Egil "Tunnadolg Vendikraka" Anunsson

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Egil / Ongentheow / Angantyr Tunnadolg Vendikraka Aunsson (Egilsson (Vandal)), Tunnadolg / "Vendilkraka"

Also Known As: "Egill (Ongentheow; Anganty; VENDELKRAKA) `Vendikraka' AUNNSSON of the YNGLING (SCYLFING) Dynasty", "Vendilkráka", "King Ongenþeow of /Uppasala/", "Eigil", "Egill", "Egil", "Angantyr", "Ongendþeow", "Ongenþio", "Ongenþeow", "Ongentheow", "Svitjord", "Tunnadolg", "Egil Aunsson /K..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Uppsala, Svithiod, Sweden
Death: Died in Svitjod, Sweden
Place of Burial: Kungshogar, Upsala, Sweden
Immediate Family:

Son of Aun "The Aged" Jorundsson King of Uppsala and Queen Hervor Helgisdottir
Husband of NN (Mrs. Egil of Sweden)
Father of Ottar Egilsson, King of Sweden; Fusto Egilsson and Ingibjørg Angantyrsdatter of Sweden
Brother of Sigrid Aunsdotter, Queen of Denmark
Half brother of Egil Angantyr

Occupation: King in Sweden, King in Uppsala, Konge i Uppsala (Sverige), Konge, King of Svitjod 448, Swedish King of the House of Yngling, King Svitjord 448, крал, Roi de Svitjod (Novgorod, Russie; Uppsala, Suède et Vingulmark Norvège), Roi, d'Uppsala, Kung
Managed by: Jennie Jacobson
Last Updated:

About Egil "Tunnadolg Vendikraka" Anunsson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongen%C3%BEeow Ongentheow, (Anglo-Saxon Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Anglo-Saxon sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.[1][2][3][4]

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. As will be shown below, it can be argued that they are based on the same person and the same events, but it should be noted that not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

Anglosaxon sources

In the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold[5]. Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn[6], and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt[7]. The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother[8], who arrived the next day with reinforcements[9]. Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home[10].

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes[11]. The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow[12]. Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf[13]. Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet[14], giving Ongentheow a death-blow[15]. Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac[16]. When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded[17], and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter[18]. Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer[19].

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden: lines 30–33: Wald Woingum, Wod þyringum, Wald [ruled] the Woings, Wod the Thuringians, Sæferð Sycgum, Sweom Ongendþeow, Saeferth the Sycgs, the Swedes Ongendtheow, Sceafthere Ymbrum, Sceafa Longbeardum Sceafthere the Ymbers, Sceafa the Lombards,

Egil

In Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók and in Historia Norwegiae, he was called Egil Vendelcrow (Vendilcraca/Vendilkráka, a name traditionally given to those living at the royal estate of Vendel in Sweden). Snorri Sturluson, however, gave the name Vendelcrow to Egil's son Ottar (Ohthere). In these sources, Egil was the son of Aun the Old, and like him, not very warlike. After he had made the thrall Tunni (or Tonne) responsible for the treasury, Tunni rebelled against Egil. They fought eight battles after which Egil fled to Denmark, according to the Ynglinga saga (Ynglingatal does not mention where he fled and Historia Norwegiae does not mention any escape at all). Snorri wrote that Fróði, the Danish king, aided Egil in defeating Tunni, and made Egil a tributary to the Danish king.

Egil was killed by a bull during the sacrifices at the Temple at Uppsala.

   Ok lofsæll
   ór landi fló
   Týs óttungr
   Tunna ríki,
   en flæming
   farra trjónu
   jötuns eykr
   á Agli rauð.
   Sás of austr
   áðan hafði
   brúna hörg
   of borinn lengi,
   en skíðlauss
   Skilfinga nið
   hœfis hjörr
   til hjarta stóð.[20][21]
   The fair-haired son of Odin's race,
   Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,
   Has perished by the demon-beast
   Who roams the forests of the East.
   The hero's breast met the full brunt
   Of the wild bull's shaggy front;
   The hero's heart's asunder torn
   By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn.[22][23]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Auchun vero genuit Eigil cognomento Vendilcraco, quem proprius servus nomine Tonne regno privavit, et cum domino pedisseqvus VIII civilia bella commisit, in omnibus victoria potitus, in nono tandem devictus occubuit; sed paulo post ipsum regem truculentus taurus confodiens trucidavit. Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus [...][24] Aukun's son was Egil Vendelkråke, whose own bondman, Tunne, drove him from his kingdom; and though a mere servant he joined in eight civil combats with his master and won supremacy in all of them, but in a ninth he was finally defeated and killed. Shortly afterwards however the monarch was gored and slaughtered by a ferocious bull. The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, [...][25] The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it also gives Egil as the successor of Aunn and the predecessor of Óttarr: xvi Aun inn gamli. xvii Egill Vendilkráka. xviii Óttarr[26].

Comments

The two versions seem contradictory, but it has been shown that the two stories may very well describe the same event (Schück H. 1907, Nerman B. 1925), and that Ynglingatal was probably misinterpreted by Snorri due to a different dialectal meaning of the word farra. In Ynglingatal, it says

   en flæming
   farra trjónu
   jötuns eykr
   á Agli rauð.

If there is any authenticity behind the traditions, the origin of Ynglingatal was most probably a Swedish poem which has not survived (see also Sundquist 2004). In Old Swedish, farra did not mean "bull" but it meant "boar" (cf. English farrow meaning "young pig"). Moreover, in Old Norse Trjóna normally meant a pig's snout (modern Scandinavian tryne). Flæmingr meant "sword" (originally a Flemish sword imported by Vikings).

Moreover, the sword of the snout can hardly refer to the horns of a bull, but it is more natural to interpret it as the tusks of a boar. In English, the lines can be translated as but the giant beast coloured its tusk red on Egil.

In Anglo-Saxon, the name eofor meant "boar" and consequently Ynglingatal could very well relate of Eofor (the boar) killing Egil with kennings for boars. These kennings, sung originally by Swedes, were later misinterpreted by Norwegians and Icelanders as literal expressions due to the different dialectal meanings of farra.

Moreover, according to Schück, the name Tunni which has no meaning in Old Norse should in Proto-Norse have been *Tunþa and derived from *Tunþuz. Consequently, it would have been the same word as the Gothic Tunþus which meant "tooth". This would mean that the name of Egil's enemy, actually meant "tooth" and Tunni and the bull/boar would consequently have been the same enemy, i.e. Eofor.

Some scholars have suggested that the name Ongentheow is connected to the Danish king Ongendus, (fl. c. 700) who appears in one sentence of Alcuin's life of Willibrord. -------------------- Ongentheow, (Old Englsh: Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish: Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Old English sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongentheow -------------------- Egil Vendilkråke Frå Wikipedia – det frie oppslagsverket Gå til: navigering, søk Egil Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, far til Ottar Vendilkråke og son av Aun den gamle. Namnet "Vendilkråke" er sett på Egil av Are Frode, medan Ynglingesoga berre kjenner til at sonen Ottar har bore namnet. Etter Are skulle Vendil vise til ein stad i Uppland i Sverige, der Ynglingekongane er hauglagde.

Det angelsaksiske kvædet Béowulf har ein hovding ved namn Ongentheow på same stad som Egil i ættelina over skilvingane/ynglingane. Dette har ført til ei drøfting av om desse to i røynda er same mannen, sjølv om grunnforteljingane er noko ulike. Prova for likskap finst i tolkinga av Ynglingatal, som moglegvis er tolka gale av nordmenn og islendingar, på grunnlag av austnordisk (svensk) norrøn dikting. Egil er den einaste i diktet som har nemninga "Skilving" knytt til seg.

Ynglingesoga [endre]

Etter islandske kjelder laut Egil vinne attende makta frå trælen Tunne eller Tonne, som hadde rådd i staden til faren Aun, som døydde medan Egil framleis var liten. Tunne hadde vore skattmeister hjå Aun, og rømde unna med ei mengd skattar og lausøyre. Då Egil vart konge, vart Tunne sett mellom trælane, og dette lika han dårleg, rømde, og vart teken til hovding. Tunne og mennane hans dreiv med røvarferder etter dette, og herja bygdene. Egil laut gå mot Tunne i ei rekkje slag, men det tok tid før han vann. Snorre fortel at dei heldt åtte slag seg imellom, og Tunne vann dei alle. Då rømde Egil til Danmark, og bad om hjelp hjå kong Frode den frøkne. Saman greidde desse å vinne over Tunne, men sidan sende Egil mange gåver til Frode kvart år. Egil vart drepen av ein gra-okse som vart mannevond, og då Egil ville veide han, sette stuten horna i han og drap han. Det vart banen hans.

Tjodolv frå Kvine fortel det slik:

Og den lovsæle laut or lande røma, son hans Ty, for Tunne den mektuge. Men jotuns øyken på Egil farga blanke panne-sverd av blode raudt, uksen, som hadde aust i skogen hovude lengi høgt bori; men hovud-sverde slire-laust skilvings-sonen stod til hjarta.

Ongentheow [endre]

Ongentheow er far til Onela (Åle) og Ohthere (Ottar). Hædcyn, kongen over gautane, gjer hemntog mot sveane, og dronninga til Ongentheow vert teken til fange. Ongentheow reiser ut og vinn dronniga att. Hædcyn vert drepen. Så held han gautane innestengde i Hræfnawuwu (ramnholtet), og trugar dei på livet. Bror av Hædcyn, Hygelac, kjem til med ein annan her, og gautane kjem unna. Sveane dreg seg unna, og Ongentheow vert såra av Wulf, son av Wonred, men Wulf vert sjølv slegen ned. Eofor, bror av Wulf, hemner han, drep Ongentheow og tek herbunad og våpen attende til Hygelac. Wulf overlever åtaket, og Eofor vert gift med dotter til Hygelac.

Samanstilling [endre]

Ordet farra, som finst i den norrøne originalteksta, tykkjest vera tolka ulikt på svensk og vestnordisk. På gamal austnordisk tydde farra villsvin, ikkje okse. Dette høver godt med namnet Eofor, som og tyder villsvin på gamalengelsk. At Egil/Ongentheow då er drepen av "hoggtennene til svinet" (en flæming farra trjónu), i staden for horna til oksen, kan vera ein språkleg bilete på korleis Eofor drap Ongentheow. Trjonu tyder tryne, og flæming kan tyde eit sverd, altså: "Sverdet frå svinetrynet". Dei språklege bileta i kvadet er sidan mistydd av norske og islandske skaldar på grunn av dialektale skilnader (engelsk Wikipedia).

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egil_Vendilkr%C3%A5ke»

-------------------- 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.

Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others of the slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains, pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land, ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular and strong in men. King Egil assembledúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him; and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: --

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

  • **********************

Events in the life of Egill Aunnsson

† death 1 . ·King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: -- "The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn." event 1 . ·succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death event 1 . ·no warrior, but sat quietly at home event 1 . ·rebelled against by a slave of his late father's named Tunne, who'd taken Aunn's treasure and buried it, and when Egil withheld the respect he felt he'd deserved, he unearthed the treasure and used it to gather about him men to pillage and maraud King Egil's lands, and Tunne won every battle they fought and eventually forced Egil to flee to Denmark event 1 . ·assisted against the usurper Tunne by King Frode the Bold of Denmark, who provided men, in exchange for the promise of a tax from Egil, and Egil therewith recovered Uppsala event 1 . ·did not fulfill his promise of paying tax to Frode, but managed to remain friends with the king

-------------------- Död: omkring 515 Gamla Uppsala

Noteringar Sveakonung i G:a Uppsala i början av 500-talet. Son till Ane den gamle. Han var ingen härman utan styrde i fred. Han hade en träl vid namn Tunne som varit hans fars skattväktare, men när Egil kom till makten fick Tunne återgå till de andra trälarna. Innan dess hade Tunne stulit en del av kung Anes lösöre och grävt ner det. Nu flydde han tillsammans med flera andra trälar, grävde upp skatten och delade den bland sina män. De gjorde honom till sin hövding och han samlade allsköns dåligt folk omkring sig. De rånade, plundrade och dräpte och allt bytet delade han ut bland sina män. Kung Egil tog upp kampen mot Tunne. Det blev en bitter strid och kung Egil blev tvungen att fly. Egil samlade en här och gick till slag mot Tunne. Det blev åtta hårda strider och kung Egil förlorade dem alla. Efter detta flydde Egil landet, ner till kung Frode den djärve på Själland. Han lovade Frode svearnas skatt om de hjälpte honom bli av med Tunne. När Egil kom hem hade han en stor här av kung Frodes män och envigskämpar med sig. Det blev ett väldigt slag där Tunne äntligen stupade. Egil återtog sitt rike och Frodes män åteervände hem. Efter det sände Egil stora gåvor till Frode vartenda år, men han gäldade ingen skatt som han hade lovat. Trots det höll vänskapen i sig. Efter Tunnes död regerade Egil ytterligare tre år men sedan hände det sig att en tjur som skulle blotas hade blivit alldeles folkilsken och rymde till skogs. Kung Egil som var en stor jägare mötte tjuren i skogen under en jakt och försökte dräpa den. Kungen bröt sitt spjut mot tjuren, tjuren välte kungens häst, kungen drog svärd men tjuren rände hornen i bröstet på honom. Kungens män lyckades till sist dräpa tjuren men kungen dog av sina sår. Höglades i G:a Uppsala, troligen i den sk Frejshögen (mellan Auns högen i söder och Adils hög i norr). Utgrävningar där visade på bålrester från 520-talet.

-------------------- Notes for Egil Aunson Slåss mot en som heter Tunne 8 ganger og Tunne seiret alltid.

Egil Tunnadogli. Under ham rømte en Træl ved Navn Tunne bort med Anes Skatter, og samlede ved dette Middel en Hob Trælle og løst Pak, som hærjede Landet. Egil, som fleregange angreb ham, og derved altid blev slagen, maatte tage sin Tilflugt til Kong Frode i Danmark. Tunne blev omsider slagen og dræbt, og Egil sendte siden Skat til Danskekongen for hans Hjælp. Han stangedes ihjel paa en Jagt af en løssluppen Offertyr. -------------------- Battled 9 times with father's ex-slave, Tunni, and finally killed Tunni with help of others. Died by being gored by a bull that first gored his horse

   Not much of a warrior -- a bad thing for a Viking. Had to have help from the Danish King Frode to subdue a revolt of one of his subjects. [WBH - Sweden]
   FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
   !Soon after the 6th century opened the Swedes of Uppland were ruled by an aged but formidable monarch, the anglicized from of whoe name was Ongentheow. In Old Norse this should be represented by a form like Angantyr. The Ynglinga Saga calls this king, Egill. The Swedes and Geats were natural enemies, and Hethcyn, king of the Geats, in answer to the onslaughts and ambuses of Ongentheow's sons, led a raid into Swedish territory and carried off Ongentheow's aged wife. The the Swede, 'old and terrible', gave pursuit, killed Hethcyn, and rescued the lady, though stripped of her ornaments of gold. The Geat survivors escaped to an unidentified Ravenswood, where he surrounded and through the night taunted them with a propsect of the gallows in the morning. But before first light they heard the warhorns of Hygelac, prince of Geats, as he came hastening along their bloody track with the chivalry of the Geats. Hygelac's warriors overran the Swedish entrenchments. Egill was killed in the battle. Egill was succeeded by his younger brother, Onela/Ali. [A History of the Vikings, pp. 33-37]
   King Egil was the son of Ane, and like his father, no warrior. Under his reign and that of his son, King Ottar, Sweden suffered a good deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat, or tribute, in return. [History of Sweden, p. 37]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-W1

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  3. Note: 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.
   Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land,ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular andstrong in men. King Egil assemble dúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of  the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest,separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

-------------------- Egil's father was Aun (The Aged Ani) Jorundsson and his mother was <Unknown>. His paternal grandparents were Jorund Yngvasson and <Unknown>. Their ancestry is found elsewhere in this chart.

The info below is for Egil Aunsson:

   Battled 9 times with father's ex-slave, Tunni, and finally killed Tunni with help of others. Died by being gored by a bull that first gored his horse
   Not much of a warrior -- a bad thing for a Viking. Had to have help from the Danish King Frode to subdue a revolt of one of his subjects. [WBH - Sweden]
   FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
   !Soon after the 6th century opened the Swedes of Uppland were ruled by an aged but formidable monarch, the anglicized from of whoe name was Ongentheow. In Old Norse this should be represented by a form like Angantyr. The Ynglinga Saga calls this king, Egill. The Swedes and Geats were natural enemies, and Hethcyn, king of the Geats, in answer to the onslaughts and ambuses of Ongentheow's sons, led a raid into Swedish territory and carried off Ongentheow's aged wife. The the Swede, 'old and terrible', gave pursuit, killed Hethcyn, and rescued the lady, though stripped of her ornaments of gold. The Geat survivors escaped to an unidentified Ravenswood, where he surrounded and through the night taunted them with a propsect of the gallows in the morning. But before first light they heard the warhorns of Hygelac, prince of Geats, as he came hastening along their bloody track with the chivalry of the Geats. Hygelac's warriors overran the Swedish entrenchments. Egill was killed in the battle. Egill was succeeded by his younger brother, Onela/Ali. [A History of the Vikings, pp. 33-37]
   King Egil was the son of Ane, and like his father, no warrior. Under his reign and that of his son, King Ottar, Sweden suffered a good deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat, or tribute, in return. [History of Sweden, p. 37]
  1. Reference Number: G6SZ-W1

---

  1. Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
  2. Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
  3. Note: 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.
   Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land,ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular andstrong in men. King Egil assemble dúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of  the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest,separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn." -------------------- Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land, ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular and strong in men. King Egil assembled an army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, Separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race,

Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,

Has perished by the demon-beast

Who roams the forests of the East.

The hero's breast met the full brunt

Of the wild bull's shaggy front;

The hero's heart's asunder torn

By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

--------------------

Ongentheow, (Anglo-Saxon Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Anglo-Saxon sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. As will be shown below, it can be argued that they are based on the same person and the same events, but it should be noted that not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

In the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold. Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn, and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt. The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother, who arrived the next day with reinforcements. Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home.

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes. The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow. Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf. Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet, giving Ongentheow a death-blow. Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac. When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded, and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter. Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer.

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden:

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongentheow -------------------- Roi de Uppland -------------------- Ongentheow (Old Englsh: Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish: Angantyr) (died ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Old English sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.[1][2][3][4]

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. As will be shown below, it can be argued that they are based on the same person and the same events, but not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

Old English sources

In the Old English epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold.[5] Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn,[6] and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt.[7] The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother,[8] who arrived the next day with reinforcements.[9] Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home.[10]

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes.[11] The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow.[12] Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf.[13] Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet,[14] giving Ongentheow a death-blow.[15] Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac.[16] When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded,[17] and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter.[18] Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer.[19]

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden: lines 30–33: Wald Woingum, Wod þyringum, Wald [ruled] the Woings, Wod the Thuringians, Sæferð Sycgum, Sweom Ongendþeow, Saeferth the Sycgs, the Swedes Ongendtheow, Sceafthere Ymbrum, Sceafa Longbeardum Sceafthere the Ymbers, Sceafa the Lombards,

Egil

In Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók and in Historia Norwegiae, he was called Egil Vendelcrow (Vendilcraca/Vendilkráka, a name traditionally given to those living at the royal estate of Vendel in Sweden). Snorri Sturluson, however, gave the name Vendelcrow to Egil's son Ottar (Ohthere). In these sources, Egil was the son of Aun the Old, and like him, not very warlike. After he had made the thrall Tunni (or Tonne) responsible for the treasury, Tunni rebelled against Egil. They fought eight battles after which Egil fled to Denmark, according to the Ynglinga saga (Ynglingatal does not mention where he fled and Historia Norwegiae does not mention any escape at all). Snorri wrote that Fróði, the Danish king, aided Egil in defeating Tunni, and made Egil a tributary to the Danish king.

Egil was killed by a bull during the sacrifices at Gamla Uppsala.

   Ok lofsæll
   ór landi fló
   Týs óttungr
   Tunna ríki,
   en flæming
   farra trjónu
   jötuns eykr
   á Agli rauð.
   Sás of austr
   áðan hafði
   brúna hörg
   of borinn lengi,
   en skíðlauss
   Skilfinga nið
   hœfis hjörr
   til hjarta stóð.[20][21]

   The fair-haired son of Odin's race,
   Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,
   Has perished by the demon-beast
   Who roams the forests of the East.
   The hero's breast met the full brunt
   Of the wild bull's shaggy front;
   The hero's heart's asunder torn
   By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn.[22][23]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Auchun vero genuit Eigil cognomento Vendilcraco, quem proprius servus nomine Tonne regno privavit, et cum domino pedisseqvus VIII civilia bella commisit, in omnibus victoria potitus, in nono tandem devictus occubuit; sed paulo post ipsum regem truculentus taurus confodiens trucidavit. Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus [...][24]

Aukun's son was Egil Vendelkråke, whose own bondman, Tunne, drove him from his kingdom; and though a mere servant he joined in eight civil combats with his master and won supremacy in all of them, but in a ninth he was finally defeated and killed. Shortly afterwards however the monarch was gored and slaughtered by a ferocious bull. The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, [...][25]

The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it also gives Egil as the successor of Aunn and the predecessor of Óttarr: xvi Aun inn gamli. xvii Egill Vendilkráka. xviii Óttarr.[26]

Comments

The two versions seem contradictory, but it has been shown that the two stories may very well describe the same event (Schück H. 1907, Nerman B. 1925), and that Ynglingatal was probably misinterpreted by Snorri due to a different dialectal meaning of the word farra. In Ynglingatal, it says

   en flæming
   farra trjónu
   jötuns eykr
   á Agli rauð.

If there is any authenticity behind the traditions, the origin of Ynglingatal was most probably a Swedish poem which has not survived (see also Sundquist 2004). In Old Swedish, farra did not mean "bull" but it meant "boar" (cf. English farrow meaning "young pig"). Moreover, in Old Norse Trjóna normally meant a pig's snout (modern Scandinavian tryne). Flæmingr meant "sword" (originally a Flemish sword imported by Vikings).

Moreover, the sword of the snout can hardly refer to the horns of a bull, but it is more natural to interpret it as the tusks of a boar. In English, the lines can be translated as but the giant beast coloured its tusk red on Egil.

In Old English, the name eofor meant "boar" and consequently Ynglingatal could very well relate of Eofor (the boar) killing Egil with kennings for boars. These kennings, sung originally by Swedes, were later misinterpreted by Norwegians and Icelanders as literal expressions due to the different dialectal meanings of farra.

Moreover, according to Schück, the name Tunni which has no meaning in Old Norse should in Proto-Norse have been *Tunþa and derived from *Tunþuz. Consequently, it would have been the same word as the Gothic Tunþus which meant "tooth". This would mean that the name of Egil's enemy, actually meant "tooth" and Tunni and the bull/boar would consequently have been the same enemy, i.e. Eofor.

Some scholars have suggested that the name Ongentheow is connected to the Danish king Ongendus, (fl. c. 700) who appears in one sentence of Alcuin's life of Willibrord.[27][28] -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongen%C3%BEeow Ongentheow, (Anglo-Saxon Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Anglo-Saxon sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.[1][2][3][4]

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. As will be shown below, it can be argued that they are based on the same person and the same events, but it should be noted that not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

Anglosaxon sources

In the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold[5]. Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn[6], and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt[7]. The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother[8], who arrived the next day with reinforcements[9]. Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home[10].

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes[11]. The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow[12]. Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf[13]. Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet[14], giving Ongentheow a death-blow[15]. Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac[16]. When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded[17], and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter[18]. Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer[19].

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden: lines 30–33: Wald Woingum, Wod þyringum, Wald [ruled] the Woings, Wod the Thuringians, Sæferð Sycgum, Sweom Ongendþeow, Saeferth the Sycgs, the Swedes Ongendtheow, Sceafthere Ymbrum, Sceafa Longbeardum Sceafthere the Ymbers, Sceafa the Lombards,

Egil

In Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók and in Historia Norwegiae, he was called Egil Vendelcrow (Vendilcraca/Vendilkráka, a name traditionally given to those living at the royal estate of Vendel in Sweden). Snorri Sturluson, however, gave the name Vendelcrow to Egil's son Ottar (Ohthere). In these sources, Egil was the son of Aun the Old, and like him, not very warlike. After he had made the thrall Tunni (or Tonne) responsible for the treasury, Tunni rebelled against Egil. They fought eight battles after which Egil fled to Denmark, according to the Ynglinga saga (Ynglingatal does not mention where he fled and Historia Norwegiae does not mention any escape at all). Snorri wrote that Fróði, the Danish king, aided Egil in defeating Tunni, and made Egil a tributary to the Danish king.

Egil was killed by a bull during the sacrifices at the Temple at Uppsala.

  Ok lofsæll
  ór landi fló
  Týs óttungr
  Tunna ríki,
  en flæming
  farra trjónu
  jötuns eykr
  á Agli rauð.
  Sás of austr
  áðan hafði
  brúna hörg
  of borinn lengi,
  en skíðlauss
  Skilfinga nið
  hœfis hjörr
  til hjarta stóð.[20][21]
  The fair-haired son of Odin's race,
  Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,
  Has perished by the demon-beast
  Who roams the forests of the East.
  The hero's breast met the full brunt
  Of the wild bull's shaggy front;
  The hero's heart's asunder torn
  By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn.[22][23]

The Historia Norwegiæ presents a Latin summary of Ynglingatal, older than Snorri's quotation:

Auchun vero genuit Eigil cognomento Vendilcraco, quem proprius servus nomine Tonne regno privavit, et cum domino pedisseqvus VIII civilia bella commisit, in omnibus victoria potitus, in nono tandem devictus occubuit; sed paulo post ipsum regem truculentus taurus confodiens trucidavit. Cui successit in regnum filius suus Ottarus [...][24] Aukun's son was Egil Vendelkråke, whose own bondman, Tunne, drove him from his kingdom; and though a mere servant he joined in eight civil combats with his master and won supremacy in all of them, but in a ninth he was finally defeated and killed. Shortly afterwards however the monarch was gored and slaughtered by a ferocious bull. The successor to the throne was his son Ottar, [...][25] The even earlier source Íslendingabók also cites the line of descent in Ynglingatal and it also gives Egil as the successor of Aunn and the predecessor of Óttarr: xvi Aun inn gamli. xvii Egill Vendilkráka. xviii Óttarr[26].

Comments

The two versions seem contradictory, but it has been shown that the two stories may very well describe the same event (Schück H. 1907, Nerman B. 1925), and that Ynglingatal was probably misinterpreted by Snorri due to a different dialectal meaning of the word farra. In Ynglingatal, it says

  en flæming
  farra trjónu
  jötuns eykr
  á Agli rauð.

If there is any authenticity behind the traditions, the origin of Ynglingatal was most probably a Swedish poem which has not survived (see also Sundquist 2004). In Old Swedish, farra did not mean "bull" but it meant "boar" (cf. English farrow meaning "young pig"). Moreover, in Old Norse Trjóna normally meant a pig's snout (modern Scandinavian tryne). Flæmingr meant "sword" (originally a Flemish sword imported by Vikings).

Moreover, the sword of the snout can hardly refer to the horns of a bull, but it is more natural to interpret it as the tusks of a boar. In English, the lines can be translated as but the giant beast coloured its tusk red on Egil.

In Anglo-Saxon, the name eofor meant "boar" and consequently Ynglingatal could very well relate of Eofor (the boar) killing Egil with kennings for boars. These kennings, sung originally by Swedes, were later misinterpreted by Norwegians and Icelanders as literal expressions due to the different dialectal meanings of farra.

Moreover, according to Schück, the name Tunni which has no meaning in Old Norse should in Proto-Norse have been *Tunþa and derived from *Tunþuz. Consequently, it would have been the same word as the Gothic Tunþus which meant "tooth". This would mean that the name of Egil's enemy, actually meant "tooth" and Tunni and the bull/boar would consequently have been the same enemy, i.e. Eofor.

Some scholars have suggested that the name Ongentheow is connected to the Danish king Ongendus, (fl. c. 700) who appears in one sentence of Alcuin's life of Willibrord. -------------------- Ongentheow, (Old Englsh: Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish: Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Old English sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongentheow -------------------- Egil Vendilkråke Frå Wikipedia – det frie oppslagsverket Gå til: navigering, søk Egil Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, far til Ottar Vendilkråke og son av Aun den gamle. Namnet "Vendilkråke" er sett på Egil av Are Frode, medan Ynglingesoga berre kjenner til at sonen Ottar har bore namnet. Etter Are skulle Vendil vise til ein stad i Uppland i Sverige, der Ynglingekongane er hauglagde.

Det angelsaksiske kvædet Béowulf har ein hovding ved namn Ongentheow på same stad som Egil i ættelina over skilvingane/ynglingane. Dette har ført til ei drøfting av om desse to i røynda er same mannen, sjølv om grunnforteljingane er noko ulike. Prova for likskap finst i tolkinga av Ynglingatal, som moglegvis er tolka gale av nordmenn og islendingar, på grunnlag av austnordisk (svensk) norrøn dikting. Egil er den einaste i diktet som har nemninga "Skilving" knytt til seg.

Ynglingesoga [endre]

Etter islandske kjelder laut Egil vinne attende makta frå trælen Tunne eller Tonne, som hadde rådd i staden til faren Aun, som døydde medan Egil framleis var liten. Tunne hadde vore skattmeister hjå Aun, og rømde unna med ei mengd skattar og lausøyre. Då Egil vart konge, vart Tunne sett mellom trælane, og dette lika han dårleg, rømde, og vart teken til hovding. Tunne og mennane hans dreiv med røvarferder etter dette, og herja bygdene. Egil laut gå mot Tunne i ei rekkje slag, men det tok tid før han vann. Snorre fortel at dei heldt åtte slag seg imellom, og Tunne vann dei alle. Då rømde Egil til Danmark, og bad om hjelp hjå kong Frode den frøkne. Saman greidde desse å vinne over Tunne, men sidan sende Egil mange gåver til Frode kvart år. Egil vart drepen av ein gra-okse som vart mannevond, og då Egil ville veide han, sette stuten horna i han og drap han. Det vart banen hans.

Tjodolv frå Kvine fortel det slik:

Og den lovsæle laut or lande røma, son hans Ty, for Tunne den mektuge. Men jotuns øyken på Egil farga blanke panne-sverd av blode raudt, uksen, som hadde aust i skogen hovude lengi høgt bori; men hovud-sverde slire-laust skilvings-sonen stod til hjarta.

Ongentheow [endre]

Ongentheow er far til Onela (Åle) og Ohthere (Ottar). Hædcyn, kongen over gautane, gjer hemntog mot sveane, og dronninga til Ongentheow vert teken til fange. Ongentheow reiser ut og vinn dronniga att. Hædcyn vert drepen. Så held han gautane innestengde i Hræfnawuwu (ramnholtet), og trugar dei på livet. Bror av Hædcyn, Hygelac, kjem til med ein annan her, og gautane kjem unna. Sveane dreg seg unna, og Ongentheow vert såra av Wulf, son av Wonred, men Wulf vert sjølv slegen ned. Eofor, bror av Wulf, hemner han, drep Ongentheow og tek herbunad og våpen attende til Hygelac. Wulf overlever åtaket, og Eofor vert gift med dotter til Hygelac.

Samanstilling [endre]

Ordet farra, som finst i den norrøne originalteksta, tykkjest vera tolka ulikt på svensk og vestnordisk. På gamal austnordisk tydde farra villsvin, ikkje okse. Dette høver godt med namnet Eofor, som og tyder villsvin på gamalengelsk. At Egil/Ongentheow då er drepen av "hoggtennene til svinet" (en flæming farra trjónu), i staden for horna til oksen, kan vera ein språkleg bilete på korleis Eofor drap Ongentheow. Trjonu tyder tryne, og flæming kan tyde eit sverd, altså: "Sverdet frå svinetrynet". Dei språklege bileta i kvadet er sidan mistydd av norske og islandske skaldar på grunn av dialektale skilnader (engelsk Wikipedia).

Henta frå «http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egil_Vendilkr%C3%A5ke»

-------------------- 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.

Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others of the slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains, pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land, ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular and strong in men. King Egil assembledúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him; and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: --

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

   **********************

Events in the life of Egill Aunnsson

† death 1 . ·King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: -- "The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn." event 1 . ·succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death event 1 . ·no warrior, but sat quietly at home event 1 . ·rebelled against by a slave of his late father's named Tunne, who'd taken Aunn's treasure and buried it, and when Egil withheld the respect he felt he'd deserved, he unearthed the treasure and used it to gather about him men to pillage and maraud King Egil's lands, and Tunne won every battle they fought and eventually forced Egil to flee to Denmark event 1 . ·assisted against the usurper Tunne by King Frode the Bold of Denmark, who provided men, in exchange for the promise of a tax from Egil, and Egil therewith recovered Uppsala event 1 . ·did not fulfill his promise of paying tax to Frode, but managed to remain friends with the king

-------------------- Död: omkring 515 Gamla Uppsala

Noteringar Sveakonung i G:a Uppsala i början av 500-talet. Son till Ane den gamle. Han var ingen härman utan styrde i fred. Han hade en träl vid namn Tunne som varit hans fars skattväktare, men när Egil kom till makten fick Tunne återgå till de andra trälarna. Innan dess hade Tunne stulit en del av kung Anes lösöre och grävt ner det. Nu flydde han tillsammans med flera andra trälar, grävde upp skatten och delade den bland sina män. De gjorde honom till sin hövding och han samlade allsköns dåligt folk omkring sig. De rånade, plundrade och dräpte och allt bytet delade han ut bland sina män. Kung Egil tog upp kampen mot Tunne. Det blev en bitter strid och kung Egil blev tvungen att fly. Egil samlade en här och gick till slag mot Tunne. Det blev åtta hårda strider och kung Egil förlorade dem alla. Efter detta flydde Egil landet, ner till kung Frode den djärve på Själland. Han lovade Frode svearnas skatt om de hjälpte honom bli av med Tunne. När Egil kom hem hade han en stor här av kung Frodes män och envigskämpar med sig. Det blev ett väldigt slag där Tunne äntligen stupade. Egil återtog sitt rike och Frodes män åteervände hem. Efter det sände Egil stora gåvor till Frode vartenda år, men han gäldade ingen skatt som han hade lovat. Trots det höll vänskapen i sig. Efter Tunnes död regerade Egil ytterligare tre år men sedan hände det sig att en tjur som skulle blotas hade blivit alldeles folkilsken och rymde till skogs. Kung Egil som var en stor jägare mötte tjuren i skogen under en jakt och försökte dräpa den. Kungen bröt sitt spjut mot tjuren, tjuren välte kungens häst, kungen drog svärd men tjuren rände hornen i bröstet på honom. Kungens män lyckades till sist dräpa tjuren men kungen dog av sina sår. Höglades i G:a Uppsala, troligen i den sk Frejshögen (mellan Auns högen i söder och Adils hög i norr). Utgrävningar där visade på bålrester från 520-talet.

-------------------- Notes for Egil Aunson Slåss mot en som heter Tunne 8 ganger og Tunne seiret alltid.

Egil Tunnadogli. Under ham rømte en Træl ved Navn Tunne bort med Anes Skatter, og samlede ved dette Middel en Hob Trælle og løst Pak, som hærjede Landet. Egil, som fleregange angreb ham, og derved altid blev slagen, maatte tage sin Tilflugt til Kong Frode i Danmark. Tunne blev omsider slagen og dræbt, og Egil sendte siden Skat til Danskekongen for hans Hjælp. Han stangedes ihjel paa en Jagt af en løssluppen Offertyr. -------------------- Battled 9 times with father's ex-slave, Tunni, and finally killed Tunni with help of others. Died by being gored by a bull that first gored his horse

  Not much of a warrior -- a bad thing for a Viking. Had to have help from the Danish King Frode to subdue a revolt of one of his subjects. [WBH - Sweden]
  FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
  !Soon after the 6th century opened the Swedes of Uppland were ruled by an aged but formidable monarch, the anglicized from of whoe name was Ongentheow. In Old Norse this should be represented by a form like Angantyr. The Ynglinga Saga calls this king, Egill. The Swedes and Geats were natural enemies, and Hethcyn, king of the Geats, in answer to the onslaughts and ambuses of Ongentheow's sons, led a raid into Swedish territory and carried off Ongentheow's aged wife. The the Swede, 'old and terrible', gave pursuit, killed Hethcyn, and rescued the lady, though stripped of her ornaments of gold. The Geat survivors escaped to an unidentified Ravenswood, where he surrounded and through the night taunted them with a propsect of the gallows in the morning. But before first light they heard the warhorns of Hygelac, prince of Geats, as he came hastening along their bloody track with the chivalry of the Geats. Hygelac's warriors overran the Swedish entrenchments. Egill was killed in the battle. Egill was succeeded by his younger brother, Onela/Ali. [A History of the Vikings, pp. 33-37]
  King Egil was the son of Ane, and like his father, no warrior. Under his reign and that of his son, King Ottar, Sweden suffered a good deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat, or tribute, in return. [History of Sweden, p. 37]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-W1

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note: 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.
  Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land,ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular andstrong in men. King Egil assemble dúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of  the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest,separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

-------------------- Egil's father was Aun (The Aged Ani) Jorundsson and his mother was <Unknown>. His paternal grandparents were Jorund Yngvasson and <Unknown>. Their ancestry is found elsewhere in this chart.

The info below is for Egil Aunsson:

  Battled 9 times with father's ex-slave, Tunni, and finally killed Tunni with help of others. Died by being gored by a bull that first gored his horse
  Not much of a warrior -- a bad thing for a Viking. Had to have help from the Danish King Frode to subdue a revolt of one of his subjects. [WBH - Sweden]
  FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES
  !Soon after the 6th century opened the Swedes of Uppland were ruled by an aged but formidable monarch, the anglicized from of whoe name was Ongentheow. In Old Norse this should be represented by a form like Angantyr. The Ynglinga Saga calls this king, Egill. The Swedes and Geats were natural enemies, and Hethcyn, king of the Geats, in answer to the onslaughts and ambuses of Ongentheow's sons, led a raid into Swedish territory and carried off Ongentheow's aged wife. The the Swede, 'old and terrible', gave pursuit, killed Hethcyn, and rescued the lady, though stripped of her ornaments of gold. The Geat survivors escaped to an unidentified Ravenswood, where he surrounded and through the night taunted them with a propsect of the gallows in the morning. But before first light they heard the warhorns of Hygelac, prince of Geats, as he came hastening along their bloody track with the chivalry of the Geats. Hygelac's warriors overran the Swedish entrenchments. Egill was killed in the battle. Egill was succeeded by his younger brother, Onela/Ali. [A History of the Vikings, pp. 33-37]
  King Egil was the son of Ane, and like his father, no warrior. Under his reign and that of his son, King Ottar, Sweden suffered a good deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat, or tribute, in return. [History of Sweden, p. 37]
   Reference Number: G6SZ-W1

---

   Note: Heimskringla or The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway
   Note: The Ynglinga Saga, or The Story of the Yngling Family from Odin to Halfdan the Black
   Note: 30. OF EGIL AND TUNNE.
  Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land,ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular andstrong in men. King Egil assemble dúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of  the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest,separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn." -------------------- Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others ofthe slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains,pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land, ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular and strong in men. King Egil assembled an army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him;and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, Separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull,and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound.The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up,and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull.The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal.Thjodolf sings of it thus:

"The fair-haired son of Odin's race,

Who fled before fierce Tunne's face,

Has perished by the demon-beast

Who roams the forests of the East.

The hero's breast met the full brunt

Of the wild bull's shaggy front;

The hero's heart's asunder torn

By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

--------------------

Ongentheow, (Anglo-Saxon Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish Angantyr) (– ca 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Anglo-Saxon sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. As will be shown below, it can be argued that they are based on the same person and the same events, but it should be noted that not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

In the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold. Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn, and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt. The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother, who arrived the next day with reinforcements. Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home.

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes. The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow. Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf. Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet, giving Ongentheow a death-blow. Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac. When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded, and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter. Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer.

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden:

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongentheow -------------------- Föredrog framför att strida att sitta hemma. Var ändå med om många strider och flydde till sist till Danmark där han fick stöd. Tre år senare stångades han av en tjur och avled.

15. EGIL - King in Svitjod until 456. Egil, like his father, preferred sitting at home to fighting, yet he engaged in many battles before fleeing to Denmark. Here he got the support he needed to recover his kingdom. Three years later Egil was gored by a bull and died. He was buried in a mound at Uppsala, Sweden, His son was:

16. OTTAR VENDELCROW - King in Svitjod who died in 460. -------------------- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Illustration by Gerhard Munthe (1899)Ongentheow (Old English: Ongenþeow, Ongenþio, Ongendþeow; Swedish: Angantyr) (died ca. 515) was the name of a semi-legendary Swedish king of the house of Scylfings, who appears in Old English sources. He is generally identified with the Swedish king Egil (also Swedish Egill, Eigil) who appears in Ynglingatal, Historia Norwegiae and in Ynglinga saga.[1][2][3][4]

The names are different and have little etymological connection. Ongenþeow would in Proto-Norse have been *Anganaþewaz, whereas Egil would have been *Agilaz. The reason why they are thought to have been the same is that they have the same position in the line of Swedish kings and are described as the fathers of Ohthere and grandfathers of Eadgils. For the argument that they are, in fact, the same figure, see below under "Interpretation." Further, not every scholar is open to the historicity of the characters in Beowulf, and in the Norse sagas.

Contents 1 Old English sources 2 Egil 3 Interpretation 4 Notes 5 Primary sources 6 Secondary sources


[edit] Old English sourcesIn the Old English epic Beowulf Ongentheow is described as a fearsome warrior and it took two warriors Eofor and Wulf Wonreding to take him down.

The epic tells that the Geats under their new king Hæþcyn captured the Swedish queen, but old king Ongenþeow saved her, at a hill fort called Hrefnesholt, although they lost her gold.[5] Ongentheow killed Hæþcyn,[6] and besieged the Geats at Hrefnesholt.[7] The Geats were, however, rescued by Hygelac, Hæþcyn's brother,[8] who arrived the next day with reinforcements.[9] Having lost the battle, but rescued his queen, Ongenþeow and his warriors returned home.[10]

However, the war was not over. Hygelac, the new king of the Geats, attacked the Swedes.[11] The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf fought together against the hoary king Ongenþeow.[12] Wulf hit Ongentheow's head with his sword so that the old king bled over his hair, but the king hit back and wounded Wulf.[13] Then, Eofor retaliated by cutting through the Swedish king's shield and through his helmet,[14] giving Ongentheow a death-blow.[15] Eofor took the Swedish king's helmet, sword and breastplate and carried them to Hygelac.[16] When they came home, Eofor and Wulf were richly awarded,[17] and Eofor was given Hygelac's daughter.[18] Because of this battle, Hygelac is referred to as Ongentheow's slayer.[19]

Ongentheow is also mentioned in passing by the earlier poem Widsith as the king of Sweden:

lines 30–33: Wald Woingum, Wod þyringum, Wald [ruled] the Woings, Wod the Thuringians, Sæferð Sycgum, Sweom Ongendþeow, Saeferth the Sycgs, the Swedes Ongendtheow, Sceafthere Ymbrum, Sceafa Longbeardum Sceafthere the Ymbers, Sceafa the Lombards, [edit] Egil Middle royal tumulus at Old Upsala, suggested grave of King Ongentheow/Egil (photo: Jacob Truedson Demitz)In Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók and in Historia Norwegiae, he was called Egil Vendelcrow (Vendilcraca/Vendilkráka, a name traditionally given to those living at the royal estate of Vendel in Sweden). Snorri Sturluson, however, gave the name Vendelcrow to Egil's son Ottar (Ohthere). In these sources, Egil was the son of Aun the Old, and like him, not very warlike. After he had made the thrall Tunni (or Tonne) responsible for the treasury, Tunni rebelled against Egil. They fought eight battles after which Egil fled to Denmark, according to the Ynglinga saga (Ynglingatal does not mention where he fled and Historia Norwegiae does not mention any escape at all). Snorri wrote that Fróði, the Danish king, aided Egil in defeating Tunni, and made Egil a tributary to the Danish king.

Egil was killed by a bull during the sacrifices at Gamla Uppsala.

Ok lofsæll ór landi fló Týs óttungr Tunna ríki, en flæming farra trjónu jötuns eykr á Agli rauð. Sás of austr áðan hafði brúna hörg of borinn lengi, en skíðlauss Skilfinga nið hœfis hjörr til hjarta stóð.[20][21] The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear

-------------------- Ongenþeow, Ongentheow, Ongendþeow, Egil, Egill, Eigil, or Angantyr. He was the son of Auchun and a king in Uppsala.

In Ari Frode's Íslendingabók and in Historia Norwegiae, he was called Egil Vendelcrow (Vendilcraca/Vendilkráka, a name traditionally given to those living at the royal estate of Vendel in Sweden). Snorri Sturluson, however, gave the name Vendelcrow to Egil's son Ottar (Ohþere). In these sources, Egil was the son of Aun the Old, and like him, not very warlike. After he had made the thrall Tunni (or Tonne) responsible for the treasury, Tunni rebelled against Egil. They fought eight battles after which Egil fled to Denmark, according to the Ynglinga saga (Ynglingatal does not mention where he fled and Historia Norwegiae does not mention any escape at all). Snorri wrote that Fródi, the Danish king, aided Egil in defeating Tunni, and made Egil a tributary to the Danish king.

Egil was killed by a bull during the sacrifices at the Temple at Uppsala. -------------------- BIOGRAFI:

Egil Vendilkråke var ein konge av Ynglingeætta, far til Ottar Vendilkråke og son av Aun den gamle. Namnet "Vendilkråke" er sett på Egil av Are Frode, medan Ynglingesoga berre kjenner til at sonen Ottar har bore namnet. Etter Are skulle Vendil vise til ein stad i Uppland i Sverige, der Ynglingekongane er hauglagde.

Det angelsaksiske kvædet Béowulf har ein hovding ved namn Ongentheow på same stad som Egil i ættelina over skilvingane/ynglingane. Dette har ført til ei drøfting av om desse to i røynda er same mannen, sjølv om grunnforteljingane er noko ulike. Prova for likskap finst i tolkinga av Ynglingatal, som moglegvis er tolka gale av nordmenn og islendingar, på grunnlag av austnordisk (svensk) norrøn dikting. Egil er den einaste i diktet som har nemninga "Skilving" knytt til seg. -------------------- OF EGIL AND TUNNE.


Egil was the name of On the Old's son, who succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death. He was no warrior, but sat quietly at home. Tunne was the name of a slave who had been the counsellor and treasurer of On the Old; and when On died Tunne took much treasure and buried it in the earth. Now when Egil became king he put Tunne among the other slaves, which he took very ill and ran away with others of the slaves. They dug up the treasures which Tunne had concealed, and he gave them to his men, and was made their chief. Afterwards many malefactors flocked to him; and they lay out in the woods, but sometimes fell upon the domains, pillaging and killing the people. When King Egil heard this he went out with his forces to pursue them; but one night when he had taken up his night quarters, Tunne came there with his men, fell on the king's men unexpectedly, and killed many of them. As soon as King Egil perceived the tumult, he prepared for defence, and set up his banner; but many people deserted him, because Tunne and his men attacked them so boldly, and King Egil saw that nothing was left but to fly. Tunne pursued the fugitives into the forest, and then returned to the inhabited land, ravaging and plundering without resistance. All the goods that fell into Tunne's hands he gave to his people, and thus became popular and strong in men. King Egil assembledúan army again, and hastened to give battle to Tunne. But Tunne was again victorious, and King Egil fled with the loss of many people. Egil and Tunne had eight battles with each other, and Tunne always gained the victory. Then King Egil fled out of the country, and went to Sealand in Denmark, to Frode the Bold, and promised him a scatt from the Swedes to obtain help. Frode gave him an army, and also his champions, with which force King Egil repaired to Sweden. When Tunne heard this he came out to meet him; and there was a great battle, in which Tunne fell, and King Egil recovered his kingdom, and the Danes returned home. King Egil sent King Frode great and good presents every year, but he paid no scatt to the Danes; but notwithstanding, the friendship between Egil and Frode continued without interruption. After Tunne's fall, Egil ruled the kingdom for three years. It happened in Sweden that an old bull, which was destined for sacrifice, was fed so high that he became dangerous to people; and when they were going to lay hold of him he escaped into the woods, became furious, and was long in the forest committing great damage to the country. King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: --


"The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn."

•**********************

Events in the life of Egill Aunnsson


† death 1 . ·King Egil was a great hunter, and often rode into the forest to chase wild animals. Once he rode out with his men to hunt in the forest. The king had traced an animal a long while, and followed it in the forest, separated from all his men. He observed at last that it was the bull, and rode up to it to kill it. The bull turned round suddenly, and the king struck him with his spear; but it tore itself out of the wound. The bull now struck his horn in the side of the horse, so that he instantly fell flat on the earth with the king. The king sprang up, and was drawing his sword, when the bull struck his horns right into the king's breast. The king's men then came up and killed the bull. The king lived but a short time, and was buried in a mound at Upsal. Thjodolf sings of it thus: -- "The fair-haired son of Odin's race, Who fled before fierce Tunne's face, Has perished by the demon-beast Who roams the forests of the East. The hero's breast met the full brunt Of the wild bull's shaggy front; The hero's heart's asunder torn By the fell Jotun's spear-like horn." event 1 . ·succeeded as king in Sweden after his father's death event 1 . ·no warrior, but sat quietly at home event 1 . ·rebelled against by a slave of his late father's named Tunne, who'd taken Aunn's treasure and buried it, and when Egil withheld the respect he felt he'd deserved, he unearthed the treasure and used it to gather about him men to pillage and maraud King Egil's lands, and Tunne won every battle they fought and eventually forced Egil to flee to Denmark event 1 . ·assisted against the usurper Tunne by King Frode the Bold of Denmark, who provided men, in exchange for the promise of a tax from Egil, and Egil therewith recovered Uppsala event 1 . ·did not fulfill his promise of paying tax to Frode, but managed to remain friends with the king


-------------------- Död: omkring 515 Gamla Uppsala

Noteringar Sveakonung i G:a Uppsala i början av 500-talet. Son till Ane den gamle. Han var ingen härman utan styrde i fred. Han hade en träl vid namn Tunne som varit hans fars skattväktare, men när Egil kom till makten fick Tunne återgå till de andra trälarna. Innan dess hade Tunne stulit en del av kung Anes lösöre och grävt ner det. Nu flydde han tillsammans med flera andra trälar, grävde upp skatten och delade den bland sina män. De gjorde honom till sin hövding och han samlade allsköns dåligt folk omkring sig. De rånade, plundrade och dräpte och allt bytet delade han ut bland sina män. Kung Egil tog upp kampen mot Tunne. Det blev en bitter strid och kung Egil blev tvungen att fly. Egil samlade en här och gick till slag mot Tunne. Det blev åtta hårda strider och kung Egil förlorade dem alla. Efter detta flydde Egil landet, ner till kung Frode den djärve på Själland. Han lovade Frode svearnas skatt om de hjälpte honom bli av med Tunne. När Egil kom hem hade han en stor här av kung Frodes män och envigskämpar med sig. Det blev ett väldigt slag där Tunne äntligen stupade. Egil återtog sitt rike och Frodes män åteervände hem. Efter det sände Egil stora gåvor till Frode vartenda år, men han gäldade ingen skatt som han hade lovat. Trots det höll vänskapen i sig. Efter Tunnes död regerade Egil ytterligare tre år men sedan hände det sig att en tjur som skulle blotas hade blivit alldeles folkilsken och rymde till skogs. Kung Egil som var en stor jägare mötte tjuren i skogen under en jakt och försökte dräpa den. Kungen bröt sitt spjut mot tjuren, tjuren välte kungens häst, kungen drog svärd men tjuren rände hornen i bröstet på honom. Kungens män lyckades till sist dräpa tjuren men kungen dog av sina sår. Höglades i G:a Uppsala, troligen i den sk Frejshögen (mellan Auns högen i söder och Adils hög i norr). Utgrävningar där visade på bålrester från 520-talet.

-------------------- Notes for Egil Aunson Slåss mot en som heter Tunne 8 ganger og Tunne seiret alltid.

Egil Tunnadogli. Under ham rømte en Træl ved Navn Tunne bort med Anes Skatter, og samlede ved dette Middel en Hob Trælle og løst Pak, som hærjede Landet. Egil, som fleregange angreb ham, og derved altid blev slagen, maatte tage sin Tilflugt til Kong Frode i Danmark. Tunne blev omsider slagen og dræbt, og Egil sendte siden Skat til Danskekongen for hans Hjælp. Han stangedes ihjel paa en Jagt af en løssluppen Offertyr. -------------------- Battled 9 times with father's ex-slave, Tunni, and finally killed Tunni with help of others. Died by being gored by a bull that first gored his horse


Not much of a warrior -- a bad thing for a Viking. Had to have help from the Danish King Frode to subdue a revolt of one of his subjects. [WBH - Sweden]


FOSTER, MINOR, BURR, WAITE, NEWLIN LINES


!Soon after the 6th century opened the Swedes of Uppland were ruled by an aged but formidable monarch, the anglicized from of whoe name was Ongentheow. In Old Norse this should be represented by a form like Angantyr. The Ynglinga Saga calls this king, Egill. The Swedes and Geats were natural enemies, and Hethcyn, king of the Geats, in answer to the onslaughts and ambuses of Ongentheow's sons, led a raid into Swedish territory and carried off Ongentheow's aged wife. The the Swede, 'old and terrible', gave pursuit, killed Hethcyn, and rescued the lady, though stripped of her ornaments of gold. The Geat survivors escaped to an unidentified Ravenswood, where he surrounded and through the night taunted them with a propsect of the gallows in the morning. But before first light they heard the warhorns of Hygelac, prince of Geats, as he came hastening along their bloody track with the chivalry of the Geats. Hygelac's warriors overran the Swedish entrenchments. Egill was killed in the battle. Egill was succeeded by his younger brother, Onela/Ali. [A History of the Vikings, pp. 33-37]


King Egil was the son of Ane, and like his father, no warrior. Under his reign and that of his son, King Ottar, Sweden suffered a good deal of trouble from Denmark. The Danish King Frode had helped Egil against the revolt of one of his subjects, and demanded from his son a scat, or tribute, in return. [History of Sweden, p. 37]

1.Reference Number: G6SZ-W1

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-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ongen%C3%BEeow

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Egil "Tunnadolg Vendikraka" Anunsson's Timeline

530
530
Uppsala, Svithiod, Sweden
530
Sweden
550
550
Age 20
Of, , , Sweden
551
551
Age 21
Sweden
553
553
Age 23
Sweden
590
590
Age 60
Svitjod, Sweden

Killed in battle by The Geatish warriors Eofor and Wulf

1923
May 28, 1923
Age 60
May 28, 1923
Age 60
May 28, 1923
Age 60
1928
April 23, 1928
Age 60