Elizabeth Heskett Dalton (Allred) (1823 - 1916)

‹ Back to Dalton surname

2

Matches

0 0 2
Adds more complete birth place, sibling(s), spouse(s) and child(ren).

View Elizabeth Heskett Dalton (Allred)'s complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Elizabeth Heskett Dalton (Allred)
  • Request to view Elizabeth Heskett Dalton (Allred)'s family tree

Share

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Monroe, Monroe, Missouri, United States
Death: Died in Circleville, Piute, Utah, United States
Managed by: Arthur Whittaker
Last Updated:

About Elizabeth Heskett Dalton (Allred)

Elizabeth Allred was the second wife of Charles Wakeman Dalton.

The surname of Allred was originally Aldridge/Arledge/Aldrich. This family was from Worstead, Norfork, England and came to America in about 1665. I have a complete pedigree of Elizabeth Allred's family going back to England, starting with William Allred/Aldridge/Arledge/Aldrich, born about 1441 in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England.

The Aldrich family, originally from Greater Yarmouth (coastal Norfolk), was prominent in the civic affairs of Norwich, Norfolk in the 15th and 16th centuries. JOHN ALDRICH is generally thought to have been the father of REV. HENRY ALDRED, who is believed to have been the forefather of the American ARLEDGE family. The two Norwich parishes in which the Aldrich family was active were St. Clement's and St. Michael's-at-Plea. Both churches survive today, though St. Michael's is now an antique market. St. Clement's has been maintained as a small church, though it shows evidence today of being a meeting place for local garment-worker's unions.

The first immigrant to America was Clement Allred Sr., 1601-c.1668 and his wife Susan Boswell, who migrated from Norfolk, England to Northumberland County, Virginia in late 1600's. At least four of his sons --George, Thomas, William and Clement are believe to have come to America as well.

Elizabeth Ann Heskell Allred married our Charles Wakeman Dalton on Nov. 2 1850 In Salt Lake City Utah. She was Charles Wakeman Dalton’s second wife. Elizabeth Allred’s grand father was James Allred, born Jan. 22 1788. James Allred was the first of this Allred family to join the new LDS Church.

Elizabeth Ann Heskett Allred Dalton is Rodney Dalton’s great-great grandmother.

Elizabeth Ann Heskett Allred Dalton was born Feb. 23 1833 in Monroe City, Monroe Co. Missouri. Her parents were Martin Carroll Allred and Mary Polly Heskett.

Below is a history of Elizabeth’s father, who was Martin Carroll Allred. He was a member of Zion's Camp in 1834 and was a member of the High Council at Nauvoo. Martin Carroll, along with many others, was taken prisoner. He was brought before Austin A. King, at Richmond, for trial, charged with several crimes of high treason against the state, murder, burglary, arson, robbery, and larceny on Nov. 11, 1838. The charges brought against Martin Carroll were dismissed because nothing could be proven so he and several others were discharged. Martin Carroll covenanted to assist the saints in removing from Missouri on Jan. 29, 1838.

Martin Carrol Allred (1806-1840). Was born in Warren, KY. He participated in march of Zion's Camp 1834. Received anointing or special blessing in Kirtland Temple, 14 April 1836. Received into elders quorum same day. Moved to Caldwell Co, Mo. In the fall of 1836.

The Allred family had joined the LDS Church in 1832, the year a son, James Franklin was born, and suffered much of the persecutions of the Mormons which took place for the ensuing fourteen years. They moved from Monroe County to Clay County, thence to Caldwell County in 1836, and finally under the Mormon “Extermination” order of Governor Boggs, were driven from the state of Missouri in 1839. A direct quotation from Mavis’ writings is informative and interesting: “James Franklin’s father was one of the men arrested and put in prison with the Prophet Joseph Smith, although he was later released. Some of the Allred’s moved first to Pike County, Illinois, and then later to Nauvoo. Family tradition states that Martin the father died from exposure suffered at that time. He died May 2, 1840, but the place is unknown. The history of mother Mary - or Polly - is not available, but she undoubtedly died during this time, because her children came west with their grandparents, after the expulsion of the Saints from Nauvoo in

1846.”

Just how Elizabeth traveled across the plains is really not known, but it is believed she traveled with her grandparents or others of the Allred family who must of arrived in the Valley before Elizabeth met Charles Wakeman Dalton. (See article below on Isaac Allred)

“The family lived in Nauvoo until 1846, when with the rest of the Saints, Isaac Allred and his family were forced to flee for their lives. He crossed the Missouri River on the ice in February of 1846. After much deprivation, suffering and sorrow, the family struggled across the whole State of Iowa to a point 8 miles east of Council Bluffs. Here with his brother James and the other Allred families, they formed a camp and planted crops. Here they stayed in what was known as "Allred Camp" until 1849 when they moved west in Allen Taylor's Company, their son-in-law who had married Sarah Lovisa. The company started on July 12, 1849, with Captain Taylor in command and Isaac as one of his counselors, and captains of fifty. The company consisted of approximately 300 emigrants and 100 wagons. Isaac Allred and his wife and family arrived in Salt Lake Valley on October 10, 1849”

Source: LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 3.

Elizabeth Allred married Charles Wakeman Dalton in Salt Lake City on Nov. 2nd 1850.

During her long life in a typical Mormon marriage, she bore her husband five sons and five daughters, including Martin Carrell Dalton Sr., Rodney Dalton’s great-great-grandfather. All of Elizabeth Ann’s children lived to adulthood except two, Landon died in infancy and Brigham Wakeman Dalton died at age 13.

I’m sure that after Elizabeth Dalton married Charles Wakeman she lived in SLC and probably first lived in the same log house that her husband and his first wife did. In the 1851 Salt Lake County census, it shows Charles W. Dolton, Juliet and their first son, Charles Albert and a brother of Juliettia, Merritt Bowen. It does not list Elizabeth Ann. So where was Charles Wakeman’s second wife? By this time he may have built her a separate home.

Elizabeth Dalton moved to many places with her husband Charles. We assume that she lived in the places her children were born in; Orson in Parowan, Iron Co.1851; Brigham in Cedar City, Iron Co. 1854; George in Fort Harmony, Washington Co., 1856; Ann, Monetta and Landon in Centerville, Davis Co.1858; Levira in Chicken Creek, Juab Co. (very near the present town of Levan) 1865. Martin in Circleville, Piute Co., 1867; Harriet in Beaver City, Beaver Co., 1870; and Effie in Wild Cat Canyon, (Near Zion Park) 1875.

Elizabeth Ann Dalton must have spent quite a bit of time alone raising her children, as Charles Wakeman was on the road most of the time. Read the history of Charles Wakeman Dalton in Chapter 7. She died on Nov. 8 1916 in Circleville, Piute Co. Utah and is buried in the Circleville Cemetery.

view all 13

Elizabeth Dalton's Timeline

1823
February 23, 1823
Monroe, Monroe, Missouri, United States
1850
November 2, 1850
Age 27
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States
1851
November 17, 1851
Age 28
Parowan, Iron, Utah, United States
1854
January 3, 1854
Age 30
Cedar City, Iron, Utah, United States
1856
November 22, 1856
Age 33
Harmony, Washington, Utah, United States
1858
December 20, 1858
Age 35
Centerville, Davis, Utah, United States
1860
January 21, 1860
Age 36
Centerville, Davis, Utah, United States
1862
September 30, 1862
Age 39
Centerville, Davis, Utah, United States
1865
February 9, 1865
Age 41
Chicken Creek, Juab, Utah, United States
1867
February 19, 1867
Age 43
Beaver, Beaver, Utah, United States