Ermengardis d'Italie, Queen of Provence

Is your surname d'Italie?

Research the d'Italie family

Ermengardis d'Italie, Queen of Provence's Geni Profile

Records for Ermengarde d'Italie

4,633,952 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Ermengarde d'Italie

Also Known As: "Irmengard", "Ermengarda", "Ermengarde", "Irmingard", "Ermeginda", "Irmengard /De Italia/", "Ermengarde //", "irmengardis carolingian d'italy", "Ermengarde Adelaide d'Italia"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Frankish Empire (within present Italy)
Death: Died in Vienne, Département de l'Isère, Kingdom of Provence (Present Rhône-Alpes), Frankish Empire (within present France)
Place of Burial: Cathédrale de Saint-Maurice, Vienne, Département de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Louis II "le Jeune", Emperor of Italy and of the Franks and Engelberga von Friaul
Wife of Bosa d Autun dux ai Provence Swabia and Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence
Mother of Willa Von Swabia Swabia; Louis III the Blind, Holy Roman Emperor; Ermengarde de Bourgogne, Daughter of Boson; Rudolph II Graf von Vienne; Richardis de Metz and 4 others
Half sister of Carolman Caroling Prince of Bavaria

Occupation: Princess of Italy and the Holy Roman Empire, @occu00076@
Managed by: Petra Spithost-Douma
Last Updated:

About Ermengardis d'Italie, Queen of Provence

Summary for Ermengardis d'Italie

Relationships

Parents:

  • Father: Louis "le Jeune" (b. c 825), King of Italy (844 - 12 August 875), Joint Emperor of the Romans (April 850 - 29 September 855), Emperor of the Romans (29 September 855 - 12 August 875)
  • Mother: Engelberga (possibly daughter of Adalgis I, Count of Parma, Duke of Spoleto, of the Supponidi family), Abbess of San Sisto at Piacenza in 896.

Siblings:

  • 1. Gisela (852/55 - before 28 Apr 868)

Spouse:

  • Boson (d. 11 January 887), Comte de Vienne in 870, Comte de Berry in 872, dux regni Italici in 876, Governor and Comte de Provence 877-879, King of Provence 15 October 879 - 882.

Children:

  • 1. Engelberga (c877 - after January 917, m. GuilaumeI "le Pieux," Duke of Aquitaine)
  • 2. Louis (after late 882 - 5 Jun 928, m. Adelais, possibly related to Rudolf I King of Upper Burgundy of the Welf family), King of Provence (890 - 5 June 928), King of Italy (12 October 900 - July 905), Emperor of the Romans (February 901 - 5 June 928, de facto only in Tuscany and Lombardy and only to July 905)
  • 3. Other daughters, including one that married Manasses, Comte de Vergy (d. after 925)

Basic Information

Birth: 852 - 855, somewhere in Italy.

Baptism: Unknown

Marriage: Mar/Jun 876, after being abducted while serving as Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia, and following her husband poisoning his first wife.

Death: 896, before June 2, Vienne (within present Isere)

Burial: Cathédrale de Saint-Maurice, Vienne (within present Isere)

Occupation:

  • Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia (-878)
  • Comtesse de Provence (June 878 - 15 October 879)
  • Queen of Provence (15 October 879 - 882)
  • Regent of Provence (890 - 896)

Timeline:

  • 852-855, while her father was serving as joint Emperor of the Romans, and likely based in Rome or further south, Ermengardis was born. She was apparently alive at the death of her grandfather, Lothar I, who died 29 September 855 in Prum. Her father was crowned sole Emperor in Rome by Pope Leo IV.
  • 13 January 861, older sister Gisele is appointed Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia (age 6-9)
  • 865, throughout much of her childhood, Bari remained occupied by the Saracens, who had sacked Rome before she was born. Her father, Emperor Louis "le Jeune", began to prepare to take Bari by force from his base, and likely Ermengardis' home, at Benevento (age 10-13)
  • 28 April 868, older sister Gisele, Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia, dies. (age 13-16). Mother of both girls Ermengarda becomes the next Abbess. Either this year or next, following the Byzantine fleet arriving at Dubrovnik to relieve the Saracen siege there, Emperor Louis "le Jeune" negotiates for Byzantine participation in the taking of Bari. He confirms an alliance by betrothing Ermengardis to the son of Byzantine Emperor Basileios, Konstantin. (age 13 - 17)
  • February 871, after the Byzantine fleet departed and never returned, Emperor Louis "le Jeune" recaptured Bari from the Saracens by himself. The Byzantines were regarded as having not lived up to their obligations to Rome, and the marriage with Konstantin was broken off. As a result, Byzantine Emperor Basileios pays no further attention to the fate of Italy. (age 16-19)
  • August 871, after some incident in which her mother's overbearing manner was involved, both her parents were arrested at Benevento for a month,until the local bishop could secure their release and return to Rome. (age 16-19)
  • 12 August 875, Louis "le Jeune", Emperor of the Romans, dies near Brescia, and is buried soon after at the Church of San Ambrosia in Milan. Following his death, King Charles II "le Chauve" of Western Francia, accompanied by Boson, Comte de Berry, enters Italy to assert claims there. (age 20-23)
  • February 876, King Charles II "le Chauve" appoints future husband Boson, Comte de Berry, as dux regni Italici at Padova, and for the next several months he serves as viceroy in Italy for King Charles. (age 21-24)
  • March-June 876, Boson, Comte de Provence, has his first wife (name forgotten in present day) poisoned and sets out for Italy to seize Ermengardis from her post as Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia. Their forced marriage could have taken place either at Brescia or Padova. (age 21-24)
  • Early 877, Boson leaves Italy, likely with pregnant wife, to take over governance of Provence, and remains there in rebellion against Charles II's successor, King Louis II "le Begue" of Western Francia. (age 22-25)
  • 11 September, 878, first child Engelberga, shortly after birth, is betrothed to Carloman, the 12-year-old son of King Louis II "le Begue", possibly as some act of reconciliation. (age 23-26)
  • 11 April 879, Louis II "le Begue", King of the Western Franks, dies at Compiegne, and his 13-year-old son Carloman ascends to the throne. (age 24-27)
  • 15 October 879, the archbishops of Vienne, Besançon, Lyon, Tarentaise, Aix-en-Provence, and Arles meet at Mantaille, near Vienne, and assent to the crowning of Boson as King of Provence, which takes place at Lyons a few days later. As such, Ermengardis becomes Queen Consort of Provence. (age 24-27)

880, in response to the upstart Boson taking the crown of the Kingdom of Provence in the vacuum following the death of Louis "le Begue", the Carolingian Frankish monarchs ally with one another to overthrow the new kingdom and restore its lands to the young King Carloman. (age 25-28)

  • 882, after capturing Lyons, Frankish forces under the young King Carloman of the Western Franks (Engelberga's betrothed) lay siege to Vienne, eventually taking Boson's capital. Boson refuses to capitulate, but somehow remains alive for another five years. The pregnant Ermengardis and her children are brought from the seized city to the Western Frankish court. (age 27-30)
  • 6 December 884, Carloman, King of the Western Franks, dies in a hunting accident at the Bézu-la-Forêt, near Andelys (present Eure) (age 29-32).
  • 11 January 887, Boson, her husband, dies in Vienne and is buried at the cathédrale de Saint-Maurice. (age 32-35)
  • End of May 887, at Ermengardis' request, her son Louis is brought before Emperor Charles III "le Gros" at Kirchen-am-Rhein, and the 5-year-old boy is adopted by the Emperor, rendering him eligible to be elected a king under Carolingian rules of succession. (age 32-35)
  • 890, Ermengardis' 8-year-old son Louis is elected by the archbishops of Lyon, Arles, Vienne, and Embrun as King of Provence, a region that consists of the provinces of Provence and the Viennois. Ermengardis is appointed regent over the boy until maturity. (age 35-38)
  • 896, before June 2, Ermengardis dies age age 41-44. Following her death, opponents of Berengario, King of Italy, pledge their support for King Louis III of Provence (age 14), in return for invading Italy.

Alternate Names:

-----------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy Medlands Project page on Italy Kings (covering her birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ITALY,%20Kings%20to%20962.htm#Ermengardisdied896

LOUIS "le Jeune" ([825]-near Brescia 12 Aug 875, bur Milan, San Ambrosio).

  • Regino names "Hludowicum, Hlotharium et Carolum" as the three sons of Emperor Lothar & his wife[648].
  • He was sent to Italy as king in 844, crowned in Rome in 844 as LOUIS King of Italy by Pope Sergius II.
  • After the Arab sack of Rome in 846, he led troops south to arrange better protection for the city. They started by unsuccessfully attempting to recapture Bari, but more importantly Louis was able to achieve a settlement to the civil war between Benevento and Salerno by arranging a division of territories between the two sides under the Radelgisi et Siginulfi Divisio Ducatus Beneventani signed in early 849[649].
  • He was crowned joint Emperor LOUIS II in Rome in Apr 850 by Pope Leo IV, ruling jointly with his father.
  • He was sole emperor after the death of his father in 855.
  • He claimed part of the territory inherited by his brother Lothaire, a final settlement being achieved between the three brothers at Orbe, Jura in Oct 856. He acquired Geneva, Lausanne and Sitten from his brother Lothaire in 859.
  • After the death of his brother Charles in 863, Louis and his surviving brother Lothaire agreed a division of Charles's territories, Louis taking half of Provence and part of Transjuranian Burgundy. On the death of his brother Lothaire, their uncle Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks appropriated his territories ignoring Emperor Louis's protests[650].
  • From his base at Benevento King Louis began preparations to recapture Bari from the Arabs in 865. He negotiated Byzantine naval help for the project in 868/69, the agreement being confirmed by his daughter's betrothal. However, the Byzantine fleet which arrived in summer 869 departed abruptly, although the reasons for this are unclear, and the betrothal was terminated. Bari eventually fell in Feb 871 to a combined Frankish/Lombard army[651].

[Betrothed ([842/43], contract broken) to [--- of Byzantium], daughter of Emperor THEOPHILOS & his wife Theodora ---. This betrothal is referred to by Settipani[652].

  • According to the Continuata Constantinopolitana, the negotiations did not get as far as a formal betrothal[653].]

m (betrothed 851 before 5 Oct, [852]) ENGELBERGA, daughter of --- (-[896/901]).

  • "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" names "sponsam nostram Angilbergam" in a charter dated 5 Oct [860] by which he granted Campo Miliacio in the county of Modena to her[654].
  • Her origins are unknown. According to some secondary sources[655], she was Engelberga, daughter of Adalgis [I] Count of Parma, Duke of Spoleto [Supponidi]. Jean-Noël Mathieu highlghts that this is supported only by Count Suppo [III] being referred to in 870 as consobrinus of the emperor´s wife[656]. The origin of Empress Engelberga is discussed briefly by Odegaard, who dismisses the proposed Supponidi connection but proposes no alternative theory[657].
  • Some clue is also suggested by Emperor Karl III who confirmed grants to "Angilbergam…Hludouuici…imperatori consobrini nostri coniugem augustam, dilectam sororem nostram" by charter dated 23 Mar 880[658]. In addition, Emperor Karl refers to Engelberga's daughter as "neptam nostram Hermingardam…filioque suo Hludouuico nepoti nostro et sororibus eius"[659]. Jean-Noël Mathieu suggests that these references could mean that Engelberga was the uterine half-sister of the emperor, the daughter of his mother Emma by an otherwise unknown first marriage[660]. However, this assumes that "soror" and "neptis" should be interpreted in these documents in their strictest sense, although a wide variety of meaning is attributed to the terms in contemporary sources.
  • Another possibility is that Engelberta was related to Emperor Karl III through his wife Richardis who was the daughter of Graf Erchanger. The different possibilities are too numerous and uncertain for further speculation about Engelberga´s parentage to be worthwhile.
  • Engelberga´s over-bearing manner triggered her arrest and that of her husband at Benevento in Aug 871, although their release was negotiated within a month by the bishop of Benevento[661]. "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted the abbey of San Salvatore to "nostra coniux…Angilberga ante filiam…nostrum Hermengardem" by charter dated at Venosa 28 Apr 868[662].
  • Suspected of supporting the usurpation of her son-in-law King Boso, she was imprisoned in a convent in Alemannia by Charles III "le Gros" King of the East Franks, but returned to Italy with his permission in Oct 882[663].
  • Abbess of San Sisto at Piacenza in 896.

Emperor Louis II & his wife had two children:

i) GISELA ([852/55]-before 28 Apr 868).

  • The necrology of Brixen records that "Domnus Hludowicus Imperator tradidit filiam suam Gisla"[664]. "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" appointed "filia nostra Gisla" as abbess of San Salvatore by charter dated at Brescia 13 Jan 861, which also names "mater eius Engilburga"[665].

ii) ERMENGARDIS ([852/55]-896 before 2 Jun, bur Vienne, Isère, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

  • "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted the abbey of San Salvatore to "nostra coniux…Angilberga ante filiam…nostrum Hermengardem" by charter dated at Venosa 28 Apr 868[666]. Regino records the marriage of "Hirmingardem filiam Hludowici imperatoris" and "Bosoni germano Richildis reginæ"[667]. "Ludowicus…rex" granted "nepta nostra Hirmingarda" property at Morcula and Almenno in the county of Bergamo by a charter dated 26 Feb 875[668].
  • Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia 878.
  • She married without her father's knowledge and against his wishes[669]. "Boso…et coniunx mea Hirmingardi proles imperiales" donated property "in pago Laticense…in villa Lantinus" to the abbey of Montiérender by charter dated 25 Jul 879, subscribed by "Richardi comitis, Teutbaldi comitis, Bernardi comitis"[670].
  • She was regent for her son King Louis from 890.

Betrothed (869, contract broken autumn 869) to co-Emperor KONSTANTINOS, son of Emperor BASILEIOS I & his first wife Maria --- (-3 Sep 879).

  • This betrothal sealed the alliance between the fathers of the two parties, but was annulled after the alliance broke down in 871[671]. The primary source on which it is based has not so far been identified.

m ([Mar/Jun] 876) as his second wife, BOSO dux in Italy, Governor and Comte de Provence, son of comte BUVINUS & his wife --- of Arles (-Vienne, Isère 11 Jan 887, bur Vienne, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

  • Comte de Troyes 877.
  • He was crowned King [of Provence] in Oct 879.

References:

  • [648] Reginonis Chronicon 851, MGH SS I, p. 568.
  • [649] Kreutz, B. M. (1996) Before the Normans. Southern Italy in the Ninth and Tenth Centuries (Philadelphia), pp. 28 and 32.
  • [650] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), pp. 268-9.
  • [651] Kreutz (1996), pp. 40, 42, and 43-5.
  • [652] Settipani (1993), p. 267.
  • [653] Continuata Constantinopolitana, cited by Davids, A. Empress Theophano [MB].
  • [654] MGH Diplomata, IV, 30, p. 125.
  • [655] Lexikon des Mittelalters, Band I, p. 634, and Ennen, Edith Frauen im Mittelalters, p. 59.
  • [656] Mathieu, J. N. 'Recherches sur les origines de deux princesses du IX siècle: la reine Guille de Bourgogne et l'impératice Engelberge', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), p. 177, citing (footnote 54) Hlawitschka, E. (1960) Franken, Alemannen, Bayern und Burgunder in Oberitalien (774-962) (Freiburg), pp. 271-3.
  • [657] Odegaard, Charles E. 'The Empress Engelberga', Speculum 26 (1951), 77-103.
  • [658] DD Karl, 22, p. 36.
  • [659] DD Karl, 165, p. 267.
  • [660] Mathieu, J. N. 'Recherches sur les origines de deux princesses du IX siècle: la reine Guille de Bourgogne et l'impératice Engelberge', Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. and Settipani, C. (eds.) (2000) Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident medieval (Prosopographica et Genealogica, Vol. 3), p. 178.
  • [661] Kreutz (1996), pp. 46-7.
  • [662] D Lu II 48, p. 159.
  • [663] Settipani (1993), p. 269.
  • [664] Muratori, L. A. (1778) Antiquitates Italicæ Medii ævi, Tome XIV, col. 106.
  • [665] D Lu II 34, p. 135.
  • [666] D Lu II 48, p. 159.
  • [667] Reginonis Chronicon 877, MGH SS I, p. 589.
  • [668] D Lu D 157, p. 220.
  • [669] Settipani (1993), p. 270.
  • [670] Poupardin, R. (ed.) (1920) Recueil des actes des rois de Provence 855-928 (Paris) 16, p. 31.
  • [671] Ostrogorsky, G. (1952) Geschichte des byzantinischen Staates, French translation (1977) Histoire de l'Etat Byzantin (Payot), p. 264.

---------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy Medlands Project page on Byzanteum (covering details of her betrothal):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BYZANTIUM.htm#Konstantinosdied879

BASILEIOS, son of --- & his wife Pankalo --- ([813] or [825]-29 Aug 886, bur Constantinople, church of the Holy Apostles).

  • The Vita Basilii records that "Basilius imperator" was "ex regione Macedonum…originem…ad Armenios, Arsacidæ genere", recording in a later passage that he and his parents were captured by the Bulgars while Krum was "Bulgarorum princeps" (died in 814)[1036]. Settipani suggests that Basileios was born in [836]. He cites no source on which this is based[1037], but the hypothesis is inconsistent with the family´s capture by Krum Tsar of the Bulgarians which is recorded in the Vita Basilii.
  • Symeon Magister records that "Basilius genere Macedo" was 25 years old when he is first introduced into the narrative[1038]. It is not possible to date this text with any accuracy, but, on the assumption that Basileios arrived at the royal palace in the early 850s, he must have been born much later than before the death of Krum Tsar of Bulgaria if the passage is correct.
  • Basileios went to Constantinople where he was a groom in the imperial stables and became the favourite of Emperor Mikhael III. Basileios murdered Bardas (the emperor's maternal uncle and chief adviser) 21 Apr 865 during a campaign against the Arabs in Crete. Mikhael III created Basileios parakoimomenos (equivalent to Lord Chamberlain, literally "one who sleeps near [the emperor]") in 865, and magistros in 866 when he also adopted him. Theophanes Continuatus records that Emperor Mikhael invested "Basilium" with "magistri dignitate"[1039]. He crowned him co-emperor 26 May 866[1040], but Basileios ordered the murder of Emperor Mikhael in the following year and succeeded 24 Sep 867 as Emperor BASILEIOS I.
  • He recalled Ignatius, installed him as Patriarch of Constantinople 23 Nov 867, and re-established relations with the Church of Rome.
  • His fleet relieved the siege of Dubrovnik by the Arabs in 868, after which Emperor Basileios formed an alliance with Emperor Ludwig II, sealed by the betrothal of his son to Emperor Ludwig's daughter, with a view to prevent further Arab advances in Italy and Dalmatia[1041]. After this alliance broke down, Basileios turned his attention eastwards, capturing Zapetra and Samosate in the Euphrates region in 873, but suffering a defeat at Melitene[1042].
  • In administrative affairs, he conceived a project to rewrite the legal codes of Justinian which, although never finalised, formed the basis for his son's subsequent legislative work.
  • He was mortally wounded in a hunting accident[1043]. Emperor Konstantinos VII's De Ceremoniis Aulæ records that "Basilium et eius uxorem Eudociam et filiam Alexandrum" were buried in the church of the Holy Apostles[1044].

m secondly (865) EVDOKIA Ingerina, daughter of INGER [of the Martiniakos family[1047 (-882, bur Constantinople, Church of the Holy Apostles).

  • Symeon Magister records that "Basilium" married "Eudocia Ingerina" in the eleventh year of the reign of Emperor Mikhael III[1048].
  • She was previously the mistress of Emperor Mikhael III, from whom Empress Theodora obliged her to separate in 855. Presumably she was the mistress of Basileios before eventually marrying him. The Vita Basilii names "Ingeris filia" and in a later passage "uxor…Eudocia"[1049].
  • Emperor Konstantinos VII's De Ceremoniis Aulæ records that "Basilium et eius uxorem Eudociam et filiam Alexandrum" were buried in the church of the Holy Apostles[1050].

Emperor Basileios I & his second wife had six children:

3. KONSTANTINOS ([Sep 866]-3 Sep 879).

  • The Vita Basilii names "uxor…Eudocia cum liberis Constantino et Leone"[1063]. Cedrenus names "Constantinus, filiorum Basilii natu maximus" when recording his death[1064]. Symeon Magister records the birth in Sep (maybe in 866 from the context) of "Constantinus ex Michaele imperatore et Eudocia Ingerina"[1065]. It is more likely that this Konstantinos was the same person as the son of the future Emperor Basileios I of the same name. His birth is recorded after his mother's marriage to Basileios, and no other reference has been found to the birth of Basileios's son Konstantinos.
  • It is assumed that Basileios acknowledged him as his own son after he succeeded to the throne in 867, although the report of his death in Symeon Magister suggests that this was not the case. It should be noted that Georgius Monachus Continuatus records the birth in Sep of "Leo imperator ex Michaele et Eudocia Ingerina", but does not mention the birth of Konstantinos[1066]. It is not known whether this relates to a birth in the same year, and if this is correct what the true identity of the son was. Tougher cites several sources which imply that Konstantinos was the son of Evdokia Ingerina because of the allegations that he, Leon and Alexander were all illegitimate children of Emperor Mikhael III[1067].
  • His father crowned him co-emperor 6 Jan 868, which demonstrates that he must have been Basileios´s oldest son. Symeon Magister records the death in the thirteenth year of the reign of Emperor Basileios of "Constantinus Michaelis filius ex Eudocia…vulgique opinion Basilii filius"[1068]. [1069]

Betrothed (869, contract broken Autumn 869) to ERMENGARDIS, daughter of Emperor LOUIS II King of Italy & his wife Engelberga --- ([852/55]-896 before 2 Jun, bur Vienne, Isère, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

  • This betrothal sealed the alliance between the fathers of the two parties, but was annulled after the alliance broke down in 871[1070]. The primary source on which it is based has not yet been identified.

References:

  • [1036] Theophanes Continuatus, V, Historia de Vita et rebus gestis Basilii inclyti imperatoris, 2 and 4, pp. 212 and 216.
  • [1037] Settipani (1991), pp. 185-6, citing Adontz, N. (1965) Notes Arméno-Byzantines (Lisbon), pp. 92 and 94.
  • [1038] Symeon Magister (referred to as Pseudo-Symeon in PBE I CD-Rom), De Michaele et Theodora, 11, p. 655.
  • [1039] Theophanes Continuatus, IV, Michaelis Theophili filii Imperium, 43, p. 207.
  • [1040] Theophanes Continuatus, IV, Michaelis Theophili filii Imperium, 43, p. 207.
  • [1041] Ostrogorsky, G. (1952) Geschichte des byzantinischen Staates, French translation (1977) Histoire de l'Etat Byzantin (Payot), p. 264.
  • [1042] Ostrogorsky (1977), p. 265.
  • [1043] Ostrogorsky (1977), p. 269.
  • [1044] De Ceremoniis Book II, ch. 42, p. 643.
  • [1047] Settipani (1991), p. 16, footnote 4 (continuation on p. 17).
  • [1048] Symeon Magister (referred to as Pseudo-Symeon in PBE I CD-Rom), De Michaele et Theodora, 40, p. 675.
  • [1049] Theophanes Continuatus, V, Historia de Vita et rebus gestis Basilii inclyti imperatoris, 16 and 29, pp. 235 and 256.
  • [1050] De Ceremoniis Book II, ch. 42, p. 643.
  • [1063] Theophanes Continuatus, V, Historia de Vita et rebus gestis Basilii inclyti imperatoris, 29, p. 256.
  • [1064] Cedrenus I, col. 1130.
  • [1065] Symeon Magister (referred to as Pseudo-Symeon in PBE I CD-Rom), De Michaele et Theodora, 46, p. 681.
  • [1066] Georgii Monachi Vitæ Recentiorum Imperatorum (referred to as Georgius Monachus Continuatus in PBE I CD-Rom), De Michaele et Theodora, 33, p. 835.
  • [1067] Tougher (1997), pp. 42-5 [MB].
  • [1068] Symeon Magister (referred to as Pseudo-Symeon in PBE I CD-Rom), De Basilio Macedone, 15, p. 692.
  • [1069] Settipani (1993), p. 270.
  • [1070] Ostrogorsky (1977), p. 264.

---------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy Medlands Project Page on Provence (covering her marriage family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#BosonKingProvencedied887B

BOSON, son of comte BUVINUS [Bouvin] & his wife --- d'Arles (-Vienne, Isère 11 Jan 887, bur Vienne, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

  • The Annals of Hincmar name "Bosone filio Buvini quondam comitis" in 869[12]. An agreement between Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks and his brother Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks dated Jun 860 names "nobilis ac fidelibus laicis…Chuonradus, Evrardus, Adalardus, Arnustus, Warnarius, Liutfridus, Hruodolfus, Erkingarius, Gislebertus, Ratbodus, Arnulfus, Hugo, item Chuonradus, Liutharius, Berengarius, Matfridus, Boso, Sigeri, Hartmannus, Liuthardus, Richuinus, Wigricus, Hunfridus, Bernoldus, Hatto, Adalbertus, Burchardus, Christianus, Leutulfus, Hessi, Herimannus, item Hruodulfus, Sigehardus"[13], although it is not known whether "…Boso…" refers to the same person.
  • His brother-in-law King Charles II "le Chauve" granted the abbey of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune to him. "Boso comes simulque Bernardus comes ad vicem" donated Nogent "in pago Otmense" for the soul of "quondam amici nostri Odonis comitis…uxoris suæ Guendilmodis" to Saint-Martin-des-Tours by charter dated 871 after 21 Jun[14].
  • He was invested as Comte de Vienne in 870 by King Charles II after the latter conquered the kingdom of Provence.
  • He was installed as Comte de Berry in [872] after the deposition of Gérard comte en Aquitaine. He accompanied King Charles II to Italy in 875: an agreement dated Feb 876 of King Charles II "le Chauve" names "Bosonis…ducis et sacri palatii archiministri atque imperiali missi" among those present in Italy with the king[15].
  • He was invested as dux regni Italici at Pavia in Feb 876, fulfilling the role of viceroy in the absence of the king. Recalled by Emperor Charles in early 877, Boson left his brother Richard in his place in Italy and became Governor and Comte de Provence in [877].
  • He took part in the general rebellion of 877, refusing to swear allegiance to Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks on his accession[16]. After the death of King Louis II, "Hugo abbas et Boso et alii" sent "Walterum Episcopum Aurelianensem et Goiranum et Anscherum comites" to Ludwig III King of the East Franks to offer him part of the kingdom in 879[17].
  • He was named King BOSON at Mantaille, near Vienne 15 Oct 879 by the archbishops of Vienne, Besançon, Lyon, Tarentaise, Aix and Arles, and crowned at Lyon a few days later. Settipani points out that Boson´s kingdom was not referred to as Provence or Lower Burgundy (Bourgogne transjurane), doubting even that any term was used at all to describe it[18]. He installed his capital at Vienne.
  • The reigning Carolingian monarchs formed a league against him, captured Lyon, and besieged Vienne which fell in 882, although Boson refused to capitulate[19]. The Annales Fuldenses record that the sons of Ludwig II " der Deutsche" King of the East Franks fought "Buosonem in Galliam" in 880 and expelled him from "Madasconam urbem", accepting homage from "Bernhardum qui in ea principatum tenebat"[20].
  • The Annales Fuldenses record the death in 887 of "Buosone", leaving a young son by "filia Hludowici Italici regis"[21]. The epitaph of "Bosonis Regis" records his death "III Id Jan VIII anno regni sui"[22].

[m firstly ---.

  • The name of the supposed first wife of King Boson is not known. The only reference to her existence so far identified is in the Annales Fuldenses which record that "Buosone comite" abducted "filiam Hludowicis imperatoris de Italiam" by force in 878, having poisoned his wife[23]. If this is correct, it is surprising that it is not reported in any other contemporary source. However, as shown below, the chronology is favourable for one of the possible daughters attributed to King Boson to have been born from a first marriage, although as the existence of this daughter is not certain this represents a circular argument for proving the king´s supposed first marriage.]

m [secondly] ([Mar/Jun] 876) ERMENGARDIS, daughter of Emperor LOUIS II King of Italy & his wife Engelberga --- ([852/55]-896 before 2 Jun, bur Vienne, Isère, cathédrale de Saint-Maurice).

  • "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted the abbey of San Salvatore to "nostra coniux…Angilberga ante filiam…nostrum Hermengardem" by charter dated at Venosa 28 Apr 868[24]. "Ludowicus…rex" granted "nepta nostra Hirmingarda" property at Morcula and Almenno in the county of Bergamo by a charter dated 26 Feb 875[25]. Regino records the marriage of "Hirmingardem filiam Hludowici imperatoris" and "Bosoni germano Richildis reginæ"[26].
  • Abbess of San Salvatore at Brescia 878.
  • The Annales Fuldenses record that "Buosone comite" abducted "filiam Hludowicis imperatoris de Italiam" by force in 878, having poisoned his wife[27]. "Boso…et coniunx mea Hirmingardi proles imperiales" donated property "in pago Laticense…in villa Lantinus" to the abbey of Montiérender by charter dated 25 Jul 879, subscribed by "Richardi comitis, Teutbaldi comitis, Bernardi comitis"[28].
  • The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[29].
  • She was regent for her son King Louis from 890.

King Boson & his [first] wife had [one child]:

1. [WILLA [Guille] (-before 924).

  • Chaume[30] and Hlawitschka[31] suggest that Willa, wife of Rudolf I King of Burgundy, was the daughter of King Boson, the former considering that she was the daughter of King Boson's second marriage while the latter prefers the king´s supposed first wife as her mother. If Willa was the daughter of King Boson, it is more probable that she was the daughter of a first marriage as her husband is recorded as already having children in 888[32].
  • Alternatively, she may have been King Rudolf's second wife (which Chaume assumes), the king's children having been born from an unrecorded earlier marriage. This would fit better with Willa's second marriage in 912, when her second husband would have been about 30 years old, while Willa would have been over 50 if her first children had been born in the early 880s.
  • m firstly ([880/85][33]) RUDOLF, son of CONRAD II [Welf] Comte d'Auxerre & his wife Waldrada --- (-25 Oct 911). He was proclaimed RUDOLF I King of Upper Burgundy in 888.
  • m secondly (912) as his first wife, HUGUES d'Arles, son of THEOTBALD Comte d'Arles & his wife Berta of Lotharingia [Carolingian] ([880]-10 Apr 947). He succeeded as UGO King of Italy in 926.]

King Boson & his [second] wife had three children:

2. ENGELBERGA ([877]-after Jan 917).

  • Her parentage and marriage are deduced from her donation to Cluny with her husband dated Jan 917, in which her brother "Ludovico" is named[34]. The Annales Bertiniani record the betrothal in 878 of "filiam Bosonis" and "Karlomanno filio suo [=Hlodowici rex]"[35]. It is assumed that this daughter was Engelberga, who must have been an infant at the time, but no proof has been found which confirms that this is correct. "Bosonis" could refer either to the future King Boson or to Count Boson, husband of the adulterous Engiltrudis.
  • While Boson of Provence had refused to swear allegiance to Louis II "le Bègue" King of the West Franks ("Hlodowici rex") on the latter's accession, it is not known whether he was still in rebellion the following year. Assuming that some reconciliation had taken place, a marriage alliance between the two parties would have been a likely possibility. The other Count Boson was presumably of less political importance and, in addition, his problems with his adulterous wife may have rendered his daughters unmarriageable at the time.

^The Annales Bertiniani indicate that Engelberga was born from her father´s [second] marriage when they record that "Richardus frater Bosonis" took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882 after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman[36].

  • Engelberga is named as co-founder with her husband of the monastery of Cluny in a charter dated 11 Sep 910[37].
  • She died as a nun at San Sisto, Piacenza.
  • [Betrothed (11 Sep 878) to CARLOMAN, son of LOUIS II "le Bègue" King of the Franks & his first wife Ansgardis --- (867-killed accidentally Bézu-la-Forêt, near Andelys, Eure 6 Dec 884, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He succeeded his brother in 882 as CARLOMAN King of the West Franks.]
  • m (before 898[38]) GUILLAUME I "le Pieux" Duke of Aquitaine, son of BERNARD "Plantevelue" Comte d'Auvergne & his wife Ermengarde [d'Auvergne] (-6 Jul 918, bur Abbaye de Brioude, Haute-Loire).

3. LOUIS (late 882 or after-Arles 5 Jun 928).

  • Herimannus names "puer Ludowicus" son of Boson "ex filia Ludowici Italiæ imperatoris" when recording that he was adopted by Emperor Karl III after his father's death[39]. The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[40], which suggests that Louis was born after the siege of Vienne.
  • The Annales Fuldenses record the death in 887 of "Buosone", leaving a young son by "filia Hludowici Italici regis" but does not name him[41].
  • His parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 6 Jun 903 under which "Hludovicus…imperator augustus" confirmed privileges which Charles II "le Chauve" King of the West Franks had ceded to "fideles nostri Liutfridus, Hugo atque Teutbertus comites" at the request of "Adalelmo comite et eius coniugi Rotlindi", the charter naming "rex genitor nostri Boso"[42]. "Ludovico" is named as brother of Engelberga in the latter's donation to Cluny dated Jan 917[43].
  • He was adopted by his maternal great-uncle Emperor Karl III "der Dicke/le Gros" at Kirchen-am-Rhein end May 887, at the request of his mother, rendering him eligible to be elected king according to the rules of Carolingian succession[44].
  • He was elected LOUIS King [of Provence] at Valence in 890 by the Archbishops of Lyon, Arles, Vienne and Embrun, ruling over Provence and Viennois under the regency of his mother[45].
  • He was called to Italy in 896 by opponents of Berengario King of Italy, captured Pavia, expelled Berengario, and was elected LOUIS III King of Italy at Pavia 12 Oct 900, crowned the same day. He claimed the imperial crown from Pope Benedict IV, and was crowned Emperor LUDWIG III in Rome 15 or 22 Feb 901, although this was only recognised in Lombardy and Tuscany.
  • He was expelled from Pavia by King Berengario in Jul 902, whereupon he returned to Vienne, but continued to call himself emperor. He was recalled to Italy in 905 by Adalbero II Marchese of Tuscany and reconquered the kingdom, but was captured by King Berengario at Verona and blinded 21 Jul 905.
  • Regino records that "Hludowicus filius Bosonis" expelled "Berengarium" from Italy in 905[46]. He was freed and returned to Provence, where he continued to reign at Vienne, but in name only as Hugues Comte d'Arles was appointed governor[47].
  • "Ludowicus imperator augustus" restored property to the church of Avignon at the request of "comes nosterque propinquus Boso" by charter dated to [907/10][48].
  • Betrothed ([Jun/Jul] 900]) ANNA, daughter of Emperor LEON VI & his second wife Zoe Zautsina ([886/88]-[901/early 904], bur Constantinople Church of the Holy Apostles). The basis for this betrothal is a letter written by Nikolaos Mystikos, which Settipani quotes in French translation, recalling the writer's admonishing Emperor Leon VI for his unsuitable third marriage (dated to Spring 900), excused because of "l'accord…conclu avec le Franc…tu lui destinais comme épouse ta fille unique…[au] cousin de Berta auquel il est arrivé l'infortune que l'on sait"[49]. The date, the relationship with "Berta" (assuming, as Settipani proposes, that this is Berta daughter of Lothaire II King of Lotharingia who married Adalberto Marchese of Tuscany), and "l'infortune" (his blinding) are consistent with "le Franc" being identified with Louis III King of Italy (his title in 900). Settipani assumes that the marriage actually took place. However, the translation only refers to a proposed marriage ("…tu lui destinais…") and provides no proof that the marriage ever happened or, if it did occur, that the bride ever left Byzantium for Provence. Anna is not named in any of the surviving charters of Emperor Louis, nor has any mention of her been found in any of the primary sources so far consulted. As this would have been the first marriage between the families of the eastern and western emperors (no previous betrothals having resulted in marriage), this absence from contemporary western documentation is therefore striking. It also contrasts sharply with the extensive records which relate the Byzantine origin of Theophano, wife of Emperor Otto II (even though Theophano's precise ancestry is unrecorded), although it is recognised that Anna´s career was cut short by premature death in contrast to Theophano´s. Traditional genealogies[50] show Emperor Louis III's son, Charles Constantin, as the child of this alleged first marriage of Emperor Louis, presumably because of his grandiose name. However, another possible explanation is that the name was a symbol of the emperor's hope that his son would one day unite the two successor parts of the ancient Roman empire, in the name of his illustrious predecessors Emperors Charlemagne and Constantine I "the Great", completely independent of his maternal ancestry. Tougher suggests that Anna was legitimate, born after her parents' marriage, and that the marriage to King Louis did not take place[51]. If he is correct about her legitimacy at birth, this excludes her from being the mother of King Louis's son Charles Constantin, if the latter's birth date is correctly estimated below. Anna was crowned Augusta in Constantinople in [899/900], after the death of her mother and before the third marriage of her father[52]. Emperor Konstantinos VII's De Ceremoniis Aulæ records that "Anna et Eudocia, filiæ beati eiusdem Leonis ex [secunda uxore] Zoe", the Greek text specifying "Aννα και Aννα" although the editor suggests that "Ευδοκία" be substituted for the second Anna (without giving his reasons: this may result from confusion with Anna's older half-sister of that name), were buried in the church of the Holy Apostles[53]. It is not known whether this is an error, but in any case both daughters named Anna (assuming that there were two) must have died young. Her burial in Constantinople suggests that Anna never left her father's court.
  • m ([Jun 902/905]) ADELAIS, daughter of ---. "Hludowicus…imperator augustus" granted property at Tressin, Viennois to "fideli nostro Girardo" at the request of "coniux nostra Adalaida" by charter dated 18 Jan 915[54]. Her origin is not known. According to Poupardin[55], she was Adelais, relative [maybe niece] of Rudolf I King of Upper Burgundy [Welf]. Presumably this is based on the two charters dated 28 Mar 943 and 18 May 943 under which "Carolus comes" is named "consanguineus noster" by Conrad I King of Burgundy[56]. The potential problem with this is the apparently impossible marriage of King Louis with his own niece. The solution would be either that Adelais was the daughter of King Rudolf by an earlier otherwise unrecorded marriage, or that King Rudolf's known wife Willa was not the daughter of Boson King [of Provence]. The problem is discussed fully by Settipani[57]. The discussion proceeds on the basis that Adelais was in some way related to King Rudolf, but the precise basis for this speculation does not appear to be clearly stated. The estimated date for this relatively obscure marriage is based on its having taking place during the ex-emperor's period of exile in Vienne, before his recall to Italy, at a time when he would not have been considered a great marriage prospect by more prominent prospective fathers-in-law. Another difficulty is that “consanguineus” in the 943 charters could indicate a more remote relationship than second cousin.
  • Emperor Louis III & his wife had two children: Charles Constantin (905/910 - after January 962, m. Teutberga), and Raoul or Rodolphe (d. after 19 March 929)

4. daughter ([after 882]-after 11 Aug 887).

  • The existence of more than one daughter of King Boson & his second wife is confirmed by the charter dated 11 Aug 887 under which Emperor Karl III confirms a donation by "neptam nostram Hermingardim…filioque suo Hludouuico nepoti nostro et sororibus eius"[72]. It is not known how many other daughters there may have been.
  • The Annales Bertiniani name "Richardus frater Bosonis" when recording that, after the capture of Vienne by the forces of King Carloman, he took “uxorem Bosonis et filiam eius” back to “comitatum suum Augustudensem” in 882[73], which suggests that any other children were born after the siege of Vienne.
  • same person as…? [ERMENGARDE (-after Jun 924). One version of the Series abbatum Flaviniacensium, as reproduced only in a 17th century secondary source, records that "Richardus dux et Ingelbertus" installed "Vualonem, fratrem Manasserii comitis qui gener erat B fratris Richardi ducis" as abbot of Flavigny[74] which, if correct, means that the wife of Manassès was the daughter of King Boson. If this is right, her name suggests that she was the daughter of his second wife, although Chaume proposed that she was the daughter of his first marriage[75].
  • m MANASSES Comte [de Vergy], son of MANASSES & his wife --- (-925 or after).]

References:

  • [12] Hincmarus Annales 869, quoted in MGH SS XXIII, p. 737 footnote 8.
  • [13] Adnuntatio domni Karoli, MGH LL 1, p. 469.
  • [14] Recueil Actes Provence 15, p. 29.
  • [15] Karoli II Conventus Ticinensis, MGH LL 1, p. 528.
  • [16] Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), pp. 369-70.
  • [17] Historia Regum Francorum 879, RHGF IX, p. 41.
  • [18] Settipani (1993), p. 372.
  • [19] Settipani (1993), pp. 371-2.
  • [20] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 880, MGH SS I, p. 394.
  • [21] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 887, MGH SS I, p. 404.
  • [22] Epitaphia III, MGH Poetæ latini IV, p. 1037.
  • [23] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 878, MGH SS I, p. 392.
  • [24] MGH Diplomata, IV, Lu II 48, p. 159.
  • [25] MGH Diplomata, I, Lu D 157, p. 220.
  • [26] Reginonis Chronicon 877, MGH SS I, p. 589.
  • [27] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 878, MGH SS I, p. 392.
  • [28] Recueil Actes Provence 16, p. 31.
  • [29] Annales Bertiniani III 882.
  • [30] Chaume, M. (1925) Les origines du duché de Bourgogne (Dijon), Vol 1, p. 382 note 3, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 374.
  • [31] Hlawitschka, E. (1976) 'Die verwandschaftlichen Verbindungen zwischen dem hochburgundischen und dem niederburgundischen Köingshaus. Zugleich ein Beitrag zur Geschichte Burgunds in der 1. Hälfte des 10. Jahrhunderts', Festschrift für Peter Acht (Munich), pp. 28-57.
  • [32] Settipani (1993), p. 374.
  • [33] Date estimated from Rudolf having been recorded as already having children in 888, Settipani (1993), p. 374.
  • [34] Bernard, A. and Bruel, A. (eds.) (1876-1903) Recueil des chartes de l'abbaye de Cluny (Paris) Tome I, 205, p. 193.
  • [35] Annales Bertiniani III 878.
  • [36] Annales Bertiniani III 882.
  • [37] Cluny Tome I, 112, p. 124.
  • [38] ES III 731. Settipani (1993), p. 375, gives "before 910" as the date of the marriage.
  • [39] Herimanni Augiensis Chronicon 887, MHG SS V, p. 109.
  • [40] Annales Bertiniani III 882.
  • [41] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 887, MGH SS I, p. 404.
  • [42] Recueil Actes Provence 42, p. 78, and Chartarium Viennensium 12, in Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-André-le-Bas de Vienne, Collection de cartularies dauphinois Tome I ("Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas"), p. 221.
  • [43] Cluny Tome I, 205, p. 193.
  • [44] Settipani (1993), p. 377.
  • [45] Settipani (1993), p. 377.
  • [46] Reginonis Chronicon 905, MGH SS I, p. 610.
  • [47] Settipani (1993), pp. 377-8.
  • [48] Recueil Actes Provence 42, p. 78, and Chartarium Viennensium 12, in Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, p. 221.
  • [49] Settipani (1991), p. 7 footnote 5.
  • [50] For example ES II 189, replacement table at end of ES III.1.
  • [51] Tougher, S. (1997) The Reign of Leo VI, pp. 147-8 [MB].
  • [52] Settipani (1991), p. 8.
  • [53] Reiske, J. J. (ed.) (1829) Constantini Porphyrogeniti Imperatoris De Ceremoniis Aulæ Byzantinæ, Corpus Scriptorum Historiæ Byzantinæ (Bonn)Book II, ch. 42, p. 643.
  • [54] Recueil Actes Provence 42, p. 78, and Chartarium Viennensium 16, in Vienne Saint-André-de-Bas, p. 226.
  • [55] Poupardin, R. (1901) Le royaume de Provence sous les Carolingiens (855-933?) (Paris), p. 206-7, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 379 footnote 117.
  • [56] Cluny Tome I, 622, p. 579, and I.631, p. 588.
  • [57] Settipani (1993), p. 379 footnote 117.
  • [72] D Karl 165, p. 267.
  • [73] Annales Bertiniani III 882.
  • [74] Du Chesne, A. (1625) Histoire généalogique de la maison de Vergy (Paris), preuves, p. 17, quoted in Settipani (1993), p. 373 footnote 80, the text in question not appearing in Series abbatum Flaviniacensium, MGH SS VIII, p. 502.
  • [75] Chaume, M. (1925) Les origines du dcuhé de Bourgogne, p. 266 n. 2, cited in Settipani (1993), p. 373.

---------------------

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10323.htm#i103226

Irmengard d'Aquitaine

  • F, #103226
  • Last Edited=8 Mar 2007

Irmengard d'Aquitaine is the daughter of Louis II, Holy Roman Emperor and Engeberge (?). She married Boso, Roi de Provence.

Children of Irmengard d'Aquitaine and Boso, Roi de Provence

  • -1. Engelberga de Provence (1)
  • -2. Louis of Provence, King of Italy b. c 880, d. 28 Jun 928

-------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Ermengard of Provence:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ermengard_of_Provence

Ermengard (also Ermengarda, Ermengarde, or Irmingard) was the only surviving daughter of Louis II, Holy Roman Emperor. In 876, she married Boso, from the Bosonid, Count of Vienne, who declared himself King of Provence in 879.

In May 878, she and her husband sheltered Pope John VIII, who was taking refuge from the Saracens, in Arles. After her husband's coup d'état in October 879, she helped defend his cities from her Carolingian relatives. In 880, she successfully defended Vienne itself, the capital, from the combined forces of Charles the Fat and the co-ruling kings of France, Louis III and Carloman. In August 881, the newly-crowned Emperor Charles the Fat pillaged and burned Vienne, focing Ermengard and her children to take refuge in Autun with her brother-in-law Richard, Duke of Burgundy. Meanwhile, Boso fled into Provence.

On Boso's death in January 887, the Provençal barons elected Ermengard to act as his regent, with the support of Richard. In May, Ermengard travelled with her son Louis to the court of Charles the Fat, and received his recognition of the young Louis as king. Charles adopted Louis as his son and put both mother and son under his protection. In May 889, she travelled to Charles' successor, Arnulf, to make submission anew.

Through her marriage to Boso, Ermengard also had two daughters and one son[1] :

  • 1. Ermengard (c.877-917), who married Manasses, Count of Chalon
  • 2. Engelberga, who married William the Pious, Count of Auvergne.
  • 3. Louis the Blind

Sources

Riché, Pierr. Les Carolingiens: Une famille qui fit l'Europe, genealogical table XII (Bosonides).

Notes

1. ^ Ermengardis on FMG site -------------------- Ermengarde is "said to be mistress before 866 of 'an Emperor of Byzantium.'" - "Ancestral Roots..." (Balt., 1992) 141B-17.

References: [ES],[RFC] -------------------- Ermengarde d'Italie

  • Place of Burial:
  • Cathédrale de Saint-Maurice, Vienne, Département de l'Isère, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • Birth: 852 Frankish Empire (within present Italy)
  • Death: between June 2, 896 and April 2, 897 (44) Vienne, Département de l'Isère, Kingdom of Provence (Present Rhône-Alpes), Frankish Empire (within present France)
  • Daughter of Louis II "le Jeune", Emperor of Italy and of the Franks and Engelberga von Friaul
  • Wife of Boson d'Autun, Comte de Vienne, Dux de Provence
  • Mother of
  • Ermengarde de Bourgogne (de Provence),
  • Daughter of Boson;
  • Rudolph II Graf von Vienne;
  • Richardis de Metz;
  • Folmar von Metzgau;
  • Willa, Queen of Upper Burgundy;
  • Varnier (Warnier) d'Autun (de Bourgogne);
  • Engelberge de Provence and
  • Louis III the Blind, Holy Roman Emperor

Ermengarde (Irimgard) CAROLING of Italy •Born: 852, Lorraine, France •Married: 876 •Died: Before 2 Apr 897 parents: Ludwig (Louis) II CAROLING Holy Roman Emperor (Abt 823-875) Angilberga DI SPOLETO (837-896)

  General Notes:Before 866 - mistress of Byzantine Emperor. [Ancestral Roots] 573

Ermengarde married Boso II DE PROVENCE Count of Vienne, King of Provence, son of Budwine (Bouin, Bivin, Beuvesde) DE VIENNE Count of Italy & Metz and Richilde DI TORINO, in 876 . (Boso II DE PROVENCE Count of Vienne, King of Provence was born in 847 in Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France and died on 11 Jan 886-887 in Vienne, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France 572,577

Children:

•Kunigunda DE PROVENCE+ •Willa DE VIENNE •Ingelburga DE PROVENCE+ •Willa DE HAUTE-BOURGOGNE "the Elder"+ •Louis III "the Blind" DE PROVENCE Holy Roman Emperor+

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/2/2102.htm

Vienne, Dpartement de l'Ise, Kingdom of Provence (Present Rhne-Alpes), Frankish Empire (within present France)

Ermengarde (Irimgard) CAROLING of Italy

  • Born: 852, Lorraine, France
  • Married: 876
  • Died: Before 2 Apr 897
  • parents:
  • Ludwig (Louis) II CAROLING Holy Roman Emperor (Abt 823-875)
  • Angilberga DI SPOLETO (837-896)
  General Notes:Before 866 - mistress of Byzantine Emperor. [Ancestral Roots] 573

Ermengarde married Boso II DE PROVENCE Count of Vienne, King of Provence, son of Budwine (Bouin, Bivin, Beuvesde) DE VIENNE Count of Italy & Metz and Richilde DI TORINO, in 876 . (Boso II DE PROVENCE Count of Vienne, King of Provence was born in 847 in Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, France and died on 11 Jan 886-887 in Vienne, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France 572,577

Children:
  • Kunigunda DE PROVENCE+
  • Willa DE VIENNE
  • Ingelburga DE PROVENCE+
  • Willa DE HAUTE-BOURGOGNE "the Elder"+
  • Louis III "the Blind" DE PROVENCE Holy Roman Emperor+

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/2/2102.htm

view all 21

Ermengardis d'Italie, Queen of Provence's Timeline

844
844
852
852
Frankish Empire (within present Italy)
855
855
Age 3
855
Age 3
Burgundy, France
873
December 873
Age 21
Provence, France
874
874
Age 22
875
875
Age 23
876
876
Age 24
Châlons-en-Champagne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
876
Age 24
(Present Italy)
877
877
Age 25
Autun, Saone-et-Loire, Bourgogne, France