Eystein «Fret/Fjert» Halfdansson

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Eystein «Fret/Fjert» Halfdansson, Konge i Romerike og Vestfold

Also Known As: "Øystein Halvdansson Fret", "Eysteinn Fart", "Eysteinn I "Fretr" Glumru Halfdansson"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Vestfold, Norway
Death: Died in Holtum, Vestfold, Norway
Place of Burial: Vadla, Borre, Østfold, Norway
Immediate Family:

Son of Halfdan Olafsson «Whiteshanks» Kvitbein and Åsa (Aasa) Eysteinsdotter
Husband of Hild (Hildi) Eiriksdotter
Father of Halvdan Eysteinsson «the Meek» den Milde; Asa Østeinsdottir; Geva Eysteinsdotter von Westfold and Gudrod Eysteinsson "Jagtkonge" (King in Vestfold)
Brother of Gudrød Halfdansson

Occupation: Konge i Romerike Vestfold, Romerike og Vestfold, King of Vestfold
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Eystein «Fret/Fjert» Halfdansson

Eystein "Fret/Fjert" Halfdansson, son of Halvdan Olavsson Kvitbein

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%98ystein_Halvdansson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eystein_Halfdansson

Øystein Halvdansson / Eystein Halfdansson / Eysteinn Hálfdansson

(In English: Eystein Halfdansson)

King in part of Norway: Romerike / Vestfold

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=%D8ystein%20Halvdansson

Øystein Halvdansson (levde i tiden rundt 730 e. Kr.) var, i henhold til Snorre Sturlassons Ynglingesagaen, småkonge over Vestfold og Romerike. Han var sønn av Halvdan Kvitbein og Åsa Øysteinsdotter og ble gift med Hild Eiriksdotter, datter til Eirik Agnarsson, småkonge i Vestfold. Deres sønn var Halvdan Øysteinsson, også kalt for den den gavmilde.

Øystein arvet av sin far Solør, store deler av Hedmark, Toten, Hadeland og en del av Vestfold. Etter at svigerfaren Eirik Agnarsson døde sønnesløs arvet Øystein også resten av Vestfold.

Snorre forteller at Øystein dro på plyndringsferd til Varna og tok med seg alt av husdyr og verdisaker. Kongen av Varna var på denne tiden var Skjøld som etter sigende var «en stor trollmann». Da Skjøld kom til stranda og så Øysteins seil vinket han med kappen sin og blåste inn i den. Trolldommen fikk bommen på Øysteins skip til å svinge og slo ham over bord. I sjøen druknet Øystein og det ble hans bane. Liket ble derimot berget og ført til Borre, hvor det ble hauglagt.

Druknet, begravet på Borrestranda (Hauglagt)

Den eldste Noregshistoria frå 1170 fortel at Øystein hadde tilnamnet fjert

--------------------

Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

Preceded by

Halfdan Hvitbeinn Head of the House of Yngling Succeeded by

Halfdan the Mild

--------------------

ABT 0725 - ABT 0780

OCCUPATION: Konge i Romerike/Vestfold

BIRTH: ABT 0725, (704 ?)

DEATH: ABT 0780, Jarlsø (druknet)

BURIAL: Borrestranda (hauglagt)

Father: Halvdan Olavsson KVITBEIN

Mother: Aasa ØYSTEINSDATTER

Family 1 : Hild EIRIKSDATTER

+Halvdan ØYSTEINSSON

Kilde: nermo.org

--------------------

Öystein var son till Halfdan Hvitbeinn av huset Yngling enligt Heimskringla . Han ärvde tronen i Romerike och Västfold .

Hans hustru var Hild , dotter till konungen i Västfold , Erik Agnarsson . Erik hade ingen son så Eystein ärvt Västfold .

Öystein gick till Varna med några fartyg att plundra och transporteras bort alla djur och andra värdesaker . Var dock konungen i Varna kung Skjold som var en stor trollkarl . Skjold kom till stranden och såg seglen för Öystein skepp . Han vinkade sin kappa och blåste in i den som orsakade en boom av ett fartyg att svinga och slå Eystein så att han föll överbord och drunknade. Hans kropp bärgades och begravd i en kulle .

Öystein ärvdes av hans son Halfdan Mild .

Öystein gift Hild Eriksdatter , dotter till Erik Agnarsson och Okänd.

--------------------

Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Ynglings were the oldest known Scandinavian dynasty. It can refer to the following clans:

The Scylfings (Old Norse: Skilfingar), the semi-legendary royal Swedish clan during the Age of Migrations, with kings such as Eadgils, Onela and Ohthere. When Beowulf and Ynglingatal were composed sometime in the eighth-tenth centuries, the respective scop and skald expected his audience to have a great deal of background information about these kings, which is shown in the allusiveness of the references.

The Fairhair dynasty, descending from the kings of Oppland, Norway. According to surviving early sources, such as Ynglingatal and Íslendingabók, these kings were descended from the Swedish Scylfings of Uppland, Sweden.

The House of Munsö, a Swedish dynasty. The earliest kings of this dynasty that historians generally agree are historical are Eric the Victorious and Olof Skötkonung.

Some early kings were probably mythical, whereas others probably existed in real life. Especially, Egil, Ottar, Ale and Adils are mentioned in several sources and are very likely to have been real kings

In the Scandinavian sources they are the descendants of Yngvi-Frey of Vanaheim. Yngling means descendant of Frey, and in the Gesta Danorum of Saxo Grammaticus they are called the sons of Frey.

Several of these kings appear in Beowulf: Eadgils (Adils), Onela (Ale), and Ohthere (Ottar Vendelkråka), but here they are called Scylfings (see the Beowulf section below). Snorri Sturluson hints at a less divine origin in Skáldskaparmál for this dynasty: One war-king was named Skelfir; and his house is called the House of Skilfings: his kindred is in the Eastern Region (Sweden is the eastern part of Scandinavia, and the Swedish kings could be called east kings).

Another origin for the name skilfing is possible: Snorri described Erik and Alrik, the sons of Skjalf to be the de facto ancestors of this Norse clan.

The kings who resided at Upsal had been the supreme chiefs over the whole Swedish dominions until the death of Agne, when, as before related, the kingdom came to be divided between brothers (Alrek and Erik). After that time the dominions and kingly powers were spread among the branches of the family as these increased; but some kings cleared great tracts of forest-land, and settled them, and thereby increased their domains

From Sweden to Norway

According to Snorri Sturluson, the dynasty led the settlement of the Swedish provinces and established themselves as the kings of its provinces, accepting the overlordship of the Swedish king at Uppsala, until the dynasty all but exterminated itself with Ingjald Ill-Ruler and his downfall. A survivor Olof Trätälja was the ancestor of the Norwegian branch

However, both Snorri (as in the earlier quote) and Saxo described the clan as remaining in Sweden after this date.

Saxo on the Battle of Bråvalla (ca 750):

Now the bravest of the Swedes were these: Arwakki, Keklu-Karl (Kelke-Karl), Krok the Peasant, (from Akr), Gudfast and Gummi from Gislamark. These were kindred of the god Frey, and most faithful witnesses to the gods. Ingi (Yngwe) also, and Oly, Alver, Folki, all sons of Elrik (Alrek), embraced the service of Ring (Sigurd Ring); they were men ready of hand, quick in counsel, and very close friends of Ring. They likewise held the god Frey to be the founder of their race. Amongst these from the town of Sigtun (Old Sigtuna) also came Sigmund, a champion advocate, versed in making contracts of sale and purchase; besides him Frosti surnamed Bowl: allied with him was Alf the Lofty (Proud?) from the district of Upsala (Old Uppsala); this man was a swift spear-thrower, and used to go in the front of the battle.

Moreover, both in Icelandic sources and in the Gesta Danorum, king Sigurd Ring would become the ancestor of the houses of Ragnar Lodbrok and would thus be the semi-legendary ancestor of later Swedish and Danish royal houses. (See the House of Munsö.)

--------------------

Eysteinn I "Fretr" Glumru Halfdansson King Of Vestfold 1 2

Birth: About 740 in , , Vestfold, Norway 3 4

Death:

Sex: M

Father: Halfdan "Hvitbein" Olafsson King Of Uppsala b. 725 in , Ringerike, Buskerud, Norway

Mother: Asa Eysteinsdatter Princess Of Hedmark b. About 710 in (, , Uppsala, Sweden)

   

Unknown: , , Vestfold, Norway 5 1 2 4

Unknown: 5 1 2 4

  Spouses & Children    
  
  

 Hildi Eiriksdatter (Wife) b. About 740 in (, , Vestfold, Norway)  

1 2 3 4

Marriage: Abt 755 in (, , Vestfold, Norway) 6 Nov 2004 14:29

Children:

Geva Eysteinsdatter b. About 756 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)

Halfdan II Eysteinsson King Of Vestfold b. About 767 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)

Lifa Eysteinsdatter Princess Of Vestfold b. 772 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)


 

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  Notes    
  
  

 Individual:

Name Suffix: King of Vestfold

REFN: HWS8564

Ancestral File Number:HRN9-Q6

OBJE: C:\LEGACY\PICTURES\c_crown.gif

OBJE: C:\LEGACY\PICTURES\C_Murale.GIFCHAN20 Mar 2001


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  Sources    
  
  

 Title: "Concise Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia"

Author: Ansley, Clarke F.

Publication: (Morningside Heights, New York, Columbia University Press

, Licensed from INSO Corporation, December 31, 1941, 1994), Hard C

lbert F. Schmuhl, "Title: "Royal Lines & Adamic Genealogy: Genealogical Research of A

lbert F. Schmuhl, "Author: Schmuhl, Albert F.

Publication: e-mail documentation, March 1997, Albert F. Schmuhl, Americ

a Online Posting: Genealogy Forum

Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral Fileâ„¢ v4.19"

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: 3 Feb 2001

Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"

Author: Larson, Kirk

Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Desce

ndants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library

Title: "Héraldique européenne"

Author: Arnaud Bunel

Publication: Coats of Arms for European Royalty and Nobility (http://www

.heraldique-europeenne.org, Arnaud Bunel, 1998) , Internet"Armigerous" (ahr-MIJ-ehr-us) adjective

Bearing or entitled to bear heraldicarms.

The reason the notion of a family crest was brought into th

e languagewas that those who were armigerous (entitled to bear arms) used to put their crest or achieveme




--------------------

After Halfdan Whiteleg's death, according to the sagas, his son Eystein ruled Vestfold until a rival king named Skjold used his magic powers to have Eystein knocked overboard during a sailing expedition. Eystein's body was recovered from the sea and buried with great ceremony.

  1. Note: [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flander & Kiev]
  2. Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
  3. Note: Page: 7

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eystein_Halfdansson -------------------- Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_090.htm

51. OF KING EYSTEIN'S DEATH.

Eystein, Halfdan Hvitbein's son, became king after in Raumarike

and Westfold. He was married to Hild, a daughter of Eric

Agnarsson, who was king in Westfold. Agnar, Eric's father, was a

son of Sigtryg, king in the Vend district. King Eric had no son,

and died while King Halfdan Hvitbein was still in life. The

father and son, Halfdan and Eystein, then took possession of the

whole of Westfold, which Eystein ruled over as long as he lived.

At that time there lived at Varna a king called Skjold, who was a

great warlock. King Eystein went with some ships of war to

Varna, plundered there, and carried away all he could find of

clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed

cattle on the strand for provision, and then went off. King

Skjold came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at

such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see

his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it.

King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past

Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when

there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other

ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his

death. His men fished up his body, and it was carried into

Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea

at Raden, near Vodle. So says Thjodolf: --

"King Eystein sat upon the poop

Of his good ship: with sudden swoop

The swinging boom dashed him to hell,

And fathoms deep the hero fell

Beneath the brine. The fury whirl

Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl,

Grim Hel, clutched his soul away;

And now where Vodle's ocean bay

Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave

Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"

  • ****************************

Events in the life of Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdansson

·King Skjold of Varna came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it. King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his death.

event 1 .

·given Vestfold to rule over after his father took possession of Eystein's deceased father-in-law's territory

burial 1 .

in Borre, Raden, near Vodle, Vestfold.

·His men fished up his body, and it was carried into Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea at Raden, near Vodle. So says Thjodolf: -- "King Eystein sat upon the poop Of his good ship: with sudden swoop The swinging boom dashed him to hell, And fathoms deep the hero fell Beneath the brine. The fury whirl Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl, Grim Hel, clutched his soul away; And now where Vodle's ocean bay Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"

event 1 .

·went with some ships of war to Varna, the land of King Skjold, and plundered there, and carried away all he could find of clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed cattle on the strand for provision, and then began his return home -------------------- Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike. He was known by his nickname Eysteinn Fart, an Old Norse name, possibly meaning "the swift".

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein obtained Vestfold as his wife's inheritence.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild. -------------------- Eystein "Fret/Fjert" Halfdansson, son of Halvdan Olavsson Kvitbein

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%98ystein_Halvdansson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eystein_Halfdansson

Øystein Halvdansson / Eystein Halfdansson / Eysteinn Hálfdansson

(In English: Eystein Halfdansson)

King in part of Norway: Romerike / Vestfold

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=%D8ystein%20Halvdansson

Øystein Halvdansson (levde i tiden rundt 730 e. Kr.) var, i henhold til Snorre Sturlassons Ynglingesagaen, småkonge over Vestfold og Romerike. Han var sønn av Halvdan Kvitbein og Åsa Øysteinsdotter og ble gift med Hild Eiriksdotter, datter til Eirik Agnarsson, småkonge i Vestfold. Deres sønn var Halvdan Øysteinsson, også kalt for den den gavmilde.

Øystein arvet av sin far Solør, store deler av Hedmark, Toten, Hadeland og en del av Vestfold. Etter at svigerfaren Eirik Agnarsson døde sønnesløs arvet Øystein også resten av Vestfold.

Snorre forteller at Øystein dro på plyndringsferd til Varna og tok med seg alt av husdyr og verdisaker. Kongen av Varna var på denne tiden var Skjøld som etter sigende var «en stor trollmann». Da Skjøld kom til stranda og så Øysteins seil vinket han med kappen sin og blåste inn i den. Trolldommen fikk bommen på Øysteins skip til å svinge og slo ham over bord. I sjøen druknet Øystein og det ble hans bane. Liket ble derimot berget og ført til Borre, hvor det ble hauglagt.

Druknet, begravet på Borrestranda (Hauglagt)

Den eldste Noregshistoria frå 1170 fortel at Øystein hadde tilnamnet fjert

--------------------

Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

Preceded by

Halfdan Hvitbeinn Head of the House of Yngling Succeeded by

Halfdan the Mild

--------------------

ABT 0725 - ABT 0780

OCCUPATION: Konge i Romerike/Vestfold

BIRTH: ABT 0725, (704 ?)

DEATH: ABT 0780, Jarlsø (druknet)

BURIAL: Borrestranda (hauglagt)

Father: Halvdan Olavsson KVITBEIN

Mother: Aasa ØYSTEINSDATTER

Family 1 : Hild EIRIKSDATTER

+Halvdan ØYSTEINSSON

Kilde: nermo.org

--------------------

Öystein var son till Halfdan Hvitbeinn av huset Yngling enligt Heimskringla . Han ärvde tronen i Romerike och Västfold .

Hans hustru var Hild , dotter till konungen i Västfold , Erik Agnarsson . Erik hade ingen son så Eystein ärvt Västfold .

Öystein gick till Varna med några fartyg att plundra och transporteras bort alla djur och andra värdesaker . Var dock konungen i Varna kung Skjold som var en stor trollkarl . Skjold kom till stranden och såg seglen för Öystein skepp . Han vinkade sin kappa och blåste in i den som orsakade en boom av ett fartyg att svinga och slå Eystein så att han föll överbord och drunknade. Hans kropp bärgades och begravd i en kulle .

Öystein ärvdes av hans son Halfdan Mild .

Öystein gift Hild Eriksdatter , dotter till Erik Agnarsson och Okänd.

--------------------

Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Ynglings were the oldest known Scandinavian dynasty. It can refer to the following clans:

The Scylfings (Old Norse: Skilfingar), the semi-legendary royal Swedish clan during the Age of Migrations, with kings such as Eadgils, Onela and Ohthere. When Beowulf and Ynglingatal were composed sometime in the eighth-tenth centuries, the respective scop and skald expected his audience to have a great deal of background information about these kings, which is shown in the allusiveness of the references.

The Fairhair dynasty, descending from the kings of Oppland, Norway. According to surviving early sources, such as Ynglingatal and Íslendingabók, these kings were descended from the Swedish Scylfings of Uppland, Sweden.

The House of Munsö, a Swedish dynasty. The earliest kings of this dynasty that historians generally agree are historical are Eric the Victorious and Olof Skötkonung.

Some early kings were probably mythical, whereas others probably existed in real life. Especially, Egil, Ottar, Ale and Adils are mentioned in several sources and are very likely to have been real kings

In the Scandinavian sources they are the descendants of Yngvi-Frey of Vanaheim. Yngling means descendant of Frey, and in the Gesta Danorum of Saxo Grammaticus they are called the sons of Frey.

Several of these kings appear in Beowulf: Eadgils (Adils), Onela (Ale), and Ohthere (Ottar Vendelkråka), but here they are called Scylfings (see the Beowulf section below). Snorri Sturluson hints at a less divine origin in Skáldskaparmál for this dynasty: One war-king was named Skelfir; and his house is called the House of Skilfings: his kindred is in the Eastern Region (Sweden is the eastern part of Scandinavia, and the Swedish kings could be called east kings).

Another origin for the name skilfing is possible: Snorri described Erik and Alrik, the sons of Skjalf to be the de facto ancestors of this Norse clan.

The kings who resided at Upsal had been the supreme chiefs over the whole Swedish dominions until the death of Agne, when, as before related, the kingdom came to be divided between brothers (Alrek and Erik). After that time the dominions and kingly powers were spread among the branches of the family as these increased; but some kings cleared great tracts of forest-land, and settled them, and thereby increased their domains

From Sweden to Norway

According to Snorri Sturluson, the dynasty led the settlement of the Swedish provinces and established themselves as the kings of its provinces, accepting the overlordship of the Swedish king at Uppsala, until the dynasty all but exterminated itself with Ingjald Ill-Ruler and his downfall. A survivor Olof Trätälja was the ancestor of the Norwegian branch

However, both Snorri (as in the earlier quote) and Saxo described the clan as remaining in Sweden after this date.

Saxo on the Battle of Bråvalla (ca 750):

Now the bravest of the Swedes were these: Arwakki, Keklu-Karl (Kelke-Karl), Krok the Peasant, (from Akr), Gudfast and Gummi from Gislamark. These were kindred of the god Frey, and most faithful witnesses to the gods. Ingi (Yngwe) also, and Oly, Alver, Folki, all sons of Elrik (Alrek), embraced the service of Ring (Sigurd Ring); they were men ready of hand, quick in counsel, and very close friends of Ring. They likewise held the god Frey to be the founder of their race. Amongst these from the town of Sigtun (Old Sigtuna) also came Sigmund, a champion advocate, versed in making contracts of sale and purchase; besides him Frosti surnamed Bowl: allied with him was Alf the Lofty (Proud?) from the district of Upsala (Old Uppsala); this man was a swift spear-thrower, and used to go in the front of the battle.

Moreover, both in Icelandic sources and in the Gesta Danorum, king Sigurd Ring would become the ancestor of the houses of Ragnar Lodbrok and would thus be the semi-legendary ancestor of later Swedish and Danish royal houses. (See the House of Munsö.)

--------------------

Eysteinn I "Fretr" Glumru Halfdansson King Of Vestfold 1 2

Birth: About 740 in , , Vestfold, Norway 3 4

Death:

Sex: M

Father: Halfdan "Hvitbein" Olafsson King Of Uppsala b. 725 in , Ringerike, Buskerud, Norway

Mother: Asa Eysteinsdatter Princess Of Hedmark b. About 710 in (, , Uppsala, Sweden)

  

Unknown: , , Vestfold, Norway 5 1 2 4

Unknown: 5 1 2 4

LDS Baptism: 28 May 1923

LDS Endowment: 16 May 1928 ARIZO

LDS Sealing Child: Done

Changed: 11 Dec 2002 00:00

 Spouses & Children    
 
 
Hildi Eiriksdatter (Wife) b. About 740 in (, , Vestfold, Norway)  

1 2 3 4

Marriage: Abt 755 in (, , Vestfold, Norway) 6 Nov 2004 14:29

Children:

Geva Eysteinsdatter b. About 756 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)

Halfdan II Eysteinsson King Of Vestfold b. About 767 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)

Lifa Eysteinsdatter Princess Of Vestfold b. 772 in (, Holtum, Vestfold, Norway)


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 Notes    
 
 
Individual:

Name Suffix: King of Vestfold

REFN: HWS8564

Ancestral File Number:HRN9-Q6

OBJE: C:\LEGACY\PICTURES\c_crown.gif

OBJE: C:\LEGACY\PICTURES\C_Murale.GIFCHAN20 Mar 2001

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 Sources    
 
 
Title: "Concise Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia"

Author: Ansley, Clarke F.

Publication: (Morningside Heights, New York, Columbia University Press

, Licensed from INSO Corporation, December 31, 1941, 1994), Hard C

lbert F. Schmuhl, "Title: "Royal Lines & Adamic Genealogy: Genealogical Research of A

lbert F. Schmuhl, "Author: Schmuhl, Albert F.

Publication: e-mail documentation, March 1997, Albert F. Schmuhl, Americ

a Online Posting: Genealogy Forum

Title: "FamilySearch® Ancestral Fileâ„¢ v4.19"

Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Publication: 3 Feb 2001

Title: "Genealogical Research of Kirk Larson"

Author: Larson, Kirk

Publication: Personal Research Works including Bethune & Hohenlohe Desce

ndants, 1981-2001, Kirk Larson, Private Library

Title: "Héraldique européenne"

Author: Arnaud Bunel

Publication: Coats of Arms for European Royalty and Nobility (http://www

.heraldique-europeenne.org, Arnaud Bunel, 1998) , Internet"Armigerous" (ahr-MIJ-ehr-us) adjective

Bearing or entitled to bear heraldicarms.

The reason the notion of a family crest was brought into th

e languagewas that those who were armigerous (entitled to bear arms) used to put their crest or achieveme

--------------------

After Halfdan Whiteleg's death, according to the sagas, his son Eystein ruled Vestfold until a rival king named Skjold used his magic powers to have Eystein knocked overboard during a sailing expedition. Eystein's body was recovered from the sea and buried with great ceremony.

   Note: [Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flander & Kiev]
   Note: Title: Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ.
   Note: Page: 7

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eystein_Halfdansson -------------------- Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

-------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps05/ps05_090.htm

51. OF KING EYSTEIN'S DEATH.

Eystein, Halfdan Hvitbein's son, became king after in Raumarike

and Westfold. He was married to Hild, a daughter of Eric

Agnarsson, who was king in Westfold. Agnar, Eric's father, was a

son of Sigtryg, king in the Vend district. King Eric had no son,

and died while King Halfdan Hvitbein was still in life. The

father and son, Halfdan and Eystein, then took possession of the

whole of Westfold, which Eystein ruled over as long as he lived.

At that time there lived at Varna a king called Skjold, who was a

great warlock. King Eystein went with some ships of war to

Varna, plundered there, and carried away all he could find of

clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed

cattle on the strand for provision, and then went off. King

Skjold came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at

such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see

his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it.

King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past

Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when

there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other

ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his

death. His men fished up his body, and it was carried into

Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea

at Raden, near Vodle. So says Thjodolf: --

"King Eystein sat upon the poop

Of his good ship: with sudden swoop

The swinging boom dashed him to hell,

And fathoms deep the hero fell

Beneath the brine. The fury whirl

Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl,

Grim Hel, clutched his soul away;

And now where Vodle's ocean bay

Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave

Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"

   ****************************

Events in the life of Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdansson

·King Skjold of Varna came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it. King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his death.

event 1 .

·given Vestfold to rule over after his father took possession of Eystein's deceased father-in-law's territory

burial 1 .

in Borre, Raden, near Vodle, Vestfold.

·His men fished up his body, and it was carried into Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea at Raden, near Vodle. So says Thjodolf: -- "King Eystein sat upon the poop Of his good ship: with sudden swoop The swinging boom dashed him to hell, And fathoms deep the hero fell Beneath the brine. The fury whirl Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl, Grim Hel, clutched his soul away; And now where Vodle's ocean bay Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"

event 1 .

·went with some ships of war to Varna, the land of King Skjold, and plundered there, and carried away all he could find of clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed cattle on the strand for provision, and then began his return home -------------------- Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike. He was known by his nickname Eysteinn Fart, an Old Norse name, possibly meaning "the swift".

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein obtained Vestfold as his wife's inheritence.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild. -------------------- King of Raumerike and Vestfold Eysteinn "the Fart" Hálfdanarson was given Vestfold to rule over after his father took possession of Eystein's deceased father-in-law's territory. He was King between 750 and 780.

He married Hild Eiríksdóttir, daughter of King of Vestfold Eiríkr Agnarsson.

He went with some ships of war to Varna, the land of King Skjold, and plundered there, and carried away all he could find of clothes or other valuables, and of peasants' stock, and killed cattle on the strand for provision, and then began his return home.

King Skjold of Varna came to the strand with his army, just as Eystein was at such a distance over the fjord that King Skjold could only see his sails. Then he took his cloak, waved it, and blew into it. King Eystein was sitting at the helm as they sailed in past Jarls, and another ship was sailing at the side of his, when there came a stroke of a wave, by which the boom of the other ship struck the king and threw him overboard, which proved his death.

He was buried in Borre, Raden, near Vodle, Vestfold, Norway. His men fished up his body, and it was carried into Borre, where a mound was thrown up over it, out towards the sea at Raden, near Vodle.

So says Thjodolf:

"King Eystein sat upon the poop

Of his good ship: with sudden swoop

The swinging boom dashed him to hell,

And fathoms deep the hero fell

Beneath the brine. The fury whirl

Of Loke, Tempest's brother's girl,

Grim Hel, clutched his soul away;

And now where Vodle's ocean bay

Receives the ice-cold stream, the grave

Of Eystein stands -- the good, the brave!"

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p278.htm#i9085 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- King of Norway -------------------- Eystein "Fret/Fjert" Halfdansson, son of Halvdan Olavsson Kvitbein

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%98ystein_Halvdansson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eystein_Halfdansson

Øystein Halvdansson / Eystein Halfdansson / Eysteinn Hálfdansson

(In English: Eystein Halfdansson)

King in part of Norway: Romerike / Vestfold

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=%D8ystein%20Halvdansson

Øystein Halvdansson (levde i tiden rundt 730 e. Kr.) var, i henhold til Snorre Sturlassons Ynglingesagaen, småkonge over Vestfold og Romerike. Han var sønn av Halvdan Kvitbein og Åsa Øysteinsdotter og ble gift med Hild Eiriksdotter, datter til Eirik Agnarsson, småkonge i Vestfold. Deres sønn var Halvdan Øysteinsson, også kalt for den den gavmilde.

Øystein arvet av sin far Solør, store deler av Hedmark, Toten, Hadeland og en del av Vestfold. Etter at svigerfaren Eirik Agnarsson døde sønnesløs arvet Øystein også resten av Vestfold.

Snorre forteller at Øystein dro på plyndringsferd til Varna og tok med seg alt av husdyr og verdisaker. Kongen av Varna var på denne tiden var Skjøld som etter sigende var «en stor trollmann». Da Skjøld kom til stranda og så Øysteins seil vinket han med kappen sin og blåste inn i den. Trolldommen fikk bommen på Øysteins skip til å svinge og slo ham over bord. I sjøen druknet Øystein og det ble hans bane. Liket ble derimot berget og ført til Borre, hvor det ble hauglagt.

Druknet, begravet på Borrestranda (Hauglagt)

Den eldste Noregshistoria frå 1170 fortel at Øystein hadde tilnamnet fjert

--------------------

Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein inherited Vestfold.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.

Preceded by

Halfdan Hvitbeinn Head of the House of Yngling Succeeded by

Halfdan the Mild

-------------------- Eystein HalfdanssonFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He inherited the throne of Romerike. He was known by his nickname Eysteinn Fart, an Old Norse name, possibly meaning "the swift".

His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son, so Eystein obtained Vestfold as his wife's inheritance.

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound. Eystein was succeeded by his son Halfdan the Mild.[

-------------------- A Norwegian Knight that ruled in the Upplands. King of Vestfold & Roumarike. Øistein was also called Gøte (meaning from Gotland in Sweden) and in the Orkneyingasaga "the Swede", since he was probably fostered in Sweden. In those days often a foster father (even in another country) raised a child. Øistein was king over greater part of Norway south of Dovre. He was buried in Borre. -------------------- BIOGRAFI:

Øystein Halvdansson (levde i tiden rundt 730 e. Kr.) var, i henhold til Snorre Sturlassons Ynglingesagaen, småkonge over Vestfold og Romerike. Han var sønn av Halvdan Kvitbein og Åsa Øysteinsdotter og ble gift med Hild Eiriksdotter, datter til Eirik Agnarsson, småkonge i Vestfold. Deres sønn var Halvdan Øysteinsson, også kalt for den den gavmilde.

Øystein arvet av sin far Solør, store deler av Hedmark, Toten, Hadeland og en del av Vestfold. Etter at svigerfaren Eirik Agnarsson døde sønnesløs arvet Øystein også resten av Vestfold.

Snorre forteller at Øystein dro på plyndringsferd til Varna og tok med seg alt av husdyr og verdisaker. Kongen av Varna var på denne tiden var Skjøld som etter sigende var «en stor trollmann». Da Skjøld kom til stranda og så Øysteins seil vinket han med kappen sin og blåste inn i den. Trolldommen fikk bommen på Øysteins skip til å svinge og slo ham over bord. I sjøen druknet Øystein og det ble hans bane. Liket ble derimot berget og ført til Borre, hvor det ble hauglagt. -------------------- Note: 'Fretr' AKA "the Fart". -------------------- http://www.mathematical.com/sviadrassonsveide.html

view all 44

Eystein «Fret/Fjert» Halfdansson's Timeline

726
726
Vestfold, Norway
736
736
Age 10
Of Vestagder Norway
740
740
Age 14
Vestfold,,,Norway
742
742
Age 16
Holtum, Vestfold, Norway
750
750
Age 24
Rogaland, , Norway
750
Age 24
Jutland,Denmark
755
755
Age 29
Vadla, Borre, Østfold, Norway
780
780
Age 54
Holtum, Vestfold, Norway

Eystein died while pillaging in Varna. King Skjöld of Varna, a great warlock, arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound

1923
May 28, 1923
Age 54
May 28, 1923
Age 54