Euseby Isham (1552 - 1626) MP

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Birthplace: Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in Pytchey, Northamptonshire, England
Occupation: Lord Sheriff of Northamptonshire
Managed by: Lois Maxine Burbach
Last Updated:

About Euseby Isham

THIS EUSEBY ISHAM WAS THE SON OF GREGORY ISHAM (SON OF EUSEBY & ANNE PULTON) AND ELIZABETH/ISABEL DALE, HE MARRIED ANNE BORLASE AND HAD CHILDREN 1.JOHN, 2. EUSEBY, 3. WILLIAM, 4. GREGORY, 5. THOMAS, 6. ANTHONY, 7. ANNE (Died infancy), 8. ANNE, 9. MARY, 10. SARAH, 11. SUSANNA, 12. ELIZABETH.

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  • A genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the peerage and baronetage of the ... By John Bernard Burke
  • http://books.google.com/books?id=mDA_AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA548&lpg=PA548&dq=Susannah+Isham+1504&source=bl&ots=rd8ufGAg6R&sig=aKS9dZ8EO-BYQJ8n-PwDYPfsnSA&hl=en&ei=j0bPTMTFDIv4swO2qe3UAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CC0Q6AEwCTgK#v=onepage&q=borlase&f=false
  • Pg.548
  • Gregory Isham, who d. 4 Sept. 1558, last of Philip and Mary. He m. Elizabeth, dau. of Matthew Dale, of Bristol, who after his decease, had to her second husband William Roswell, Esq., solicitor-general to Queen Elizabeth. By her he was father of Sir Euseby, Thomas, Mary, the second wife (and by whom he only left issue) of Thomas Andrews, Esq. of Charwelton, who seems to be the sheriff of Northamptonshire, according to Camden, that attended on Mary, Queen of Scots, to her execution, at Fotheringhay Castle; and Elizabeth, m. to Henry Cave, Esq. of Ingarsby, in the co. of Leicester. The son and heir,
  • SIR EUSEBY ISHAM, Knt. of Picheley and Braunston, received the honour of knighthood from King James I. at the Charter House. He d. 11 June, 1626, and, as tradition delivers it, in no very good circumstances, though, in all appearance, his children were well provided for, of whom he had a good number by his lady, ANNE, dau. of John BORLASE, Esq. of marlow, in Buckinghamshire. The sons were,
    • i. John, who was twice married; 1st, to Anne, dau. of Sir William Fitz-Williams, Knt., of Milton, by whom he had, Anne, his only dau. and heir, (the wife, first, of William Lane, Esq. of Horton and Glendon, and after his deceased, of Pierce Walsh, Esq.): 2ndly, to Elizabeth, dau. of Edmond Dunch, Esq. of Wittenham, co Berks, who brought him no issue. He d. 9 Dec. 1626, and this last wife, 6 Aug. 1657.
    • ii. Euseby, who m. Susanna, relict of Daniel Keohen.
    • iii. William, who by Mary, his wife, had issue, Euseby and Anne.
    • iv. Gregory.
    • v. Thomas, who m. Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Thomas Denton, Knt. of Hillersdon, Bucks; by whom he had, Thomas Isham, of the Middle Temple, who d. a bachelor, 17 July 1676, besides a son and dau. that d. young.
    • vi. anthony.
  • Sir Euseby's daus. were,
    • i. Anne, who d. an infant.
    • ii. Another Anne, m. to Edward Glover, Exq. of Baxterley, Warwickshire.
    • iii. Mary, m. 1st to Edward Reede, Esq. of Cottesbrook; and 2ndly, to Sir Fleetwood Dormer, Knt. of Leegrange, Buckinghamshire.
    • iv. Sarah, m. to Henry Turvile, Esq. of Thurleston, co. Leicester.
    • v. Susanna, m. to John Faldo, Esq. of Goldington-green, co. Bedford.
    • vi. Elizabeth.
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  • Sir Euseby Isham, Sheriff of Northamptonshire1
  • M, b. 26 February 1553, d. 11 June 1626
  • Father Gregory Isham, Lord of Braunston Manor b. 1520, d. 4 Sep 1558
  • Mother Elizabeth Dale b. c 1530
  • Sir Euseby Isham, Sheriff of Northamptonshire was born on 26 February 1553 at of Pytchley & Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. He married Anne Borlase, daughter of John Borlase, Esq., Sheriff of Buckinghamshire and Anne Lytton, circa 1580 at of Little Marlow, Buckinghamshire, England. Sir Euseby Isham, Sheriff of Northamptonshire Knighted by King James I on this date. on 11 May 1603. He died on 11 June 1626 at Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England, at age 73.
  • Family Anne Borlase b. c 1558, d. Dec 1627
  • Child
    • William Isham+ b. 20 Mar 1588, d. a 4 Oct 1630
  • Citations
  • 1.[S6047] Unknown author, Magna Charta by Wurts, p. 2842; Burke's Peerage, 1938, p. 1382; Family Group Sheets in SLC Archives.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p653.htm#i19610
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  • Sir Euseby Isham - Ishams of Pytchley
  • Sir Thomas Vaux, Lord Harrowden, with William Vaux his son and heir, sold the manor of Pytchley called Geynes in 1555 to Gregory Isham, citizen and merchant of London. (fn. 66)
  • The descent of the Ishams of Pytchley has already been dealt with in the genealogical volume for Northamptonshire. (fn. 67) Henry de Isham of Northampton, to whom a debt of £200 was owing in 1325, (fn. 68) may have been identical with the Henry de Isham who in 1309 (fn. 69) was bailiff of Richard son of Roger son of Henry in the case of a free tenement in Pytchley claimed by Richard against his brothers Roger and John and his sisters Beatrice, Emma, and Joan. (fn. 70) It seems probable that he was the Henry de Isham the lands of whose widow Agnes at Pytchley were in 1349 the scene of a conflict between the bailiff of the sheriff and Henry Dengayne and others. (fn. 71) Henry's great-grandson Robert settled lands in Pytchley on his son William Isham, (fn. 72) who was succeeded by his son Thomas. Thomas Isham married Ellen, daughter of Richard Vere and granddaughter of John Green of Drayton, and was the father of that Euseby Isham of Pytchley who, with his wife Anne, daughter of Giles Pulton of Desborough, (fn. 73) brought up on his farm at Ringstead the family of twenty children of whom Gregory, the purchaser of Engaynes, was no unworthy member.
  • How Gregory, the third of the brothers, had been sent up to London by his father to be apprenticed, and there accumulated the fortune which enabled him to return to his own county and purchase Engaynes and the Earl of Rutland's manors in Braunston before his death in 1558; and how Giles, the eldest, associated with Gregory in the fine of 1555 conveying Engaynes to him, had been sent to London to study the law, and returning on the death of Euseby to succeed him at Pytchley, was also in the commission of the peace, and died in 1559, is recorded in the family archives preserved by the descendants of their brother John at Lamport (q.v.); which tell, too, how Robert, the second of the brothers, was chaplain to Queen Mary, at whose death he resigned his stall at Peter- borough, and died in 1564 parson of Pytchley, his heirs being the three daughters of his brother Giles. Giles, who was M.P. for Peterborough in 1553–4 and 1557– 8, was buried at Pytchley. He was returned as seised of a manor in Pytchley called ISHAMS (fn. 74) held of Robert Isham, clerk, as of his manor of Staffords, which latter manor also passed next into the hands of their brother Gregory's son Euseby Isham of Braunston.
  • Euseby early in 1580 was dealing by fine with a third of the manors of Geynes and Ishams in Pytchley; (fn. 75) and in 1587 by recovery with the manors of Pytchley and Bassets; (fn. 76) and in 1606 he was, in conjunction with his son and heir John, dealing with the manors of Pytchley and Braunston (fn. 77) as Sir Euseby Isham, having been knighted by King James on 11 May 1603. He built the famous old house at Pytchley whose mullioned windows and pinnacled gables were the background of many a hunt picture, and inclosed 140 acres at Pytchley. (fn. 78) He died at Pytchley on 11 June 1626.
  • From: 'Parishes: Pytchley', A History of the County of Northampton: Volume 4 (1937), pp. 208-213. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66350 Date accessed: 31 December 2008.
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Grandfather of Henry Isham, the emigrant to Virginia; m. Anne Borlase of Morlowe, Bucks Co., England;

It will be noted that the famous Praisegod Barbon or Barebones, was a witness to Sir Euseby's will. ---- Extract of his will:

"A note of such debts as I requie my wife to pay". To my brother Tipping 5 pounds. To my cosin William Downall 42s. To Robert Lade of Cransby 10 pounds. To my son John Isham my sorrel mare. To Mr. (sic) Barbon so much money as she will say I ought to pay her. To Saxby the man that dwelled in my grounds 10.4s.0d. To my son Euseby Isham "as you can" 66.13s.4d. To my sons William and Thomas I refer them to yourself. To the servants with you a year's wages. To Richard Berry 60s. To Steynes for a horse 4.10s.0d. To my man Barber if he go away 40s. To poor of Picheley 5 pounds Small debts which I cannot call to mind I pray you see paid. Witnesses: Feargod Barbon, Ha. Kinnesman.

Memorandum that I Harold Kymesman of Picheley gent wished by Sir Euseby Isham, knight, on 7 June last to write the particulars specified as he spoke it which I did in his presence. He desired that his wife should see legacies paid ... his sickness being such and he so short taken he could not do more neither was he desirous to the articles on Feargod Barbon subscribed as a witness, And to this I will depose Sir Euseby said he could not live long and his wife should have all. Anne should have all. 27 July 1626 emat com' to Lady Ann Isham, relict of Sir Euseby Isham, Militis.

Suceeded his uncle Giles at Pytchley and erected a manor house in 1559. Sheriff Northants in 1584; knighted by King James I, 11 May 1603.

Will of Sir Euseby Isham (extract) Jan 1627 , Pytchly, Northamptonshire, England

SIR EUSEBY ISHAM. "A note of such debts as I require my wife to pay." To my brother Tipping £5. To my cosin William Downall 42s. To Robert Lade of Cransby £10. To my son John Isham my sorrel mare. To Mr. (sic) Barbon so much money as she way I ought to pay her. To Saxby the man that dwelled in my grounds £10.4s.0d. To my son Euseby Isham "as you can" £66. 13s. 4d. T my sons William and Thomas I refer them to yourself. To the servants with you a year's wages. To Richard Berry 60s. To Steynes for a horse £4. 10s.0d. To my man Barber if he go away 40s. To poor of Picheley £5. Small debts which I cannot call to mind I pray you see paid.

Witnesses: Feargod Barbon, Ha. Kinnesman.

Memorandum that I Harold Kymesman of Picheley gent wished by Sir Euseby Isham, knight, on 7th Hune last to write the particulars specified as he spoke it which I did in his presence. He desired that his wife should see legacies paid…his sickness being such and he so short taken he could nto do more neither was he desirous to the articles on Feargod Barbon subscribed as a witness, And to this I will depose Sir Euseby said he could not live long and his wife should have all. Anne should have all. 27 July 1626 emat com' to Lady Ann Isham. Relict of Sir Euseby Isham, Militis. 1st [p. 569] January 1627 em't com' to Thomas Isham fil. Nat. et ltmo. Etc. Hele 100.

This surname of ISHAM was an ancient English locational name meaning 'one who came from ISHAM' a parish in County Northampton, three miles from Kettering. The name is also spelt ISOM and ISHOM. The earliest of the name on record appears to be Henry de ISHAM, who was recorded in Northampton during the reign of Edward III (1327-1377), and John ISHAM was the prior of Windham, County Norfolk in 1416. Surnames can be divided into four categories; place names, occupation names, nicknames and patronymics. PLACE NAMES are the largest group and covers all those names first applied to people who lived in or nearby to a particular place. For example, Grove, Wood, Field, Meadow, and Street are obvious. Occasionally names were taken from obscure villages or hamlets which no longer exist and this can make research confusing. OCCUPATION NAMES cover nearly all trades which existed in the Middle Ages. These are numerous. It does not necessarily follow that such names as King, Duke, Earl and so on mean your ancestors were of noble blood. It is much more likely that such named people worked for the person referred to. NICKNAMES. This is a smaller group but in many ways more interesting. They usually originated as a by-name for someone by describing their appearance, personal disposition or character but which became handed down through the ages and did not apply to their descendants. For instance the name Black would denote a dark man, Little, someone small (or even somewhat ambiguously) someone tall. PATRONYMICS. This group covers all names which derive immediately from the owner's father. Many christian names which are also surnames have, over the years, lost the possessive form but the origin is still the same. Examples of this could be names such as Peter,Thomas, Henry - all names which became both christian and surnames over the years. Later instances of the name include Grace, daughter of Ropbert ISAM, who was buried at St. Michael, Cornhill, London in 1582, and Thomas Stacye and Agnes ISAM were married in London in 1590. Edward ISHAM of County Linconlshire, registered at Oxford University in 1621. Edward ISUM and Elizabeth Morryer were married at St. James's, Clerkenwell, London in 1625, and Thomas ISOM wed Charlotte Harris at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in 1807.

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Euseby Isham, Sheriff of Northamptonshire's Timeline

1552
February 26, 1552
Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England
1583
June, 1583
Age 31
Braunston, Northamptonshire, England
1584
1584
Age 31
1587
March 20, 1587
Age 35
Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England, United Kingdom
1587
Age 34
England
1597
1597
Age 44
Probably Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England
1600
1600
Age 47
Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England
1603
1603
Age 50
Pytchley, Northamptonshire, England
1605
1605
Age 52
England
1626
June 11, 1626
Age 74
Pytchey, Northamptonshire, England