Erna Solberg MP

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Birthdate: (53)
Managed by: Aimee C. Speidel von Ofterdingen Mack
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

    • Sindre
      husband
    • Ingrid
      daughter
    • Erik
      son
    • Inger Wenche
      mother
    • Ingrid
      sister
    • Sister
      sister
    • mother's ex-partner

About Erna Solberg

Prime Minister Erna Solberg (Conservative Party) Erna Solberg was born in Bergen 24 February 1961. She is married to Sindre Finnes. The couple has two children. Solberg holds a Cand. Mag. Degree (in Sociology, Political Science, Statistics and Economy) from the University of Bergen in 1986.

Solberg was Minister of Local Government and Regional Development 2001-2005, in Kjell Magne Bondevik's Second Government.

Solberg has represented the Conservative Party in the County of Hordaland at the Storting (Parliament) since 1989. At the change of government she was the Conservative Party's parliamentary leader. During the recent Storting period she was member of the Standing Committee on Health and Care Services Affairs, the Standing Committee on Foreign and Defence Affairs and the Electoral Committee, 08.10.2009 - 30.09.2013. She has previously been a member of standing committees on i.a. Finance and Local Government, and head of the Storting's delegation to NATO's Parliamentary Assembly.

Solberg has been leader of the Conservative Party since 2004.

source: http://www.regjeringen.no/en/dep/smk/primeminister/prime-minister-erna-solberg.html?id=742859 ----------------------

Norsk høyre-politiker, statsminister fra 2013.

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September 5, 2013 1:28 pm Erna Solberg eyes victory in Norway elections By Richard Milne in Oslo Erna Solberg NORWAY-POLITICS-CONSERVATIVE PARTY©AFP Erna Solberg, leader of Norway's Conservative party Erna Solberg would in many ways like to be Norway’s answer to Angela Merkel. The leader of the centre-right Conservatives and probable next Norwegian prime minister, Ms Solberg is an admirer of the German chancellor, to whom she bears a passing resemblance. “She’s a talented woman [and] a role model,” Ms Solberg said last year. But the campaign ahead of Monday’s parliamentary elections in Norway has emulated Ms Merkel’s rise to the chancellorship in 2005 in deeper ways than merely having centre-right women as central characters. Both faced charismatic centre-left leaders – Jens Stoltenberg in Norway and Gerhard Schröder in Germany – who had governed for two terms. Both were outsiders from places away from their parties’ traditional power bases, with Ms Solberg coming from Norway’s west coast not Oslo and Ms Merkel from eastern Germany. And both let a big lead slip in the polls, with Ms Solberg’s party trailing Mr Stoltenberg’s governing Labour party after being ahead earlier in the summer.

More video The good news for Ms Solberg is that unlike Ms Merkel – who faced a night of electoral agony in 2005 as she practically tied with Mr Schröder – the Conservatives seem set to govern as its likely coalition partners are polling far ahead of Labour’s. That would be vindication for her attempt to give the Conservatives a broader appeal than they historically have enjoyed in Norway, one of the richest countries in Europe thanks to oil, where they last came in first place in an election in 1924. More ON THIS STORY Populist right seeks pivotal Nordic role Norway’s prime minister runs out of road in election race Editorial Undercover politics Norway’s opposition mulls oil fund split ON THIS TOPIC Norway to bring in begging ban Comment Norway tames populist barbarians Norway scraps oil fund ethics committee Global Insight Norway’s oil fund caught in paradox IN EUROPE Kiev calls ceasefire as it secures east China signs $4bn of deals with Greece Nato claims Moscow funding anti-fracking groups Turkish court orders mass release “Solberg has transformed the party, as it used to have a very ideological rhetoric on financial markets: the private sector is best. She has changed it from a party that is formed from the elite in Oslo to one more focused on the west of Norway, where the big industry is,” says Frithjof Jacobsen, a political commentator who is writing a book about Ms Solberg on the campaign trail. Ms Solberg, who comes from the western merchant city of Bergen where her father ran a local bus company, became an MP at the age of 28 in 1989 and she soon served on a commission to determine what to do with Norway’s military after the cold war. She earned the nickname “Jern-Erna” or “Iron Erna” when as a minister in the last Conservative government she refused to become involved in asylum disputes, and it is a tag her team have been keen to play down in the current campaign. In an interview at her party’s central Oslo headquarters overlooking the National Theatre, Ms Solberg sounds concerned about how the country’s dominant oil sector could be crowding out other industries and says she wants to help business. “As long as we are one of the most expensive countries to produce in, we should focus on cutting costs that directly and indirectly weigh on business,” she says. Her priorities for her first 100 days will, she adds, be focused on education – in particular improving science and mathematics teaching – cutting queues in healthcare, and investment in infrastructure. She has also proposed tax cuts and big changes in some state-owned groups: the Conservatives are weighing up whether to split the $750bn oil fund – the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund – and how quickly to privatise several companies. “The future of Norway isn’t about competing on being the cheapest but the most innovative. We have an expensive welfare state and the only answer to continue that way is to become more competitive, especially on knowledge,” she says. Those that know her best say she values hard work over flashiness. “She’s a politician with a very strong will and with a very high work capacity,” says Svein Flåtten, a Conservative MP. Mr Jacobsen, a columnist at VG newspaper, says: “She has a keen mind and eye for details and facts. She is patient. She puts a price on long, thorough work . . . Her style is a long, sluggish fight that you win at the very end.” Solberg has transformed the party . . . that is formed from the elite in Oslo to one more focused on the west of Norway, where the big industry is - Frithjof Jacobsen, political commentator But perhaps her toughest hour came after the last elections in 2009 when the Conservatives were relegated to third place and many expected her to resign. She faced her critics down and after big gains in 2011 local elections her nickname had changed to “Erna-Stjerna”, Erna the star. If she is one, she is a reluctant one unlike Mr Stoltenberg. Mr Jacobsen tells of Ms Solberg – who says she likes to wind down by playing the mobile game Candy Crush Saga – walking down a street in her home town last month when suddenly people in front of the merchant houses shouted out “Erna, Erna”. “Her advisers poked her and said: ‘wave at them’. She did and the people stood up and applauded her. You suddenly sensed her feeling: I’m a regular girl from Bergen and I’m going to become prime minister,” he says. Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2014. You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/e2a7f4ec-155d-11e3-b519-00144feabdc0.html#axzz35ICnlQOE

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Erna Solberg was born in Bergen in western Norway and grew up in the affluent Kalfaret neighbourhood. Her father, Asbjørn Solberg (1925 – 89), worked as an consultant in the Bergen Sporvei and her mother, Inger Wenche Torgersen (1926–), was an office-worker. Solberg has two sisters. She is married to Sindre Finnes, a business man, with whom she has two children. source: http://freetofindtruth.blogspot.com/2014/03/33-watch-norway-and-prime-minister-erna.html -------------------- Prime Minister Erna Solberg

She is leading a minority government with the Progress Party (FrP). Erna Solberg is married to Sindre Finnes with whom she has two children.

Political career

Erna Solberg has been leader of the Conservative Party since 2004. After a centre-right coalition won a majority in the 2013 parliamentary election, she is expected to take office as Prime Minister of Norway on 16 October 2013.

She has served as a member of the Storting since 1989 and served as Minister of Local Government and Regional Development in Bondevik"s Second Cabinet from 2001 to 2005. After winning the elections, she will be the second female Prime Minister of Norway after Gro Harlem Brundtland.

Erna Solberg was born in Bergen and grew up in the affluent Kalfaret neighbourhood. Her father, Asbjørn Solberg (1925 – 89), worked as an consultant in the Bergen Sporvei and her mother, Inger Wenche Torgersen (1926–), was an office-worker. Solberg has two sisters.

Erna Solberg had some struggles at school, which were clarified, at the age 16, with the diagnosis of dyslexia. She was, nevertheless, an active and talkative contributor in the classroom.As a high-school student, she was elected to the board of the School Student Union of Norway, in 1979, and in the same year she led the national charity event Operasjon Dagsverk, in which students collected money for Jamaica.

In 1986, Erna Solberg graduated with her cand.mag. degree in sociology, political science, statistics and economics from the University of Bergen. In her final year, she also led the Students" League of the Conservative Party in Bergen.

Erna Solberg was a deputy member of Bergen city council in the periods 1979–1983 and 1987–1989, the last period on the executive committee. She chaired local and municipal chapters of the Young Conservatives and the Conservative Party.

Erna Solberg was first elected to the Storting (Norwegian Parliament) from Hordaland in 1989 and has been re-elected on five occasions. She was also the leader of the national Conservative Women"s Association, from 1994 to 1998.

source: http://www.gonorway.no/norway/articles/government/451/index.html ------------------------ 28th Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˌæːɳɑ ˈsuːlˈbærɡ]) (born 24 February 1961) is a Norwegian politician who has been leader of the Conservative Party since May 2004 and Prime Minister of Norway since October 2013.

Solberg has served as a member of the Storting since 1989 and served as Minister of Local Government and Regional Development in Bondevik's Second Cabinet from 2001 to 2005. In her term as minister, she oversaw the tightening of immigration policy and the preparation of a proposed reform of the administrative divisions of Norway.[1] After the 2005 election, she chaired the Conservative Party parliamentary group until 2013. Solberg has emphasized the social and ideological basis of the Conservative policies, although the party also has becomed visibly more pragmatic.[2]

After winning the election in September 2013, she became the second female Prime Minister of Norway, after Gro Harlem Brundtland.[3] Solberg's Cabinet, often referred to informally as the "Blue-Blue Cabinet", is a two-party minority cabinet consisting of the Conservative Party and Progress Party. The cabinet has established a formalized co-operation with the non-socialist Liberal Party and Christian Democratic Party in the Storting.[4]

Family background and education[edit] Solberg was born in Bergen in western Norway and grew up in the affluent Kalfaret neighbourhood. Her father, Asbjørn Solberg (1925 – 89), worked as an consultant in the Bergen Sporvei and her mother, Inger Wenche Torgersen (1926–), was an office-worker. Erna Solberg grew up as the second oldest of three sisters.[5]

Solberg had some struggles at school and at the age 16 was diagnosed as suffering from dyslexia. She was, nevertheless, an active and talkative contributor in the classroom.[6] In her final year as a high-school student in 1979, she was elected to the board of the School Student Union of Norway, and in the same year led the national charity event Operasjon Dagsverk, in which students collected money for Jamaica.

In 1986, she graduated with her cand.mag. degree in sociology, political science, statistics and economics from the University of Bergen. In her final year, she also led the Students' League of the Conservative Party in Bergen.

Since 1996 she has been married to Sindre Finnes, a businessman and former Conservative Party politician, with whom she has two children.[7] The family has lived in both Bergen and Oslo.

Political career[edit] Local government[edit] Solberg was a deputy member of Bergen city council in the periods 1979–1983 and 1987–1989, the last period on the executive committee. She chaired local and municipal chapters of the Young Conservatives and the Conservative Party.

Parliamentarian[edit] She was first elected to the Storting (Norwegian Parliament) from Hordaland in 1989 and has been re-elected on five occasions. She was also the leader of the national Conservative Women's Association, from 1994 to 1998.

Government Minister[edit] From 2001 to 2005 Solberg served as the Minister of Local Government and Regional Development under Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik. Her alleged tough policies in this department, including a firm stance on asylum policy, earned her the nickname "Jern-Erna" (Norwegian for "Iron Erna") in the media.[8]

In fact, numbers show that the Bondevik government, of 2001–2005, actually let in thousands more asylum seekers than the subsequent centre-left Red-Green government, of 2005–2009.[9]

In 2003, Solberg proposed introducing Islamic Sharia Councils in Norway after being informed of the existence of such councils in the United Kingdom,[10][11] and, in 2004, said that she wished to increase immigration to Norway.[12]

As Minister, Solberg instructed the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration to expel Mulla Krekar, being a danger to national security. Later, terrorism charges were filed against Krekar for a death threat he uttered in 2010 against Erna Solberg.

Party Leader[edit] She served as deputy leader of the Conservative Party from 2002 to 2004 and, in 2004, she became the party leader.

Prime Minister[edit] Solberg became the presumptive head of government after winning the general election on 9 September 2013 and was appointed Prime Minister on 16 October 2013. Solberg is Norway's second female Prime Minister after Gro Harlem Brundtland.[13]

In 2014 she participated at the Agriculture and Food meeting which was held by Sylvi Listhaug where Minister of Transportation Ketil Solvik-Olsen and Minister of Climate and Environment Tine Sundtoft also were present. Later on, the four took a picture which appeared on the Government.no website on March 14 of the same year.[14] In April of the same year she criticized European Court over data retention which Telenor Group argued can be used without court proceedings.[15]

Mordechai Vanunu case[edit] In April 2008, it was revealed that Solberg, as Minister of Local Government and Regional Development in 2004, had rejected a request for asylum in Norway by Israeli nuclear whistleblower, Mordechai Vanunu.[16] While the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration had been prepared to grant Vanunu asylum, it was then decided that the application could not be accepted because Vanunu's application had been made outside the borders of Norway.[17] An unclassified document revealed that Solberg and the government considered that extraditing Vanunu from Israel could be seen as an action against Israel and thus unfitting to the Norwegian government's traditional position as a friend of Israel and as a political player in the Middle East. Solberg rejected this criticism and defended her decision.[18]

References[edit] Wikimedia Commons has media related to Erna Solberg. Jump up ^ Hellberg, Lars. "Erna Solberg" (in Norwegian). Norsk biografisk leksikon. Retrieved May 23, 2014. Jump up ^ Alstadheim, Kjetil B. (December 22, 2012). "Solberg-og-dal-banen". Dagens Næringsliv (in Norwegian) (Oslo). p. 2. Jump up ^ PM 1981, 1986–1989, 1990–1996 Jump up ^ "Avtale mellom Venstre, Kristelig Folkeparti, Fremskrittspartiet og Høyre" (in Norwegian). Høyre. Retrieved May 23, 2014. Jump up ^ Johansen, Per Kristian (February 9, 2009). "Erna Solberg varsler tøffere integrering" (in Norwegian). Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on October 10, 2013. Retrieved May 23, 2014. Jump up ^ Eivind Fondenes and Aslak Eriksrud. "Partifellene, syntes ikke Erna Solberg var blå nok" [Comrades did not Erna Solberg was blue enough] (in Norwegian). TV2. Archived from the original on February 8, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013. Jump up ^ "After softening, 'Iron Erna' Solberg set to become Norway's PM". Daily News and Analysis. Reuters. September 10, 2013. Archived from the original on April 11, 2014. Jump up ^ Morken, Johannes (8 May 2009). "Erna Solberg varsler tøffere integrering" [Erna Solberg suggests tougher integration]. Vårt Land (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on April 12, 2014. Retrieved July 11, 2010. Jump up ^ Svela, Helge O. (September 13, 2009). "Det (var) altså flere asylsøkere som kom til Norge under den forrige Bondevik-regjeringen som Erna var med i, enn det har kommet nå under den rød-grønne regjeringen" [It (was) thus more asylum seekers coming to Norway during the previous Bondevik government that Erna was in, than it has now come under the red-green government]. Bergens Tidende (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on September 15, 2009. Retrieved August 29, 2010. Jump up ^ Sandli, Espen (November 6, 2003). "Solberg ber om shariaråd" [Solberg asking for Sharia Council]. Drammens Tidende (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on February 25, 2010. Retrieved August 29, 2010. Jump up ^ Ljones, Bjørg Irene (August 11, 2007). "Forby sharialover i Norge" [Prohibiting Sharia law in Norway]. Norge Idag (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on January 17, 2004. Retrieved August 29, 2010. Jump up ^ Almendingen, Berit (September 20, 2004). "Erna vil friste innvandrere til Norge" [Erna will entice immigrants to Norway]. TV 2 (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved August 29, 2010. Jump up ^ "Dette er utfordringene som møter de nye statsrådene" [These are the challenges facing the new ministers]. Aftenposten. October 16, 2013. Archived from the original on July 24, 2011. Retrieved October 16, 2013. Jump up ^ "Skogens rolle i klimasammenheng" [The forest's role in climate change]. Government.no. March 14, 2014. Archived from the original on April 12, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2014. Jump up ^ "Erna Solbergs datalagring kan bli torpedert" [Erna Solberg: Data storage can be torpedoed]. Bergens Tidende. Archived from the original on April 12, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2014. Jump up ^ Dennis Ravndal (September 4, 2008). "Erna Solberg hindret Vanunu i å få asyl" [Erna Solberg prevented Vanunu in getting asylum]. VG. Archived from the original on April 13, 2008. Retrieved April 10, 2008. Jump up ^ Stian Eisenträger (September 4, 2008). "Vanunu: - Håper Norge angrer asyl-avslaget" [Vanunu: - Hope Norway regrets asylum refusal]. VG. Archived from the original on April 13, 2008. Retrieved April 10, 2008. Jump up ^ Stian Eisenträger (September 4, 2008). "Vanunu-venner i harnisk" [Vanunu friends outraged]. VG. Archived from the original on April 14, 2008. Retrieved April 10, 2008. "Erna Solberg" (in Norwegian). Stortinget.no.

External links[edit] "Erna Solber prevented Vanunu's asylum" "Vanunu - Hope that Norway will give me asylum" "Vanunu's friends furious - politicians mute"

Categories: 1961 birthsCommanders of the Order of St. OlavConservative Party (Norway) politiciansMinisters of Local Government and Modernisation of NorwayLiving peopleMembers of the Parliament of NorwayNorwegian ChristiansNorwegian women in politicsPeople from BergenPrime Ministers of NorwayUniversity of Bergen alumni

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erna_Solberg

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solberg's_Cabinet

Erna Solberg's Cabinet Solberg's Cabinet is the incumbent Government of the Kingdom of Norway. The Government was appointed by the King on 16 October 2013 following the parliamentary election on 9 September. It succeeded Stoltenberg's Second Cabinet.

Parliamentary support[edit] The Government is a coalition of the Conservative Party and the Progress Party, relying on parliamentary support from the Liberal Party and the Christian Democratic Party through a separate agreement giving them influence on policy.[1] The Government is the first in which the Progress Party participates.

Name[edit] By convention, a Norwegian government is usually named after the Prime Minister, in casu the Solberg Cabinet. The Government, however, has officially referred to itself as the Høyre Frp Cabinet. Informally, it is called the Blue Cabinet and even the Blue Blue Cabinet, referring to Høyre's light blue and the Progress Party's dark blue party colour, respectively.

Members[edit] On 16 October 2013, Erna Solberg's cabinet ministers were formally appointed by the King Harald V.[2]

The Cabinet has 18 ministers; two fewer than the previous Stoltenberg cabinet. It has eleven ministers from the Conservatives and seven from Progress, reflecting the parties numerical strength in Parliament.[3]

The cabinet has nine men and nine women. The average age at the start is 43. Six ministers have studies in economics, four are jurists and four have studies in the humanities or social sciences.[4]

Seven ministers hail from Western Norway,[4] including Listhaug who now represents Oslo. Seven ministers (including Listhaug) represent Eastern Norway, three ministers represent Trøndelag, one Northern Norway and one Sørlandet. Siv Jensen is the only minister who was born and grew up in Oslo.[4]

Portfolio Minister Took office Left office Party Prime Minister Erna Solberg 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister at the Office of the Prime Minister, responsible for EEA Affairs and EU Relations, also Chief of Staff at the Office of the Prime Minister Vidar Helgesen 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Finance Siv Jensen 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Local Government and Modernisation Jan Tore Sanner 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Defence Ine Marie Eriksen Søreide 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Foreign Affairs Børge Brende 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Trade and Industry Monica Mæland 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Transport and Communications Ketil Solvik-Olsen 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Agriculture Sylvi Listhaug 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Fisheries also Minister for Nordic Cooperation Affairs Elisabeth Aspaker 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Justice and Public Security Anders Anundsen 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Education and Research Torbjørn Røe Isaksen 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion Solveig Horne 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Petroleum and Energy Tord Lien 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Health and Care Services Bent Høie 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Robert Eriksson 16 October 2013 Incumbent Progress Minister of Culture and Church Affairs Thorhild Widvey 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative Minister of Climate and the Environment Tine Sundtoft 16 October 2013 Incumbent Conservative References[edit] Jump up ^ Conservative Party and Progress Party to form a coalition government. 2013-09-30 Aftenposten Jump up ^ Official news release from the Cabinet 16 October 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2013. Jump up ^ NTB (14 October 2013)Frp får landbruksministeren Aftenposten. Retrieved 17 October 2013 (Norwegian) ^ Jump up to: a b c John Olav Egeland (16 October 2013) En regjering for markedsstaten Aftenposten. Retrieved 17 October 2013 (Norwegian)

Solberg's Cabinet 61st Cabinet of Norway Flag of Norway.svg Incumbent Erna Solberg - 2013-08-10 at 12-58-32.jpg Date formed 16 October 2013 People and organizations Head of government Erna Solberg Head of state Harald V of Norway Number of ministers 18 Member party Conservative Party Progress Party Status in legislature Minority government History Election(s) 2013 parliamentary election Legislature term(s) 2013-2017 Previous Stoltenberg's Second Cabinet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solberg's_Cabinet

----------------------- http://www.nyasatimes.com/2014/06/28/norway-prime-minister-visits-malawi-to-launch-girls-education-programme/ ---------------------- http://www.ba.no/nyheter/article6843745.ece

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Erna Solberg's Timeline

1961
February 24, 1961
1996
February 29, 1996
Age 35
Bergen