Eliza Ann Bellinger (Howard) (c.1822 - d.)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: MA, USA
Death: Died in Grant, OR, USA
Cause of death: After 9-22-1899
Managed by: Chuck Bury
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Eliza Ann Bellinger (Howard)

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=oregon1847&id=I1538

Judge [Charles Byron] Bellinger's mother was Eliza Howard, a member of an old Massachusetts family and herself a native of that state. Her death occurred in Grant County. Of her five children, only two survive. Charles B and Mrs. Ellen Shrewsbury, of Los Angeles, Cal. The only brother of Judge Bellinger, Edward H., who became a well known businessman of Salem, OR was drowned while attempting to cross Mill creek during the freshet of 1889. The eldest child in the family was Charles B....

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http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=oregon1847&id=I1539

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First Marriage:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=oregon1847&id=I1538

ID: I1538 Name: Edward H 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER

Birth: 1815 in ,Montgomery,NY Death: 26 OCT 1850 in ,,,thrownfromahorse

Note:

   No. 1886 Bellinger, Edward H., Widow and Heirs, Marion Co; b 1815, Montgomery
   Co., NY; SC 1 May 1850; m Eliza Ann 1 Jan 1839, Knox Co., Ill. Edward H Bellinger d 26 Oct 1850 leaving minor children; Estavinia, Caroline, and Edward H. His father John Bellinger was appt guardian. 1849 Edward G Bellinger paid $600 for the claim of N B Evans. Fales Howard Claimed ownership when he returned from Cal. 

Eliza Ann Bellinger m Caleb Brooks.

=================

http://klockconnections.com/Descendants%20of%20Barvalis%20Klock.pdf

EDWARD HENRY BELLINGER was born February 18, 1815, and died October 26, 1850 in Marion County, Oregon.

He married ELIZA ANN HOWARD January 01, 1839 in Knox County, Illinois. She was born October 14, 1822, and died August 07, 1886 in Oregon.

Eliza Howard was the daughter of David Howard.

=====================

1st husband's gravestone: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sallyneely/3864596977/

http://genforum.genealogy.com/bellinger/messages/534.html

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Eliza Ann Bellinger's Timeline

1822
October 14, 1822
MA, USA

http://49.americanancestors.org/queries-vol-1-no-2/

HOWARD/FALES/BELLINGER: David HOWARD was father of Eliza Ann, b. Mass., who m. Edward BELLINGER Knox Co. Ill. 1839. BELLINGERS went Ore. 1847. Need proof that wife of David HOWARD was Hannah FALES, dau. of Lemuel4, Nehemiah3, James2, James1.

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"a member of an old Massachusetts family, and herself a native of that state."

1839
November 21, 1839
Age 17

http://archive.org/stream/portraitbiographor00chic#page/408/mode/2up

"Portrait and biographical record of Portland and vicinity, Oregon..."
Richard Caton.

HON. CHARLES B. BELLINGER. Viewing
the progress and civilization of the twentieth
century from the standpoint of judge of the
United States district court for Oregon and
regent of the University of the State of Oregon,
Judge Bellinger finds much to interest him in the
contrast between the present and conditions as
they existed in 1847, when, a boy eight years of
age, he caught his first glimpse of the far west
from the "upper deck" of a prairie schooner.
For more than half a century he has been closely
identified with the history of this state, and
during the period of its development, in its
territorial days and through the entire era of its
statehood, he has been intimately associated with
its most important interests — in journalism and
as an influential and successful member of the
bench and bar.

Judge Bellinger is a member of an eastern
family which traces its lineage to Holland, and
was represented among the pioneers of the ]\Io-
hawk ^'alley, in the Empire state. His paternal
great-grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution
and his grandfather, John H. Bellinger, fought in
the war of 181 2. To the latter is also given
the credit for operating one of the first canal-
boats on the Erie canal. In 1837 he removed
with his family to Maquon, 111., where he and
his son, Edward H., followed the wagon-maker's
trade. Ten years after settling in Illinois he
decided to cross the plains to Oregon. In his
journey he was accompanied by his wife, their
son and his wife and the three children in the
family of the latter.

The journey of six months was not without
its grave dangers. The Columbia River Indians
were particularly troublesome that year, and just
a little later in the season the historic Whitman
massacre occurred. The safety of the emigrants
was probably due to the fact that much of the
way across the plains they traveled with the
Mormon contingent of that year, Brigham Young
leading a large party that was accompanied by
a strong military organization. The Bellingers
camped almost side by side with the Mormons
until they reached the Bear River \'alley, when
the Mormons turned toward Salt Lake City and
the other party continued on its way to Oregon.
They had come via St. Joseph, Mo., where they
crossed the Missouri; thence up the Platte, via
Independence Rock and Fort Laramie ; from
there via Fort Hall (now Soda Springs),
crossing the Green river about ten miles north of the
present railroad crossing. Arriving in Marion
county they settled in the then uninhabited region.
The environment was that of the roughest frontier.
Soon it became recognized among the
pioneers that Edward H. Bellinger was a young
man of fine qualities and excellent judgment, and
they thereupon elected him a member of the
territorial legislature of 1850. However, before
the beginning of the session, and while he was
but thirty-two years of age, he died from injuries
sustained by being thrown from a horse.
Meantime, in 1849, his father determined to seek
the gold fields of California, and with a party
traveled overland, swimming rivers and following
a route practically the same as that now traversed
by the railroad. For a time he was engaged in
placer mining in California. Upon his return to
Oregon he continued to make Marion county his
home until his death in 1882, at the age of nearly
ninety years. In many respects he was a remark-
able man, possessing strong characteristics and
a distinguished personality, and even in his old
age he retained the qualities that had awakened
admiration when he was in his prime. In religion
he was a member of the Christian Church.
Judge Bellinger's mother was Eliza Howard,
a member of an old Massachusetts family, and
herself a native of that state. Her death occurred
in Grant county in 1883. Of her five children,
two only are now living, Charles B., and Mrs.
Ellen Shrewsbury, of Los Angeles, Cal. The
only brother of Judge Bellinger, Edward H.,
who became a well-known business man of
Salem, Ore., was drowned while attempting to
cross Mill creek during the freshet of 1889. The
eldest child in the family was Charles B. Bellinger,
who was born in Alaquon, Ill., November
21, 1839. He was scarcely eight years of age
when the family left his birth-place and under-
took the perilous journey across the plains to
seek a home in the undeveloped regions of the
west. After his father's death he made his
home for several years with his grandfather.
One of his earliest recollections of the territory
is of his attendance upon a district school near
the Santiam river, where his teacher was Orange
Jacobs, afterward a member of congress from
Washington. also a judge of the superior court
of Washington, and now a prominent attorney
at Seattle.

Ambitious to make his way in the world at as
early an age as practicable, and impelled by the
knowledge that his father had intended to educate
him for the law. Judge Bellinger earned the
means necessary to attend Willamette University,
where he was a student several years. He after-
wards studied law with Judge 15. F. Bonham of
Salem and was admitted to the bar in 1863, after
which he began practice with John C. Cartwright.
Subsequently he edited the Arena, a weekly
newspaper published at Salem, and the
Democratic organ of the state. His next journalistic
venture was the publication of the Salem Review.
His health becoming somewhat impaired, he
removed to Monroe, Bent county, and engaged
in the mercantile business with Mr. Shannon. In
1868 he represented Bent county in the legislature.
The next year he removed to Albany
with the intention of engaging in practice, but
changed his plans and became editor of the
Albany Democrat, to which he gave most of his
time. In 1870 he came to Portland and took up
his professional practice. At the same time he
founded and for two years edited the Portland
News, which eventually became the Portland
Telegram. From 1874 to 1878 he served as
clerk of the supreme court of Oregon, after
which Governor Thayer appointed him to fill a
vacancy on the bench of the circuit court in the
fourth judicial district, which vacancy resulted
from the reorganization of the judicial districts
of the state. At the general election of 1880 he
received the Democratic nomination for the office,
but the district being overwhelmingly Republican,
he was defeated, although he enjoyed the
satisfaction of running eleven hundred votes
ahead of his ticket. From 1880 to 1883 he
practiced in partnership with John M. Gearin, after
which he became a member of the firm of Dolph,
Bellinger, Mallory & Simon. In April, 1893,
President Cleveland appointed him judge of the
United States district court to fill the vacancy
caused by the death of Judge Deady. Assuming
the duties of the office May 1, 1893, he has since
most capably performed every obligation
devolving upon him, and has become recognized as one
of the strongest jurists of the northwest.

While clerk of the supreme court of Oregon
Judge Bellinger participated in the Modoc Indian
war and was a member of the staff of General
Miller, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.
January 17, 1873, he took part in the famous fight
at the lava beds, on which occasion the United
States troops and the Oregon and California
volunteers were under command of General
Wheaton. The Modocs, knowing every foot of
the almost impenetrable region of the lava beds,
had a decided advantage, and the result was an
ambush and defeat for General Wheaton. Soon
afterward a peace commission was appointed at
Washington and word was sent out to suspend
military operations, whereupon the volunteers
returned home. Under the promise of safety
the peace commission was induced to meet the
Indians in the lava beds, and all its members were
there massacred. The troops next sent against
them were also routed. Finally Gen. Jefferson
C. Davis with his troops settled down to a siege,
hemming the Indians in and ultimately reducing
them to such a condition of starvation that the
settlement of the trouble became an easy matter.

In Linn county, Ore., in early life. Judge Bel-
linger married Margery Johnson, who was born
in Ohio and in 1852 came with her father, James
Johnson, to Linn county, settling upon a farm.
Seven children have been born of their union,
viz. : Oscar, who is a civil engineer with the
Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company at
Portland ; Victor, deceased, who was a practicing
attorney at Portland ; Emmet and Howard, who
are engaged in the cattle business in Washington ;
Mrs. Edith Edwards, of Springfield, 111. ; Mrs.
L. H. Knapp, of Portland ; and Catherine, who
resides at home. In addition to his residence in
Portland Judge Bellinger owns a ranch near the
city, where he enjoys spending the summer
months.

Judge Bellinger is a member of the Oregon
Historical Society and the Oregon Pioneer
Association. During the administration of Governor
Geer he was appointed a commissioner of the
Lewis and Clark Exposition. In the establishment
of the Order of United Artisans he bore
a prominent part, and has always been a director
of that organization. He was a prime factor in
the organization of the Oregon State Bar Association,
and at one time officiated as president. He
has recently completed, with W. W. Cotton, an
annotated compilation of the laws of Oregon.
For ten years he was professor of equity,
jurisprudence and pleading in the law department of
the University of Oregon, and since 1896 has
been a member of the board of regents of that
institution. His identification with Masonry
began in Washington Lodge No. 46, A. F. & A.
M., of Portland, which he served as master for
two years. Later he was made a member of
Washington Chapter No. 18, R. A. M. Socially
he is a member of the Arlington Club.

With other leading citizens of Oregon Judge
Bellinger is deeply interested in the subject of
cremation, which he staunchly advocates, believing
it to be a sanitary practice of great benefit
to every large community. Desirous that it
should come into universal use, he has done all
in his power to interest people in the matter and
to educate them up to an understanding of the
merits of the practice. He was an organizer and
is now president of the Portland Cremation
Association, which has established the most complete
and modern crematory on the coast. Its builders
have been influenced wholly by philanthropic
motives, but it is their hope that, in time, the
enterprise may be made self-sustaining.

Regarding questions of politics Judge Bellinger
has thought deeply. Prior to 1896 he
voted the Democratic ticket, but, not being in
sympathy with the Chicago platform of that year,
he found he could not follow his party in its
advocacy of a silver standard, and since that
time has been independent. In the important
developments of the last few years, which "nave
established the position of the American nation
among the great powers of the world, he has
been intensely interested, and in principle is an
expansionist, favoring the retention of the Philip-
pine Islands, but believing that they should be
granted free commercial intercourse with the
United States; in other words, if they are to be
American in jurisdiction, they should also be
American in their trade relations.

In concluding this brief memoir to one of the
most forceful and interesting representatives of
the legal fraternity of the northwest, it is proper
to record the fact that Judge Bellinger is held in
high esteem by all classes of thoughtful people
for the many admirable traits in his personality,
as well as for his erudition. His distinguished
bearing, his great forensic ability, his breadth of
mind and liberality in all his views, and his
acknowledged integrity and honesty of purpose —
these are the chief characteristics which enter
into his striking individuality. Add to these his
splendid training at the bar and his experience
upon the bench, where the sound foundation of
his knowledge of the law is demonstrated in his
daily work, and we have an ideal American citizen,
and a man who may well be regarded as
deserving of the most distinguished consideration
at the hands of his contemporaries, either
in private or public life, and likewise a permanent
and conspicuous place in the annals of the
northwest.

=======================

"Portland, Oregon, Its History and Builders:...," Volume 3
By Joseph Gaston http://is.gd/dtwyMM

HON. CHARLES B. BELLINGER.

The concensus of public opinion established the position of Hon. Charles B. Bellinger as an able and distinguished representative of the Oregon judiciary. The public continually maintains a critical attitude toward its servants, and only the utmost rectitude of character, the most capable discharge of duty and the most unfaltering loyalty to the trusts imposed win favorable comment. The envious and the malevolent have scarcely dared to assail the record of Judge Charles B. Bellinger, for his ability in his chosen profession was of superior order and his fidelity to what he believed to be right no man ever questioned. Doubtless he made mistakes as he traveled along the pathway of life, but they were matters of judgment rather than of intent, and therefore weighed in the balance of public opinion Charles B. Bellinger was never found wanting. He typified in his life the progress of the northwest, arriving as he did in Oregon to cast in his lot with its pioneer development when but eight years of age.

He was born in Maquon, Illinois, November 21, 1839, a son of Edward H. and Eliza (Howard) Bellinger. The original American ancestor came from Holland and settled in the Mohawk valley of the Empire state when this country was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. His paternal great-grandfather was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, while John H. Bellinger, his grandfather, defended American interests in the second war with England and later operated one of the first canal boats on the Erie canal. When the tide of emigration was steadily flowing westward he made his way to Maquon, Illinois, in 1837, and there he and his son Edward conducted a wagon shop. Still the voices of the west called Edward H. Bellinger, and the spirit of the pioneer prompted his further removal until, with wife and three children, he started for Oregon. They traveled much of the way across the plains with the Mormon contingent of that year, Brigham Young leading a large number who were accompanied by a strong military organization. This rendered them safe from attack by the Columbia Indians, who were manifesting particular hostility that year. The Bellingers camped almost side by side with the Mormons until they reached the Bear river valley, when the latter turned toward Salt Lake City and the Bellinger family continued on their way to the Sunset state. Marion county, where they established their home, was practically an uninhabited district and the most strenuous experiences in frontier life were there to be met. Law and order had in a measure been neglected in the establishment of an organized government, and in 1850 the abilities of Edward H. Bellinger were recognized in his election to the territorial legislature. Ere the session was called, however, he died at the age of thirty-two years from injuries sustained by being thrown from a horse. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Eliza Howard, was a native of Massachusetts and a representative of one of the old families of that state. Long surviving her husband, she died in Grant, Oregon, in 1883, and was survived by only two of their five children, Charles B. and Mrs. Ellen Shrewsbury, the latter of Los Angeles, California.

The parents of Edward Bellinger had also come to the Pacific coast in 1847, and two years later John Bellinger made his way to the gold fields of California and for a time was engaged in placer mining in that state. Later he returned to his home in Marion county, Oregon, where he lived to the age of nearly ninety years, passing away in 1882. He was a member of the Christian church and a man of splendid personal characteristics and qualities. He retained the prize of keen mentality to the closing years of his life and left his influence for good upon the community in which he made his home.

It was in the home of his grandfather, John H. Bellinger, that Judge Bellinger of this review resided subsequent to his father's death. He had come as a boy of eight years to the northwest. Every incident of the trip across the plains was of interest to him, and upon memory's wall hung many pictures of the pioneer days. He pursued his education in a district school near the Santiam river, where his teacher was Orange Jacobs later a member of congress from Washington also a judge of the superior court of that state and now a prominent attorney of Seattle. In his youthful days Judge Bellinger was impressed by the fact, often told to him, that his father had intended to educate him for the bar. He resolved to carry out his father's wishes as to a profession, and through his own labors earned the funds necessary to meet the tuition and expense of a course in Willamette University, which he attended for several years, laying the foundation in broad literary knowledge for his professional learning. His law reading was directed by Judge B. F. Bonham of Salem, and following his admission to the bar in 1863 he entered upon practice in connection with John C. Cartwright. After a time, however, he turned from the practice of law to journalism and edited the Arena, a weekly democratic newspaper published at Salem, regarded as a party organ in this state. He afterward became the publisher of the Salem Review, and, when impaired health made it advisable that he seek a change of labor, he engaged in merchandising at Monroe. Bent county. His abilities there won recognition in his election to the legislature in 1868. The following year he removed to Albany and became editor of the Albany Demo

crat, which he published until 1870, when he came to Portland and was afterward closely associated with the practice of law. At the same time he founded and for two years edited the Portland News, which eventually became the Portland Telegram.

His marked public spirit and his superior ability obtained his election for various positions of honor and trust. He was clerk of the Oregon supreme court from 1874 until 1878 and was then appointed by Governor Thayer to fill out an unexpired term as judge of the fourth judicial court, which vacancy resulted from the reorganization of the judicial districts of the state. In 1880 he was made the democratic nominee for the office, but could not overcome the overwhelming republican vote of the district. However, the vote given him was extremely complimentary, as he ran eleven hundred votes ahead of his ticket. Following a partnership with John M. Gearin from 1880 until 1883, Judge Bellinger became a member of the law firm of Dolph, Bellinger, Mallory & Simon, and so practiced until April, 1893, when he was appointed by President Cleveland to the position of judge of the United States district court following the demise of Judge Deady. He took his place upon the bench May 1, 1893, and the court records bear testimony to his superior ability. He always showed himself thoroughly competent in the discharge of the multitudinous delicate duties that devolve upon him in this connection, and has given proof of his comprehensive knowledge of the law and his ability to correctly apply its principles.

An important chapter in his life record covers his military experience. When a goodly proportion of Oregon's inhabitants were of the red race and the hostility of the savages was ofttimes manifested, he temporarily put aside the duties of clerk of the supreme court to participate in the Modoc Indian war, serving with the rank of lieutenant colonel on the staff of General Miller. On the 17th of January, 1873, he took part in the famous fight at the lava beds, on which occasion the United States troops and the Oregon and California volunteers were under command of General Wheaton. The Modocs, knowing every foot of the almost impenetrable regions of the lava beds, had a decided advantage, and the result was an ambush and defeat for General Wheaton. Soon afterward a peace commission was appointed at Washington and word was sent out to suspend military operations so that the volunteers returned home. Upon the promise of safety the peace commission was induced to meet the Modocs in the lava beds and all of its members were there massacred. The troops next sent against them were also routed. Finally General Jefferson C. Davis with his troops settled down to a siege, hemming the Indians in and ultimately reducing them to such a condition of starvation that the settlement of the trouble became an easy matter.

The attractive home life of Judge Bellinger had its beginning in his marriage, in Linn county, Oregon, to Miss Margery Johnson, who was born in Ohio and in 1852 came with her father, James Johnson, to the northwest, the family home being established upon a Linn county farm. Judge and Mrs. Bellinger became the parents of seven children: Oscar now deceased; Victor, who was a member of the Portland bar but is now deceased; Emmett, engaged in the dairy business in Washington; Howard, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume; Mrs. Edith Edwards of Springfield, Illinois, now deceased; Mrs. L. H. Knapp of Portland; and Mrs. W. J. Morrison of Portland.

Judge Bellinger was deeply interested in the study of cremation as a most sanitary practice for every large community, and did much to interest his fellowmen in this practice. He became the organizer and president of the Portland Cremation Association, which established the most complete and modern crematory on the coast, maintaining this at a pecuniary loss for a long period, prompted by philanthropic motives. In his political views Judge Bellinger was formerly a democrat, but as he could not indorse the silver standard of 1896 he severed his connection therewith and became an independent voter. He held advanced ideas on many of the important questions which engaged the interest of statesmen and thinking men of the nation, his opinions always resulting from broad study and a thorough understanding of the subject. He was a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the Arlington Club and also of the Oregon Historical Society and the Oregon Pioneer Association. Governor Geer appointed him a commissioner to the Lewis and Clark Exposition. His high standing in his profession was indicated by the fact that he was honored with the presidency of the Oregon Bar Association. He compiled, in connection with W. W. Cotton, an annotated edition of the laws of Oregon. For ten years he was professor of equity, jurisprudence and pleading in the law department of the University of Oregon, and from 1896 to his death was a member of its board of regents. He inscribed his name deeply on the keystone of Oregon's legal arch, and of the long line of illustrious men of whom the state is proud, the record of none has been more faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. He passed away at his home in Portland May 12, 1905.

HOWARD BELLINGER.

Among the family names well known on the northern Pacific coast none is more honored than that of Bellinger. Ever since 1847 have members of this family been identified with the Columbia river region and Howard Bellinger, whose name stands at the head of this review, is one of its worthy representatives. He is a great-grandson of John H. Bellinger, the grandson of Edward H. Bellinger and the son of Hon. Charles B. Bellinger, who was one of the most able and distinguished men that Oregon has known and a review of whom appears elsewhere in this work. The mother of Howard Bellinger was Margery Johnson, who came with her father to Linn county, Oregon, in 1852 and was one of the helpful pioneer women of the early days.

Howard Bellinger was born at Portland in 1878, was here reared, and in the public schools of this city he received his preliminary education, later becoming a student in the State University at Eugene, Oregon. He possessed the inestimable advantages of a congenial and refined home, which is worth more in the development of right thought and character than all the education that can be derived from books. Mr. Bellinger early showed an inclination for outdoor life and for the pursuits of agriculture and stock raising. Acordingly in 1899 he came to the ranch which had been bought by his father in Clarke county, Washington, and which is located twelve miles north of Vancouver on the Columbia river. This ranch is known as the Lake River farm and contains eight hundred acres, of which one hundred are under cultivation, and a young orchard of eighteen acres is one of its attractive features. About six hundred acres of the ranch are used for pasturage and for growing wild hay with which to carry the stock through the winter. The ranch maintains about two hundred head of cattle, and is known as one of the best conducted ranches in this region.

In 1904 Mr. Bellinger was united in marriage to Miss Lena M. Huber of Portland, and two children have been born to them: Frances and Charles Byron. Mr. Bellinger is a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge, No. 173, of Felida, and also of the Sara Grange and takes a lively interest in every movement that aims to advance the permanent welfare of western Oregon.

J. E. Bellinger, a brother of our subject, is a native of Portland, born in 1870. After leaving the public schools he became chief clerk of the United States internal revenue office at Portland, continuing until 1896, when he gave up his position and came to the ranch where he has since made his home and where he has attained a fine reputation among his neighbors as a man of good judgment and a first class farmer. When he came here the land was all stumpage. It has since been cleared off and improvements have been made, including residence, barns, fences and other accessories of a modern farm, and the ranch has become one of the good paying investments of the county. J. E. Bellinger is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Vancouver and also of Sara Grange. By the application of skill and intelligence the Bellinger brothers have attained high standing among agriculturists and stock raisers. Through such men the vocation is ennobled, and it adds dignity, wealth and stability to the nation and the occupation of the farmer becomes not only the most independent but also the happiest of all occupations known to man.

1839
- 1850
Age 16
OR, USA

http://www.oregonpioneers.com/1847.htm

BELLINGER FAMILY RESEARCHER:
BELLINGER, Caroline (1847- ): d/o Edward and Eliza (Howard) Bellinger

BELLINGER, Charles Byron (1839-1905): m'd 1858 JOHNSON, Margery Serene; s/o Edward and Eliza (Howard) Bellinger

BELLINGER, Edward H. Sr. (1815-1850): m'd 1839 HOWARD, Eliza Ann; s/o Henry and Maria (Klock) Bellinger

BELLINGER, Ellen (1844- ): m'd SHREWSBURY, Unknown; d/o Edward and Eliza (Howard) Bellinger

BELLINGER, Estevina (1842- ): m'd 1859 JOHNSTON, David; d/o Edward and Eliza (Howard) Bellinger

BELLINGER, John Henry (1791-1878): m'd 1814 CRANE, Mary Catherine; s/o Henry and Maria (Klock) Bellinger

==================================

Historical and genealogical notes for Edward: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=orego...

Father: John Henry 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER b: 27 NOV 1791 in ,Montgomery,NY
Mother: Mary Catherine 1847_Ore_Trail CRANE b: SEP 1793 in ,,NY

Marriage 1 Eliza Ann 1847_Ore_Trail HOWARD b: 1821/1822 in ,,MA

Married: 1 JAN 1839 in ,Knox,IL

Children

Has No Children Charles Byron 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER b: 21 NOV 1839 in Maquon,,IL
Has No Children Estefinea Estavinia 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER b: 1841/1842 in ,,IL
Has No Children Ellen 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER b: 1843/1844 in ,,IL
Has No Children Caroline 1847_Ore_Trail BELLINGER b: 1846/1847 in ,,IL
Has No Children Edward H BELLINGER b: ABT JUL 1849 in ,,OR

==================================

Historical notes about Edward and his father John, and brother John Henry Belleinger:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=orego...

.. (a descendant of John Henry's - p. 408 Hon. Charles B Bellinger ) paternal great-grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution and his
grandfather, Joh H Bellinger, fought in the War of 1812. To the latter is also
given the credit for operating one of the first canal boats on the Erie Canal.
In 1837, he removed to Maqoun, Ill, where he and his son, Edward H, followed the wagon-makers trade. Ten years after settling in Illinois he decided to cross
the plains to Oregon. In his journey he was accompanied by his wife, their son
and his wife and the three children in the family of the latter. (account of
trip typed separately for files)....in 1849 (John H) determined to seek the
gold fields of California, and with a party traveled overland, swimming rivers
and following a route practically the same as that now traversed by the
railroad....He continued to make his home in Marion county until his death in
1882 at nearly 90 years.
. . .
John H Bellinger built the first canal boat to ply on Erie Canal. Served in
was of 1812. He died in 1878 age 87. His son Edward H Bellinger, like his
father, was born in NY state. Bellingers moved from NY state to Illinois in
1836. Here Judge Bellinger was born 21 Nov 1839. He was 8 yr old when he
crossed the plains with his parents and grandparents.

...

p. 628 J H Bellinger was born in the state of New York in 1791, served in the
war of 1812, and built the first canal-boat for the Erie canal. He settled in
Marion County, and his family have been much noted in state politics. He died
of paralysis Nov 13, 1878. Portland Bee, Nov 14, 1878; Corvallis Gazette, Nov
22, 1878.

....

..J H Bellinger had a sawmill on "Bellinger
Creek" just north of Jefferson. He was born in New York in 1791, served in the
War of 1812 and built the first boat for the Erie Canal. He was the father of
Judge Bellinger of the United States District Court for Oregon.

1850
1850
- February 9, 1890
Age 27
Oregon

http://www.salempioneercemetery.org/records/display_record.php?id=845

Edward Henry Bellinger
LAST NAME: Bellinger FIRST NAME: Edward MIDDLE NAME: Henry NICKNAME:
TITLE: Mr. GENDER: M MILITARY:
BORN: 1850 DIED: Feb 1890 BURIED: 11 Feb 1890
ETHNICITY: OCCUPATION: Businessman & Real Estate Agent
BIRTH PLACE:
DEATH PLACE: Salem, Marion Co., Oregon
NOTES:
IOOF - E. H. Bellenger [sic], age 39, died of drowning in Mill Creek.
R.L. Polk & Co's Salem Directory 1889 - 1890 - E. H. Bellinger & Co. Agricultural Implements; Real Estate 156 State; Bellinger, E. H. res 19th and Mill, E Salem .
OBITUARY:
Mr. BELLINGER'S FUNERAL.
The funeral of E. H. Bellinger, who met death by drowning in North Mill creek Sunday evening, was conducted yesterday from the M. E. church. The remains were interred in the Odd Fellows' cemetery, followed to their resting place by a large number of the deceased's friends.
A brother Hon. C. B. Bellinger, arrived from Portland shortly after noon, to attend the funeral, coming by way of the west side broad guage to Dixie and then to Salem by wagon.
Oregon Statesman 12 Feb 1890 4:3
INSCRIPTION:
Bellinger
Edward Henry
1850 - 1890
(shares marker with Martha)
SOURCES:
LR
LD
IOOF Register of Burials
S&H pg 69
R.L. Polk & Co's Salem Directory 1889 - 1890
DOS 12 Feb 1890 4:3
OS 1 Jan 1891 (Necrology)
CONTACTS:
LOT: 890 SPACE: 1 SW

= = = = = = =

http://www.salempioneercemetery.org/records/display_record.php?id=848

Martha A. Bellinger
LAST NAME: Bellinger FIRST NAME: Martha MIDDLE NAME: A. NICKNAME:
MAIDEN NAME: Cresswell
TITLE: Mrs. GENDER: F MILITARY:
BORN: Jul 1855 DIED: 22 Jan 1936 BURIED: 25 Jan 1936
ETHNICITY: OCCUPATION: Housewife
BIRTH PLACE: Oregon
DEATH PLACE: Allyn, Mason Co., Washington
NOTES:
1870 OR CENSUS - Martha A. Cresswell, age 15, b. Oregon, is enumerated with J. R., age 46, occupation farmer, b. Indiana, and Minerva, age 39, b. Indiana, along with Jas. A., age 17, Jno J. C., age 12, Thos. C., age 7, Addison G., age 5, Juniatti, age 3, and Alfred G., age 10 months, all born in Oregon.
MARRIAGE - "Edward H. Bellinger & Martha A. Creswell, m 28 Nov 1873 M. E. church in Jefferson; J. F. Moshee, M. G. Wit: David Johnson & Martha Cosper #1617 og 81".
1900 OR CENSUS - Martha A. Bellinger, age 45, b. Jul 1855 in Oregon, is enumerated with Clyde A., age 25, b. Jan 1875 in Oregon, Grace, age 24, b. Nov 1876 in Oregon, Clifford, age 22, b. Sep 1878 in Oregon, Edwina, age 18, b. Feb. 1882 in Oregon, Grover, age 15, b. Aug 1884 in Oregon, and Edith, age 12, b. Feb 1888 in Oregon.
1920 OR CENSUS - Martha A. Bellinger, age 64, widow, b. Oregon.
OBITUARY:
Martha A. Bellinger at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Edith Skene, near Allyn, Wash., Wednesday. Survived by three sons, Dr. G. C. Bellinger and Cliff Bellinger, both of Salem, Clyde A. Bellinger of Prosser, Wash.; two daughters, Mrs. Edith Skene of Allyn, Wash., and Mrs. Grace Skully of Northport, Wash. Funeral services Saturday, January 25, at 2 p.m. from Clough-Barrick chapel, Eastern Star in charge. Interment I.O.O.F. cemetery with Rev. H. C. Stover officiating minister.
Oregon Statesman 24 January 1936 5:1
Also Capital Journal 24 January 1936 10:8
INSCRIPTION:
Martha Cresswell Bellinger
1855 - 1936
(shares marker with Edward)
SOURCES:
LR
LD
S&H pg 69
Saucy
1870 OR CENSUS (Marion Co., Jefferson, FA #1767)
Marion County Oregon Marriage Records 1871-1874, Vol II, pg 18
1900 OR CENSUS (Marion Co., Salem, ED 136, sheet 3B)
1920 OR CENSUS (Marion Co., Salem, ED 346, sheet 7A)
OS 24 January 1936 5:1
CONTACTS:
LOT: 890 SPACE: 2 SW

1851
July 16, 1851
Age 28
Marion, OR, USA

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=orego...

xvii. Eliza Ann 1847_Ore_Trail HOWARD was born ABT 1830 in maybe of,,MO,bef 1847. She married Edward H BELLINGER. He was born ABT 1825 in of,,OR,by 1847. She married Caleb B BROOKS 16 JUL 1851 in ,Marion,OR. He was born ABT 1825 in of,,OR,IN 1851.

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Possibly there was a second Caleb Brooks in Oregon at this time. Another source has Eliza Ann Howard Bellinger living until 1883 - if he married her in 1851, he would later marry Sara & Mary while Eliza Ann was still alive. And yet another source has Caleb with a "third" wife that survives him.

????
Grant, OR, USA

SOn' biography states:

"Her death occurred in Grant county in 1883."

=======================

Going by Caleb's obituary that he was survived by his wife, this is a possible match. but too little information in the records to make a positive match:

Oregon, Death Index, 1903-1998: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VZHS-DD7

Name: Lizzie Brooks
Event: Death
Event Date: 18 Aug 1903
Event Place: Umatilla, Oregon
Age:
Birth Date:
Spouse:
Certificate Number: 50
Comments: