Elizabeth Morgan (Bliss) (1637 - 1683)

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Birthplace: Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
Death: Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts
Managed by: Boyle John
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Morgan (Bliss)

  • Genealogy of the Bliss family in America, from about the year 1550 to 1880 (1881, [1880])
  • http://www.archive.org/details/genealogyofbliss00blisuoft
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/genealogyofbliss00blisuoft#page/28/mode/1up
  • THOMAS, of England, of Braintree, Mass., and afterwards of Hartford, Conn., was a son of the first Thomas Bliss, of England, and was born about the year 1580 or 1585. He married in England about 1612-15, to Margaret __,* and had ten children, of whom six were born previous to their removal to this country; these were name respectively, Ann, Mary, Thomas Nathaniel, Lawrence, and Samuel; and in this country were probably born Sarah, Elizabeth, Hannah and John. Owing to religious persecutions, Thomas Bliss was compelled to leave England, and in the autumn of 1635, he with his younger brother George embarked at Plymouth with their families for the then wilderness of America. Upon their arrival at Boston, as before stated, Thomas located temporarily at Braintree, Mass., whence he afterwards removed to Hartford, Conn., where he died in 1640. We have been unable to ascertain the dates of birth of all the children in this family, but is is evident that Thomas was the oldest son, and that he must have been of age at the time of the distribution of the lots in Hartford, which would place his birth at about the year 1615-16. The births of the other children must have occurred between that of Thomas, jr. (unless Ann and Mary were older), and the death of Thomas sen., in 1640, which would allow two years at least between them. Probably there were no other sons of age at the time of their arrival in Hartford, as otherwise they would have had lots assigned them -- and there is nothing more discoverable respecting any of the children in Hartford.
  • *It is thought her maiden name was Margaret Lawrence, and that she was born about the year 1594, and married to Thomas Bliss about 1612-15. She was a good looking woman, with a square ablong face that betokened great capability and force of character. She had a broad open brow, fair hair, and blue eyes. After the death of her husband, which took place about the close of the year 1639, she managed the affairs of the family with great prudence and judgment. He eldest daughter, Ann, was married to Robert Chapman, of Saybrook, Conn., April 29, 1642, choosing April for their marriage month instead of May, for the old English adage ran - "To wed in May, you'll rue the day." She removed with her husband to Saybrook, where her eldest brother, Thomas, came soon after to live with them, and where he married in 1644, and in 1659 removed to Norwich, Conn., with thirty-four or thirty-five others and effected the settlement of that town. The other children of the widow Margaret Bliss, of Hartford, concluded not to settle there permanently, chills and fever prevailing in some localities near the town; she and her children, therefore in the year 1643, removed to the settlement of Springfield, Mass., thirty miles or more up the Conecticut River. Margaret sold her property in Hartford, and gathering her household goods and cattle together, prepared with her eight children to make the journey through the forest to Springfield, which she accomplished in about five days. Nathaniel and Samuel, her second and fourth sons, had been there previously, and a dwelling had been prepared for the family on their arrival. A journey like this was thought a great thing in those days. They camped out in the forest three nights with their teams, so sparsely was the country settled at that time; and the forests, infested with savage beasts and scarcely less savage Indians, were broken only by the single roads to the seaboard, on the east and on the south, and these were by no means of the best. Mrs. Margaret had acquaintances in Springfield whom she had known in England, and here she settled down for the remainder of her days. It is said she purchased a tract of land in Springfield one mile square, situated in the south part of the town, on what is now Main Street, and bordering on Connecticut River. One of the streets laid out on the manor tract has been named "Margaret Street," and another "Bliss Street," on which has been built a Congregational Church. She lived to see all her children brought up, married and established in homes of their own, except Hannah, who died at about twenty-three years of age. Mrs. Margaret died in Springfield, August 28, 1684, after a residence in America of nearly fifty years, and over forty since her husband's death. She was an energetic, efficient woman, capable of transacting most kinds of business, and was long remembered in Springfield as a woman of great intellectual ability. A mother with these characteristics seldom fails to transmit them to posterity. Her will, dated in September (1683?) mentions her son John, son Lawrence, deceased, son Samuel, daughter Elizabeth (Morgan), deceased, daughter Mary Parsons (widow of Joseph), and daughter Sarah (Scott). As no reference is made to Thomas or Ann, it has been questioned whether they were he children. But neither is there any reference in it to the children of her son Nathaniel, deceased, to which in their younger years she had been guardian and guide; so that it cannot be inferred from such omission that Thomas, jr., and Ann were not her children. As she survived her husband forty-four years, it may have been that she was a second wife, and that these were children of a former marriage. He must have died comparatively young, or there may have been a great disparity in their ages. She lived more than ninety years, in spite of the hardships and anxieties she had passed through, and her grandchildren were generally very strong of consitution and long-lived, as where also her children. She was a woman of superior abilities, great resolution, and uncommon enterprise, and is entitled to the respect of her descendants, both for her vigor of mind and consitution.
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/genealogyofbliss00blisuoft#page/30/mode/1up
  • The following are the names of the children of Thomas and Margaret Bliss, with their chronology as far as we have been able to ascertain:
    • 9. ANN, b. in England, __, m. April 29, 1642, Robert Chapman, of Saybrook, Conn., and d. November 20, 1685. He was born about 1616, and came from Hull, England, to Boston, in August 1635 and in November to Saybrook, Conn. He d. October 13, 1687. Issue: 1. John, b. July, 1644. 2. Robert, b. September, 1646. 3. Ann, b. September 12, 1648, d. next year. 4. Hannah, b. October 4, 1650. 5. Nathaniel, b. February 16, 1653. 6. Mary, b. April 15, 1655. 7. Sarah, b. September 25, 1657.
    • 10. MARY, b. in England, __, m. November 26, 1646, Joseph Parsons, Springfield, Mass., who d. October 9, 1683. She d. January 29, 1712. Mr Parsons, associated with Mr. Pynchon, was one of the most prominent men in the public business of the place, and quite wealthy. He was a witness to the deed given by the Indians to Pynchon,* July 15, 1636. Joseph and Mary Parsons had five children before their removal to Northampton, Mass., in 1654. (Their son Ebenezer, born in this place, May 1, 1655, was the first white child born in the town, and he was killed by the Indians at Northfield, September 2, 1675.) Here in Northampton they had seven more children, making twelve in all, but three, named Benjamin, John and David, died young. Mary Bliss, the mother of this family, two years after the birth of her youngest child, was charged with witchcraft by some of her neighbors who were envious of their prosperity and endeavored in this way to disgrace them. She was sent to Boston for trail where the jury gave her a full acquittal of the crime, and she returned home to Northampton, from whence they removed back to Springfield in 1679. Just after he acquittal in Boston, her son Ebenezer was killed by the Indians, and those who had been instrumental in bringing her to trial said: "Behold, though human judges may be bought off, God's vengeance neither turns aside nor slumbers." It is said that she possessed great beauty and talents, but was not very amiable.
    • 11. *THOMAS, b. in England, __, d. April 15, 1688.
    • [ A Mr. Thomas Blythe (aged twenty years) came over in the barque "Globe" from London, August 7, 1635. If this was Thomas Bliss, afterwards of Norwich, Conn., it gives his birth date as 1615.]
    • 12. *NATHANIEL, b. in England, __, d. November 8, 1654.
    • 13. *LAWRENCE, b. in England, __, d. in 1676.
    • 14. *SAMUEL, b. in England in 1624, d. March 23, 1720.
    • 15. SARAH, b. at Boston Mount, about 1635-6, m. at Springfield, Mass., July 20 1659, John Scott, by whom she had nine children, only one of whom (William) had issue. Mr. Scott died January 2, 1690, and the same year she was married again, to Samuel Terry. She d. September 17, 1705.
    • http://www.archive.org/stream/genealogyofbliss00blisuoft#page/31/mode/1up
    • 16. ELIZABETH, b. at Boston Mount, about 1637, was m. February 15, 1669-70, as the second wife of Sergeant Miles Morgan (b. 1615 and d. May 28, 1699), who had eight children by a previous marriage. Elizabeth had only one child, named Nathaniel, b. June 14, 1671. She was thirty-two or three years of age at the time of her marriage, and had been engaged in marriage before, but her intended husband was killed by the Indians.
    • 17. HANNAH, b. at Hartford, 1639, d. single, January 25, 1662.
    • 18. *JOHN, b. at Hartford, 1640, d. September 10, 1702.
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  • Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of the ..., Volume 3 edited by William Richard Cutter, William Frederick Adams
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=Bc8UAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA1525&lpg=PA1525&dq=Thomas+Bliss+1580&source=bl&ots=k7xfoEC4aI&sig=Fq73SbMoj7Cce6SgdNMExWCE1Ik&hl=en&ei=dR6yTI3yJJK6sQOjgumCDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CCgQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Thomas%20Bliss%201580&f=false
  • Pg.1525
  • (1) Thomas Bliss, the earliest known of the family of Bliss of this article, lived near Okehampton, in the village of Belstone, in Devonshire, England. (IT IS BELIEVED THAT NONE OF THE BLISS FAMILY WAS FROM BELSTONE Cp) He was a yeoman, a wealthy landowner and a member of the despised sect called Puritans, and suffered many persecutions on account of his religious faith. He was maltreated, impoverished and imprisoned, and finally ruined in health (as well as financially) by the many indignities and hardships forced upon him by the intolerant church party in power. He is supposed to have been born about the year 1550 or 1560. The date of his death is not certainly known, but it probably occurred about the time his sons emigrated to America or soon after. One of his sons, Jonathan, was imprisoned for non-conformity, fined heavily, ill-treated, and in long confinment contracted a fever from which he never recovered. The name of the wife of Thomas Bliss is unknown. His five children were; Jonathan, Thomas, Elizabeth, George, and Mary Elizabeth, married Sir John Calcliffe.
    • (II) Thomas (2), second son of Thomas (1) Bliss, was in Belstone parish, Devonshire, about 1580 or 1585. Thomas and George Bliss embarked at Plymouth with their families and came to America in the autumn of 1635 and landed at Boston. They found they could not be comfortably located together unless they built new houses, for which undertaking the season was too far advanced, so they separated and Thomas settled in that part of Boston called the Mousit; it is across the bay, a little south of the city, and was afterwards named Braintree. The land there alloted to him being situated upon the mountain, he soon came to be called "Thomas of the Mount," and was near losing the family name altogether. The town has since been divided and the part where Thomas lived is now called Quincy. Thomas Bliss and his family and his nephew, Thomas Bliss (son of his brother Jonathan of England) who had arrived in Boston the year before, went from Braintree, perhaps with Rev. Thomas Hooker; if not soon after; and became a pioneer settler in Hartford, Connecticut, some time in 1636-37. By making a farm and selling his improvements to a newcomer, Thomas Bliss had cleared a little money, then about the only way to make money in New England. In the second year after his arrival (1640), Thomas Bliss, senior, as he was called, died. The land apportioned among the Harford settlers was laid out in "lots" and "tiers," and the lot assigned to Thomas Bliss (senior), was "No. 58" in the "tenth tier," south of the little river. It lay on the east side of a street now discontinued, which extended north and south, a short distance to the west of the present Lafayette street, and south of the old state house. The present Trinity street was one of the original streets of Harford and was known as Bliss street from the first settlement to about 1855. It was probably so named from this family, and was then described as extending from "George Steele's to the Mill." Thomas Bliss married, in England, about 1612 or 1615, Margaret, whose maiden name is thought to have been Margaret Lawrence, and it is believed that she was born about the year 1594. The following account of her is taken from the "Genealogy of the Bliss Family," compiled by John Homer Bliss, of Norwich, Connecticut; "She was a good looking woman, with a square oblong face that betokened great capacity and force of character. She had a broad open brow, fair hair, and blue eyes. After the death of her husband she managed the affairs of the family with great prudence and judgment." Her eldest daughter Ann married Robert Chapman, of Saybrook, Connecticut, in 1642, and removed to Saybrook, where her eldest brother Thomas, came soon after to live with them, and where he married in 1644. The other children of the Widow Margaret Bliss, of Hartford, concluded not to settle there permanently, chills and fever prevailing in some localities near the town; she and her children, therefore, in the year of 1643 removed to the settlement at Springfield, Massachusetts, thirty miles or more up the Connecticut river. Margaret sold her property in Hartford, and gathering her household goods and cattle together, prepared with her eight children to make the journey through the forest to Springfield, which she accomplished in about five days. Nathaniel and Samuel, her second and fourth sons, had been there previously, and a dwelling had been prepared for the family on their arrival. A journey like this was thought a great thing in those days. They camped out in the forest three nights with their teams so sparsely was the country settled at that time; and the forests infested with the savage beast and scarcely less savage Indians, were broken only by the single roads to the seaboard, on the east and on the south and these were by no means of the best. Mrs. Margaret had acquaintances in Springfield, whom she had known in England, and here she settled down for the remainder of her days. It is said she purchased a tract of land in Sprinfield one mile square, situated in the south part of the town, on what is now Main street, and bordering on the Connecticut river. One of the streets laid out on the Manor tract has been named "Margaret" street and another "Bliss" street, on which has been built a Congregational church. She lived to see all her children brought up, married and established in homes of their own, except Hannah, who died at about twenty-three years of age. Mrs. Margaret died in Springfield, August 28, 1684, after a residence in America of nearly fifty years, and over forty years since her husband's death. She was an energetic, efficient woman, capable of transacting most kinds of business, and was long remembered in Springfield as a woman of great intellectual ability. A mother with these characteristics seldom fails to transmit them to posterity. Her will, dated in September, 1683, mentions some but not all of the children of Thomas, hence it has been surmised that she may have been a second wife, and that he had children by a former wife. As she survived her husband forty-four years, he must had died comparatively young, or there may have been a great disparity in their ages. She lived more than ninety years in spite of the hardships and anxieties she had passed through and her grandshildren were generally very strong of constitution and longlived, as were also her children. She was a woman of superior abilities, great resolution, and uncommon enterprise, and is entitled to the respect of her descendants, both for her vigor of mind and constitution. The children of Thomas and Margaret Bliss were: Ann, Mary, Thomas, Nathaniel, Lawrence, Samuel, Sarah, Elizabeth, Hannah and John.
  • _________________________
  • The Bliss Family History Society
  • http://blissfhs.co.uk/pioneers.htm
  • These are the first generations of the three Bliss pioneers in New England.
  • THOMAS BLISS of Hartford Connecticut was probably a native of Co. Gloucester, England and we now think he lived his adult life prior to emigrating in the City of Gloucester. First wife? Margaret wife of Thomas Blisse was buried 4 Jun 1621 at St Nicholas church in Gloucester. Thomas had children by his first marriage to Margaret (maidenname unknown) THOMAS born c 1618 ANN born c 1620. SARAH christened 23 Ap 1620 at St Nicholas. Thomas then married Margaret Hulins of Rodborough at Gloucester St Nicholas 18th Oct 1621. Their son NATHANIEL was baptised at Rodborough 28th Dec 1622. Other children by Margaret Hulins were MARY born c 1625 LAWRENCE born c 1628 HANNAH born c 1633 JOHN born c 1635 SAMUEL christened 4 Feb 1637/8 St Mary de Crypt, Gloucester, HESTER & ELIZABETH twins born c 1640 (Hartford?).
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  • A history of the family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to present times ([1902?])
  • https://archive.org/details/historyoffamilyo00morg
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/40/mode/1up
  • Pg.40
    • BRANCH FROM MORGAN OF TREDEGAR.
  • A. (See XVI. 10, ante p. 16.)
  • ELIZABETH, daughter of Sir William of Tredegar; married William Morgan, merchant of Diveru; went to Bristol, England, 1616. Elizabeth died 1638. William died 1648; both buried in Bristol. (See Great Orphan Book and Book of Wills of Bristol.) Issue: Miles Morgan, born 1616, named perhaps after Miles Morgan, captain British Army, who perished with Sir Humphrey Gilbert, half brother of Sir Walter Raleigh, who sailed, 1576, under a patent "to occupy any heathen lands not actually possessed of any Christian prince or people." .....
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/48/mode/1up
  • Pg.48
  • I. MILES MORGAN married Prudence Gilbert 1636. Issue: 1. Mary, born Dec. 14, 1644. 2. Jonathan, born Sept. 16, 1646. 3. David, born July 23, 1648. 4. Peletiah. born May 17, 1650: killed by the Indians 1675; died unmarried. 5. Isaac, born March 12, 1652. 6. Lydia, born Feb. 8, 1654. 7. Hannah, born Feb. 11, 1656. 8. Mercy, born May 18, 1658. PRUDENCE GILBERT MORGAN died Nov. 14. 1660. Miles married, Feb, 15. 1669 (2) ELIZABETH BLISS. By her he had issue : 1. Nathaniel, born June 14, 1671. MILES MORGAN died May 28. 1699. aged 84 years.
  • II. JONATHAN, married, Sarah Cooley, Jan. 15, 1679; died 1780. Issue: 1. Sarah, born Dec. 3, 1690. 2. Jonathan, born Nov. 27. 1682. 3. Mary, born April 19, 1684. 4. Elizabeth, born July 27. 1693. 5. Rebecca, born Oct. 20, 1695.
  • III. DAVID, married Mary Clark Jan. 16, 1672; did May 30, 1731. Issue: 1. Peletiah, born March, 1676, 2. David, born Feb. 18, 1679. 3. John, born Oct. 7, 1682. 4. Jonathan, born Sept, 1685. 5. Mary, born Dec. 24, 1686. 6. Benjamin, born May 2, 1695; married Mary Graves June 4, 1718. Issue: 1. Benjamin, born Nov. 26, 1719. 2. Stephen, born May 4, 1722. 3 Aaron, born Nov. 7, 1724. 4. Mary, born Aug. 4, 1727.
  • IV. ISAAC, married Abigail Gardiner Nov. 12, 1673;
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/49/mode/1up
  • Pg.49
  • (THERE IS CONFUSION HERE WITH BENJAMIN BEING LISTED HERE & AS HUSBAND OF MARY HORTON & SARAH WARNER WITH CHILDREN AS THESE ARE LISTED AS WIVES OF EBENEZER WITH THE CHILDREN)
  • died Oct. 3, 1740. Issue: 1. Prudence, born Nov. 12, 1674. 2. Elizabeth, born Aug. 27, 1677. 3. Jonathan, born Jan. 15, 1679. Benjamin (6 of III. above) m. (1) Mary Horton; m. (2) Sarah Warner. Issue; 1. Ebenezer, b. June 12, 1738, m. Miriam Kilbourn, Feb., 1766. 2. Samuel, b. Feb. 2, 1740, m. Abigail Cooley, Nov., 1766. 3. Sarah, b. Nov. 18, 1742, m. TITUS MORGAN (see below, TITUS 2d, in II. line from NATHANIEL.) 4. Catharine, b. Dec. 31, 1744, m. (1) Moses Cooley; m. (2) James Melvin, Jan., 1779. 5. Choloe, b. Oct. 14, 1747, m. John Burt.
  • V. NATHANIEL, only child of Miles by his second wife, Elizabeth Bliss, born June 14, 1671; married Hannah Bird June 19, 1691; died Aug 30, 1752. Issue: 1. Nathaniel, born Feb. 16, 1692. 2 Samuel, born 1694; died Dec., 1799. 3. Ebenezer, born 1696. 4 Hannah, born 1698. 5. Miles, born 1700. 6. Joseph, born Dec. 3, 1702; married Mary Stebbins. 7. James, born 1705. 8. Isaac, born 1708; died Nov. 7, 1796. 9. Elizabeth, born 1710.
  • https://archive.org/stream/historyoffamilyo00morg#page/66/mode/1up
  • Pg.66
    • LINE OF NATHANIEL, SON OF MILES AND ELIZABETH BLISS.
  • I. NATHANIEL (V, page 49, supra), married Hannah Bird, of Springfield, January 19, 1691. He erected a homestead in West Springfield, on the east side of what is now Chicago street, where he lived to the age of eighty-one years, dying August 30, 1752. His issue were: 1. Nathaniel, b. Feb. 16, 1692. 2. Samuel, b. 1694; d. 1799. 3. Ebenezer, b. March 6, 1696. 4. Hannah Bird, 1698. 5. Miles, b. 1700. 6. Joseph, b. Dec. 3, 1702; married Mary Stebbins. 7. James, b. 1705. 8. Isaac b. 1708. 9. Elizabeth, b. 1710.
  • II. EBENEZER (3 of I above), m. (1) Mary Horton, Jan. 1719; m. (2) Sarah Warner, June 20, 1737. Issue: 1. Ebenezer, b. June 12, 1738. 2. Samuel, b. Feb, 2, 1740; m. Abigail Cooley. 3. Sarah, b. Nov, 18, 1742; m. Titus Morgan, 2nd. 4. Catherine, b. Dec. 31, 1744; m. Moses Cooley, (1), May, 1763; James Melvin, (2), May, 1763. 5. Chloe, b. Oct. 14, 1747; m. John Burt, May 10, 1782.

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Elizabeth (Bliss) Morgan the connection to the JP "Robber Baron" Morgan in the Bliss Family.

The American generational descent from Thomas Sr. Bliss of Hartford to "Robber Baron" John Pierpont (JP) Morgan is

Gen. 1: Thomas Sr. of Hartford (1590-1650) and Margaret (Hulins) (c. 1595-1684) Bliss;

Gen. 2: Elizabeth (Bliss) (c. 1636-1683) and Sgt. Miles (c. 1615-1699) Morgan;

Gen. 3: Nathaniel (1671-1752) and Hannah (Bird) (c. 1670-1751) Morgan;

Gen. 4: Joseph (1702-1786) and Mary (Stebbins) (1713-1798) Morgan;

Gen. 5: Capt. Joseph (1740-1847) and Experience (Smith) (1741-1821) Morgan;

Gen. 6: Joseph (1780-1847) and Sarah (Spencer) (1787-1859) Morgan;

Gen. 7: Junius Spencer (1813-1890) and Juliet (Pierpont) (1816-1884) Morgan;

Gen. 8: John Pierpont "Robber Baron" (1837-1913) and Amelia (Sturges) (1835-1862) Morgan; For links and details see the Descendancy Links of Laurence Overmire:

<http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=DESC&db=glencoe&id=I34198>

JP "Robber Baron" Morgan and Floyd Bliss Hanson are 6th Cousins Thrice Removed.

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view all 26

Elizabeth Morgan's Timeline

1637
1637
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut
1670
February 15, 1670
Age 33
Springfield, Hampden, Mass
1671
June 14, 1671
Age 34
Hartford (Hartford) Connecticut
1683
October 2, 1683
Age 46
Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts
1916
May 2, 1916
Age 46
May 2, 1916
Age 46
May 2, 1916
Age 46
May 2, 1916
Age 46
May 2, 1916
Age 46
1917
May 9, 1917
Age 46