F. Sherwood Rowland, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995

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F. Sherwood Rowland, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995

Birthdate: (87)
Birthplace: Delaware, OH, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Prof. Rowland
Husband of <private> Rowland (Lundberg)
Father of <private> Rowland and <private> Rowland
Brother of <private> Rowland and <private> Rowland

Occupation: Professor of Atmospheric and environmental chemistry
Managed by: Private User
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Immediate Family

    • <private> Rowland (Lundberg)
      spouse
    • <private> Rowland
      child
    • <private> Rowland
      child
    • father
    • <private> Rowland
      sibling
    • <private> Rowland
      sibling

About F. Sherwood Rowland, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995

Frank Sherwood Rowland (born June 28, 1927) is an American Nobel laureate and a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. His research is in atmospheric chemistry and chemical kinetics.

Born in Delaware, Ohio, Rowland received his B.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1948. He then earned his M.S. in 1951 and his Ph.D. in 1952, both from the University of Chicago. He held academic posts at Princeton University (1952–56) and at the University of Kansas (1956–64) before becoming a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine, in 1964. At Irvine in the early 1970s he began working with Mario Molina. Rowland was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1978, and served as a president of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 1993.

His best-known work is the discovery that chlorofluorocarbons contribute to ozone depletion. Rowland theorized that manmade organic compound gases combine with solar radiation and decompose in the stratosphere, releasing atoms of chlorine and chlorine monoxide that are individually able to destroy large numbers of ozone molecules. Rowland's research, first published in Nature magazine in 1974, initiated a scientific investigation of the problem. The National Academy of Sciences concurred with their findings in 1976, and in 1978 CFC-based aerosols were banned in the United States.

He received the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Mario Molina of MIT and Paul Crutzen of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany. The Physical Sciences Building at the University of California, Irvine, which held his laboratories for many years, was renamed Rowland Hall in his honor that same year.

He has won numerous awards for his work:

  • Tolman Medal, 1976
  • Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, 1983
  • Japan Prize, 1989
  • Peter Debye Award, 1993
  • Roger Revelle Medal, 1994
  • Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995

See also: "F.Sherwood Rowland - Autobiography". Nobelprize.org.

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F. Sherwood Rowland, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1995's Timeline

1927
June 28, 1927
Delaware, OH, USA
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