Elizabeth Thomas (Carter) (1811 - 1889)

‹ Back to Thomas surname

5

Matches

4 1 0
Adds burial place.

View Elizabeth Thomas (Carter)'s complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Elizabeth Thomas (Carter)
  • Request to view Elizabeth Thomas (Carter)'s family tree

Share

Related Projects

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ledbury, Herefordshire England
Death: Died in Salt Lake City, UT
Managed by: Ryan Lindsay
Last Updated:
view all 20

Immediate Family

About Elizabeth Thomas (Carter)

Biography from William Carter - First Plowman In Utah: His Ancestors & Descendants by Shanna S. Jones. 1999

"Elizabeth Carter, born 28 Mar 1811 in Ledbury, Hereford, England; christened 8 Jan 1812 in Ledbury, Hereford, England; died 28 Sep 1889 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah; buried in Spanish Fork, Utah, Utah.

Elizabeth Carter was baptized by Wilford Woodruff in England, Sept. 1840, according to his Journal; a copy of which is located in the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. About 1829 is the approximated marriage date M. Dale Robertson lists as Elizabeth Carter's Marriage to William Patrick Woodyatt. However, some histories say she never married William Patrick Woodyatt but had his baby in May 1831. Barbara Chambers, the English researcher hired by the William Carter Family Organization in 1997, found a base born (illegitimate) daughter Elizabeth born to Elizabeth Carter, Bishop's Street, Ledbury, Hereford, spinster (single) woman, 3 May 1831 in the Ledbury Bishop's Transcripts.

Elizabeth came to Utah in 1852 with her husband, Charles Thomas, and their small children. Two more children were bom in Illinois; two in Iowa, and two in Salt Lake City. Their home was a large two-story building in the Seventh Ward in Salt Lake City. "Grandma Thomas" spent much of her time ministering to the sick. During the summer and fall months she would gather herbs and roots which she carefully dried and stored. When sickness came to her family and neighbors, she was often called upon to aid them. She was seventy-eight years of age at the time of her death, loved by all who knew her. —Eliza Beach Johnson (Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 2, p. 110)

Elizabeth is buried in the Spanish Fork Cemetery with her husband, and next to her first daughter, Eliza, and her husband."

More information regarding Charles and Elizabeth Carter Thomas and her brother William Carter and their conversion to the Mormon faith and subsequent migration to Nauvoo is also found in the Jones' book:

"While William Carter was working at a forge in Ledbury, he heard some beautiful singing. He went to the door but could not detect where the singing was coming from. That night as he was returning home from work, he met a Church Elder who invited him to come to a meeting that evening. William took some of his family and went to the gathering. The gospel message of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints so impressed him, that he went to the speaker after the meeting and asked to be baptized. They told him he should wait and learn more about the gospel before being baptized. William replied, "If I should wait a year, I would not be any more ready than I am now." Young William was certain it was the true gospel. His mother was of the opposite opinion and her children were forbidden to attend any more meetings! They baptized William's married sister, Elizabeth Carter Thomas, September 22, 1840.

Despite his mother's wishes, William continued to attend the meetings in secret. Brigham Young visited Mr. Ockey on December 20,1840. A week later, nineteen year-old William walked to Castle Frome, where they baptized him on December 27,1840, by Elder Edward Ockey. All this was done in secret, his mother not being the wiser of what he had done. His father was alive until 1848, but William never mentioned his opinion of the Church. William's sister, Elizabeth, who was married to Charles Thomas, was living at Stanley Hill, a hamlet 4.5 miles north west of Ledbury, and in the parish of Bosbury. Elizabeth, Charles and their four children had also joined the Church. They were planning to go to America. When Sarah, their mother, heard of this, she was very upset and tried to persuade Elizabeth to change her mind. Sarah was very attached to her ten-year-old granddaughter Eliza, and asked that she come and visit her before she left for America. Sarah had decided that she would not let her return to her mother. Elizabeth tried to get the child from her mother with-out causing any trouble, but Sarah insisted that the child stay longer.

William planned to go to America on the same ship as his sister, her husband and their family. He and Ehzabeth planned to get Eliza away from their mother before they set sail. Being just ten years old, Eliza wasn't aware of the plans to sail to America. The night before they were to leave, William told her of the plans and that they would need to quietly leave her grandmother's house, so as not to disturb her. At 3:00 a.m., William awakened Eliza and together they prepared to leave. They were able to leave the house without disturbing anyone. That was to be the last time William ever saw his home in England, his mother and father, or any family mem- bers other than his sister Ehzabeth and her family. Little Eliza and William walked all the way to Bristol to the ship where the group of Saints was preparing to sail. Elizabeth and her hus- band, Charles, were thankful as they met William and their daughter at the boat. They set sail from Bristol, England, in April 1841 on the 320-ton bark Caroline, arriving in Quebec, a passage of more than two months. The bark Caroline was 106' x 27' x 7'. They built her in 1825 at Cochin, India.5 These passengers were among the first Mormons to emigrate from England. This vessel carried the group of Saints under the leadership of Elder Thomas Clark. However, no information is available on this voyage. From British records of ship registrations identifying this vessel with reasonable assurance was possible, although the name Caroline is one of the most popular in ship registries. This small three-masted bark was London-owned. They built her with two decks, a square stern, and had a figurehead of a woman's bust. On 26 March 1850 they wrecked her at Honolulu. They landed in Quebec, Canada, and sailed up the St. Lawrence River. The company sailed across the Great Lakes to Chicago, Illinois, and then journeyed by land to Nauvoo, Illinois. By the time William arrived in Nauvoo, his shoes were worn, and he was barefoot.

When the party was just a few miles from Nauvoo, they heard someone shout, "Here comes the Prophet." Thrills went through the little company and they stopped at the side of the road. Wilham, being ashamed of his bare feet, quickly stepped behind a fallen log by the side of the road. The Prophet Joseph Smith rode up on his horse and stopped in front of them. This was a joyous moment for William Carter and the band of Saints that had been traveling for three months. They were worn and tired, but now were being greeted by a prophet of God. When Joseph Smith saw William,he said,"Boy,what are you here for?" William replied,"For the Gospel's sake." July 11,1841 was the day William arrived in Nauvoo. He began work the next day on the Nauvoo House. He became acquainted with the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum Smith, and assisted in the erection of the Nauvoo Temple."

view all 16

Elizabeth Thomas's Timeline

1811
May 28, 1811
Ledbury, Herefordshire England
1831
May 5, 1831
Age 19
Ledbury, Herefordshire England
1834
August 2, 1834
Age 23
Hereford, Herefordshire, England
1835
1835
Age 23
1837
January 24, 1837
Age 25
Hereford, Herefordshire, England
1839
September 16, 1839
Age 28
Hereford, Herefordshire, England
1841
April, 1841
- July 11, 1841
Age 29
Nauvoo, IL, USA
1842
December 12, 1842
Age 31
Nauvoo, IL
1845
July 27, 1845
Age 34
Nauvoo, IL
1848
November 12, 1848
Age 37
Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, USA