Elizabeth Brainerd

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Elizabeth Brainerd (Wakeman)

Also Known As: "Arnold"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
Death: Died in Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Samuel Wakeman and Elizabeth Willett
Wife of Joseph Arnold and Deacon Daniel Brainerd
Mother of Gideon Arnold; John Arnold; John Arnold; Joseph Arnold; Samuel Arnold and 4 others
Sister of Child Wakeman; Ezibon Wakeman; Joanna Anna Whittaker; Grace Kelly and Hanna Wakeman

Managed by: Lisa Bench
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Brainerd

Elizabeth Wakeman

  • Birth: 1630 - Of, Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
  • Death: Oct 22 1691 - Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
  • Parents: Samuel Wakeman, Elizabeth Wakeman
  • Husband: Joseph Arnold, Daniel Brainerd
  • Children: Josiah Arnold, Gideon Arnold, John Arnold, Joseph Arnold, Samuel Arnold, Susanna Arnold, Jonathan Arnold, Elizabeth Arnold

__________________________

The Town of Haddam is located in Middlesex County, in the south-central part of Connecticut in the lower Connecticut River Valley. Middletown and East Hampton border the town to the north, East Haddam to the east, Chester and Killingworth to the south, and Killingworth and Durham to the west. With approximately 7,200 residents (2000 census) the town covers 46.7 square miles. Haddam has the distinction of being the only town in the state of Connecticut that is bisected by the Connecticut River, with residents on both sides; Haddam and Higganum are on the west side and Haddam Neck is on the east side.

Plantation at Thirty Mile Island In 1660 the Connecticut Colonial Legislature sent Matthew Allyn and Samuel Willys down the Connecticut River from Hartford to purchase land from the Wangunk Indian Tribe at the place the English called 'Land of Thirty Mile Island'. The island, now known as Haddam Island was thought to be thirty miles from the mouth of the "Grate River" at Long Island Sound (it is only 17 miles from the mouth of river). In May 1662 the Englishmen finally purchased land comprising approximately 104 square miles and extending in six miles on each side of the river from the straits at "Pattyquonck" (now Chester) to the Mattabeseck-Mill River (now Middletown) across to the line of Chatham (now East Hampton). The English paid 30 coats (worth approximately $100) for the land from four Native American chiefs, two queens and others. The Native Americans did set aside some property for their own use including 40 acres at Cove Meadow (Chester) and Haddam Island as well reserving the right to hunt and fish where they pleased.

The first settlers were twenty-eight men and their families from Hartford, Wethersfield and Windsor:

Nicholas & Mariam (Moore) Ackley John & Martha (Steele) Hannison Joseph & Elizabeth (Wakeman) Arnold Richard & Elizabeth (Carpenter) Jones James & Hannah (Withington) Bates Stephen Luxford (No Wife Listed) John & Lydia (Backus) Bailey John Parents (No Wife Listed) Daniel & Hannah (Spencer) Brainerd Thomas & Alice (Spencer) Shayler Thomas & Alice (Spencer) Brooks Simon & Elizabeth (Wells) Smith Samuel & Elizabeth (Olmsted) Butler Thomas Smith (No Wife Listed) William & Katherine (Bunce) Clark Gerrard & Hannah (Hills) Spencer Daniel & Mehitable (Spencer) Cone John & Rebecca (Howard) Spencer William Corby (No Wife Listed) Joseph & Elizabeth (Spencer) Stannard Abraham & Lydia (Tefft) Dibble William & Elizabeth (No Maiden Name Listed) Ventres Samuel & Anna (Burnham) Gaines John & Hannah (No Maiden Name Listed) Webb George & Sarah (Olmstead Gates James & Elizabeth (Clark) Wells John & Mary (Bronson) Wyatt

View of Haddam and the RiverOriginally there were two small settlements on the west bank of the river, the Town Plot was laid out along the southern end of what is presently Walkley Hill Road and extended to the old burying ground (Burial Yard at Thirty Mile Island Plantation) and the Lower Plantation was settled south of the Mill Creek in the area now known as Shailerville. Each proprietor was given a home lot and land for farming. There was also land set aside for a meetinghouse and ministers lot. In October 1668 town was incorporated and given the name Haddam after Much Hadham in England. Haddam had very little tillable agricultural land and the best farming land was located along the river. Early residents utilized all of the natural resources available to them including water, fish, timber and granite in order to survive. The Connecticut River was a major source of income and transportation for the first 200 years of the town existence. Shipyards were built along the river, while many other small tributaries provided waterpower for mills and eventually factories.

In 1685 a group of residents moved across the river to settle East Haddam including the Gates, Ackley and Bates families. In 1700 East Haddam formed their own ecclesiastical society and became a separate town in 1734. Haddam Neck, which is also located on the east side of the river, was settled around 1712 but remained a part of Haddam and continues so today.

By 1720 the population of Haddam had grown to 500 and continued to grow steadily, forcing new settlers and younger generations to expand inland to the less fertile areas. Families that came to Haddam in the late 17th century included Walkley, Scovil, Dickinson, Hubbard, Hazelton, Higgins, Knowles, Lewis, Ray, Thomas, Tyler, Burr and Smith, some of which settled in the interior portions of town including Ponsett, Candlewood Hill, Little City, Burr and Turkey Hill.

During the Revolutionary War Haddam men served in the local militia and many citizens participated in privateering, the state sanctioned practice of capturing enemy ships. Privateering gave United State ships permission to capture British ships to cut off their supply lines and furnish our Navy with needed vessels and supplies. Once a ship was captured, it was brought to the nearest friendly port where the ship owner, captain and crew all benefited financially from the seized cargo. It is recorded that in 1779 two British ships, the York and Tryon were captured on the Connecticut River by Haddam made ships captained by Simon Tyler and Samuel Shaylor. Haddam, like many other Connecticut towns, served as a provisionary town during the war supplying troops with food including fish, beef and pork. During the winter of 1778 the horses of Washington's dragoons (cavalry) were housed in Haddam and Durham, which seriously depleted the residents' stock of hay and feed. The following year residents protested and the dragoons were moved to Colchester.

http://www.haddamhistory.org/history_haddam.htm ________________________

[S01785] Ancestry.com: History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Donald Lines Jacobus, (Name: Name: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.;;).

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Elizabeth Brainerd's Timeline

1630
1630
Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
1633
1633
Age 3
Haddam,Middlesex,Connecticut
1633
Age 3
Haddam,Middlesex,Connecticut
1638
September 16, 1638
Age 8
1651
1651
Age 21
Hartford,Hartford,Connecticut
1662
September 6, 1662
Age 32
Hartford,Hartford,Connecticut
1662
Age 32
East Haddam, Connecticut Colony
1664
1664
Age 34
1665
March 12, 1665
Age 35
Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut
1669
1669
Age 39
Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut