Eric of Friuli, im Vinzgau

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Eric of Friuli, im Vinzgau

German: Erich von Friaul, im Vinzgau, Italian: Enrico di Friuli, im Vinzgau
Nicknames: "Ericus dux Foroiulanus"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Savoy, , , France
Death: Died in Trsatica, Croatia
Place of Burial: Reichenau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Gerold, count in Kraichgau and Anglachgau and Imma - Emma, Herzogin von Schwaben
Brother of Ermentrude von Nagolzgau; Gerold II "der Jüngere" in der Baar; Hildegard of Vinzgouw, wife of Charlemagne; Megingoz in Alemannien; Udalrich I, Graf im Breisgau and 7 others

Occupation: Duke of Friuli, Dux Foroiulensis (Duke of Friuli, 789-799)
Managed by: Rachel Lehman Groessel
Last Updated:

About Eric of Friuli, im Vinzgau

From the Wikipedia page on Eric of Friuli:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_of_Friuli

Eric (also Heirichus or Ehericus;[1] died 799) was the Duke of Friuli (dux Foroiulensis) from 789 to his death. He was the eldest son of Gerold of Vinzgouw and by the marriage of his sister Hildegard the brother-in-law of Charlemagne.

Most of Eric's tenure was occupied by the job of subduing the Avars. In this he was accompanied by Pepin of Italy and his own father, the margrave of Avaria. In 791, he and Pepin marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia, while Charlemagne marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792. Pepin and Eric continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia.

In 795 or 796, Eric and Pepin, allied with the Western Avar tudun, led an attack which forced the submission of the chief khagan and led to the capture of the Hunorum Hringum, or Ring of the Avars, their chief camp. The khagan was taken to Aachen, where he was baptised as Theodorus. According to the Annales Fuldenses, the khagan was killed by his own men.

According to the Annales Laurissenses, Eric sent raiders against Pannonia in 796 under Vojnomir, duke of the Pannonian Croats.

Some time between 787 and 796, Paulinus of Aquileia wrote a Liber Exhortationis for Eric. The work draws from the Bible and certain Fathers of the Church to offer instruction on how to live a morally upright Christian life while carrying out secular duties.

In 799, Eric was killed at Trsat (Tharsatica) in Liburnia by the treachery of the inhabitants according to Einhard. His father died on the eve of battle with the Avars that same year.

Notes

1.^ It has been suggested that his name is a mistranscription of Munichis.

Sources

Einhard. Vita Caroli Magni. translated by Samuel Epes Turner. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1880.

Wallach, Luitpold. "Alcuin on Virtues and Vices: A Manual for a Carolingian Soldier." Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 48, No. 3. (Jul., 1955), pp. 175-195.

Ross, James Bruce. "Two Neglected Paladins of Charlemagne: Erich of Friuli and Gerold of Bavaria." Speculum, Vol. 20, No. 2. (Apr., 1945), pp 212–235.

Hodgkin, Thomas. Italy and her Invaders. Clarendon Press: 1895.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_of_Friuli

Eric of Friuli

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Eric (also Heirichus or Ehericus;[1] died 799) was the Duke of Friuli (dux Foroiulensis) from 789 to his death. He was the eldest son of Gerold of Vinzgouw and by the marriage of his sister Hildegard the brother-in-law of Charlemagne.

Most of Eric's tenure was occupied by the job of subduing the Avars. In this he was accompanied by Pepin of Italy and his own father, the margrave of Avaria. In 791, he and Pepin marched a Lombard army into the Drava valley and ravaged Pannonia, while Charlemagne marched along the Danube into Avar territory. Charlemagne left the campaigning to deal with a Saxon revolt in 792. Pepin and Eric continued, however, to assault the Avars' ring-shaped strongholds. The great Ring of the Avars, their capital fortress, was taken twice. The booty was sent to Charlemagne in Aachen and redistributed to all his followers and even to foreign rulers, including King Offa of Mercia.

In 795 or 796, Eric and Pepin, allied with the Western Avar tudun, led an attack which forced the submission of the chief khagan and led to the capture of the Hunorum Hringum, or Ring of the Avars, their chief camp. The khagan was taken to Aachen, where he was baptised as Theodorus. According to the Annales Fuldenses, the khagan was killed by his own men.

According to the Annales Laurissenses, Eric sent raiders against Pannonia in 796 under Vojnomir, duke of the Pannonian Croats.

Some time between 787 and 796, Paulinus of Aquileia wrote a Liber Exhortationis for Eric. The work draws from the Bible and certain Fathers of the Church to offer instruction on how to live a morally upright Christian life while carrying out secular duties.

In 799, Eric was killed at Trsat (Tharsatica) in Liburnia by the treachery of the inhabitants according to Einhard. His father died on the eve of battle with the Avars that same year.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ It has been suggested that his name is a mistranscription of Munichis.

[edit] Sources

   * Einhard. Vita Caroli Magni. translated by Samuel Epes Turner. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1880.
   * Wallach, Luitpold. "Alcuin on Virtues and Vices: A Manual for a Carolingian Soldier." Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 48, No. 3. (Jul., 1955), pp. 175-195.
   * Ross, James Bruce. "Two Neglected Paladins of Charlemagne: Erich of Friuli and Gerold of Bavaria." Speculum, Vol. 20, No. 2. (Apr., 1945), pp 212–235.
   * Hodgkin, Thomas. Italy and her Invaders. Clarendon Press: 1895.

Preceded by

Marcarius Duke of Friuli

789 – 799 Succeeded by

Hunfrid

This page was last modified on 31 December 2009 at 01:15.

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Eric of Friuli, im Vinzgau's Timeline

799
September 1, 799
Trsatica, Croatia
????
Savoy, , , France
????
Reichenau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany