriel Ronay, The lost King of England : the East European adventures of Edward the Exile, Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Wolfeboro, N.H., USA : Boydell Press, 1989, ISBN 0-85115-541-3, pp. 109-121

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http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/royalty/prince.html

Edgar Atheling,

or Prince Edgar, son of Edward Atheling, also called Edward the Outlaw, and grandson of Edmund Ironside, was probably born in Hungary, whither his father and uncle, then children, had been sent after the accession of Canute. He came to England with his father in 1057, but though he was rightful heir to the throne on the death of Edward the Confessor, his claims were passed over. After the fall of Harold at the battle of Hastings, he was actually proclaimed king at London, and appears to have been recognized for some time as such; however, he was one of the first to profess submission to the Conqueror, whom in the next year he followed into Normandy. In 1068 he was in Scotland, and his sister Margaret was married not long after to King Malcolm. He took part in the invasion of England and the storming of York Castle in 1069, and was induced on several occasions subsequently to make rash attempts of a similar kind, followed by formal reconciliation with William. In 1086 he went to Italy, and is said to have joined the Norman bands there. In 1098 his nephew Edgar, with his aid, was raised to the Scottish throne. In the civil war between Henry I. and his brother Robert, duke of Normandy, Edgar joined the latter, and was captured by Henry at the battle of Tinchebrai in 1106. The year of his death is unknown.

http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/of-england_3.htm

Prince Edward "Atheling" of England - was born in 1016 in Wessex, England and died in 1057 in London, Middlesex, England . He was the son of King Edmund II "Ironside" of England and Queen Ealdgyth of England.

Prince Edward married Princess Agatha Von Brunswick of England about 1035 while living in London, Middlesex, England. Princess Agatha was born about 1018 in Braunschweig, Prussia. She was the daughter of Count Ludolf of Brunswick and Countess Gertrud In Nordgau. She died on 13 Jul 1024 .

--------------------

--------------------

  1. ID: I28837
  2. Name: Edward (Atheling) of England
  3. Given Name: Edward (Atheling)
  4. Suffix: of England
  5. Prefix: Prince
  6. Sex: M
  7. Birth: 1016 in Wessex, England
  8. Death: 1057 in London, Middlesex, England
  9. Burial: St. Paul's Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England

Father: Edmund II of England b: ABT 0988 in of Wessex, England

Mother: Ealdgyth (Algitha) of England b: ABT 0986 in of Wessex, England

Marriage 1 Agatha Von Brunswick of England b: ABT 1018 in Braunschweig, Prussia

   * Married: ABT 1035 in of London, Middlesex, England

Children

  1. Has No Children Edgar (Atheling) of England b: ABT 1036 in Wessex, England
  2. Has Children Margaret of Scotland Atheling b: ABT 1042/1045 in of Wessex, , England
  3. Has No Children Christina (Atheling) of England b: ABT 1044 in Wessex, England

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Edward was Prince of England and reigned from 1016 to 1017. He was exiled to Hungary, where he held lands in Berenger County, Hungary.

He was the founder of the House of Burgoyne.

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Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

--------------------

Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

References

Gabriel Ronay, The lost King of England : the East European adventures of Edward the Exile, Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Wolfeboro, N.H., USA : Boydell Press, 1989, ISBN 0-85115-541-3, pp. 109-121

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

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Edward the Exile

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Edward the Exile (1016–February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or step-brother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson

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Edmund, son of Edmund Ironside

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20&%20Danish%20Kings.htm#Edmunddied1016B

EDMUND ([1016/17]-before 1054).

Edmund was the older of King Edward's sons according to William of Malmesbury[1889]. However, the brothers may have been twins as there is barely sufficient time between the king's marriage in Summer 1015 and his death in Nov 1016 for two children to have been conceived, the second son inevitably having been born posthumously if the births were separate. After his father's death, Edmund and his brother were smuggled out of England and ultimately found their way to Hungary. The sources are contradictory about the exact route of their flight and the chronology of each step.

According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, King Canute "banished [them] into Hungary"[1890]. Orderic Vitalis names "Edward et Edmund" as the two sons of king Edmund II, specifying that King Canute sent them to Denmark to be killed but that his brother "Suenon [error for Harald] roi de Danemark" sent them "comme ses neveux en otage au roi des Huns" where Edmund died prematurely[1891].

Florence of Worcester specifies that the infants were first "sent to the king of the Swedes to be killed [but the latter] sent them to Solomon King of Hungary to spare their lives and have them brought up at his court"[1892].

Roger of Wendover, presumably copying Florence of Worcester, records that "filios…regis Eadmundi, Eadwinum [error for "Eadmundus"] et Eadwardum" were sent "ad regem Suanorum" and from there to "Salomonem, Hungariæ regem"[1893]. Adam of Bremen records that the sons of "Emund" (whom he mistakenly calls "frater Adelradi") were "in Ruzziam exilio dampnati"[1894].

Geoffrey Gaimar (in an altogether confusing account) names "Li uns…Edgar…li alters…Edelret" as the children of King Edmund, recounting that they were sent first to Denmark and later to "Russie [Susie], e vint en terre de Hungrie"[1895]. While the precise details may not at first sight appear important, as will be seen below the exact timing and location of each stage of their journey is highly significant in attempting to resolve the even more controversial issue of the identities of the wives of the two brothers. It is probably best to tackle the problem in reverse chronological order.

We know that the younger brother Edward was recalled to England from Hungary with his young family in the mid-1050s (see below). Given the turbulent history of Hungary over the previous twenty years, with four changes of regime brought about by revolution and civil war between the competing religious and political factions[1896], it is unlikely that the two immigrant princes could have enjoyed continuity of favour with the country's different leaders throughout this period. The most likely case is that the English princes arrived in Hungary from Kiev in 1046 with King András I, when the latter was recalled to his native country after at least ten years' exile. It is not impossible that the princes had lived in Hungary in earlier years and accompanied András into exile, but this is unlikely. Prince András's father and brothers represented the traditional, tribal and heathen element in the Hungarian royal family, their banishment being due to clashes with the Catholic pro-western faction. If the English princes had been in Hungary in the 1030s, it seems improbable that, as Christians from western Europe, they would have been drawn to the heathen rather than the Catholic element. The more likely hypothesis is that they were already living in Kiev when András arrived there and that their ties with him were formed there.

Iaroslav Grand Prince of Kiev married a Swedish princess in 1019. Assuming that the princes did journey through Sweden as reported by Florence of Worcester, the court at Kiev would have been a more obvious destination than Hungary for the young princes. The children may even have been part of the retinue of Ingigerd of Sweden when she travelled to Russia for her marriage. Whether the first leg of the brothers' journey from England was to Denmark or to Sweden is probably irrelevant for present purposes. According to William of Malmesbury, Edmund later died in Hungary[1897]. He must have died before his brother Edward was invited back to England, there being no mention of Edmund at that time. According to Weir[1898], he must have lived "at least into his teens", this assessment being based presumably on the fact of his supposed marriage (which is undated in Weir).

[m [HEDWIG] of Hungary, daughter of --- King of Hungary & his wife ---.

Ailred Abbot of Rievaulx records that "Edmundo", son of "regem Edmundum" [King Edmund "Ironsides"], married "Hungariorum regem…filiam suam"[1899].

Geoffrey Gaimar recounts that "Edgar" (older of the two children of King Edmund whom he names incorrectly in an earlier passage) made "la fille al rei [de Hungrie]" pregnant, was married to her and appointed heir by her father, but adding confusingly that they were parents of "Margarete" who married "rei Malcolom"[1900]. The basis for this story, and whether there is any element of truth hidden somewhere in it, is unknown.

Edmund's wife is named Hedwig in Burke's Guide to the Royal Family[1901], although the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. In the absence of further information, the accuracy of these reports must be considered dubious as none of the Hungarian kings during the first half of the 11th century provides an obvious match. In the case of King István, it is likely that all his daughters predeceased their father in view of the accession of his nephew, King Péter, when he died. In any case, his daughters would have been beyond child-bearing age when the ætheling Edmund arrived in Hungary, assuming that this arrival took place in [1046] as explained above. As the ætheling brothers were closely linked to King András I, it is unlikely that Edmund would have married a daughter of either of his disgraced predecessors King Péter or King Samuel Aba, and any daughters of the former at least would have been too young for such a marriage. Finally, any daughters of King András himself would certainly have been too young for the marriage. There is therefore considerable doubt about the historical authenticity of this Hungarian princess or her marriage to Edmund.]

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Edmund (?)

M, #102406, b. between 1016 and 1017

Edmund (?) was born between 1016 and 1017. (2) He was the son of Edmund II 'Ironside', King of England and Ealdgyth (?). (1) He married Hedwig of Hungary, daughter of St. Stephen I Arpád, King of Hungary and Gisela of Germany. (2)

He died at Hungary, died young. (2)

Forrás:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10241.htm#i102406

Edmund of Wessex1

b. 1016

Father Edmund II "Ironside", King of the English1 b. circa 989, d. 30 November 1016

Mother Ealdgyth Morcardóttir of Northumbria1 b. 990?

    Edmund of Wessex was born in 1016.1 He was the son of Edmund II "Ironside", King of the English and Ealdgyth Morcardóttir of Northumbria.1 Edmund of Wessex married Hercegnõ Magyarország Agatha Magyar, daughter of Szent István I, Király Magyarország and Gisela von Bayern, circa 1041 at Hungary.1 Edmund of Wessex died at Hungary. He died without issue.1

Family Hercegnõ Magyarország Agatha Magyar b. circa 1016

Citations

1.[S484] Peter Townend, B:P, 105th, pg. l.

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p281.htm#i17315

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

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Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

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Edvard den landflyktige (engelsk Edward the Exile) (født 1016 – død februar 1057), stundom også kalt for Edward Ætheling, var sønn av kong Edmund Jernside og av Ealdgyth. Han fikk tilnavnet «Den landflyktige» eller «Landsflyktningen» ettersom han tilbrakte mesteparten av livet langt unna England. Etter den danske erobringen av England i 1016 fikk kong Knut den mektige sendt Edvard og hans bror Edmund i eksil på kontinentet. Edvard var bare noen få måneder gammel da han ble fraktet til hoffet til svenskekongen Olof Skötkonung (som var enten Knuts halvbror eller stebror) med instrukser om at barnet måtte drepes. Isteden ble han i hemmelighet fraktet til Kiev hvor Olofs datter Ingegjerd Olofsdatter var dronning i sitt ekteskap med Jaroslav I av Kiev. Herfra ble barnet fraktet til Ungarn, sannsynligvis ifølge med Ingegjerds svigersønn kong Andreas I av Ungern.

Mange år senere, da kong Edvard Bekjenneren fikk høre nyheten om at hans bror Edvard var i livet, fikk han kalt ham tilbake til England for å bli hans arving. Edvard var den siste sjansen til en udiskutabel etterfølger av den angelsaksiske kongelige familie ettersom Bekjenneren selv ikke hadde barn. Nyheten om Edvard den landflyktiges eksistens kom på en tid da det gamle angelsaksiske monarkiet, gjeninnført etter en lang tid med dansk dominans, gikk mot katastrofe. Bekjenneren var personlig engasjert, men politisk svak og ute av stand til å stå imot de mektige og ambisiøse sønnene til jarl Godwin av Wessex. Bekjennerens mor var Emma, datter av hertug Richard I av Normandie og søster av Richard II av Normandie; Edvard var således halvt normannisk, og på den andre siden av den engelske kanal hadde hertugen av Normandie, Vilhelm, også et oppmerksomt øye på etterfølgeren til den engelske tronen. Edvard den landflyktige kom tilbake i akkurat riktig tid. Han ble godtatt av både kongen og av witan (de ledende menn og rikets råd). Den landflyktige tilbød en utveg av uføret og bremset både sønnene til Godwin og hertugen av Normandie, og representerte et rettmessig kongsemne som ikke kunne utfordres.

Edvard den landflyktige hadde vært i forvaringen til den tysk-romersk keiseren Henrik III og var endelig tilbake i England i slutten av august 1057. Da skjer det utrolige og katastrofale at han dør to dager etter ankomsten.

Den nøyaktige grunnen til Edvards død har forblitt uklart, men det er åpenbart at han hadde mange mektige fiender, og det er en stor mulighet for at han ble myrdet, men av hvem og hvem som sto bak er ikke kjent. Det som vi vet er at hans adkomst til kongen, Edvard Bekjenneren, ble forhindret med en gang han kom tilbake til England uten at noen forklarlig grunn. Det skjedde samtidig på en tid da sønnene til jarl Godwin, da i form av Harald Godwinson, igjen var kommet tilbake til politisk makt og innflytelse. Denne vendingen av hendelser etterlot den engelske trone igjen til et stridbart emne, og ble utfordret av jarl Harald Godwinson, den norske kongen Harald Hardråde og hertug Vilhelm av Normandie, og førte til slutt til den normanniske erobringen av England.

Edvard den landflyktiges hustru var en kvinne ved navn Agatha, og hennes opprinnelse er høyst uklar og åpen for tolkninger. Deres barn var Edgar Ætheling og hans to søstre Margaret og Cristina. Edgar Ætheling ble tilsynelatende nominert til ny arving, men var altfor ung for selv å kunne ta hånd om hendelsene, og ble til slutt feid til side av Harald Godwinson.

[rediger] Litteratur

Gabriel Ronay, The lost King of England : the East European adventures of Edward the Exile, Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Wolfeboro, N.H., USA : Boydell Press, 1989, ISBN 0-85115-541-3, sidene 109-121

[rediger] Eksterne lenker

Genealogy for Edward the Exile – slektstre for Edvard den landflyktige

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Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057),

also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

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Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

Contents [hide]

1 Ancestors

2 See also

3 References

4 External links

[edit] Ancestors

[show]v • d • eAncestors of Edward the Exile

 16. Edmund I of England
 8. Edgar the Peaceful
 17. Elgiva
 4. Ethelred the Unready
 18. Ordgar
 9. Ælfthryth
 2. Edmund Ironside
 10. Thored
 5. Ælfgifu
 1. Edward the Exile
 3. Ealdgyth

[edit] See also

House of Wessex family tree

[edit] References

Gabriel Ronay, The lost King of England : the East European adventures of Edward the Exile, Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Wolfeboro, N.H., USA : Boydell Press, 1989, ISBN 0-85115-541-3, pp. 109-121

[edit] External links

Genealogy for Edward the Exile

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From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_472.htm

Lived in exile in Hungary

References: [Weis1],[AR7],[Isenburg],[Moriarty],[Moncreiffe], [ES],[PlantagenetA],[RFC]

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Edward the Exile

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

• Have questions? Find out how to ask questions and get answers. •

Edward the Exile (1016–February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or step-brother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

References

Gabriel Ronay, The lost King of England : the East European adventures of Edward the Exile, Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Wolfeboro, N.H., USA : Boydell Press, 1989, ISBN 0-85115-541-3, pp. 109-121

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

Edward the Exile (1016 – Late August 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

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Sources:

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Great Britain'

The book, 'In Search of the Dark Ages'

The book, 'The Isle Race', by Winston Churchill

(plus many more ~ see Ancestors/Descendants)

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Edward 'Atheling' was born posthumously circa 1016.3,2 He was the son of Edmund II 'Ironside', King of England and Ealdgyth.2 He married Agatha, daughter of Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, in Hungary.3 He died in 1057 London, England.3 He was buried at Old St. Paul's Cathedral, London, England.3

    Edward 'Atheling' also went by the nick-name of Edward 'the Outlaw'.3

Family Agatha

Children Christina d. b 11022

Saint Margaret 'the Exile'+ b. 1045, d. 16 Nov 10932

Edgar 'Atheling' b. c 1053, d. bt 1125 - 11302

Citations [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

[S52] G. S. P. Freeman-Grencville, The Queen's Lineage: from A.D. 495 to the Silver Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (London , U.K.: Rex Collings, 1977), page 6. Hereinafter cited as The Queen's Lineage.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 27. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

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Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of "Exile" from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he was brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the child murdered. Instead, Edmund was secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen, and then made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, King András.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Earl Godwin. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

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Also called "the Outlaw". Some say he married Agatha daughter of Stephen, and some say Agatha was the daughter of Henry II of Germany. Stephen is accepted as being incorrect, and other more complex relationships have been postulated. One has been shown here which is attributed to David Boles bolesd @ goya.its.rpi.edu. See also articles by Rene Jette NEHGR 150, 96 and Szabolcs de Vajay in Duquesne Review 7.

In 1036 Prince Alfred, one of the younger sons of Athelred and Emma, had returned from exile, ostensibly to visit his mother, but in all likelihood to test out support for a possible bid for the throne. However he and his supporters were captured and imprisoned. Alfred was blinded so brutally that he died from the wounds. His death is recorded as either 5 February 1036 or 1037, the ASC favouring 1036, though either are possible as uncertainty remained in England until Harold was crowned; a situation compounded when Earl Godwin changed sides and supported Harold. Emma fled into exile to Flanders for her own safety.

Harthacnut was Canute's eldest son by his second wife Emma and was the designated heir in both Denmark and England. On Canute's death, however, Harthacnut was in Denmark and was forced to protect his kingdom from Magnus I of Norway who was fighting to reclaim the Norwegian crown. Harthacnut thus appointed his hal f-brother Harold I as his regent along with his mother Emma. The protection of Denmark kept Harthacnut busy for longer than anticipated and in 1037, Harold was crowned king in England. It is likely that there was some political coup, as Earl Godwin, originally appointed as regent alongside Emma and Harold, switched sides and supported Harold in his claim to the throne. Godwin may also have been the murderer of Prince Alfred, by order of Harold. Harold died three years later, and foul play cannot be entirely ruled out. At that time Harthacnut had established his authority in Denmark and was in fact on his way to England to recover his throne. He was staying with Emma, who was in exile in Bruges. W ith Harold's death Harthacnut sailed on England with a large fleet and was immediately accepted as king. Harthacnut was especially vindictive to his half-brother. He had his body exhumed, beheaded and thrown into the marshes around Westminster. He was a harsh and intolerant king. Determined to defend his kingdom in Denmark, he raised an excessive tax in England to support his fleet at four times the rate of his father's. This led to rebellion in Worcester in 1041 which Harthacnut suppressed with vicious rage, almost destroying the town. It is to this period that the legend of Lady Godiva, or Godgifu, belongs. She was the wife of Leofric, earl of Mercia, who was forced to impose Harthacanut's tax across his domain. The people of Coventry could not afford it and Godiva therefore rode naked through the town to persuade Leofric to reduce the tax. Although this is wholly folklore, it does demonstrate the strength of opposition among the Saxon nobility to Harthacanut's taxes. This was further aggravated when Harthacnut ordered the murder of Eadulf, the ealdorman of Bamburgh. Edward the Confessor was recalled from exile and sworn in as Harthacanut's heir. Some records even suggest that he was anointed king. No one mourned when, in June 104 2, Harthacnut died whilst drinking at a wedding party. Apparently he had a fit , but the possibility of poison cannot be ignored. He was an unpopular and much hated king. He had never married and with his death the kingdom passed back to the Saxons. After the welcome death of Harthacnute, there was no surviving mate heir of Canutes line. His cousin, Swein, had believed himself heir, but his entitlement was overridden. In Scandinavia, Canute's domain was overrun by Magnus of Norway whilst England saw the return of the Saxon dynasty descended from Egbert in the form of Edward, the only surviving son Of Athelred ( the Unready) and his second wife, Emma, the daughter of Duke Richard of Normandy. Edward was half Norman and had spent most of his youth (since the age of nine) in exile in Normandy. He thus grew up favouring Norman customs and, never having expected to become king, was also a rather idle and dissolute man. Upon his accession he realised he had a kingdom divided between Saxons, Danes and Norse with powerful earls of all factions.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile

Edward the Exile (1016 – Late August 1057), also called Edward Ætheling, son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth. After the Danish conquest of England in 1016 Canute had him and his brother, Edmund, exiled to the Continent. Edward was only a few months old when he and his brother were brought to the court of Olof Skötkonung, (who was either Canute's half-brother or stepbrother), with instructions to have the children murdered. Instead, the two boys were secretly sent to Kiev, where Olof's daughter Ingigerd was the Queen. Later Edward made his way to Hungary, probably in the retinue of Ingigerd's son-in-law, András in 1046, who he supported in his successful bid for the Hungarian throne.

On hearing the news of his being alive, Edward the Confessor recalled him to England in 1056 and made him his heir. Edward offered the last chance of an undisputed succession within the Saxon royal house. News of Edward's existence came at time when the old Anglo-Saxon Monarchy, restored after a long period of Danish domination, was heading for catastrophe. The Confessor, personally devout but politically weak, was unable to make an effective stand against the steady advance of the powerful and ambitious sons of Godwin, Earl of Wessex. From across the Channel William, Duke of Normandy also had an eye on the succession. Edward the Exile appeared at just the right time. Approved by both king and by the Witan, the Council of the Realm, he offered a way out of the impasse, a counter both to the Godwins and to William, and one with a legitimacy that could not be readily challenged.

Edward, who had been in the custody of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor, finally came back to England at the end of August 1057. But he died within two days of his arrival. The exact cause of Edward's death remains unclear, but he had many powerful enemies, and there is a strong possibility that he was murdered, although by whom it is not known with any certainty. It is known, though, that his access to the king was blocked soon after his arrival in England for some unexplained reason, at a time when the Godwins, in the person of Harold Godwinson, were once again in the ascendant. This turn of events left the throne of England to be disputed by Earl Harold and Duke William, ultimately leading to the Norman Conquest of England.

Edward's wife was a woman named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson. Edward's grandchild Edith of Scotland, also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England, continuing the Anglo-Saxon line into the post-Conquest English monarchy. -------------------- According the Anglo Saxon Family Tree (PDF) his wife was Agatha, dau. of STEPHEN, King of Hungary

At this Profile are the other "possible wife"-s. Edward's main Profile with his wife Agatha see: http://www.geni.com/people/Edward-the-Exile-Prince-of-England/6000000009432470359

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_the_Exile -------------------- NEHGR vol. 150 p. 418: Edward and his older brother Edmund were sent to Sweden by Cnut I, King of Denmark who asked Olaf III, King of Sweden to arrange for the children to vanish. Olaf evidently refused to commit murder, and thus the two English princes remained in Sweden until the victory of Cnut I over the Swedes in 1028. This situation forced the adolescents to flee to Russia..... In 1054, the King of England, Edward III, the Confessor, brother of Edmund II and childless, decided to recall to England his brother's son, Edward, in order to make him his heir. the older brothr, Edmund, was already deceased at that time, but Edward was residing in Hungary with his wife Agatha and their three children, Edgar, Margaret, and Christine. Edward the Exile finally disembarked in England with his family in 1057, but having hardly arrived in London, he died there mysteriously, before even meeting his uncle Edward III, the Confessor.

Notes Hungarian Noble known as 'The Exile'.

Sources [S265] Colquoun_Cunningham.ged, Jamie Vans

[S298] Pitkin, (Pitkin)

[S1144] International Genealogical Index (R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of February 1, 2006), downloaded 28 September 2005 (Reliability: 3) -------------------- Also called Edward Ætheling, was the son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth. He spent most of his life in exile following the defeat of his father by Canute the Great.

Edward's wife was named Agatha, whose origins are disputed. Their children were Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland, and Cristina. Edgar was nominated as heir apparent, but was too young to count for much, and was eventually swept aside by Harold Godwinson.

Edward's grandchild Edith of Scotland, also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England, continuing the Anglo-Saxon line into the post-Conquest English monarchy.

О {profile::pre} (Русский)

  1. [  7Bg/ Агата / Agatha Комитопулина, Княгиня];
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Edward 'the Exile', Ætheling of England's Timeline

1016
1016
Anglo Saxon England
1035
1035
Age 19
London, Middlesex, , England
1035
Age 19
Hungary
1044
1044
Age 28
Wessex, England
1045
September 8, 1045
Age 29
Budapest, Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
1051
1051
Age 35
Hungary
1057
April 19, 1057
Age 41
London, Middlesex, England
1057
Age 41
St Paul Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England
1932
November 26, 1932
Age 41
November 26, 1932
Age 41