Sylvia Pankhurst

Is your surname Corio?

Research the Corio family

Sylvia Pankhurst's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Estelle Sylvia Corio (Pankhurst)

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Manchester, Greater Manchester, UK
Death: Died in Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Richard Marsden Pankhurst and Emmeline Pankhurst
Wife of Silvio Celestino Corio
Mother of Richard PANKHURST
Sister of Christabel Pankhurst; Frank Pankhurst and Adela Pankhurst

Managed by: Randy Schoenberg
Last Updated:

About Sylvia Pankhurst

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Pankhurst

Estelle Sylvia Pankhurst (5 May 1882 – 27 September 1960) was an English campaigner for the suffragist movement in the United Kingdom. She was for a time a prominent left communist who then devoted herself to the cause of anti-fascism.


Early life


Sylvia Pankhurst was born in Manchester, a daughter of Dr. Richard Pankhurst and Emmeline Pankhurst, members of the Independent Labour Party and (especially Emmeline) much concerned with women's rights. She and her sisters attended the Manchester High School for Girls. Her sister Christabel would also become an activist.


Sylvia trained as an artist at the Manchester School of Art, and in 1900 won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in South Kensington.


Suffragism


In 1906 Sylvia Pankhurst started to work full-time with the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) with her sister and her mother. In contrast to them she retained an affiliation with the labour movement, and unlike them she concentrated her activity on local campaigning with the East London Federation of the WSPU, rather than leading the national organisation. Sylvia Pankhurst contributed articles to the WSPU's newspaper, Votes for Women, and in 1911 she published a propagandist history of the WSPU's campaign, The Suffragette: The History of the Women’s Militant Suffrage Movement. By 1914 Sylvia had many disagreements with the route the WSPU was taking: while the WSPU had become independent of any political party, she wanted an explicitly socialist organisation tackling wider issues than women's suffrage, aligned with the Independent Labour Party. She had a very close personal relationship with anti-war Labour politician Keir Hardie. In 1914 she broke with the WSPU to set up the East London Federation of Suffragettes (ELFS), which over the years evolved politically and changed its name accordingly, first to Women's Suffrage Federation and then to the Workers' Socialist Federation. She founded the newspaper of the WSF, Women's Dreadnought, which subsequently became the Workers' Dreadnought. It organized against the war, and some of its members hid conscientious objectors from the police.


First World War


During the First World War, Sylvia was horrified to see her mother and her sister Christabel become enthusiastic supporters of the war drive, and campaigning in favour of military conscription. She herself was opposed to the war. Her organization attempted to organize the defence of the interests of women in the poorer parts of London. They set up "cost-price" restaurants to feed the hungry, without the taint of charity. They also established a toy factory in order to give work to women who had become unemployed because of the war. Sylvia worked incessantly to defend soldiers' wives rights to decent allowances while their partners were away, both practically by setting up legal advice centres, and politically by running campaigns to oblige the government to take into account the poverty of soldiers' wives. She supported the International Women's Peace Congress, held during the war at The Hague, support which lost her some of her allies at home.


Communism


The group continued to move leftwards and hosted the inaugural meeting of the Communist Party (British Section of the Third International). Workers' Dreadnought published "A Constitution for British Soviets" at this meeting. This was an article by Sylvia, in which she highlighted the role of Household Soviets - "In order that mothers and those who are organisers of the family life of the community may be adequately represented, and may take their due part in the management of society, a system of household Soviets shall be built up". The CP(BSTI) was opposed to parliamentarism, in contrast to the views of the newly founded British Socialist Party which formed the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) in August 1920. The CP(BSTI) soon dissolved itself into the larger, official Communist Party. This unity was to be short-lived and when the leadership of the CPGB proposed that Pankhurst hand over the Workers Dreadnought to the party she revolted. As a result she was expelled from the CPGB and moved to found the short-lived Communist Workers Party.


Sylvia by this time adhered to left or council communism. She was an important figure in the communist movement at the time and attended meetings of the International[disambiguation needed] in Russia and Amsterdam and also those of the Italian Socialist Party. She disagreed with Vladimir Lenin on important points of Communist theory and strategy and was supportive of "left communists" such as Anton Pannekoek.


International Auxiliary Language Movement


Pankhurst also applied her energies to the consideration of a satisfactory International Auxiliary Language. To this end, she wrote and published a monograph on the topic in which she considers the history of the movement, historical and contemporary attempts at creating a non-national interlangauge and delves into the issues of how the ideal interlanguage should look, what conditions it should satisfy and how it should be implemented.


Partner and son


Sylvia Pankhurst objected to entering into a marriage contract and taking a husband's name. At about the end of the First World War, she began living with Italian anarchist Silvo Corio and moved to Woodford Green for over 30 years. A blue plaque and Pankhurst Green opposite Woodford tube station commemorate her link to the area. In 1927 she gave birth to a son, Richard. As she refused to marry the child's father, her own mother, Emmeline Pankhurst, broke with her and did not speak to her again.


Supporter of Ethiopia

 

In the early 1930s, Pankhurst drifted away from communist politics but remained involved in movements connected with anti-fascism and anti-colonialism. In 1932 she was instrumental in the establishment of the Socialist Workers' National Health Council. She responded to the Italian invasion of Ethiopia by publishing The New Times and Ethiopia News from 1936, and became a supporter of Haile Selassie. She raised funds for Ethiopia's first teaching hospital and wrote extensively on Ethiopian art and culture; her research was published as Ethiopia, a Cultural History (London: Lalibela House, 1955).


From 1936, MI5 kept a watch on Pankhurst's correspondence. In 1940, she wrote to Viscount Swinton as the chairman of a committee investigating Fifth Columnists, sending him a list of active Fascists still at large and of anti-Fascists who had been interned. A copy of this letter on MI5's file carries a note in Swinton's hand reading "I should think a most doubtful source of information."


After the post-war liberation of Ethiopia, she became a strong supporter of union between Ethiopia and the former Italian Somaliland, and MI5's file continued to follow her activities. In 1948, MI5 considered strategies for "muzzling the tiresome Miss Sylvia Pankhurst".


Pankhurst became a friend and adviser to the Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie and followed a consistently anti-British stance. She moved to Addis Ababa at Haile Selassie's invitation in 1956 with her son, Richard, (who continues to live there), and founded a monthly journal, Ethiopia Observer, which reported on many aspects of Ethiopian life and development.


She died in Addis Ababa in 1960, and was given a full state funeral at which Haile Selassie named her "an honorary Ethiopian". She is the only foreigner buried in front of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Addis Ababa, in the area reserved for patriots of the Italian war.


Writings (selection)


The Suffragette: The History of the Women’s Militant Suffrage Movement (London: Gay & Hancock, 1911)

The Home Front (1932; reissued 1987 by The Cresset Library) ISBN 0-09-172911-4
Soviet Russia as I saw it (Workers' Dreadnought, 16 April 1921)
The Suffragette Movement: An Intimate Account of Persons and Ideals (1931; reissued 1984 by Chatto & Windus)
A Sylvia Pankhurst Reader, ed. by Kathryn Dodd (Manchester University Press, 1993)
Non-Leninist Marxism: Writings on the Workers Councils (includes Pankhurst's "Communism and its Tactics"), (St. Petersburg, Florida: Red and Black Publishers, 2007). ISBN 978-0-9791813-6-8
Delphos or the Future of International Language (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., undated, but probably around 1927)

Secondary literature

Mary Davis, Sylvia Pankhurst: A Life in Radical Politics (Pluto Press, 1999) ISBN 0-7453-1518-6
Richard Pankhurst, Sylvia Pankhurst: Artist and Crusader, An Intimate Portrait (Virago Ltd, 1979) ISBN 0-448-22840-8
Richard Pankhurst, Sylvia Pankhurst: Counsel for Ethiopia (Hollywood, Calif.: Tsehai, 2003) London: Global
Shirley Harrison, Sylvia Pankhurst, A Crusading Life 1882–1960 (Aurum Press, 2004)
Shirley Harrison, Sylvia Pankhurst, Citizen of the World (Hornbeam Publishing Ltd, 2009), ISBN 978-0-9553963-2-8
Barbara Castle, Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst (Penguin Books, 1987) ISBN 0-14-008761-3
Martin Pugh, The Pankhursts (Penguin Books, 2002)
Patricia W. Romero, E. Sylvia Pankhurst. Portrait of a Radical (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1987)
Barbara Winslow, Sylvia Pankhurst: Sexual Politics and Political Activism (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996) ISBN 0-312-16268-5

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

El Correo de las Indias

La hija de Emmeline

María Rodríguez 599 ~ 23 de enero de 2014

Sylvia Pankhurst tenía la capacidad, los medios y las relaciones para dedicar su vida a muchas cosas, pero eligió seguir buscando nuevas causas en las que pudiera construir de verdad o como dicen los anglos, «to make a difference».

Sylvia PankhurstBernard Samson (el personaje de la serie de novelas de espionaje de Len Deighton) es atractivo, inteligente, fuerte, honesto y trabajador. Está casado con una mujer tremendamente culta, lista, capaz, valiente y además guapísima, pero a la vez fría, despiadada y calculadora, por lo que al preguntarse por qué acabarían casándose, se responde irónicamente que quizá fue para tener hijos perfectos y superdotados.

Y es que la creencia de que de un par de portentos van a nacer hijos que sean portentos al cuadrado no es del todo errónea, solo que la cosa depende más de las condiciones ambientales y los estímulos que de los genes. Algo así pasó con Sylvia Pankhurst (1882 – 1960), heroína del feminismo y la lucha social, y protagonista de una vida de lo más interesante.

Old Fashioned Pottery por Sylvia PankhurstSylvia Pankhurst estuvo desde muy pequeña dotada para las artes pictóricas y decorativas (recibió una beca para el Royal College of Art en South Kensington y fue alumna de Walter Crane, del movimiento Arts & Crafts), fue la sufragista que más veces ingresó en prisión, trabajó por los derechos de los desfavorecidos, se carteó con Lenin, le conoció en la Rusia revolucionaria y criticó su evolución desde posiciones consejistas; estudió las lenguas sintéticas e impulsó el movimiento por una lengua neutral internacional, ayudó a los republicanos en España y a los judíos en Alemania, luchó por la paz mundial y la eliminación de toda injusticia, editó periódicos, publicó libros sobre múltiples temas, fue investigada y considerada un peligro por el MI5 y pasó los últimos años de su vida en Etiopía, donde se convirtió en amiga y asesora del emperador Haile Selassie e hizo posible la puesta en marcha del primer Hospital Universitario del país y del primer departamento de ginecología. Todo esto resumiendo mucho.

Pero la carrera de Sylvia Pankhurst tuvo lugar en estrecha reacción a la de sus padres. Richard Pankhurst, su padre, fue un abogado y legislador comprometido, que pasó de ser políticamente conservador a liberal y después a socialista fabiano, fundó la sección manchesteriana del nuevo Independent Labour Party y sobre todo fue, al modo de John Stuart Mill, uno de los escasos varones feministas de su época.

Keir Hardie dirigiendo una manifestación pacifistaPara empezar, Richard tenía unos amigos de lo más interesantes que visitaban a menudo su casa, como William Morris (creador del movimiento Arts & Crafts), George Bernard Shaw, Thomas Mann o Keir Hardie, fundador del Independent Labour Party británico y con quien Sylvia mantuvo una estrecha relación intelectual y de amistad años después de morir su padre.

En su trabajo como legislador, Richard escribió la primera propuesta de ley para el sufragio femenino en 1869 y fue el responsable de la Ley de Propiedad de la Mujeres Casadas de 1884, que permitió a las mujeres conservar la propiedad de los bienes aportados por ellas al matrimonio o adquiridos durante el mismo, bienes que hasta entonces pasaban automáticamente a ser propiedad del marido. Las ansias de justicia social de Sylvia y sobre todo su afán por luchar contra el imperialismo, el racismo y el fascismo, fueron fuertemente influidas por su padre.

Emmeline Pankhurst siendo arrestadaLa madre de Sylvia, Emmeline, una muy activa sufragista y socialista tampoco se quedó corta, y junto con su marido (24 años mayor que ella) sin duda debían formar una pareja tan politizada como curiosa. A ella también le venía de familia. Su padre, Robert Goulden, hizo campaña contra la esclavitud y las Leyes del Maíz y su madre la llevaba con ella a las reuniones de las sufragistas a principios de los años 70 del siglo XIX.

Junto con su marido, Emmeline fundó la Women’s Franchise League en 1889 y se convirtió en un miembro activo del Independent Labour Party. En 1903, fundó la Women’s Social and Political Union para reivindicar el voto femenino, organización que pasó pronto a la acción directa, no contra personas, pero sí contra propiedades, lo que le provocó numerosos y largos encarcelamientos. También precedió a su hija Sylvia en las huelgas de hambre y en la inspiración de miles de mujeres para llevar a cabo actos de desobediencia civil.

Sylvia se unió con entusiasmo a todo eso, pero con la Primera Guerra Mundial comenzó la disensión familiar. Con el comienzo de la contienda, las sufragistas hicieron un acuerdo con el gobierno: las mujeres encarceladas serían liberadas si prometían abandonar los atentados. Emmeline y otra de sus hijas, Christabel, también activista, apoyaron enérgicamente la guerra y la aprovecharon para hacer campaña por el trabajo femenino ante el necesario abandono del puesto de trabajo por parte de muchos hombres para ir al frente.

Emmeline PankhurstDieron orden de que «las militantes, una vez liberadas las prisioneras, luchen por su país como han luchado por el voto». Poco después, la Women’s Social and Political Union organizaba una manifestación en Londres con pancartas que decían «Reclamamos el derecho a servir» o «Porque los hombres tienen que luchar y las mujeres tienen que trabajar».

Sylvia no había llevado nunca demasiado bien las acciones violentas, pero precisamente por su profundo sentido del pacifismo, la campaña patriótica de su madre y su hermana le horrorizó. A eso se unió la ley del voto femenino de 1918, que lo permitía solo para mujeres mayores de 30 años con alguna propiedad. Muchas sufragistas (supongo que todas propietarias) dieron la batalla por ganada, pero a Sylvia no le pareció en absoluto suficiente. Por entonces ya había abandonado la Women’s Social & Political Union para trabajar junto al Partido Laborista por los desfavorecidos del East End y militaba en el movimiento internacional de mujeres pacifistas. La guerra solo la distanció un poco más del feminismo inglés y de su familia.

Sylvia Pankhurst con su hijo RichardEn 1924, conoció al tipógrafo y periodista anarquista Silvio Corio, del que fue pareja (se negaron a casarse legalmente) hasta la muerte de este y con quien tuvo un hijo. Mientras tanto, Etiopía recibió la atención de Sylvia cuando fue salvajemente invadida por Mussolini. Cuando Corio murió en 1954, Sylvia decidió responder a la oportuna invitación del emperador etíope Haile Selassie y se instaló en el país africano junto con su hijo. Llevó a cabo diversos proyectos sociales, consiguió fondos para el hospital y fundó un periódico manteniendo una constante postura anti-británica. Cuando murió en Addis Abeba, recibió funerales de Estado, fue nombrada Etíope Honoraria y enterrada enfrente de la Catedral de la Santísima Trinidad, lugar de honor donde es la única no etíope.

Tumba de Sylvia PankhurstSylvia era una activista polifacética y sobre todo ideológicamente ambiciosa. El sufragismo inglés se le quedó pequeño, hasta el churretoso East End se le quedó pequeño. El mundo era enorme y estaba lleno de injusticias. Supongo que es algo que aqueja a todos los hijos de padres brillantes: si no se dedican a tiempo a algo completamente distinto a lo que hicieron sus progenitores, sienten la necesidad irremediable de superarlos. Sylvia vio quizás en Etiopía la respuesta a sus ambiciones: un país entero en el que hacer justicia.

La forma más dura de competencia es sin duda la que libramos con nuestros padres, pero da resultados hermosos y vidas interesantes. Sylvia tenía otras opciones. Podía haber sido una artista brillante, una apparatchik laborista o la primera consultora de género, además de desahogarse con el psicoanalista de los problemas con su madre. Pero eligió avanzar y seguir luchando, buscando nuevas causas en las que pudiera construir de verdad; o como dicen los anglos, «to make a difference».

view all

Sylvia Pankhurst's Timeline

1882
May 5, 1882
Manchester, Greater Manchester, UK
1960
September 27, 1960
Age 78
Addis Ababa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
????