Ephraim Olmstead (1794 - 1861)

public profile

9

Matches

0 0 9
Adds more complete birth date, more complete death place, burial place, middle name, occupation, residence and child(ren).

View Ephraim Olmstead's complete profile:

  • See if you are related to Ephraim Olmstead
  • Request to view Ephraim Olmstead's family tree

Share

Related Projects

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Grenville, Ontario, Canada
Death: Died in Matteson, Waupaca, WI
Managed by: James Hutchison
Last Updated:

About Ephraim Olmstead

Ephraim Olmstead, born 15 Sept. 1794, was the only surviving son of Israel and Elizabeth Haskins Olmstead. In July of 1816, when he was of age, he claimed Lot 24 of the broken concession B on the south side of the River Rideau, 170 acres in Wolford Twp. It had belonged to his father who died in 1802. Ephraim married Hester Breakenridge, daughter of UEL Rev. David Breakenridge JR and Rebecca Lawrence. They were enumerated on 28 May 1817 in the Wolford census as Ephraim (age 23) and Hester (age 14) Olmsted. Ephraim was in the Grenville County militia during the War of 1812 and for his service received a grant of 100 acres of land in Ross Twp, Renfrew County, Ontario on 19 January 1820. Like his father, Ephraim had problems with harassment by the Indians, including the burning of his buildings in Wolford. His acreage was also disturbed by the construction of the Rideau Canal. By 1836 he moved his family to his land grant in Ross Twp. Ephraim was a farmer, tavern and innkeeper, owner of a sawmill (manufactured shingles), and in charge of the Ross schools. He was also a Sunday School teacher and was a Universalist. He lived in a sided log home near Olmstead Lake, which was most likely named after him (now Olmstead-Jeffrey Lake). His tavern was described in an article called “Stop-Overs That Fortified, on the 100-mile Pub-Crawl to Pembroke” by Harry Walker; “At Ward’s Settlement the road wound inland to Olmstead’s clearance, near Cobden, in the heart of the Bush. Olmstead kept a good house and table, something that could not be said for many of the bush taverns.” Ephraim was the clerk of the first council meeting of the municipalities of Ross and Westmeath, held 6 March 1837. He was a councilor for the township of Ross for numerous years and a reeve in 1854. From 1842 to 1849 the council meetings were held in Perth and involved considerable travel and difficulty for Ephraim. In 1847 he was Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion of the Renfrew Militia. His wife Hester died 31 Oct. 1851 of dropsy. Sometime between 1856 and 1860 Ephraim moved near Embarrass, Matteson Twp, Shawano Co, Wisconsin, on the banks of the Pigeon River. A biographical sketch of his son James Jason states that they came to Wisconsin in 1859. Ephraim appears in the 1860 census with a second wife by the name of Eliza. She was born in Ireland and was 12 years younger than Ephraim. His youngest son James Jason was also living with them. By 1870 Eliza was a widow and living with a neighboring family of Ephraim Jr. In 1880 she was blind, 71 years old and living in the Waupaca County Poor House. Ephraim may have died in 1861, a date posted by another researcher on the Internet, but not verified. Ephraim and Hester Olmstead had nine children: Reuben B., John Nelson, Basil, Ephraim, Hester Ann, Elizabeth, Albert Kidder, Margaret, and James Jason. In this article I will cover the first two sons, Reuben B. and John Nelson.


Reuben B. (Breakenridge?) Olmsted was born in 1820 in Wolford, Ontario. He married Mary Gilchrist 13 April 1843 in Ross Twp., Renfrew County, Ontario. By 1850 they were living in Bloomingdale, Winnebago County, the first of the family to move to Wisconsin. Reuben was a carpenter and a farmer. In the 1860 census the family was in Aurora, Waushara Co, Wisconsin. Sometime around 1862, Reuben ran off with a young neighbor girl by the name of Rozilla (Zilla) Ann Craw, who was born 10 October 1848. He left his wife Mary and their six children and was never heard from again. In 1921 Zilla Craw Wadkins, widow of Philander Wadkins, wrote a letter to the circuit court clerk in Green Lake County, Wisconsin requesting a copy of her divorce record from Ruben Omstead. The clerk replied that the only record was that of Mary Ann Omsted who was granted a divorce from Ruben in 1862. Zilla’s purpose was to apply for a Civil War widow’s pension to prove that she was divorced before her marriage to Philander Wadkins. She and Reuben had at least one known child, William Henry Olmstead, who was born in Berlin, Wisconsin. William’s marriage record to the widow Ida Tillason (daughter of Daniel Hibbard and Eveline Hamilton) on 10 March 1891 in Baraboo, Wisconsin gives his parent’s names as Reuben B. Olmsted and Rosilla Craw. William was a farmer from Oshkosh at the time. Nothing further is known about him. Also nothing is known as to what became of Reuben B. Olmstead. Rozilla claimed in her Civil War pension application that he died in the Civil War. However, there is only one military record of Reuben B. Olmstead and that was Reuben Jr. the son, not the father. Mary Gilerise Olmsted, a broom maker, was living with her son Ephraim and his family in the 1870 and 1880 Aurora, Waushara County census. In July of 1872 she had the title to her ex husband’s land transferred to her own name. The original 40 acres in Waushara County was a homestead granted to Reuben in May of 1862. Mary died 25 July 1887 at age 70 and was buried in Welch Cemetery in Aurora. Mary and Reuben had six children: Ephraim, Mary A., Reuben B, Margaret, James and Harriet.

· Ephraim Olmsted was born 1 Dec. 1843 in Ross Twp., Renfrew County, Ontario. He married Susan Rose, daughter of Henry Rose and Mary Ann Pettis, 3 July 1869 in Berlin, Green Lake Co, Wisconsin. Ephraim died 2 Jan. 1889 in Berlin. He was a farmer in Aurora, Waushara County. Ephraim was a private in Company H, 38th Regiment of the Wisconsin Infantry in the Civil War. He enlisted in Aurora, Wisconsin on 26 August 1864 and was discharged 2 June 1865. While in Camp Randall, Wisconsin he was on guard duty in his civilian clothing during a rainstorm and suffered a severe cold. In spite of his illness he accompanied his regiment to Virginia. From October 1, 1864 through February 18, 1865 he was sick with typhoid fever and in the hospital in Alexandria, Virginia. His pension records state that he contracted catarrh and rheumatism from the effects of which he died in 1889. He was 5’7” with dark complexion, dark eyes and dark hair. In 1882 Ephraim signed a petition along with 138 other residents of Aurora asking for the local cranberry marshes to be shut down. There had been so many cases of diphtheria and other sicknesses which the residents claimed were caused by the flooding and draining of the cranberry marshes. After much study the Wisconsin Board of Health decided that the sickness was not related to the marshes. Ephraim’s obituary states that he was an old resident of the Shead neighborhood in Aurora. He had made a trip to Milwaukee a few weeks before his death to have a cataract removed from his eye. He arrived back in Aurora by train in a “dazed and deranged condition and had been sick ever since”. The operation and medicines taken were the cause of death. He was buried in Welsh Cemetery, in Aurora. Ephraim’s widow Susan moved to Seattle, Washington with some of her children and died there 24 April 1918. She may have been buried in Welsh Cemetery in Aurora next to her husband, as there is a stone for her there. Ephraim and Susan had six children: James E., William, Mary A., John, Margaret and Kate E.

· James E. was born in 1871. He married first Sarah Rose, a cousin, 25 November 1891, in Green Lake, Wisconsin. She was the daughter of Moses Rose and Catherine Marshall. Sarah died 22 January 1909 in Anacortes, Washington. They had one daughter, Ester, born in 1894 in Aurora. Second, James married Maggie Ann Pearson, who had been married twice before and had a number of children. James and Maggie had one son, John H. (Jack), who was born in Montana in 1913. They later lived in Harrison, Idaho. James was a carpenter in Anacortes, Washington in the 1930 census.

· William was born in 1872 and was a bachelor.

· Mary A. was born 24 July 1874. She married George W. Knapp 4 July 1897, divorced and then married Merrit Bohall in Washington in 1906. Mary had three children: Earl Knapp, Lila Knapp and Mamie Knapp.

· John was born 20 Sept. 1875. He was not married.

· Margaret (Maggie) was born 16 March 1879. She married George W. Knapp 4 July 1897, divorced and then married Merrit Bohall in Washington in 1906. Mary had three children: Earl Knapp, Lila Knapp and Mamie Knapp.

· Kate E. was born 18 June 1887 and died 17 April 1978 in San Bernardino, California. She married Percy McClaire and then a Mr. Roberts.

· Mary A. Olmsted was born in October 1846 in Ontario. She died 18 May 1866 at 20 years, 7 months, and is buried in Welch Cemetery, Aurora.

· Reuben B. Olmsted Jr. was born 21 July 1848 in Ontario and was murdered 27 Feb 1915 in Upton County, Texas on his ranch. His living niece, Eleanor Bennitt, states that the family always claimed Reuben was a bachelor and had never married. However, in the 1880 Union, Worth Co, Iowa census, there resided an R.B. Olmstead, farmer, 31 years old, born in Canada, father born in Canada and mother born in Scotland, with a wife Laura who was 28, and also born in Canada. In the 1900 Neva, Langlade County, Wisconsin census Reuben stated that he was a married man and in 1910 Upland, Texas he said he was married one time, for 30 years. Reuben Jr. enlisted in the Civil War on 24 January 1865 in Berlin, Wisconsin and was discharged in September of 1865 in Nashville. He was 5’7 ½” tall with brown hair and brown eyes. Reuben B. Olmstead purchased 40 acres of land in Waushara County on 25 April 1877. The 1890 Langlade County Civil War Veterans census lists Reuben B. Olmstead, Pvt., D 47 Wisconsin Infantry. His residence was Deerbrook. R.B. Omsted was enumerated in the 1895 Wisconsin State census for Norwood, Langlade County. There were 2 males in the household. Sometime after the 1900 census Reuben moved to Texas and had a ranch on land that was granted to him for his Civil War service. His murder was never solved. His truck, which was stolen from his ranch at the time of his murder, was later found in Mexico. Reuben is buried in Rankin Cemetery in the town of Rankin, Upton County, Texas.

· Margaret Olmsted was born in Wisconsin in February 1851. She died 12 June 1862, at 12 years, 4 months, and is buried in Welch Cemetery, Aurora.

· James Olmsted was born 13 July 1852 in Wisconsin and died 13 Oct. 1940 in Whitefish, Montana. According to family legend he was 10 years old when his father ran off with Rozilla Craw. James married Rozilla’s sister Emma Craw 13 Oct 1876. Emma was the daughter of George Washington Craw and Eveline Rose Eagle. Emma was born 26 Feb. 1861 and died 19 Oct. 1934 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. They had nine children, all born in Wisconsin.

· Thomas James was born 24 May 1879 and died 11 July 1965 in Flathead, Montana. He married first Fern then Martha Miller and lived in Toole County, Montana. He was a farmer. According to his WW1 draft registration he was short with brown eyes and brown hair. His children by Fern were Earl and Nina. By Martha he had Blanche, Mary, Margaret, Joy, Esther, Thomas James and Emma.

· Elizabeth was born 12 October 1880. She married 5 March 1899 Luther Manning Appley and lived in Toole County, Montana. Elizabeth died 4 November 1927 in a house fire when she ran back inside to rescue her cat. Their children were Blanche, Norman, Ethel, Harold, Marjorie, Charles and Doris.

· Ralph Henry was born 15 July 1884 and died 30 September 1946 in California. He married Edna Janette Hager. He was a carpenter. According to his WW1 draft registration he was short with blue eyes and dark hair. Their children were Reuben, Lester, Eva and Ruth.

· Mary Beatrice (Mae) was born 29 Dec. 1885 and died 8 April 1891 Long Beach, California. She was married in Winnebago County, 16 August 1903, to William Courtright Laymon. They moved to Montana, then Washington and finally California. Their children were Rella, Elva and Clarence.

· Laura was born 28 October of 1890. She married 14 October 1906, Mason D. Buck, lived in Montana and then moved back to Wisconsin. Their children were Mary, Alfred, Emma, Leonore, Dorothy, Luella and Edward.

· Earl was born 8 July 1895 and died in infancy.

· Eva Bella was born 31 August 1897 and died 11 April 1985 in Whitefish, Montana. She married Arnold Schiefelbein. Their children were Fred and Lila.

· Fred Luther was born 8 November 1900 and died 11 January 1962 in Tacoma, Washington. He married Retha Vernice Light 13 October 1926 in Montana. Their children were Eleanor, Vera, Glen, Carolee, Linda and Floyd.

· James Arthur was born 4 December 1902 and died 22 December 1963 in Tacoma, Washington. He was not married.

· Harriet Olmstead was born in June1856 in Wisconsin. She died 5 April 1887, at 21 years, 10 months, and was buried in Welch Cemetery, Aurora.


1. John Nelson Olmsted was born in July of 1822 in Wolford, Ontario. He married Elizabeth J. Sullivan 25 March 1844 in Ross Township. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. John Tulle, a Wesleyan Methodist minister. John was a resident of Renfrew County and Elizabeth was a resident of Nepean, Ontario. According to “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin Counties” (1895), John Olmsted and his family came to Matteson Township, Waupaca County, Wisconsin in the fall of 1862. He had been a shingle maker in Ontario. John settled on wild land and opened up a farm on section 19. Elizabeth died 29 June 1880, age 58 years, in Shawano County and was buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass. John died 18 July 1904 at the home of his daughter in Antigo, Langlade County, Wisconsin and was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Clintonville. Their four children were:

· Adolphus S. Olmsted (known as Dolphus) was born in 1847 in Renfrew County, Ontario and came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1862. He married Clara Salina Hyde on the 10th of August 1866 in Oshkosh. Dolphus was the first principal of the new Clintonville school built in the early 1870’s. According to a string of old newspaper articles, Dolphus (called Doc Olmsted) departed Clintonville, Waupaca County in May of 1879, leaving behind a warrant for his arrest, debts and broken hearts. He then went to Antigo, Langlade County and erected 2 crude buildings in town. On 24 August 1881 he was arrested for selling liquor without government licenses, fined $100 and sentenced to 30 days in jail. In spite of all this he was a justice and acted as an attorney in lawsuits in Langlade County. Dolphus died in Ironwood in 1890, according to his brother John’s biographical sketch. His wife Clara’s biographical sketch in the “History of Spokane County” which was written while she was still alive, states that he died in Wisconsin 13 March 1881. However, Dolphus actually died 9 June 1891 according to his obituary! He had gone to Ironwood, Wisconsin a month prior to his death and was in the mercantile business there. He died from congestion of the brain and pneumonia as a result of alcoholism. His obit states, “None were more regular in their business habits than he as long as he kept away from drink, But the moment the cup touched his lips he was undone. He was a sad example of a man, strong in all else except his passion for liquor.” In May of 1881, Clara (without Dolphus) and her children moved to Washington Territory and were enumerated in the 1885 Spokane census. Her mother Susan Hyde and brother Eugene Hyde were enumerated next to the Olmsted’s. Meanwhile, back in Wisconsin, Dolphus had married Emma Lewis 15 August 1885 in Waupaca County. Clara taught school in the Spokane area and also dealt in real estate. She died 7 March 1911 in Spokane. Their five children were:

· Frankie F. (female) died 26 September 1869 at 1 year, 9 months and 10 days. She was buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass, Wisconsin.

· Ida May was born 26 September 1869 (the same day her sister Frankie died)and died 26 July 1942 in Los Angeles County, California. She married George DeGolyer Patchen of Spokane 14 July 1889. Their children were Rollin Hyde (23 May 1890 - 1892), Lee DeGoyler (18 February 1892 - November 1970), Forest Gordon (13 May 1894 – 18 July 1973), Helen May (3 December 1896 –26 November 1992), Clarice (2 April 1900 – 24 May 1987) and George Harold (5 January 1906 – 18 February 1977).

· Infant son of Dolphus and Clara died 29 May 1872 at 2 days of age, and was buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass, Wisconsin.

· John G. Olmsted was born in May of 1873. He married Helen Hanning 16 June 1898 in Spokane. They had a son Harold born in 1906 and a daughter born 24 March 1908 in Spokane. John and his brother Arden were both farmers in Tiger, Stevens County, Washington. John died 22 November 1962.

· Arden Forest Olmsted was born in February of 1876. He married Fannie Josephine Kirkpatrick 21 October 1903 in Fruitland, Washington. They had three sons, Robert Keith (7 October 1904 – 19 November 1999), Hugh K. (30 January 1906 – 29 October 1979) and Roland S. (10 July 1907 – April 1981). Arden died 28 February 1910.

· John H. Olmsted was born in February of 1849 in Renfrew County, Ontario. His biographical sketch in “Commemorative Biographical Record of the Upper Wisconsin Counties” written in 1895, states that at the age of thirteen he moved to Matteson, Waupaca County, Wisconsin with his parents in the fall of 1862. On 17 November 1873 he married Emma V. Ewer, daughter of Eben. That same year John settled in the town of Embarrass, Waupaca County and worked in a sawmill. He also farmed on 52 acres. He was elected town clerk in 1892 and also was the assessor for many years. John died in 1936 and Emma in 1939. They are buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass. John and Elizabeth had three children:

· Clayton E. was born 6 August 1875 and died 3 June 1961. He married Helen and had two children, Gordon and Clayton, both born in Minnesota. By 1920 they were living in Marquette, Michigan. Clayton was a photographer and a dealer for a lumber company. He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass.

· Bernice Lucy died 2 Nov. 1877 at 7 months. She was buried in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass.

· Pearl Virginia was born 28 March 1888.

· Elizabeth Jane Olmsted (Lizzie) was born 9 January 1851 in Renfrew County, Ontario and died 4 June 1943 at the home of her daughter in Milwaukee. She came to Wisconsin with her parents in 1862 and lived on their farm in Clintonville. She was a school teacher before her marriage to John Wesley Goodwin in 1871. In 1883 they moved to Langlade County and bought a tract of land close to the city center of Antigo. John was a saw filer by profession and worked in several pioneer mills. After retirement they moved to a farm outside of town. John died in 1933. They had nine children:

· Willis (William) Nelson Goodwin was born 23 July 1872 in Embarrass, Wisconsin and died 29 July 1955 in Tacoma, Washington. He married Emma H. Seim 9 January 1897 in Waupaca County and Mary May Lorena Hendricks in Albequerque, NM.

· Marion Goodwin was born in 1874 and died 16 July 1964. She married Arthur Arveson and lived in Milwaukee.

· John P. Goodwin was born in 1876 and died 7 November 1954. He married Elizabeth Wendorf and lived in Tacoma, Washington.

· Edward E. Goodwin was born 27 November 1878 and died in June of 1964. He married Lizzie Seim, 6 January 1901 in Waupaca County. He lived in Spokane, Washington.

· Maude Goodwin was born in 1883 and died 12 January 1933. She married Thomas E. Ford, 31 October 1903 in Langlade County.

· Wesley Dolphus Goodwin was born 1 June 1886 and died 19 April 1966. He married Mabelle Geherke and lived in Port Angeles, Washington..

· Theodosia Matilda Goodwin was born 11 November 1888. She married a Palmer and lived in Portland, Oregon.

· Howard Karney Goodwin was born 22 March 1891 and died 17 November 1956 in Los Angeles County, California. He married Pearl.

· George Wilbur Goodwin was born 11 December 1894 and died 2 August 1976. He lived in San Francisco, California.

· Ephraim K. Olmsted was born 4 April 1855 in Renfrew County, Ontario. He came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1862. Ephraim was a farmer and woodsman in Clintonville, Waupaca County. He married Mary Lalendorff, daughter of Christian and Johanna, on 11 November 1877 in Matteson, Waupaca County. Ephraim and Mary were divorced according to a note in the Guyant Collection (a collection of Wisconsin tombstone inscriptions, obituaries and other related items), but there were no family records to indicate this to be true. Mary died 16 June 1895 of TB. She was buried with her parents in Riverside Cemetery, Embarrass. Just months before his death Ephraim married a young woman, Matilda Knoke (1881-1953) of Split Rock, daughter of John and Mathilde Zellmer Knoke. The marriage took place on 15 January 1907 in Shawano County. In the marriage document Ephraim’s middle name was written as “Kedor”. In the Guyant collection it is “Kildor”. Ephraim died 11 June 1907 in Matteson. Matilda is mentioned in his probate papers. He was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Clintonville, Waupaca County. Ephraim and Mary had two children:

· Effie A. was born 16 Nov. 1879. She married Thomas Whitwell 30 March 1903 in Waupaca County and had two children, Lilla (Tipp) and Bobby (died young).

· Arthur Nelson was born 22 June 1882 and died in 1971. He married Elizabeth Rhoden 3 August 1908 in Clintonville and was later divorced. They had one daughter, Evelyn Olive (18 September 1910 – 13 September 1993) who married 17 November 1930, William G. Ritter. Arthur was a performer in the circus.


My next installment will be on Ephraim and Hester’s next two sons, Basil and Ephraim Jr. I have just realized that this series on the family line of Israel and Elizabeth Haskins Olmstead will take two complete years, as it will be finished in four parts! The amount of new information that has turned up on a daily basis has been amazing. Just when I think I have completed the article to my satisfaction, I discover something else to add. I have made use of records gathered over the years by myself and by descendants of the Reuben B. and John Nelson Olmsted families, by other helpful researchers, libraries, lookup volunteers and of course, the internet with all its wonderful resources. This fall on our way to Maryland (where we do volunteer work for a couple of months) we plan to spend some time in Wisconsin digging through court records and libraries, so hopefully there will be some new surprises in store for the next article.


 http://www.jabezolmsted.com/VOL_10.2/ISRAEL_OLMSTEAD_Part_2.htm

--------------------

                   Information by Doreen Dolleman (found on the internet)

Ephraim Olmstead, born 15 Sept. 1794, was the only surviving son of Israel and Elizabeth Haskins Olmstead. In July of 1816, when he was of age, he claimed Lot 24 of the broken concession B on the south side of the River Rideau, 170 acres in Wolford Twp. It had belonged to his father who died in 1802. Ephraim married Hester Breakenridge, daughter of UEL Rev. David Breakenridge JR and Rebecca Lawrence. They were enumerated on 28 May 1817 in the Wolford census as Ephraim (age 23) and Hester (age 14) Olmsted. Ephraim was in the Grenville County militia during the War of 1812 and for his service received a grant of 100 acres of land in Ross Twp, Renfrew County, Ontario on 19 January 1820. Like his father, Ephraim had problems with harassment by the Indians, including the burning of his buildings in Wolford. His acreage was also disturbed by the construction of the Rideau Canal. By 1836 he moved his family to his land grant in Ross Twp. Ephraim was a farmer, tavern and innkeeper, owner of a sawmill (manufactured shingles), and in charge of the Ross schools. He was also a Sunday School teacher and was a Universalist. He lived in a sided log home near Olmstead Lake, which was most likely named after him (now Olmstead-Jeffrey Lake). His tavern was described in an article called “Stop-Overs That Fortified, on the 100-mile Pub-Crawl to Pembroke” by Harry Walker; “At Ward’s Settlement the road wound inland to Olmstead’s clearance, near Cobden, in the heart of the Bush. Olmstead kept a good house and table, something that could not be said for many of the bush taverns.” Ephraim was the clerk of the first council meeting of the municipalities of Ross and Westmeath, held 6 March 1837. He was a councilor for the township of Ross for numerous years and a reeve in 1854. From 1842 to 1849 the council meetings were held in Perth and involved considerable travel and difficulty for Ephraim. In 1847 he was Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion of the Renfrew Militia. His wife Hester died 31 Oct. 1851 of dropsy. Sometime between 1856 and 1860 Ephraim moved near Embarrass, Matteson Twp, Shawano Co, Wisconsin, on the banks of the Pigeon River. A biographical sketch of his son James Jason states that they came to Wisconsin in 1859. Ephraim appears in the 1860 census with a second wife by the name of Eliza. She was born in Ireland and was 12 years younger than Ephraim. His youngest son James Jason was also living with them. By 1870 Eliza was a widow and living with a neighboring family of Ephraim Jr. In 1880 she was blind, 71 years old and living in the Waupaca County Poor House. Ephraim may have died in 1861, a date posted by another researcher on the Internet, but not verified. Ephraim and Hester Olmstead had nine children: Reuben B., John Nelson, Basil, Ephraim, Hester Ann, Elizabeth, Albert Kidder, Margaret, and James Jason..

view all

Ephraim Olmstead's Timeline

1794
1794
Grenville, Ontario, Canada
1820
1820
Age 26
Woford, Ontario, Canada
1821
1821
Age 27
Wolford, Grenville, Ontario, Canada
1861
1861
Age 67
Matteson, Waupaca, WI
????
????