Eochaidh Feidlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann

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Eochaidh Feidhlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann

Nicknames: "Eochaidh Feidhlioch", "Eochaidh Feldlioch", "Eochaid Feidlach", "Eochaid Feidlech", "Eochaid Faidlioch", "Eochu Feidlech", "Eodchaidh Feidhlioch", "Sodchardh", "Eochaide Feidioch"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in Tara, Meath, Ireland
Place of Burial: Irlanda
Immediate Family:

Son of Finn mac Fionlogha, King in Ireland and Benia . ingen Crimthainn
Husband of Cloth Fionn ingen Echdach
Father of Bres, Nár and Lothar Findemna mac Echdach; Clothra . ingen Echach; Maedhb . ingen Echdach, Queen of Connaught; Mugain Aitinchairchech ingen Echdach; Derbriu . mac Echdach and 2 others
Brother of Ailill Angubae and Eochu Airem mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann

Occupation: King of Ireland - see http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_020.htm, aka Eochaid `the Steadfast'; `Constant Sighing'; 93rd MONARCH of IRELAND; slew Tachna Tathlioch, 93rd King of Ireland
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Eochaidh Feidlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann

"the enduring" -------------------- NOTES. Dates are referred Before Christ.

           Las fechas se refieren a era Antes de Cristo.
No hay una fecha segura en cuanto a la [epoca de Eochaid. Mientras unos lo sitúan a la par de Julio César 48 al 44 A.C.,otros usan la cronología de Geoffrey Keatings, determinando su muerte el a;o 142 en vez del 60 A.C.

71. EOCHAIDH FEIDHLIOCH

93rd King of Ireland, d. 142 B.C. married Cloth Fionn daughter of Eochadh Uchticathan.

Fte:Johnson Lineage Starting with Adam & Eve

(Lineage of Mardenna Johnson Hunter published in 1965. Used with permission.)

Contact

E-mail: dianajhunter@juno.com

Last modified on July 9, 2002

Eochu Feidlech

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Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"),[1] son of Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht.

According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid.[2] The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann (modern County Sligo),[3] but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Eochaid Sálbuide, the king of Ulster, was also killed. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara.[4]

Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn,[5] and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb.[6] When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb bore Conchobar a son called Amalgad, but later left him, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.[3

The three findemna tried to overthrow their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich. The night before the battle, their sister Clothru, afraid that they would die without an heir, seduced all three of them, and the future High King Lugaid Riab nDerg, was conceived. The next day they were killed, and their father, seeing their severed heads, swore that no son should directly succeed his father to the High Kingship of Ireland.[7]

He ruled for twelve years, and died of natural causes at Tara, succeeded by his brother Eochu Airem. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with the dictatorship of Julius Caesar (48-44 BC).[2] The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 94-82 BC,[8] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 143-131 BC.[9]

Preceded by

Fachtna Fáthach High King of Ireland

LGE 1st century BC

FFE 94-82 BC

AFM 143-131 BC Succeeded by

Eochaid Airem

[edit] References

1.^ Dictionary of the Irish Language, Compact Edition, Royal Irish Academy, 1990, p. 297. His name is also spelt Eochaidh, Eochy, and his epithet is variously spelled Feidleach, Feidhleach, Feidlioch, Feidhlioch.

2.^ a b R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 299

3.^ a b Joseph O'Neill (ed. & trans), "Cath Boinde", Ériu 2, 1905, pp. 173-185

4.^ Margaret C. Dobs (ed. & trans.), "La Bataille de Leitir Ruibhe", Revue Celtique 39, 1922, pp. 1-32

5.^ Margaret C. Dobs (ed. & trans.), "Cath Cumair", Revue Celtique 43, 1926, pp. 277-342

6.^ Edward Gwynn (ed. & trans.), The Metrical Dindshenchas Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1906, Vol 3, Poem 70: Duma Selga, pp. 387-395

7.^ Gwynn, The Metrical Dindshenchas Vol 4, Druimm Criaich Poem 13: Druimm Criach, pp. 43-57; Vernam Hull, (ed. & trans.), "Aided Meidbe: The Violent Death of Medb", Speculum v.13 issue 1, Jan 1938, pp. 52-61; O'Neill, "Cath Boinde"; Dobs, "Cath Cumair"

8.^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éireann 1.31

9.^ Annals of the Four Masters M5057-506972

. Eochaidh Feidlioch: his son; was the 93rd Monarch; m Clothfionn, dau. of Eochaidh Uchtleathan, who was a very virtuous lady. By him she had three children at a birth - Breas, Nar, and Lothar (the Fineamhas), who were slain at the battle of Dromchriadh; after their death, a melancholy settled on the Monarch, hence his name "Feidhlioch." This Monarch caused the division of the Kingdom by Ugaine Mór into twenty-five parts, to cease; and ordered that the ancient Firvolgian division into Provinces should be resumed, viz., Two Munsters, Leinster, Conacht, and Ulster. He also divided the government of these Provinces amongst his favourite courtiers: - Conacht he divided into three parts between Fiodhach, Eochaidh Allat, and Tinne, son of Conragh, son of Ruadhri Mór, No 62 on the "Line of Ir;" Ulster (Uladh) he gave to Feargus, the son of Leighe; Leinster he gave to Ros, the son of Feargus Fairge; and the two Munsters he gave to Tighernach Teadhbheamach and Deagbadah. After this division of the Kingdom, Eochaidh proceeded to erect a Royal Palace in Conacht; this he built on Tinne's government in a place called Druin-na-n Druagh, now Craughan (from Craughan Crodhearg, Maedhbh's mother, to whom she gave the palace), but previously, Rath Eochaidh. About the same time he bestowed his daughter the Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, whom he constituted King of Conacht; Maedhbh being hereditary Queen of that Province. After many years reign Tinne was slain by Maceacht (or Monaire) at Tara. After ten years' undivided reign, Queen Maedhbh married Oilioll Mór, son of Ros Ruadh, of Leinster, to whom she bore the seven Maine; Oilioll Mór was at length slain by Conall Cearnach, who was soon after killed by the people of Conacht. Maedhbh was at length slain by Ferbhuidhe, the son of Conor MacNeasa (Neasa was his mother); but in reality this Conor was the son of Fachtna Fathach, son of Cas, son of Ruadhri Mór, of the Line of Ir. This Monarch, Eochaidh, died at Tara, B.C. 130.

Cit: Ancestry - My Roots -------------------- Title: King of Ireland

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_020.htm

was the 93rd Monarch; m. Clothfionn, dau. of Eochaidh Uchtleathan, who was a very virtuous lady. By him she had three children at a birth — Breas, Nar, and Lothar (the Fineamhis), who were slain at the battle of Dromchriadh ; after their death, a melancholy settled on the Monarch, hence his name "Feidhlioch." This Monarch caused the division of the Kingdom by Ugaine Mór into twenty-five parts, to cease; and ordered that the ancient Firvolgian division into Provinces should be resumed, viz., Two Munsters, Leinster, Conacht, and Ulster. He also divided the government of these Provinces amongst his favourite courtiers: — Conacht he divided into three parts between Fiodhach, Echaidh Allat, and Tinne, son of Conragh, son of Ruadhri Mór, No 62 on the "Line of Ir;" Ulster (Uladh) he gave to Feargus, the son of Leighe; Leinster he gave to Res, the son of Feargus Fairge ; and tile two Munsters he gave to Tighernach Teadhbheamach and Deagbadah. After this division of the Kingdom, Eochaidh proceeded to erect a Rayal Palace in Conacht; this he built on Tinne's government in a place called Druin-na-n Druagh, now Craughan (from Craughan Crodhearg, Maedhbh's mother, to whom she gave the palace), but previously, Rath Eochaidh. About the same time he bestowed his daughter the Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, whom be constituted King of Conacht ; Maedhbh being hereditary Queen of that Province. After many years reign Tinne was slain by Maceacht (or Monaire) at Tara. After ten years' undivided reign, Queen Maedhbh married Oilioll Mór, son of Ros Ruadh, of Leinster, to whom she bore the seven Maine; Oilioll Mór was at length slain by Conall Cearnach, who was soon after killed by the people of Conacht. Maedhbh was at length slain by Ferbhuidhe, the son of Conor MacNeasa (Neasa was his mother); but in reality this Conor was the son of Fachtna Fathach, son of Cas, son of Ruadhri Mór, of the Line of Ir. This Monarch, Eochaidh, died at Tara, B.C. 130.

Irish Pedigrees by John O'Hart, part I, ch. IV

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. -------------------- Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"),[1] son of Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht.

According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid.[2] The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann (modern County Sligo),[3] but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Eochaid Sálbuide, the king of Ulster, was also killed. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara.[4]

Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn,[5] and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb.[6] When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb bore Conchobar a son called Amalgad, but later left him, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.[3]

The three findemna tried to overthrow their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich. The night before the battle, their sister Clothru, afraid that they would die without an heir, seduced all three of them, and the future High King Lugaid Riab nDerg, was conceived. The next day they were killed, and their father, seeing their severed heads, swore that no son should directly succeed his father to the High Kingship of Ireland.[7]

He ruled for twelve years, and died of natural causes at Tara, succeeded by his brother Eochu Airem. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with the dictatorship of Julius Caesar (48-44 BC).[2] The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 94-82 BC,[8] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 143-131 BC.[9]

References

  1. ^ Dictionary of the Irish Language, Compact Edition, Royal Irish Academy, 1990, p. 297. His name is also spelt Eochaidh, Eochy, and his epithet is variously spelled Feidleach, Feidhleach, Feidlioch, Feidhlioch.
  2. ^ a b R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 299
  3. ^ a b Joseph O'Neill (ed. & trans), "Cath Boinde", Ériu 2, 1905, pp. 173-185
  4. ^ Margaret C. Dobs (ed. & trans.), "La Bataille de Leitir Ruibhe", Revue Celtique 39, 1922, pp. 1-32
  5. ^ Margaret C. Dobs (ed. & trans.), "Cath Cumair", Revue Celtique 43, 1926, pp. 277-342
  6. ^ Edward Gwynn (ed. & trans.), The Metrical Dindshenchas Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1906, Vol 3, Poem 70: Duma Selga, pp. 387-395
  7. ^ Gwynn, The Metrical Dindshenchas Vol 4, Druimm Criaich Poem 13: Druimm Criach, pp. 43-57; Vernam Hull, (ed. & trans.), "Aided Meidbe: The Violent Death of Medb", Speculum v.13 issue 1, Jan 1938, pp. 52-61; O'Neill, "Cath Boinde"; Dobs, "Cath Cumair"
  8. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éireann 1.31
  9. ^ Annals of the Four Masters M5057-5069

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eochu_Feidlech -------------------- Eochaidh Feidhlioch King of Ireland

Death: 130 BC, Teamhair, Ireland

Father :Fionn (<172bc-)

Mother: Benia

Misc. Notes

was the 93rd Monarch; m. Clothfionn, dau. of Eochaidh Uchtleathan, who was a very virtuous lady. By him she had three children at a birth — Breas, Nar, and Lothar (the Fineamhis), who were slain at the battle of Dromchriadh ; after their death, a melancholy settled on the Monarch, hence his name "Feidhlioch." This Monarch caused the division of the Kingdom by Ugaine Mór into twenty-five parts, to cease; and ordered that the ancient Firvolgian division into Provinces should be resumed, viz., Two Munsters, Leinster, Conacht, and Ulster. He also divided the government of these Provinces amongst his favourite courtiers: — Conacht he divided into three parts between Fiodhach, Echaidh Allat, and Tinne, son of Conragh, son of Ruadhri Mór, No 62 on the "Line of Ir;" Ulster (Uladh) he gave to Feargus, the son of Leighe; Leinster he gave to Res, the son of Feargus Fairge ; and tile two Munsters he gave to Tighernach Teadhbheamach and Deagbadah. After this division of the Kingdom, Eochaidh proceeded to erect a Rayal Palace in Conacht; this he built on Tinne's government in a place called Druin-na-n Druagh, now Craughan (from Craughan Crodhearg, Maedhbh's mother, to whom she gave the palace), but previously, Rath Eochaidh. About the same time he bestowed his daughter the Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, whom be constituted King of Conacht ; Maedhbh being hereditary Queen of that Province. After many years reign Tinne was slain by Maceacht (or Monaire) at Tara. After ten years' undivided reign, Queen Maedhbh married Oilioll Mór, son of Ros Ruadh, of Leinster, to whom she bore the seven Maine; Oilioll Mór was at length slain by Conall Cearnach, who was soon after killed by the people of Conacht. Maedhbh was at length slain by Ferbhuidhe, the son of Conor MacNeasa (Neasa was his mother); but in reality this Conor was the son of Fachtna Fathach, son of Cas, son of Ruadhri Mór, of the Line of Ir. This Monarch, Eochaidh, died at Tara, B.C. 130.

Irish Pedigrees by John O'Hart, part I, ch. IV

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

Clothfionn Uchtleathan

Father

Eochadh Uchtleathan

Children

Bres-Nar (<130bc-)


Clotherne

-------------------- Eochu or Eochaid Feidlech ("the enduring"),[1] son of Finn, was, according to medieval Irish legends and historical traditions, a High King of Ireland. He is best known as the father of the legendary queen Medb of Connacht.

According to the 12th century Lebor Gabála Érenn, he took power when he defeated the previous High King, Fachtna Fáthach, in the Battle of Leitir Rúaid.[2] The Middle Irish saga Cath Leitrech Ruibhe tells the story of this battle. While Fachtna Fáthach was away from Tara on a visit to Ulster, Eochu, then king of Connacht, raised an army, had the provincial kings killed and took hostages from Tara. When news reached Fachtna at Emain Macha, he raised an army of Ulstermen and gave battle at Leitir Rúaid in the Corann (modern County Sligo),[3] but was defeated and beheaded by Eochu. Eochaid Sálbuide, the king of Ulster, was also killed. Fergus mac Róich covered the Ulster army's retreat, and Eochu marched to Tara.[4]

Various Middle Irish tales give him a large family. His wife was Cloithfinn,[5] and they had six daughters, Derbriu, Eile, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, and four sons, a set of triplets known as the three findemna, and Conall Anglondach. Derbriu was the lover of Aengus of the Tuatha Dé Danann. Her mother-in-law, Garbdalb, turned six men into pigs for the crime of eating nuts from her grove, and Derbriu protected them for a year until they were killed by Medb.[6] When Conchobar mac Nessa became king of Ulster, Eochu gave four of his daughters, Mugain, Eithne, Clothru and Medb, to him in marriage in compensation for the death of his supposed father, Fachtna Fáthach. Eithne bore him a son, Furbaide, who was born by posthumous caesarian section after Medb drowned her. Clothru, according to one tradition, bore him his eldest son Cormac Cond Longas, although other traditions make him the son of Conchobar by his own mother, Ness. Medb bore Conchobar a son called Amalgad, but later left him, and Eochu set her up as queen of Connacht. Some time after that, Eochu held an assembly at Tara, which both Conchobar and Medb attended. The morning after the assembly, Conchobar followed Medb down to the river Boyne where she had gone to bathe, and raped her. Eochu made war against Conchobar on the Boyne, but was defeated.[3]

The three findemna tried to overthrow their father in the Battle of Druimm Criaich. The night before the battle, their sister Clothru, afraid that they would die without an heir, seduced all three of them, and the future High King Lugaid Riab nDerg, was conceived. The next day they were killed, and their father, seeing their severed heads, swore that no son should directly succeed his father to the High Kingship of Ireland.[7]

He ruled for twelve years, and died of natural causes at Tara, succeeded by his brother Eochu Airem. The Lebor Gabála synchronises his reign with the dictatorship of Julius Caesar (48-44 BC).[2] The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éireann dates his reign to 94-82 BC,[8] that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 143-131 BC.[9]