Enguerrand VII de Courcy de Coucy, KG, 7th Earl Of Bedford

Is your surname de Coucy?

Research the de Coucy family

Enguerrand VII de Courcy de Coucy, KG, 7th Earl Of Bedford's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Enguerrand VII de Courcy de Coucy, KG, 7th Earl Of Bedford

Also Known As: "Enguerrand De Coucy VII", "Enguerrand VII De Coucy", "Ingelram De Coucy Earl Of Bedford", "Inglegram", "Enguerrand De Courcy VII"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Coucy-Le-Chateau,Aisne,France
Death: Died in Bursa, Türkiye
Cause of death: In captivity of Bubonic Plague
Place of Burial: Abbey de Villneuve, Soissons, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Enguerrand VI de Coucy and Katharina von Österreich
Husband of Isabella Plantagenet, Lady of Coucy and Isabelle de Lorraine
Father of Marie de Coucy; Philippa de Coucy; Perceval de Coucy-Guines, Seigneur d'Aubermont; Maud de Coucy and Isabelle de Coucy
Brother of Marie Anne de Coucy

Occupation: Sire de Coucy
Managed by: Flemming Allan Funch
Last Updated:

About Enguerrand VII de Courcy de Coucy, KG, 7th Earl Of Bedford

Sir Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Earl of Bedford, Comte de Soissons, Seigneur de Coucy, Oisy, Montmiral, & Marle, Grand Marshal & Butler of France, Governor of Brittany, 4th Lord Gynes1,2,3,4,5,6


M, #20474, b. circa 1339, d. 18 February 1397


Father Enguerrand VI de Coucy, Seigneur de Guines, Coucy, la Fere, & d'Oisy, Vicomte de Meaux3,6 b. c 1317, d. 25 Aug 1346

Mother Katharina of Austria3,6 b. 9 Feb 1320, d. 28 Sep 1349

Sir Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Earl of Bedford, Comte de Soissons, Seigneur de Coucy, Oisy, Montmiral, & Marle, Grand Marshal & Butler of France, Governor of Brittany, 4th Lord Gynes was born circa 1339 at of Coucy-le-Chateau, Aisne, Picardy, France; Age 5 in 1344.6 He married Isabel Plantagenet, daughter of Edward III Plantagenet, King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Aquitaine and Philippa of Hainault, on 27 July 1365 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; They had 2 daughters (Marie, wife of Henri de Bar, Seigneur d'Oisy; & Philippe, wife of Sir Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford, Duke of Ireland).3,4,5,6 A contract for the marriage of Sir Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Earl of Bedford, Comte de Soissons, Seigneur de Coucy, Oisy, Montmiral, & Marle, Grand Marshal & Butler of France, Governor of Brittany, 4th Lord Gynes and Isabella of Lorraine was signed on 26 February 1386; They had 1 daughter (Isabel, wife of Philippe de Burgundy, Count of Nevers & Rethel, Baron of Donzy). By an unknown mistress he had an illegitimate son (Perceval, Seigneur d'Aubermont).1,7,3,6 Sir Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Earl of Bedford, Comte de Soissons, Seigneur de Coucy, Oisy, Montmiral, & Marle, Grand Marshal & Butler of France, Governor of Brittany, 4th Lord Gynes died on 18 February 1397 at Bursa, Turkey; Died of Plague. Buried at Villeneuve Abbey, Soissons.1,8,4,6


Family 1 Isabella of Lorraine b. c 1366, d. a 1423

Child

  • Isabeau de Coucy+

Family 2

Child

  • Maud de Coucy+8 d. a 1349

Family 3 Isabel Plantagenet b. 16 Jun 1332, d. 5 Oct 1382

Children

  • Marie de Coucy+9,6 b. Apr 1366, d. bt 3 Mar 1405 - 31 Dec 1405
  • Philippe de Coucy10,5,11 b. c 1368, d. 24 Sep 1411

Citations

  • 1.[S2] Detlev Schwennicke, Europaische Stammtafeln, New Series, Vol. I/2, Tafel 205.
  • 2.[S6311] Unknown author, Europaische Stammtafeln by Isenburg, chart 82.
  • 3.[S2] Detlev Schwennicke, Europaische Stammtafeln, New Series, Vol. XXVII, Tafel 65.
  • 4.[S11600] 40000 Ancestors of the Counts of Paris, 22-144.
  • 5.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 269.
  • 6.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 85-86.
  • 7.[S11569] Europaische Stammtafeln, by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, Vol. VI, Tafel 130.
  • 8.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 27.
  • 9.[S2] Detlev Schwennicke, Europaische Stammtafeln, New Series, Vol. I/2, Tafel 228.
  • 10.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. X, p. 227-232.
  • 11.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 86.

From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p682.htm#i20474

____________________

Enguerrand VII de Coucy, KG (1340 – 18 February 1397, in captivity at Bursa), also known as Ingelram de Coucy, was a 14th century French nobleman, the last Sieur de Coucy, and the son-in-law of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. Following his marriage to Edward's daughter Isabella of England (1332–1382), Coucy also held the English title of 1st Earl of Bedford, among other English estates granted to the couple by Edward III. Because his life is well-chronicled, and he occupies a pivotal role in late medieval history, notably in the conflict between England and France, historian Barbara Tuchman makes him the main character in A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century.

Early years

Coucy became the Sieur de Coucy at the death of his father, Enguerrand VI during the sequence of battles ending with the Battle of Crécy in 1346. He also gained the titles of 4th Lord Gynes: Sire d' Oisy, in the district of Marle and the Sire de La Fère. His mother, Katharina von Habsburg of Austria, died in 1348 or 1349 during a wave of the Black Death. Coucy first became involved in the war against England at the age of fifteen, serving among the barons of Picardy in the battalion of Moreau de Fiennes, a future Marshal of France. In 1358, at the age of eighteen, Coucy acted as a leader during the suppression of the peasant revolt known as the Jacquerie.

Between England and France

Young Coucy first met Edward III of England in 1359 as one of forty royal and noble hostages exchanged for the future release of the captured King John II of France. He was retained as a hostage in 1360, when the Treaty of Bretigny established territorial adjustments between the two countries and set the monetary payments for King John's release. The hostages finally arrived in England in November 1360. Coucy was to spend the next five years as a guest of the royal court. Chronicler Jean Froissart records that "...the young lord de Coucy shined in dancing and caroling whenever it was his turn. He was in great favor with both the French and English..."

In 1365, the wealthy Coucy was betrothed and married to the 33-year-old Isabella of England, who has been described as an over-indulged, willful, and wildly extravagant princess. To care for her personal needs, her father settled a substantial annual income on her for life, as well as gifts of costly jewelry, and properties that included manors, castles, and priories. Coucy was her choice as a husband, as she wished to marry for love after the failure of previous betrothal negotiations with several noble houses of Europe. Coucy received, as part of the marriage settlement, the restoration of former Coucy lands in Yorkshire, Lancaster, Westmorland and Cumberland, England. He was also released as a hostage for the French treaty requirements, with no payment of ransom. In November 1365, after their marriage on 27 July, the couple was given leave to travel to France. Their daughter Marie de Coucy was born in April 1366 at Coucy. During a subsequent visit to England with his new family, Coucy was named the Earl of Bedford and was inducted into the Order of the Garter. In 1367, the Coucy's second daughter, Philippa de Coucy, was born in England. At this time, Coucy was presented with additional French lands, under the title Count of Soissons, which had come to Edward through the payment of ransom.

Coucy and his English wife spent much of their lives on their northern French estate, although Isabella made frequent trips to England, particularly while Coucy was away in the service of France. He held the office of Governor of Brittany in 1380. He also held the offices of Grand Butler of France and Marshal of France. Considered among the most skilled and experienced of all the knights of France, Coucy twice refused the position of Constable of France, the kingdom's highest and most lucrative military office.

Always diplomatic, Coucy managed to maintain both his allegiance to the King of France and to his English father-in-law during the period of intermittent armed conflict between England and France known as the Hundred Years' War. At various times, he acted as a captain, envoy, councillor and mediator during the conflict. However, Coucy resigned all of his English honours on the accession of King Richard II on 26 August 1377.

French Sire

In the autumn of 1375 Coucy engaged a number of Free Companies, including one led by Owain Lawgoch, to seize some Habsburg lands which he claimed through his mother. However, in the resulting Gugler War Coucy's troops were attacked when passing through Switzerland, and after a number of reverses the expedition had to be abandoned.

In 1380, after the death of Isabella of England, Coucy married Isabelle, daughter of John I, Duke of Lorraine and Sophie von Württemberg; they had one daughter, Isabel de Coucy (date of birth unknown; died 1411).

The 1390 siege of Mahdia saw Coucy as a participant. Coucy died at age 56, on 18 February 1397, at Bursa, Anatolia, Turkey while participating in the last medieval crusade. He fought in the Battle of Nicopolis on 28 September 1396, where he was taken prisoner. His death was due to an outbreak of the bubonic plague among the Turks. His body was returned to Europe and he was buried at Abbey of Villeneuve, near Soissons, France.

Coucy's campaigns

Enguerrand participated in the following campaigns:

1358 Suppression of the Jacquerie

1369 Alsace camapaign

1375 Gugler war

1378 Normandy campaign, Hundred Years War (HYW)

1379 Defense of the Picardy, (HYW)

1382 Suppression of Flemish uprising

1384 Italian campaign

1386 Preparation for invasion of England, (HYW)

1388 Guelders campaign

1390 Siege of Mahdia

1395 Campaign against Genoa

1396 Battle of Nicopolis

Coucy estate

Coucy inherited the most awesome fortress in Europe at the death of his father, Enguerrand VI in 1346. The castle is known as the Château de Coucy and is considered a spectacular architectural achievement for its time. Coucy was responsible for the maintenance of the castle and additional construction on his familial estates, which consisted of the fortress, 150 towns and villages, famous forests and ponds, along with significant revenue. The estate was centered in the commune of Coucy Le Château Auffrique, in the modern Department of Aisne, France.

According to historian Barbara Tuchman, Coucy found his estate in difficult economic and social circumstances when he returned from England in 1366. During his absence, facilities and agricultural properties in the estate communities had been damaged by both armies engaged in the war. Mills, granaries, breweries and other structures had to be rebuilt. Hired labor was in short supply, due both to the Black Death and war casualties. In addition, serfs permanently attached to the estate had fled to outlying communities, seeking work and security. In August 1368, Coucy issued a collective grant of freedom to 22 towns and villages under his control. He noted in the charter that his late father had intended to grant his subjects their freedom, but that the action was prevented by his premature death. Coucy established a system of rents and revenues intended to return the estate to prosperity and attract workers. (Tuchman, pp. 232–234)

After the death of Coucy, his former squire and first cousin Aubert, an illegitimate son of his father's brother, was legitimized by Charles VI. Aubert de Coucy, however, was not involved in a prolonged dispute over the Coucy estate between Coucy's eldest daughter, Marie de Bar, and his second wife, Isabelle of Lorraine (d. 1423). Upon Marie's sudden death in 1405, the vast Coucy lands became part of the royal estates of France.

The famous castle was renovated by Viollet-le-Duc in the 19th century. However, it was deliberately blown up with 28 tons of explosives at the order of General Ludendorff; this was apparently done for no other reason than to spite Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria who had asked Ludendorff to protect the castle from war damage. (Tuchman, last pages)

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enguerrand_VII,_Lord_of_Coucy

_________________________

ENGUERRAND [VI] (-killed in battle 25 Aug 1346, bur Ourecamp). Seigneur de Coucy, de Marle, de la Fère d´Oisy et de Montmirail. m (contract Vincennes 25 Nov 1338) as her first husband, KATHARINA of Austria, daughter of LEOPOLD I Duke of Austria & his wife Catherine de Savoie (9 Feb 1320-28 Sep 1349, bur Königsfelden). She married secondly (Feb 1348) Konrad Graf von Hardegg Burggraf von Magdeburg. The Chronicle of Matthias Nueweburgensis records the death in 1349 of "domina de Kussi, filia quondam Lupoldi ducis Austrie" and "Conradus de Megdburg maritus eius"[703]. Enguerrand [VI] & his wife had one child:

a) ENGUERRAND [VII] ([1339]-Bursa, Anatolia of plague 18 Nov 1397, bur Soissons, Abbaye de Villeneuve). Seigneur de Coucy, de Marle, de la Fère d´Oisy et de Montmirail. He was sent to England in 1360 as one of the hostages for Jean II King of France. Created Earl of Bedford 11 May 1366. Comte de Soissons 9 Jul 1367. He resigned all his English honours 26 Aug 1377 to King Richard II, and devoted himself to serving France. Marshal and Grand Butler of France. Having refused the appointment of Connétable of France, he was appointed Governor of Brittany. Member of the Council of Regency during the minority of Charles VI King of France. The History of the monastery at Soissons records its foundation 1 Jul 1391 by "Enguerandus dominus de Coucy…et consorte mea Isabelli de Lotharingia"[704]. He was taken prisoner at Nicopolis by the Turks. m firstly (27 Jul 1365) ISABELLA of England, daughter of EDWARD III King of England & his wife Philippa de Hainaut (Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire 16 Feb or [Mar] or 16 Jun 1332-before 4 May 1379 or [17 Jun/5 Oct] 1382, bur Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London). She remained in England after her husband resigned his English honours in 1377. m secondly (contract 26 Feb 1286) ISABELLE de Lorraine, daughter of JEAN I Duke of Lorraine & his wife Sophie von Württemberg (-after 1423). The History of the monastery at Soissons records its foundation 1 Jul 1391 by "Enguerandus dominus de Coucy…et consorte mea Isabelli de Lotharingia"[705]. Dame de Florennes, de Martigny et de Rumigny. Enguerrand [VII] & his first wife had two children:

  • i) MARIE (-1404). The History of the monastery at Soissons records that "Enguerandus dominus de Coucy" had "duas filias Mariam…et Philippam" from his first wife "filia Eduardi Angliæ regis", adding that Marie married "domino Henrico de Bar"[706]. Ctss de Soissons. Heiress of Coucy and Oisy. m HENRI de Bar, son of ROBERT I Duc de Bar & his wife Marie de France (Bar-le-Duc [1367]-Treviso Nov 1398, bur Paris, couvent des Celestins).
  • ii) PHILIPPA (-Oct 1411). Heiress of Morholm, Wirisdale. She was styled Duchess of Ireland even after her divorce[707]. m (5 Oct 1376 or before, repudiated, divorced 1387, divorce declared void 17 Oct 1389) as his first wife, ROBERT de Vere Earl of Oxford, son of THOMAS de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Maud de Ufford (16 Jan 1362-Louvain 1392, bur Louvain, transferred Nov 1395 to Earl's Colne). He was created Marquess of Dublin for life 1 Dec 1385, and Duke of Ireland for life 13 Oct 1386.

From: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#GuillaumeCoucydied1335

_______________________________

Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy was born circa 1339.1 He was the son of Enguerrand VI de Coucy, Sire de Coucy and Katharina von Habsburg.2 He married, firstly, Isabella of England, daughter of Edward III, King of England and Philippe de Hainaut, on 27 July 1365 at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.1 He married, secondly, Isabel de Lorraine, daughter of Jean I, Duc de Lorraine and Sophie von Württemberg, in 1380.2 He died on 18 February 1397 at Bursa, Anatolia, Turkey, from the palgue, while still a prisoner.3 He was buried at Abbey of Villeneuve, Soissons, France.3

Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy gained the title of 4th Lord Gynes, de jure.4 He was also known as Ingelram de Coucy.2 He gained the title of Sire de Coucy.1,2 He gained the title of Sire d' Oisy, in the district of Marle.2 He gained the title of Sire de La Fère.2 In 1360 he was one of the hostages for John, King of France, to England, and so arrived in England.2 He was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (K.G.) in 1365.2 He was created 1st Earl of Bedford [England] on 11 May 1366.1,2 He gained the title of Comte de Soissons on 9 July 1367, purchasing this territory from another of the hostages to England.1,2 He resigned as all of his English honours, on the accession of King Richard II on 26 August 1377.2 He held the office of Governor of Brittany in 1380.3 He held the office of Grand Butler of France.2 He held the office of Marshal of France.2 He fought in the Battle of Nicopolis on 28 September 1396, where he was taken prisoner by the Turks.3

Child of Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy and Isabel de Lorraine

1.Isabel de Coucy5 d. 1411

Children of Enguerrand VII de Coucy, Sire de Coucy and Isabella of England

1.Mary de Coucy1 b. Apr 1366, d. 1404

2.Philippe de Coucy1 b. 1367, d. c Oct 1411

Citations

1.[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 94. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 69. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

3.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 70.

4.[S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 79. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.

5.[S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 75. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p10206.htm#i102057

____________________

Isabella PLANTAGENET (C. Bedford)

Born: 16 Jun 1332, Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, England

Died: BEF 4 May 1379, London, England

Buried: Greyfriars Church, Newgate, London, Middlesex, England

Father: EDWARD III PLANTAGENET (King of England)

Mother: Phillippa of Hainault (Queen of England)

Married: Enguerrand Le BRUN de Courcy (7º E. Bedford) 27 Jul 1365, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England

Children:

1. Mary De COURCY (b. 1366) (m. Robert (Henry) De Barr, Marquess Pont-â-Mousson)

2. Phillippa De COURCY (b. 1367) (m. Robert De Vere, 1º D. Ireland)

From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/PLANTAGENET.htm#Isabella PLANTAGENET (C. Bedford)

_____________________

see;

Tuchman, Barbara, A Distant Mirror

______________________

_____________________________

view all 13

Enguerrand VII de Courcy de Coucy, KG, 7th Earl Of Bedford's Timeline

1340
1340
Coucy-Le-Chateau,Aisne,France
1365
July 27, 1365
Age 25
Windsor,England
1366
April 1366
Age 26
Chateau De Coucy, Coucy-Le-Chateau, Aisne, France
1367
April 18, 1367
Age 27
Eltham, Kent, England
1385
1385
Age 45
Nancy, Mthe-et-Melle, France
1386
1386
Age 46
Ofchateaudecoucy, Laon, Aisne, France
1386
Age 46
Ofchateaudecoucy, Laon, Aisne, France
1397
February 16, 1397
Age 57
Brusa, Turkey
February 18, 1397
Age 57
Bursa, Türkiye
April 1397
Age 57
Soissons, France