Fedlimid Rechtmar, 108th High King of Ireland

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Fedlimid Rechtmar mac Tuathail, 108th Ard rí na h'Éireann

Nicknames: "Feidhlimhioh Reachtmar", "Fedelmid Rechmar", "Feidhlinhidth Teachtman", "The Lawful", "Fedlimid nDerg 104 AD", "Fedlimid Rechtaid", "Feidhlime Reachtmhair"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ireland
Death: Died in Ireland
Place of Burial: Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of Túathal Teachtmhar, 106th High King of Ireland and Baine
Husband of Gormfleda and Ughna Gormfleda, Princess of Denmark
Father of Conn of the Hundred Battles, 110th High King of Ireland; Fiacha Riadhe MacFiacha Suidhe Suidhe; Eochaidh Fionn-Fohart mac Felim and Fiachadh mac Fedelmid
Brother of Fedelm Derg (TARA)
Half brother of Dairne ingen Túathal Teachtmhar and Fithir ingen Túathal Teachtmhar

Occupation: 108th High King of Ireland
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Fedlimid Rechtmar mac Tuathail, 108th Ard rí na h'Éireann

Fedlimid Rechtmar ("the lawful, legitimate" or "the passionate, furious") or Rechtaid ("the judge, lawgiver")[1] son of Tuathal Techtmar, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. His mother was Báine, daughter of Scál. He took power after killing his predecessor, and his father's killer, Mal mac Rochride.[2] He is said to have instituted the principle of an eye for an eye into Irish law, after which the behaviour of the Irish improved.[3] The completion of the road construction around Tara is attributed to him.[4] He ruled for nine or ten years before dying in his bed, and was succeeded by Cathair Mór. One of his sons, Conn Cétchathach, would succeed Cathair. Two other sons, Fiacha Suigde, ancestor of the Dal Fiachrach Suighe, and Eochaid Finn, are named in medieval sources.[5] The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 104-113, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 110-119.[6]

References

  1. ^ Dictionary of the Irish Language, Compact Edition, Royal Irish Academy, 1990, pp. 502, 503
  2. ^ R. A. Stewart Macalister (ed. & trans.), Lebor Gabála Érenn: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part V, Irish Texts Society, 1956, p. 331
  3. ^ Geoffrey Keating, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn 1.40
  4. ^ Alice Stopford Green, Making of Ireland and Its Undoing 1200-1600, Ayer Publishing, 1975, p. 42. ISBN 0-8369-6720-8.
  5. ^ Reverend P. Power & Eleanor C. Lodge, The Life of St. Declan of Ardmore, Kessinger Publishing, 2004, p. 8. ISBN 1-4191-6980-7
  6. ^ Annals of the Four Masters M110-119

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedlimid_Rechtmar

--------------------

108 High King of Ireland

Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar
111 A.D.
Son of Tuathal Teachtmhar (106). He was so called as being a maker of excellent wholesome laws, among which he established with all firmness that of "Retaliation;" kept to it inviolably; and by that means preserved the people in peace, quiet, plenty, and security during his time. He reigned nine years; and, after all his pomp and greatness, died of thirst, A.D. 119. He married Ughna, dau. of the King of Denmark.
Sources: www.familysearch.org
             The High Kings of Scotland W.I. Explorer - Google (31.05.2010) S.Bain

----------------------------------

Feidhlmidh Reachtmhar, d. ca. 119, He became king of Ireland, ca. 111 in Tara, Ireland

Father: Tuathal Teachtmhar (the Legitimate), King of Ireland, b. ca. 057, d. ca. 106 in Moin An Chatha, Dal Ariadhe, Ireland, he became king of Ireland, ca. 076 in Tara, Ireland, cause of death was slaying by Mal.

Mother: Baine, d. ca. 111

Feidhlmidh slew Mal to become king and ruled for eight years.

Source: The Ancient Kings of Ireland -------------------- 'The lawful, legitimate' or 'the passionate, furious'. Or Rechtaid 'the judge, lawgiver'. Said to have instituted the principle 'an eye for an eye' into Irish law, after which the behavior of the Irish improved. A road constructed around Tara is attributed to him. Said to have 'died in his bed'. -------------------- 108 E Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar

98. Feidhlimedh Rechtmhar

(Felim Rachtmar the Lawgiver' MacTuathal, aka Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar; aka Feidhlimdidh Reachtnar)

111–119 Joyce: 164 Felim Rachtmar, Feideilmid Rechtaid, Felim "The Lawgiver", Fedhlimidh Rachtmar, Feidhlmidh Rechtmar, Fedlimid Rechtmar (Felim the Lawgiver), Feidlimidh Rectmar
Son of Tuathal Teachtmhar #106. [Feidelmid mc Tuathail Techtmair ¶693] His mother was Baine, daughter of Scal Cnoc (Scal Balbh). Baine in Oirghialla is named after her, for it was there she was interred. Married Ughna daughter of the King of Denmark—or Una "daughter of a legendary king of Lachlainn." Father of Conn of the Hundred Battles #110. The pedigrees of the Deisi Mumham flow back to "m. Fiachach Suigde m. Feideilmid Rechtada m. Tuathal Teachtmar." Fiacha Suidhe was a brother of Conn. "Died on his pillow." 

Fedlimid Rechtmar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fedlimid Rechtmar ("the lawful, legitimate" or "the passionate, furious") or Rechtaid ("the judge, lawgiver")[1] son of Tuathal Techtmar, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. His mother was Báine, daughter of Scál. He took power after killing his predecessor, and his father's killer, Mal mac Rochride.[2] He is said to have instituted the principle of an eye for an eye into Irish law, after which the behaviour of the Irish improved.[3] The completion of the road construction around Tara is attributed to him.[4] He ruled for nine or ten years before dying in his bed, and was succeeded by Cathair Mór. One of his sons, Conn Cétchathach, would succeed Cathair. Two other sons, Fiacha Suigde, ancestor of the Dal Fiachrach Suighe, and Eochaid Finn, are named in medieval sources.[5] The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 104-113, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 110-119.[6]

----------------------------------------

108

Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar
111 A.D.
Son of Tuathal Teachtmhar (106). He was so called as being a maker of excellent wholesome laws, among which he established with all firmness that of "Retaliation;" kept to it inviolably; and by that means preserved the people in peace, quiet, plenty, and security during his time. He reigned nine years; and, after all his pomp and greatness, died of thirst, A.D. 119. He married Ughna, dau. of the King of Denmark.

-------------------- Title: King of Ireland

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedlimid_Rechtmar -------------------- Was so called as being a maker of excellent wholesome laws, among which he establisbed with all firmness that of "Retaliation;" kept to it inviolably; and by that means preserved the people in peace, quiet, plenty, and security during his time. This Felim. was the 108th Monarch ; reigned nine years; and, after all his pomp and greatness, died of thirst, A.D. 119. He married Ughna, dau. of the King of Denmark.

Felim Rachtmar: It is singular to remark how the call to a life of virginity was felt and corresponded with first in this family in Ireland after it was Christianized. As St. Ité was descended from Fiacha, a son of this wise Monarch, so the illustrious St. Bridget was (see p. 43) descended from Fiacha, another son of Felim, and brother of Conn of the Hundred Battles. St. Brigid was born at Fochard (now Faughart), near Dundalk, about A.D. 453, where her parents bappened to be staying at the time; but their usual place of residence was Kildare, where, A.D. 483, she established the famous Monastery Of "Kildare," which signifies the Church of the Oak. —MISS CUSACK

St. Ité or Idé is often called the Brigid of Munster; she was born about A.D. 480, and was the first who founded a convent in Munster, in a place called Clooncrail: the name of which was afterwards changed to "Kill-Ide," now called Killedy, a parish in the county Limerick. —JOYCE

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9.

Spouses

Ughna Princess of Denmark

-------------------- Feidhlimdh Rachtmhar King of Ireland

died 0119

father:

  • Tuathal Tiachtmhar King of Ireland

(end of reliable information)

mother:

unknown

siblings:

unknown

spouse:

  • Una wife of Feidhlimdh Rachtmhar

(end of information)

children:

  • Con Ceadcatha King in Ireland

died 0157

-------------------- Fedlimid Rechtmar ("the lawful, legitimate" or "the passionate, furious") or Rechtaid ("the judge, lawgiver")[1] son of Tuathal Techtmar, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland. His mother was Báine, daughter of Scál. He took power after killing his predecessor, and his father's killer, Mal mac Rochride.[2] He is said to have instituted the principle of an eye for an eye into Irish law, after which the behaviour of the Irish improved.[3] The completion of the road construction around Tara is attributed to him.[4] He ruled for nine or ten years before dying in his bed, and was succeeded by Cathair Mór. One of his sons, Conn Cétchathach, would succeed Cathair. Two other sons, Fiacha Suigde, ancestor of the Dal Fiachrach Suighe, and Eochaid Finn, are named in medieval sources.[5] The Lebor Gabála Érenn synchronises his reign with that of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180). The chronology of Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn dates his reign to 104-113, that of the Annals of the Four Masters to 110-119.[6] -------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps11/ps11_013.htm

Feidlimidh Rechtmar King of Ireland

  • Birth bef 97
  • Death 119, died of thirst
  • Father Tuathal "The Desired" Teachtmar King of Ireland (56-106)
  • Mother Baine Balbh
  • Spouses
  1. Ughna Princess of Denmark
  • -Father Lochlin King of Denmark
  • Children
  1. Conn (<113-157)

Misc. Notes

Was so called as being a maker of excellent wholesome laws, among which he establisbed with all firmness that of "Retaliation;" kept to it inviolably; and by that means preserved the people in peace, quiet, plenty, and security during his time. This Felim. was the 108th Monarch ; reigned nine years; and, after all his pomp and greatness, died of thirst, A.D. 119. He married Ughna, dau. of the King of Denmark.

Felim Rachtmar: It is singular to remark how the call to a life of virginity was felt and corresponded with first in this family in Ireland after it was Christianized. As St. Ité was descended from Fiacha, a son of this wise Monarch, so the illustrious St. Bridget was (see p. 43) descended from Fiacha, another son of Felim, and brother of Conn of the Hundred Battles. St. Brigid was born at Fochard (now Faughart), near Dundalk, about A.D. 453, where her parents bappened to be staying at the time; but their usual place of residence was Kildare, where, A.D. 483, she established the famous Monastery Of "Kildare," which signifies the Church of the Oak. —MISS CUSACK

St. Ité or Idé is often called the Brigid of Munster; she was born about A.D. 480, and was the first who founded a convent in Munster, in a place called Clooncrail: the name of which was afterwards changed to "Kill-Ide," now called Killedy, a parish in the county Limerick. —JOYCE

Part III, Chapter IV of Irish Pedigrees, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 351-9, 664-8 and 708-9. --------------------

   Fedlimid Rechtmar
   From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
   Fedlimid Rechtmar (Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar), son of Tuathal Teachtmhar, was a legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century. He took the throne by overthrowing Mal, who had killed his father. He instituted a law similar to the Roman lex talionis, that is, an eye for an eye. and died in his sleep after ruling for nine years.