Eirik Haakonsson Ladejarl, "Konge" av Norge

public profile

Is your surname Håkonson Jarl?

Research the Håkonson Jarl family

Eirik Haakonsson Ladejarl, "Konge" av Norge's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Eirik Haakonson Håkonson Jarl (Ladejarl), Jarl

Nicknames: "Eiríkr Hákonarson af Hladir", "Erik Haakonsen", "Eirik Håkonsson Ladejarl", ""King" of Norway", "Erik Jarl"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Trondheim, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway
Death: Died in Somerset, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Haakon II Den Mektige Sigurdson, Jarl and Tora þóra Skagesdotter (Skagadóttir)
Husband of Gyda Svendsdatter
Father of Håkon Eirikson Ladejarl
Brother of Svein Håkonsson Ladejarl, Kung af Danmark and Norway; Sigrid Haakonsdatter; Oda Haakonsdatter; Bergljot Haakonsdtr. Tambarskjelve; Heming Haakonsson and 3 others
Half brother of Ingebjørg Håkonsdotter Lade; Aud Haakonsdatter; Erlend Håkonson Lade; Ragnhild Håkonsdatter Lade, wife of Eiliv; Sigurd Hakonsson and 5 others

Occupation: Jarl, Konge ca. 1000 - 1014, Jarl av Northumbria, jarl, Jarl af Lade, Jarl / Konge i Norge, Earl of Hlathir, @occu00512@, Svolder-segrare, Riksföreståndare, Jarl af Noregi, Jarl (Ladejarl), King of Norway
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Eirik Haakonsson Ladejarl, "Konge" av Norge

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eir%C3%ADkr_H%C3%A1konarson

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eirik_H%C3%A5konsson

Eiríkr Hákonarson or Eric of Norway or Eric of Hlathir[1] (960s – 1020s) was earl of Lade, ruler of Norway and earl of Northumbria. He was the bastard eldest son of earl Hákon Sigurðarson, and brother of the legendary Aud Haakonsdottir of Lade. He participated in the Battle of Hjörungavágr, the Battle of Svolder and the conquest of England.

Sources

The most important historical sources on Eric are the 12th and 13th century kings' sagas, including Heimskringla, Fagrskinna, Ágrip, Knýtlinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, the Legendary Saga of St. Olaf and the works of Oddr Snorrason and Theodoricus monachus. The Anglo-Saxon sources are scant but valuable as they represent contemporary evidence. The most important are the 11th century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Encomium Emmae but Eric is also mentioned by the 12th century historians Florence of Worcester, William of Malmesbury and Henry of Huntingdon.

A significant amount of poetry by Eric's skalds is preserved in the kings' sagas and represents contemporary evidence. The most important are the Bandadrápa of Eyjólfr dáðaskáld and the works of Halldórr ókristni and Þórðr Kolbeinsson. Other skalds known to have composed on Eric are Hallfreðr vandræðaskáld, Gunnlaugr ormstunga, Hrafn

Youth

The principal sources on Eric's youth are Fagrskinna and Heimskringla. They relate that Eric was the son of Hákon Sigurðarson and a woman of low birth whom Hákon bedded during a sojourn in Uppland.[2] Hákon cared little for the boy and gave him to a friend of his to raise.[3] On one occasion when Eric was eleven or twelve years old he and his foster father had harboured their ship right next to earl Hákon. Then Hákon's closest friend, Skopti, arrived and asked Eric to move away so that he could harbour next to Hákon as he was used to. When Eric refused, Hákon was infuriated by the boy's pride and sternly ordered him away. Humiliated, Eric had no choice but to obey. In the following winter he avenged the humiliation by chasing down Skopti's ship and killing him. This was Eric's first exploit, as commemorated by his skald Eyjólfr dáðaskáld who mentions the incident in his Bandadrápa.[4]

The sagas say that after killing Skopti, Eric sailed south to Denmark where he was received by king Harald Bluetooth. After a winter's stay in Denmark, Harald granted Eric earldom over Romerike and Vingulmark - areas in the south of Norway long under Danish influence. In Heimskringla this information is supported with a somewhat vague verse from Bandadrápa.

Battle of Hjörungavágr

The Battle of Hjörungavágr was Eric's first major confrontation. The battle was a semi-legendary naval battle that took place in the late 10th century between the earls of Lade and a Danish invasion fleet. The battle is described in the Norse kings' sagas—such as Heimskringla—as well as in Jómsvíkinga saga and Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum. Those late literary accounts are fanciful but historians believe that they contain a kernel of truth. Some contemporary skaldic poetry alludes to the battle, including verses by Þórðr Kolbeinsson and Tindr Hallkelsson. According to Heimskringla, Eric, apparently reconciled with his father, commanded 60 ships in the battle and emerged victorious. After the battle he gave quarter to many of the Jomsvikings, including Vagn Ákason.

In 995, as Óláfr Tryggvason seized power in Norway, Eric was forced into exile in Sweden.[12] He allied himself with Olof of Sweden and Sweyn Forkbeard whose daughter, Gyða, he married. Using Sweden as his base he launched a series of raiding expeditions into the east. Harrying the lands of king Vladimir I of Kiev, Eric looted and burned down the town of Staraya Ladoga (Old Norse Aldeigja). There are no written continental sources to confirm or refute this but in the 1980s, Soviet archaeologists unearthed evidence which showed a burning of Ladoga in the late 10th century.[13]

Eric also plundered in western Estonia (ON Aðalsýsla) and the island of Saaremaa (ON Eysýsla). According to the Fagrskinna summary of Bandadrápa he fought vikings in the Baltic and raided Östergötland during the same time.[14]

Battle of Svolder

In the Battle of Svolder in 1000, Eric, Sweyn and Olof, ambushed king Óláfr Tryggvason by the island of Svolder. The place cannot now be identified, as the formation of the Baltic coast has been much modified in the course of subsequent centuries. Svolder was an island probably on the North German coast, near Rügen.

During the summer, Olaf had been in the eastern Baltic. The allies lay in wait for him at the island of Svolder on his way home. The Norwegian king had with him seventy-one vessels, but part of them belonged to an associate, Jarl Sigvaldi, a chief of the Jomsvikings, who was an agent of his enemies, and who deserted him. Olaf's own ships went past the anchorage of Eric and his allies in a long column without order, as no attack was expected. The king was in the rear of the whole of his best vessels. The allies allowed the bulk of the Norwegian ships to pass, and then stood out to attack Olaf.

Olaf refused to flee, and turned to give battle with the eleven ships immediately about him. The disposition adopted was one which is found recurring in many sea-fights of the Middle Ages where a fleet had to fight on the defensive. Olaf lashed his ships side to side, his own, the Long Serpent, the finest war-vessel as yet built in the north, being in the middle of the line, where her bows projected beyond the others. The advantage of this arrangement was that it left all hands free to fight, a barrier could be formed with the oars and yards, and the enemy's chance of making use of his superior numbers to attack on both sides would be, as far as possible, limited — a great point when all fighting was with the sword, or with such feeble missile weapons as bows and javelins. Olaf, in fact, turned his eleven ships into a floating fort.

The Norse writers, who are the main authorities, gave all the credit to the Norwegians, and according to them all the intelligence of Olaf's enemies, and most of their valour, were to be found in Eric. They say that the Danes and Swedes rushed at the front of Olaf's line without success. Eric attacked the flank. His vessel, the Iron Ram (ON Járnbarðinn), was "bearded", that is to say, strengthened across the bows by bands of iron, and he forced her between the last and last but one of Olaf's line. In this way the Norwegian ships were carried one by one, till the Long Serpent alone was left. At last she too was overpowered. Olaf leapt into the sea holding his shield edgeways, so that he sank at once and the weight of his hauberk dragged him down.

Eric captured Olaf's ship, the Long Serpent, and steered it from the battle, an event dwelled upon by his court poet Halldórr ókristni.

Rule of Norway

After the Battle of Svolder, Eric ruled the area marked purple on the map. The yellow area was held by his half-brother, Sveinn, in trust for the Swedish king while the red area was under direct control of the king of Denmark.

After the battle of Svolder, Eric became, together with his brother Sveinn Hákonarson, governor of Norway under Sweyn Forkbeard from 1000 to 1012. Eric's son, Hákon Eiríksson, continued in this position to 1015. Eric and Sveinn consolidated their rule by marrying their sister Bergljót to Einarr Þambarskelfir, gaining a valuable advisor and ally.

Fagrskinna relates that "there was good peace at this time and very prosperous seasons. The jarls maintained the laws well and were stern in punishing offences."[15]

During his rule of Norway, Eric's only serious rival was Erlingr Skjálgsson. Too powerful and cautious to touch but not powerful enough to seek open confrontation he maintained an uneasy peace and alliance with the earls throughout their rule.

According to Grettis saga, Eric forbade duelling by law and exiled berserks shortly before his expedition to England.[16]

Religion

According to Theodoricus monachus, Eric pledged to adopt Christianity if he emerged victorious from the battle of Svolder.[17] Oddr Snorrason's Óláfs saga Tryggvasonar has a more elaborate version of the story[18] where Eric replaces an image of Thor on the prow of his ship with a Christian cross. There is no skaldic poetry to substantiate this but most of the sagas agree that Eric and Sveinn adopted Christianity, at least formally. Fagrskinna says:

"These jarls had had themselves baptised, and remained Christian, but they forced no man to Christianity, but allowed each to do as he wished, and in their day Christianity was greatly harmed, so that throughout Upplönd and in over Þrándheimr almost everything was heathen, though Christianity was maintained along the coast."[15]

Adopting Christianity was no doubt a politically advantageous move for the earls since they were allied with the Christian rulers of Sweden and Denmark. Instituting freedom of religion was also a shrewd political move after Óláfr Tryggvason's violent missionary activity. Eric's religious conviction as a Christian was probably not strong.[19] While the court poets of Eric's rivals, Óláfr Tryggvason and Óláfr Haraldsson, censored heathen kennings from their poetry and praised their lord as a Christian ruler, all surviving court poetry devoted to Eric is entirely traditional.[20] The Bandadrápa, composed sometime after 1000, is explicitly pagan - its refrain says that Eric conquers lands according to the will of the heathen gods. Even the poetry of Þórðr Kolbeinsson, composed no earlier than 1016, has no indication of Christian influence. According to Historia Norwegiae and Ágrip, Eiríkr actively worked to uproot Christianity in Norway[21] but this is not corroborated by other sources.

Conquest of England

In 1014 or 1015, Eric left Norway and joined Canute the Great for his campaign in England. Judging from Þórðr Kolbeinsson's Eiríksdrápa their fleets met off the English coast (in 1015) but the chronology of the various sources is difficult to reconcile and some scholars prefer placing their meeting in 1014 in Denmark.[22] At that time Canute was young and inexperienced but Eric was "an experienced warrior of tested intelligence and fortune" (Fagrskinna)[15] and, in the opinion of Frank Stenton, "the best adviser that could have been found for a young prince setting out on a career of conquest".[23]

The Scandinavian invasion fleet landed at Sandwich in midsummer 1015 where it met little resistance. Canute's forces moved into Wessex and plundered in Dorset, Wiltshire and Somerset. Alderman Eadric Streona assembled an English force of 40 ships and submitted to Canute.[24] The Encomium Emmae is the only English source which gives any information on Eric's actions at this time but its account of his supposed independent raids is vague and does not fit well with other sources.[25]

In early1016, the Scandinavian army moved over the Thames into Mercia, plundering as it went. Prince Edmund attempted to muster an army to resist the invasion but his efforts were not successful and Canute's forces continued unhindered into Northumbria where Uhtred the Bold, earl of Northumbria, was murdered.[26] The great north English earldom was given by Canute to Eric after he had won control of the north. After conquering Northumbria the invading army turned south again towards London. Before they arrived King Ethelred the Unready died (on April 23) and Prince Edmund was chosen king.[27]

Following Ethelred's death the Scandinavian forces besieged London. According to the Encomium Emmae the siege was overseen by Eric and this may well be accurate.[28] The Legendary Saga of St. Olaf indicates that Eric was present at the siege of London[29] and a verse by Þórðr says that Eric fought a "west of London" with Ulfcytel Snillingr .

After several battles, Canute and Edmund reached an agreement to divide the kingdom but Edmund died a few months later. And in 1017 Canute was undisputed king of all England. He divided the kingdom into four parts; Wessex he kept for himself, East-Anglia he gave to Thorkell, Northumbria to Eric and Mercia to Eadric. Later the same year Canute had Eadric executed as a traitor. According to the Encomium Emmae he ordered Eric to "pay this man what we owe him" and he chopped off his head with his axe.[30]

Eric remained as earl of Northumbria until his death. His earlship is primarily notable in that it is never recorded that he ever fought with the Scots or the Britons of Strathclyde, who were usually constantly threatening Northumbria. Eric is not mentioned in English documents after 1023. According to English sources[31] he was exiled by Canute and returned to Norway. This is very unlikely as there are no Norse records of his supposed return. Eric's successor as earl, Siward, cannot be confirmed as being earl of Northumbria until 1033 so Eric's death can not strictly be placed more precisely than between 1023 and 1033. According to the Norse sources he died of a hemorrhage after having his uvula cut (a procedure in medieval medicine) either just before or just after a pilgrimage to Rome.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eirik_H%C3%A5konsson_Ladejarl

Eirik Håkonsson Ladejarl (født 957, død 1024) var jarl på Lade for Trøndelag og Hålogaland (ca 995–1012), hersker av Norge ved å anerkjenne danskekongens overherredømme (1000–1012), og jarl av Northumbria (1016–1023). Eirik Ladejarl var uekte sønn av Håkon Sigurdsson, også Ladejarl og ubestridt hersker av Norge. Eirik deltok i to store slag som var avgjørende for Norgeshistorien og han gikk seirende ut av begge: slaget ved Hjørungavåg (986) og slaget ved Svolder (1000). Eirik var også en hersker som anerkjente og støttet skaldekunsten.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eirik_H%C3%A5konsson

Kildene

Eirik Håkonsson, norrønt Eiríkr Hákonarson, ble nevnt som Eric av Hlathir, det vil si som Eirik av Norge, i England. I engelske charter er han oppført som vitne med skrivemåten Yric dux, men ble også referert til som Yric, Yrric, Iric, Eiric og Eric i latinske og gammelengelske kilder.

De viktigste skriftlige kildene om Eirik Ladejarl er de islandske og norske kongesagaer fra 1100- og 1200-tallet, deriblant Snorre Sturlassons Heimskringla, Fagrskinna, Ågrip, Knýtlinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Den legendariske saga om Olav den hellige, og skrifter av Odd Snorresson og Theodoricus monachus. De angelsaksiske kildene er knappe og sparsommelige, men verdifulle ettersom de representerer samtidige vitnebevis. Den mest betydningsfulle er Den angelsaksiske krønike og Encomium Emmae. I tillegg blir Eirik Ladejarl nevnt av historikere fra 1100-tallet som Florence av Worcester, William av Malmesbury, og Henry av Huntingdon.

En betydelig mengde skaldekvad og dikt av Eiriks skalder er bevart i kongesagaene og representerer samtidige vitnebevis. De mest betydningsfulle er drottekvadet Bandadråpa av Eyjolv Dådaskald, og kvad av Halldor Ukristne og Tord Kolbeinsson. Eirik hadde også Hallfred Vandrædaskald, Gunnlaug Ormstunge, Ravn Onundsson (Hrafn Önundarson), Skule Torsteinsson og Tord Sjåreksson som diktet for ham.

Fagrskinna og Heimskringla skriver om Eiriks ungdomsår og forteller at han var sønn av Håkon Sigurdsson og ei kvinne av lav ætt som Håkon gikk til sengs med under et opphold i Oppland. I henhold til Fagrskinna var Håkon 15 år gammel, og som vanlig var lot jarlen gutten bli fostret hos Torleiv Spake i Meldal. Snorre Sturlasson forteller i Håkon jarls saga (side 113) at Eirik vokste opp og ble tidlig en kjekk kar, vakker å se til, og stor og sterk, men faren brydde seg lite om sønnen . --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Eirik Håkonsson Regjeringstid: 1000 - 1012 Født: 957 Død: 1024 Foreldre: Håkon Ladejarl og Tora Skagesdatter Ektefelle‍(r): Gyda Sveinsdatter Barn: Håkon Eiriksson Ladejarl

Eirik Håkonsson Ladejarl (født 957, død 1024) var jarl på Lade for Trøndelag og Hålogaland (ca 995–1012), hersker av Norge ved å anerkjenne danskekongens overherredømme (1000–1012), og jarl av Northumbria (1016–1023). Eirik Ladejarl var uekte sønn av Håkon Sigurdsson, også Ladejarl og ubestridt hersker av Norge. Eirik deltok i to store slag som var avgjørende for Norgeshistorien og han gikk seirende ut av begge: slaget ved Hjørungavåg (986) og slaget ved Svolder (1000). Eirik var også en hersker som anerkjente og støttet skaldekunsten.

Innhold [skjul] 1 Kildene 2 Eiriks ungdom 3 Slaget ved Hjørungavåg 4 Herjing i Østersjøen 5 Slaget ved Svolder 6 Hersker av Norge 7 Religion 8 Erobringen av England 9 Siste år 10 Referanser 11 Litteratur

[rediger] Kildene Eirik Håkonsson, norrønt Eiríkr Hákonarson, ble nevnt som Eric av Hlathir, det vil si som Eirik av Norge, i England. I engelske charter er han oppført som vitne med skrivemåten Yric dux, men ble også referert til som Yric, Yrric, Iric, Eiric og Eric i latinske og gammelengelske kilder.

De viktigste skriftlige kildene om Eirik Ladejarl er de islandske og norske kongesagaer fra 1100- og 1200-tallet, deriblant Snorre Sturlassons Heimskringla, Fagrskinna, Ågrip, Knýtlinga saga, Historia Norvegiæ, Den legendariske saga om Olav den hellige, og skrifter av Odd Snorresson og Theodoricus monachus. De angelsaksiske kildene er knappe og sparsommelige, men verdifulle ettersom de representerer samtidige vitnebevis. Den mest betydningsfulle er Den angelsaksiske krønike og Encomium Emmae. I tillegg blir Eirik Ladejarl nevnt av historikere fra 1100-tallet som Florence av Worcester, William av Malmesbury, og Henry av Huntingdon.

En betydelig mengde skaldekvad og dikt av Eiriks skalder er bevart i kongesagaene og representerer samtidige vitnebevis. De mest betydningsfulle er drottekvadet Bandadråpa av Eyjolv Dådaskald, og kvad av Halldor Ukristne og Tord Kolbeinsson. Eirik hadde også Hallfred Vandrædaskald, Gunnlaug Ormstunge, Ravn Onundsson (Hrafn Önundarson), Skule Torsteinsson og Tord Sjåreksson som diktet for ham.

[rediger] Eiriks ungdom Fagrskinna og Heimskringla skriver om Eiriks ungdomsår og forteller at han var sønn av Håkon Sigurdsson og ei kvinne av lav ætt som Håkon gikk til sengs med under et opphold i Oppland. I henhold til Fagrskinna var Håkon 15 år gammel, og som vanlig var lot jarlen gutten bli fostret hos Torleiv Spake i Meldal. Snorre Sturlasson forteller i Håkon jarls saga (side 113) at Eirik vokste opp og ble tidlig en kjekk kar, vakker å se til, og stor og sterk, men faren brydde seg lite om sønnen.

Håkon jarl giftet seg med ei datter til Skage Toftesson og han giftet sin egen datter bort til dennes sønn, Skofte Skagesson. Det ble tett vennskap mellom disse ættene, og det fortelles om en hendelse da Eirik var 11-12 år. Han og fosterfaren har lagt sitt skip nærmest Håkon jarls. Når så Skofte kommer ber han Eirik flytte sitt skip slik at han kan ankre nærmest jarlen slik han var vant til, noe Eirik nekter. Når Håkon jarl hører dette blir han rasende over sønnens stolthet og gir ham ordre om øyeblikkelig å flytte seg. Ydmyket har Eirik ikke noe valg, men neste vår får han et skip med 30 roere av fosterfaren. Han seiler til Møre, finner Skofte, legger til kamp og Skofte faller. Dette var den første gangen Eirik setter spor etter seg, og ble senere minnet av skalden Eyjolv Dådaskald i hans Bandadråpa:

Hard og mektig lot hersen segne i striden. en gullrik herre tapte livet før han trodde. Han steig, stålsatte, aldri fra en som slår på skjoldet, før han var død og stille. Han seirer ved guders vilje. Sagaen forteller at etter at Skofte er drept seiler Eirik sørover til Danmark hvor han blir mottatt av kong Harald Blåtann. Etter å ha blitt vinteren over hos danskekongen gir Harald Håkon jarls sønn et jarldømme over Ringerike og Vingulmark (Osloområdet), områder i sørøstlige Norge som skattet til Danmark i bytte for en viss uavhengighet. Dette viser at til tross for Eiriks ungdom, at han var en frillesønn og heller ikke sto på god fot med faren, hadde han posisjon i kraft av farsætten. Han var ikke hvem som helst.

[rediger] Slaget ved Hjørungavåg

Uværet i Hjørungavåg.Slaget ved Hjørungavåg var Eirik Håkonssons første betydelig konfrontasjon. Slaget var av like deler historisk som legendarisk betydning på slutten av 900-tallet mellom jarlene på Lade og en dansk invasjonsstyrke. Slaget var mer enn en strid mellom høvdinger og konger. Det var første gang Norge som nasjon verget seg mot dansk invasjon og dominans. Slaget er blitt beskrevet i de norske kongesagaene, først og fremst Heimskringla, foruten også Jomsvikingenes saga og Saxo Grammaticus' Gesta Danorum. Disse sene litterære opptegnelsene er fantasifulle, men historikerne mener at de inneholder en kjerne av sannhet, noe som blir bekreftet av skaldekvadene som omtaler slaget, blant annet av Tord Kolbeinsson og Tind Hallkjellsson.

I henhold til Snorre Sturlasson hadde Eirik tilsynelatende kommet til forsoning med faren og var til stede ved slaget som kommandant. Han ledet seksti skip og var seierrik til tross for at danskene, støttet av de fryktede jomsvikingene, hadde større skip, men et fryktelig uvær ga fordeler til nordmennene. Etter slaget ga Eirik grid til mange av jomsvikingene, blant annet Vagn Åkesson. Det siste til stor misnøye for Håkon jarl, men griden viste Eiriks storsinn og selvhevdelse.

[rediger] Herjing i Østersjøen

Festningen i Ladoga ble opprinnelig bygget i middelalderen.I 995 kommer Olav Tryggvason til Norge og griper makten. Håkon jarl blir sviktet av trønderne og blir drept, mens Eirik Håkonsson blir tvunget til landflyktighet i Sverige. Han går i allianse med Olof Skötkonung av Sverige og Svein Tjugeskjegg av Danmark. Danskekongen lar Eirik bli gift med sin datter Gyda Sveinsdatter, noe som igjen understreker Eiriks posisjon. Han tilhører Ladejarlætten, den gamle ætten fra Hålogaland og fremste ætten med krav til Norges trone ved siden av Hårfagreætten som Olav Tryggvason tilhørte.

Med Sverige som base gjør Eirik flere hærtokt mot øst. Han herjer landområdene til kong Vladimir I av Kiev, røver, herjer og brenner ned byen som på norrønt ble kalt for «Aldeigja», og som i dag heter Staraya Ladoga. Det er ingen skrevne kilder fra kontinentet som bekrefter eller avkrefter dette angrepet, men russiske arkeologiske undersøkelser på 1980-tallet viser bevis på at byen ble brent en gang sent på 900-tallet. [1]

Eirik plyndret også i vestlige Estland, norrønt Aðalsýsla, og øya Saaremaa, norrønt Eysýsla. I henhold til Fagrskinnas sammendrag av Bandadråpa kjempet han mot vikinger i Østersjøen og gjorde landgang i Østergøtland på denne tiden, som ikke desto mindre var Olof Skötkonungs område. Hensikten var åpenbart å skaffe seg en formue lik Olav Tryggvason hadde gjort i England tidligere, en formue som kunne benyttes til å bygge opp en hær som kunne settes inn mot Olav Tryggvason.

[rediger] Slaget ved Svolder

Eiriks seier i slaget ved Svolder var hans mest feirede dåd. «Slaget ved Svolder» (1883), Otto Sinding.I slaget ved Svolder i år 1000, kanskje et sted i nærheten av Øresund, var svenskekongen, danskekongen og ikke minst Eirik Håkonsson klar til å ta imot Olav Tryggvason. I løpet av sommeren hadde kong Olav vært i den baltiske regionen, sannsynligvis i dagens Polen, og, i henhold til Snorre, for å hentet hjem rikdommer som tilhørte hans hustru Tyra Haraldsdatter. Han hadde med seg mange skip, men flere av dem tilhørte den svikefulle Sigvalde jarl, høvding for Jomsvikingene, som lurte den norske kongen i en felle. Olavs skip passerte i en lang rekke ankerplassen til den kombinerte hæren til Olof Skötkonung, Svein Tjugeskjegg og Eirik Håkonsson som lå på lur. Kong Olav stolte på Sigvalde jarl, ventet intet angrep og seilte selv helt sist i det største skipet «Ormen Lange». Den allierte hæren lot mesteparten av de norske skipene passere før de seilte ut og angrep kong Olav.

Olav Tryggvason kunne ha flyktet, men valgte å bli. For sagaforfatterne er det vel så mye ære i strålende nederlag som i seier (jfr. Vagn Åkesson). Han bant sammen sine 11 gjenværende skip til en flytende festning med «Ormen Lange» innerst og de andre utover i en lang rekke.

De islandske og norske forfatterne, som har gitt detaljer om slaget, gir all ære til de nordmennene som kjempet for Eirik Håkonsson, men også til de nordmenn som kjempet for Olav Tryggvason. Både svenskene som danskene kastet seg mot Olav Tryggvason og ble øyeblikkelig slengt tilbake. Eirik Håkonsson viste seg som strateg ved å gå metodisk til verks. Han angrep det ytterste skipet først, ryddet dette, kappet det løs og deretter det neste. De overlevende trakk seg innover helt til kun «Ormen Lange» var igjen, bemannet av trette og sårete menn. Til slutt var også «Ormen Lange» overmannet, Olav Tryggvason kastet seg over bord og ble aldri sett igjen.

Eirik Håkonsson sto igjen, akkurat som i slaget ved Hjørungavåg, som seierherren. Med det erobrete «Ormen Lange» kunne han, slik hans skald Halldor Ukristne har kvedet, seile fra kampplassen.

[rediger] Hersker av Norge Etter slaget ved Svolder ble Eirik, sammen med sin halvbror Svein Håkonsson, hersker av Norge fra 1000 til 1012. Norge var formelt under kong Svein Tjugeskjegg, og Snorre Sturlasson som Hårfagreættens egen propagandist understreker at Eirik aldri tok kongsnavn. I prinsippet var han likevel «konge» av Norge ettersom han styrte som en.

Svein Tjugeskjeggs overherredømme av Norge skal ikke overdrives. I beste fall sendte Eirik gjæve gaver til danskekongen og aksepterte at hans lojalitet lå hos denne, men store deler av Norge ble styrt uavhengig av Danmark, spesielt de områdene som Eirik selv rådde over, hvilket antagelig tilsvarte de samme områdene som Harald Hårfagre i sin tid rådde over. I henhold til Snorre var forholdene for folk flest bedre under Eirik Håkonsson enn under det voldsstyret som Olav Tryggvason hadde utøvet i sine knappe fem år som konge, akkurat som det hadde vært under Håkon jarl: «gode år i landet og god fred for bøndene innenlands».

Snorre sier om Håkon jarls sønner at: [2]

Eirik og Svein jarl lot seg døpe begge to og tok den rette tro, men så lenge de rådde for Norge, lot de hver mann gjøre som han sjøl ville med å holde kristendommen. Sjøl holdt de godt de gamle lovene og landsens skikk og bruk, og de var vennesæle menn og styrte godt. Det var støtt Eirik jarl som var den første av brødrene i alt som hadde med styringen å gjøre. Eiriks sønn med Gyda, Håkon Eiriksson, fortsatte farens posisjon fram til 1015 da Olav Haraldsson kom til landet. Eirik og Svein befestet sitt styre med å la deres søster Bergljot Håkonsdatter gifte seg med den mektige Einar Tambarskjelve, som hadde kjempet sammen Olav Tryggvason ved Svolder, og fikk således en betydningsfull rådgiver og alliert.

I løpet av den tiden som Eirik styrte Norge var hans eneste seriøse rival den mektige «Rygekongen» Erling Skjalgsson på Jæren som var gift med Olav Tryggvasons søster Astrid Tryggvesdatter. Erling var altfor mektig til selv å bli rørt, men ikke mektig nok til at han gikk til åpen konfrontasjon mot brødrene. På samme måte som brødrene var formelt under danskekongen var Erling formelt under brødrene, men styrte stort sett på egen vegne over sine egne områder. Da Svein Håkonsson i brorens fravær samlet tropper for å møte Olav Haraldsson i slaget ved Nesjar var likevel Erling en av de som stilte opp og kjempet sammen med Ladejarlen.

I henhold til Grettes saga forbød Eirik holmgang og duell ved lov og landsforviste berserker fra riket kort tid før han seilte til England. [3]

[rediger] Religion Olav Tryggvason var misjonskongen, men kampen mot kongen var ikke en kamp mot kristendommen. I henhold til Snorre Sturlasson var Eirik Håkonsson en realpolitiker med et pragmatisk syn på religion, i motsetning til faren Håkon jarl. Han lot seg døpe og lot deretter folk flest gjøre som de selv ville. Theodoricus monachus derimot fremstiller Eirik noe usannsynlig slik at han ga et løfte om å bli kristen om han seiret ved Svolder. Odd Snorressons saga om Olav Tryggvason har en mer utpenslet fortelling hvor Eirik erstatter et bilde av den norrøne guden Tor i forstavnen av skipet sitt med et kristent kors. Det er ingen skaldekvad som støtter dette, skjønt det er sannsynlig at Eirik lot seg døpe, allfall formelt, slik kongesagaene skriver. Kysten av Norge var kristen, men Trøndelag og i Oppland og innlandet var folk flest stort sett hedninger. Fagrskinna nevner at i brødrene Eirik og Sveins dager ble kristendommen meget skadelidende, underforstått at brødrene ikke drev misjonsvirksomhet og tvangsdøpning med vold.

Å gå over til kristendommen var uten tvil en politisk fordel for brødrene ettersom de var allierte med de kristne kongene i Sverige og Danmark. Å akseptere toleranse og religionsfrihet var også et skarpsindig trekk etter Olav Tryggvasons voldelige misjonsaktivitet. Eiriks religiøse overbevisning var sannsynligvis ikke sterk.

Mens hirdskaldene til Eiriks rival Olav Tryggvason og Olav Haraldsson verget seg fra å bruke hedenske kjenninger i sine kvad og lovpriste kongen som en kristen herre, er alle bevarte skaldekvad som er viet Eirik Håkonsson diktet på tradisjonelt vis. Bandadråpa som ble diktet en gang etter år 1000 er åpenbart hedensk ettersom det nevner Eirik som seierrik i henhold til «guders vilje». Begge de to norske historieverkene Historia Norvegiæ og Ågrip er fiendtlig innstilt til Eirik Håkonsson og mener at han kjempet aktivt for å rykke opp kristendommen med roten, men dette blir ikke bekreftet av andre kilder. I bestefall forveksler bøkene Eirik med faren Håkon, eller lyver bevisst for å sverte jarlen.

[rediger] Erobringen av England

Kong Knut ruster seg til å invadere England.I 1014 eller 1015 forlot Eirik Håkonsson Norge og slo seg sammen med danskekongen Knut Sveinsson, sønn av Svein Tjugeskjegg, for dennes hærtog til England. Eiriks deltagelse var sannsynligvis prisen for å styre Norge uavhengig av Danmark, og nå var tiden inne for at lojaliteten skulle betales. Å unnslå seg var ikke bare feighet, men også å erklære fiendskap med danskekongen. Antagelig var det likevel ikke en uvillig jarl som kom seilende med en norsk hær.

I henhold til Tord Kolbeinssons Eiriksdråpa møttes den norske og den danske flåten ved den engelske kysten i 1015, men kronologien i de ulike kildene er ikke samstemte, og noen forskere mener at møtet først skjedde i Danmark i 1014. På denne tiden var Knut en ung og uerfaren hersker som sto i skyggen av sin avdøde far Svein Tjugeskjegg som hadde erobret England i 1013, men døde fem uker senere. Eirik Håkonsson var på den annen side en erfaren krigsstrateg med en utprøvd intelligens og krigslykke, i henhold til Fagrskinna. Forskeren Frank Stentons mening om Eirik var at han var «den beste rådgiver som var å finne for en ung prins som var i ferd med å begynne sin erobring».[4]

Den dansk-norske invasjonsstyrken tok landgang i Sandwich på midtsommeren 1015. De møtte liten motstand. Knuts styrker forflyttet seg inn i Wessex og plyndret i Dorset, Wiltshire og Somerset. Alderman Eadric Streona samlet en engelsk hærstyrke på 40 skip og underkastet seg deretter kong Knut. Encomium Emmae er den eneste engelske kilden som gir informasjon om Eiriks bevegelser på denne tiden, men opptegnelsene om hans antatte uavhengige hærtokt er vage og står ikke i samspill med andre kilder.

Tidlig i 1016 flyttet den norrøne styrken, kanskje forsterket med angelsaksiske medsammensvorne, seg over elven Thames og inn i Mercia, og plyndret omgivelsene etter hvert. Prins Edmund II av England, eller Edmund Jernside som han ble kalt, forsøkte å mønstre en hær til å stå imot invasjonen, men hans anstrengelser var ikke vellykket. Knut fortsatte uhindret inn i Northumbria hvor jarlen for Northumbria, Uchtred den modige, ble myrdet i kaoset. Da kontrollen var tatt i nord ble det store nordengelske jarldømmet gitt til Eirik Håkonsson slik at han kunne administrere det. Den store hæren beveget seg deretter sørover og mot London. Før den kom fram døde kong Ethelred den rådville den 23. april. Prins Edmund ble valgt til ny konge av England.

I kjølvannet av Ethelreds død beleiret de norrøne styrkene London. I henhold til Encomium Emmae ble beleiringen overvåket av Eirik Håkonsson. Den legendariske saga om Olav den hellige indikerer at Eirik var til stede ved beleiringen, og et vers av Tord Kolbeinsson sier at Eirik kjempet et slag med en Ulfkytel «vest for London».[5]

Dansk-angelsaksiske jarldømmer rundt 1025.Northumbria er markert i gult.Etter flere slag kom Knut og Edmund til en enighet om å dele kongedømmet England, men Edmund dør noen få måneder senere. I 1017 er Knut den udiskutable kongen over hele England, noe som ga ham tilnavnet «den mektige» eller «den store». Han delte landet inn i fire deler: Wessex beholdt han selv, East Anglia ga han til Torkjell Høge, Northumbria til Eirik, og Mercia til angelsakseren Eadric - som ble henrettet som forræder i løpet av det samme året. I henhold til Encomium Emmae befalte han Eirik «å betale denne mannen hva vi skylder ham». Nordmannen skilte hodet hans fra kroppen med øksa. [6]

[rediger] Siste år Eirik Håkonsson forble jarl av Northumbria til han døde. Hans jarldømme er spesielt bemerkelsesverdig ved at det ikke er avtegnet at han kjempet et eneste slag mot Skottland eller Strathclyde som vanligvis truet Northumbria hele tiden.

Eirik er ikke nevnt i engelske dokumenter etter 1023. I henhold til engelske kilder ble han sendt i landflyktighet av kong Knut og dro tilbake til Norge. Det er svært lite sannsynlig og det er ingen norrøne kilder som bekrefter hans påståtte hjemreise. Hans arvtager til jarldømmet, en danske eller en engelskfødt av dansk opprinnelse, Sigurd Digre, som regel nevnt som Siward, kan ikke bekreftes at han overtok jarldømmet før 1033. Eiriks død kan ikke bli plassert med sikkerhet mellom 1023 og 1033. Tradisjonelt blir hans død regnet for å ha skjedd i 1024. I henhold til norrøne kilder døde han av blødninger etter at drøvelen hans ble kuttet (en kjent prosedyre i middelalderens legekunst) enten akkurat før eller rett etter en pilegrimsreise til Roma.

[rediger] Referanser ^ Se Jackson 2001, side 108 eller på nettutgaven. ^ Sturlasson, Snorre: Snorres kongesagaer. Slutet av "Olav Tryggvasons saga", her i oversettelse fra 1979. ^ Fox 2001, side 39. Se Of Yule at Haramsey, and how Grettir dealt with the Bearserks for en alternativ engelsk oversettelse (ved William Morris og Eiríkr Magnússon) av det relevante kapittel eller Grettis saga for en utgave av den norrøne teksten. ^ Stenton 2001, side 387. ^ Ulfkytel eller Ulfkel var, ifølge Keynes, Simon: Cnut's Earls, The Reign of Cnut, London, 1994, side 79: «Ulfcetel, who clearly held office of some kind in East Anglia (ASC (CDE), s.a. 1004, 1010, 1016), but who is not styled 'ealdorman' in contemporary sources, and who attested Æthelred's charters from 1002 to 1016 as a 'thegn'». Han navngis som Úlfkell snillingr i de norrøne kildene og deltok i slaget ved Hringmararheiðr. ^ Keyser 1849, side 8.

[rediger] Litteratur Campbell, Alistar (redaktør og oversetter) og Simon Keynes (tilleggsintroduksjon): (1998). Encomium Emmae Reginae. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-62655-2 Christiansen, Eric: (2002). The Norsemen in the Viking Age. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 0-631-21677-4 Driscoll, M. J. (redaktør): (1995). Ágrip af Nóregs konungasögum . Viking Society for Northern Research. ISBN 0-903521-27-X Ekrem, Inger (redaktør), Lars Boje Mortensen (redaktør) og Peter Fisher (oversetter): (2003). Historia Norwegie. Museum Tusculanum Press. ISBN 87-7289-813-5 Faulkes, Anthony (redaktør): (1978). Two Icelandic Stories : Hreiðars þáttr : Orms þáttr. Viking Society for Northern Research. ISBN 0-903521-00-8 Finlay, Alison (redaktør og oversetter): (2004). Fagrskinna, a Catalogue of the Kings of Norway. Brill Academic Publishers. ISBN 90-04-13172-8 Finnur Jónsson: (1924). Den oldnorske og oldislandske litteraturs historie. G. E. C. Gad. Fox, Denton og Pálsson, Hermann (oversettere): (2001). Grettir's Saga. University of Toronto Press. ISBN 0-8020-6165-6 Henry av Huntingdon (oversatt av Diana Greenway): (2002). The History of the English People, 1000-1154. ISBN 0-19-284075-4 Keyser, Rudolph og Carl Rikard Unger (red.): (1849). Olafs saga hins helga. Feilberg & Landmark. Oddr Snorrason (oversatt av Theodore M. Andersson): (2003). The Saga of Olaf Tryggvason. Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-4149-8 Snorre Sturlason: Heimskringla eller Snorres kongesagaer. Mange utgaver. Stenton, Frank M.: (2001). Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-280139-2 Theodoricus monachus (oversatt og kommentert av David og Ian McDougall med en introduksjon av Peter Foote) (1998). The Ancient History of the Norwegian Kings. Viking Society for Northern Research. ISBN 0-903521-40-7

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Forgjenger:

Olav Tryggvason  Norges Riksforstander

(1000–1012) Etterfølger:

Håkon Ladejarl

Forgjenger:

Håkon Sigurdsson  Jarl av Strinda

(995–1012) Forgjenger:

Uchtred den modige  Jarler av Northumbria

(1016–1023) Etterfølger:

Siward

-------------------- Eirik Håkonsson Ladejarl http://nn.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eirik_H%C3%A5konsson_Ladejarl

Eiríkr Hákonarson or Eric of Norway or Eric of Hlathir http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eir%C3%ADkr_H%C3%A1konarson -------------------- http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=&emne=nor&person=Erling%20Håkonsson -------------------- Eirik Håkonsson Ladejarl (født 957, død 1024) var jarl på Lade for Trøndelag og Hålogaland (ca 995–1012), hersker av Norge ved å anerkjenne danskekongens overherredømme (1000–1012), og jarl av Northumbria (1016–1023). Eirik Ladejarl var uekte sønn av Håkon Sigurdsson, også Ladejarl og ubestridt hersker av Norge. Eirik deltok i to store slag som var avgjørende for Norgeshistorien og han gikk seirende ut av begge: slaget ved Hjørungavåg (986) og slaget ved Svolder (1000). Eirik var også en hersker som anerkjente og støttet skaldekunsten. -------------------- Erik Haakonsson, Earl of Hlathir was born before 998. He married Gytha Sveynsdottir, daughter of Sveyn I 'Forkbeard' Haraldsson, King of Denmark and England and Gunhilda of Poland, in 1013.1 He died in 1024. Erik Haakonsson, Earl of Hlathir gained the title of Jarl of Norway. He gained the title of Earl in England.1 He gained the title of Earl of Hlathir.1

Family Gytha Sveynsdottir Child Haakon Eriksson, Earl of Worcester d. bt 1029 - 10301

Citations [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 26. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

-------------------- konge af Norge Eirik Håkanson Ladejarl Kilder : Wikipedia, www.familiekroeniken.dk.

О {profile::pre} (Русский)

Jackson, Tatiana (Татьяна Николаевна Джаксон): Austr í Görðum: древнерусские топонимы в древнескандинавских источниках. Moscow, Yazyki Slavyanskoi Kultury, 2001. ISBN 5-94457-022-9

view all 17

Eirik Haakonsson Ladejarl, "Konge" av Norge's Timeline

960
960
Trondheim, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway
995
995
- 1012
Age 35
998
998
Age 38
Norway
1000
1000
- 1015
Age 40
1000
- 1015
Age 40
1013
1013
Age 53
Norway
1016
1016
- 1024
Age 56
1023
1023
Age 63
Somerset, England, United Kingdom
1023
Age 63
????