Felipe III 'el Piadoso' de Habsburgo, rey de España y Portugal (1578 - 1621) MP

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Nicknames: "King of Portugal /Felipe/ II"
Birthplace: Madrid, Spain
Death: Died in Madrid, Spain
Occupation: Крал на Испания, Roi d'Espagne (1598-1621), duc de Brabant, King of Spain and King of Portugal and the Algarves
Managed by: Hanne
Last Updated:

About Felipe III 'el Piadoso' de Habsburgo, rey de España y Portugal

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00000296&tree=LEO

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_III_of_Spain

Philip III of Austria (or Habsburg) (Madrid, April 14, 1578 - ibid. March 31, 1621), called The Pious, King of Spain and Portugal [1] from September 13, 1598 until his death. He was the son and successor of Philip II and Anne of Austria (1549-1580). In 1598 he married the Archduchess Margaret of Austria, Styria, daughter of Archduke Charles II of Styria and Maria Anna of Bavaria, granddaughter of Emperor Ferdinand I. His reign marked a transition between the height of Charles I and Philip II and that would represent decandecia Philip IV and Charles II.

Amateur theater, painting and, above all, hunting, delegated government affairs in the hands of his favorite, the Duke of Lerma, who, in turn, delegated to its staff earned Rodrigo Calderón, under the influence of Duke, the Spanish court was temporarily moved to Valladolid (1601), then return to Madrid (1606). He died in Madrid on March 31, 1621, because of fever and erysipelas.

Under his reign the Hispanic Monarchy reached its highest imperial hegemony and territorial expansion greater consequence known as Pax Hispanica. Although the rule would reach its zenith during the reign of Charles III, around the year 1790.

Table of Contents

1 Titles

2 Domestic Policy

2.1 Expulsion of the Moors (1609 to 1610)

2.2 Impeachment of the Duke of Lerma (1618)

3 Politics abroad

3.1 England

Netherlands 3.2

3.3 France

3.4 Italy

3.5 Thirty Years War (1618 to 1648)

3.5.1 Statement of Philip III of Spain (1618 to 1621)

4 Assessment

5 Marriages and children

6 Bibliography

7 See also

8 See also

9 External links

 

 Titles

Don Phelippes, by Gratia of God, King of Castile and Leon, of Arragon, the Two Sicilies, of Hierusalem, Portugal, Navarre, Granada, Toledo, Valentia, Galicia, Majorca, Seville , Sardinia, Cordoue, Corsica, Murcia, Jaen, the Algarves of Algezira of Gibraltar, the Canary Islands, the East and West Indies, Islands and Mainland of the Ocean Sea

Archduke of Austria,

Duke of Burgundy, Milan and Brauante,

Habspurg Count of Flanders, of Tirol and Barcelona,

Lord of Biscay and Molina, & c.

 Domestic Policy

The Duke of Lerma's policy addressed the maintenance of international peace, to expel the Moors and their desire for personal enrichment, both economically and politically.

During the reign succeeded institutional reforms to address problems of corruption and ineffectiveness that plagued the administration of the Monarchy: apart from the changes in the traditional system of councils was extended increasingly resorting to the Boards organs for undermining the power of those in favor of a government more responsive and coherent, but that did not produce the desired result (Junta de Guerra de Indias, Performance Board, Board of Finance, Portugal ...). Financial problems, carried forward from the previous reign, made the king dependent on the Courts, which had to meet more often than their predecessors to give it the resources necessary to maintain the external action of the Monarchy (services million).

The most significant events of domestic politics during the reign of Philip III were the expulsion of the Moors from the peninsula and adoption of the currency of fleece on a large scale for transactions within the Peninsula.

 

 Expulsion of the Moors (1609 to 1610)

Main article: Expulsion of the Moriscos

In 1609 it was decreed the expulsion of the Moors from Spain for the following reasons:

The attitude of some Christians believe in a State defender of Catholicism.

Its possible alliance with the Turks and Berbers who constantly attacked the coasts of the Levant.

His unpopularity among the population.

The state's need to control their wealth and values.

Between 1609-1610 took place leaving the peninsula. For this operation were mobilized 30,000 soldiers and the Navy was responsible for its transport to Tunisia and Morocco. It expelled about 300,000 Moriscos.

This affected significantly the Kingdom of Valencia, Aragon and the meadows of the gardens of Murcia. The loss of manpower and owners who paid rents in these areas decreased significantly. The sugar and rice crops had to be replaced by the mulberry, the vine and wheat.

At the human drama of thousands of people forced to flee their homes, joined him later suffered persecution in Morocco. Besides the loss of many subjects, cultural variety - won by the Catholic Monarchs - disappeared for centuries.

 Removal of the Duke of Lerma (1618)

In 1618 corruption reached intolerable levels in the court of Madrid. The King dismissed the Duke of Lerma and appointed as successor to his son, the Duke of Uceda, who ordered the arrest Rodrigo Calderón, a figurehead of the regime of his father.

 Foreign Policy

Philip III of Spain.

 England

With the advent to the throne of James I of England, became a strong ally for Spain. In August 1604 he signed the Peace of London, through which trade and diplomatic relations between the two countries improve.

 Netherlands

Philip II of Spain had left these territories to their daughter, Isabel Clara Eugenia and her husband, Archduke Albert, with the condition that the die without heirs, their land would return to join the Spanish Crown. The equality of forces between the rebellious provinces of the north - Lutheran-Protestant and the southern territories - allies of Spain, the exhaustion after the war and the good offices of the new rulers led to the signing in 1609 of the Twelve Years Truce with the United Provinces. This meant de facto independence for the Dutchmen and allowed the start of its expansion in the Caribbean and the East Indies.

 France

With the death of Henry IV of France - a supporter of the war against Spain, there was a time of instability in the French kingdom. The queen regent, Marie de Medicis, sought help from Spain in the fight against the Huguenots. So peace with France, which Philip II of Spain had concluded in his last moments (Vervins, 1598) was consolidated in 1615 by two separate marriages of the French king with a Spanish princess and crown prince of Spain (later Philip IV) Isabella of Spain.

 Italy

The Duke of Osuna, viceroy of Naples, and the Marquis de Villafranca, governor of Milan, directed the policy of the Hispanic monarchy in Italy, which met with resistance from the kingdom of Savoy and the Republic of Venice. To secure the connection between the Milanese and the Netherlands opened a new route through the Valtellina, in Switzerland and in 1618 there was the conspiracy of Venice, in which the authorities initiated a persecution against pro-Spanish agents.

 Thirty Years War (1618 to 1648) [edit] Main article: Thirty Years War

Confrontation between Catholics and Protestants in Bohemia.

 Statement of Philip III of Spain (1618 to 1621)

The Emperor Ferdinand II called for help from their Spanish relatives to meet the German Protestant rebellion.

Spain, allied to Austria and Bavaria (the leader of the German princes of the Catholic League) faced the Bohemian Protestants supported by the Palatinate (the leader of the German princes of the Protestant Union). The victory of the Spanish troops commanded by Ambrosio de Spinola in the Palatinate, and troops of the League, commanded by Count Tilly - Johan Tzerelae - in Bohemia - in the Battle of White Mountain in 1620 against the Czechs.

 Poll

With Philip III, despite being a king often reviled by traditional historiography, the Hispanic Monarchy reached its greatest territorial expansion (with the acquisition of new territories such as Finale, various places of North Africa as Larache or La Marmora, along with new victories on American soil), but not only that, but during his reign which had splendor has been called the Spanish Golden Age, if not forget that during these years Miguel de Cervantes wrote Don Quixote, Lope de Vega and Luis de Gongora started writing what today are considered masterpieces of world literature, ... Furthermore although many historians have wanted to see the famous Pax Hispanica a sign of weakness by the monarchy, it is certain that it was part of a grand strategy that would allow Spain to recover its military and economic strength through deceptive lures to their away from their opponents to military enterprises. In fact both Philip III and his advisers wanted the truce lasted only until Spain could resume their struggle and thus defeat their enemies. In fact Philip III has been judged more harshly than they have been his son, Philip IV, and relied on it, Olivares, more favorably than Lerma, which is surprising if one compares the results of their respective governments. Therefore, it can be said that under the reign of the third Felipe Spain reached its true peak.

 Marriage and children

Philip III and Queen Margaret of Austria-Styria had eight children:

Ana Maria Mauricia (September 22, 1601; † January 20, 1666), queen consort of France, wife of Louis XIII.

Mary (* / † February 1, 1603).

Philip (April 8, 1605; † September 17, 1665), future Philip IV married Isabella of Spain.

Maria Anna (August 18, 1606; † May 13, 1646), the Holy Roman Empress, wife of Ferdinand III.

Charles of Austria (September 15, 1607; † July 30, 1632).

Fernando (May 16, 1609 or May 24, 1610; † November 9, 1641), known as the Cardinal-Infante.

Margarita (* / † May 24, 1610).

Alfonso (* / † September 22, 1611).

--------------------

Philip III, King of Spain and Portugal

 

Reign April 14, 1598-March 31, 1621

Consort Margaret of Austria

Father Philip II of Spain

Mother Anna of Austria

 

Born April 14, 1578

Madrid, Spain

Died March 31, 1621 (aged 42)

Madrid, Spain

Philip III (Spanish: Felipe III; April 14, 1578 - March 31, 1621) was the King of Spain and King of Portugal and the Algarve, where he ruled as Philip II (Portuguese: Filipe II), from 1598 until his death. His chief minister was the Duke of Lerma. Philip III married Margaret of Austria, sister of Emperor Ferdinand II. On the eve of his death in 1621, the Portuguese empire spanned almost 2 billion acres.

Born in Madrid, the son of Philip II of Spain and his fourth wife (and niece) Anna, daughter of the Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain. He shared the viewpoints and beliefs of his father, but did not inherit his industry. The hardworking and diligent old king had sorrowfully confessed that God had not given him a son capable of governing his vast dominions, and that he had foreseen that Philip III would be led by his servants. This assessment of his son Ultimately proved correct.

The new king put the direction of his government entirely into the hands of his favorite, the Duke of Lerma, Francisco Gomez de Sandoval y Rojas, and when I fell under the influence of Lerma's son, Cristóbal de Sandoval, the Duke of Uceda in 1618 I trusted himself and his states to the new favorite.

The King's own life was passed amid court festivities, on Which enormous sums of money were wasted, or in the practice of piety. It was said that he was so virtuous as hardly to have committed a venial sin.

He died at Madrid on March 31, 1621. The story told in the memoirs of the French ambassador Bassompierre, that he was killed by the heat of a brazier (a pan of hot charcoal), because the proper official to take it away was not at hand, is a humorous exaggeration of the formal etiquette of the court.

The policies of the Duke of Lerma were Aimed towards the maintenance of international peace, the expulsion of the Moors and personal enrichment, as much economic as political.

Throughout his reign, institutional reforms followed one after another to solve the problems of corruption and inefficiency that plagued the administration of the Monarchy: apart from the changes introduced in the traditional system of Counselors, resources were extended to the boards, bodies responsible for decreasing the power of royal favorites, in order to create a more agile and coherent government, but they did not produce the desired result. The financial problems that left behind Philip II had made the king dependent on the Courts, who had to meet more frequently than their predecessors in order to grant the resources to run the empire.

The most significant domestic policy acts during the reign of Philip III were the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula and the adoption of the coins of a copper and silver alloy for domestic money transactions.

-----------------------------------------

Felipe III von Habsburg, Rey de España

M, #102774, b. 14 April 1578, d. 31 March 1621

Last Edited=5 Mar 2007

Consanguinity Index=21.44%

Felipe III von Habsburg, Rey de España was born on 14 April 1578 at Madrid, Spain. (2) He was the son of Felipe II von Habsburg, Rey de España and Anna Erzherzogin von Österreich. (2) He married Margarete Erzherzogin von Österreich, daughter of Karl II Erzherzog von Österreich and Maria Prinzessin von Bayern, on 18 April 1599. (2)

He died on 31 March 1621 at age 42 at El Escorial Palace, Madrid, Spain. (2)

    Felipe III von Habsburg, Rey de España gained the title of Rei Felipe II de Portugal in 1598. (3) He gained the title of Rey Felipe III de España in 1598. (4)

Children of Felipe III von Habsburg, Rey de España and Margarete Erzherzogin von Österreich

-1. Ana Maria Maurica von Habsburg, Princesa de España+ b. 22 Sep 1601, d. 20 Jan 1666

-2. Maria von Habsburg b. 1603, d. 1603

-3. Felipe IV von Habsburg, Rey de España+2 b. 8 Apr 1605, d. 17 Sep 1665

-4. Maria Anna von Habsburg, Infanta de España+ b. 1606, d. 1646

-5. Carlos von Habsburg (3) b. 1607, d. 1632

-6. Fernando von Habsburg3 b. 1609, d. 1641

-7. Margarita von Habsburg b. 1610, d. 1617

-8. Alfonso von Habsburg b. 1611, d. 1612

Forrás / Source

http://thepeerage.com/p10278.htm#i102774

--------------------

Philip III of Spain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philip III (Spanish: Felipe III; April 14, 1578 – March 31, 1621) was the King of Spain and King of Portugal and the Algarves, where he ruled as Philip II (Portuguese: Filipe II), from 1598 until his death. His chief minister was the Duke of Lerma. Philip III married Margaret of Styria, sister of Emperor Ferdinand II.

Born in Madrid, the son of Philip II of Spain and his fourth wife (and niece) Anna, daughter of the Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain. He shared the viewpoints and beliefs of his father, but did not inherit his industry. The hardworking and diligent old king had sorrowfully confessed that God had not given him a son capable of governing his vast dominions, and that he had foreseen that Philip III would be led by his servants. This assesment of his son ultimately proved correct.

The new king put the direction of his government entirely into the hands of his favorite, the Duke of Lerma, Francisco Goméz de Sandoval y Rojas, and when he fell under the influence of Lerma's son, Cristóbal de Sandoval, the Duke of Uceda in 1618, he trusted himself and his states to the new favourite.

The king's own life was passed amid court festivities, on which enormous sums of money were wasted, or in the practice of piety. It was said that he was so virtuous as hardly to have committed a venial sin.

He died at Madrid on March 31, 1621. The story told in the memoirs of the French ambassador Bassompierre, that he was killed by the heat of a brasero (a pan of hot charcoal), because the proper official to take it away was not at hand, is a humorous exaggeration of the formal etiquette of the court.

Domestic Policy

The policies of the Duke of Lerma were aimed towards the maintenance of international peace, the expulsion of the Moors and personal enrichment, as much economic as political.

Throughout his reign, institutional reforms followed one after another to solve the problems of corruption and inefficiency that plagued the administration of the Monarchy: apart from the changes introduced in the traditional system of Counselors, resources were extended to the Juntas, bodies responsible for decreasing the power of royal favorites, in order to create a more agile and coherent government, but they didn't produce the desired result. The financial problems that Philip II had left behind made the king dependent on the Courts, who had to meet more frequently than their predecessors in order to grant the resources to run the empire.

The most significant domestic policy acts during the reign of Philip III were the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula and the adoption of the coins of a copper and silver alloy for domestic money transactions.

[edit]Expulsion of the Moors (1609–1610)

In 1609 a decree for the expulsion of the Moors from Spain was declared for the following reasons:

A possible alliance between the Berbers to attack the coast of Levant

Their unpopularity among the people

The necessity of the State to control its riches and values

Between 1609 and 1610 they began to leave the peninsula. To accomplish this, the Navy and 30,000 soldiers were mobilized with the mission of transporting the Muslims to Tunis or Morroco. Approximately 300,000 Moors were expelled.

This measure considerably affected the Kingdom of Valencia, the valleys of Aragon and the markets of Murcia. The cheap labor and the number of rent paying owners in these areas decreased considerably. The cultivation of sugar and rice had to be substituted for white mulberry, vineyards, and wheat.

[edit]The Dismissal of the Duke of Lerma (1618)

In 1618 the corruption grew to an intolerable level in the Court of Madrid. The King dismissed the Duke of Lerma and named the duke's son as his successor, the Duke of Uceda, who he sent to detain Rodrigo Calderón, a figure emblematic of the administration of his father.

International Policy

England

With the ascension to the throne of James I of England, succeeding his cousin Elizabeth, it became possible to end the Anglo–Spanish War which had been dragging on since 1585 and was far too costly for both countries. In August of 1604 the Treaty of London was signed.

[edit]Netherlands

Philip II of Spain had bequeathed this remaining territory in the Southern Netherlands to his daughter Isabella Clara Eugenia of Spain and her husband, Archduke Albert, under the condition that if she died without any heirs, the land would return to the Spanish Crown. The equality of forces between the rebellious provinces of the north - Calvinist Protestants - and the southern provinces - allied with Spain - led to war exhaustion and in 1609 to a truce that was to last for twelve years, also known as Pax Hispanica. The truce did enable the Southern Netherlands to recover, but it was a de facto recognition of the independence of the Dutch Republic and did not stop its commercial and colonial expansion into the Caribbean and the East-Indies, although Spain had tried to impose the liquidation of the Dutch East India Company as a treaty condition. Minor concessions of the Dutch Republic were the scrapping of the plan to create a West India Company and to stop the harassment of the Portuguese in Asia. Both concessions would appear to be temporal.

[edit]France

With the death of Henry IV of France - a supporter of the war against Spain - a period of instability commenced in the Kingdom of France. The Queen Regent, Marie de' Medici, asked Spain for help in the fight against the Huguenots. And so the peace with France that Philip II of Spain had arranged in his last moment with the Peace of Vervins was consolidated in 1615, by means of the marriage of the King of France with a Spanish infant and the crown prince of Spain (future Philip IV) with Elisabeth of Bourbon.

[edit]Italy

The Duke of Osuna, viceroy of Naples, the Marquess of Villafranca, and the Governor of Milan directed the Spanish policy in Italy that encountered resistance from the Kingdom of Savoy and the Republic of Venice. To secure the connection between Milan and the Netherlands a new route was opened through Valtelina, Switzerland and in 1618 the plot of Venice occurred in which the authorities engaged in the persecution of pro-Spanish agents.

[edit]Thirty Years' War

Main article: Thirty Years' War

Confrontation between the Catholics and Protestants in Bohemia.

[edit]Intervention of Philip III of Spain (1618–1621)

Emperor Ferdinand II Habsburg asked the Spanish branch of his family for help to put down the rebellion of the Protestant Czechs.

Spain, allied with Austria and Bavaria confronted the Bohemian Protestants supported by the Electoral Palatinate. The Spanish troops headed by Ambrosia Spinola in the Palatinate and by Johann Tserclaes, Count of Tilly in Bohemia, achieved victory against the Czechs in the Battle of White Mountain.

--------------------

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philipp_III._%28Spanien%29

Philipp III. (Spanien)

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König Philipp III. von Spanien und Portugal

Philipp III. (* 14. April 1578 in Madrid; † 31. März 1621 in Madrid) war als Felipe III König von Spanien, als Filippo II König von Neapel und Sizilien, sowie als Filipe II König von Portugal und als Filippo II König von Sardinien.

Philipp III. wurde als fünfter Sohn von Philipp II. von Spanien und dessen vierter Gemahlin Anna von Österreich geboren. Er regierte in Spanien und Portugal von 1598 bis 1621.

Was sich 1588 mit der Niederlage der Spanischen Armada schon angekündigt hatte, nahm nun, 10 Jahre später, Gestalt an: es begann der Niedergang des spanischen Weltreiches. Philipp III., der Sohn König Philipps II., der Spanien auf den Zenit geführt hatte, glich seinem Vater nur in seiner Frömmigkeit. Politisch unbedarft, legte er die Staatsführung in die Hände von Günstlingen, allen voran in die des Herzogs von Lerma, der ihn 1609 dazu brachte, die Morisken (zum Katholizismus übergetretene Mauren; ca. 275 000) aus Spanien zu vertreiben, was katastrophale Auswirkungen auf die Volkswirtschaft des Königreichs hatte. Immerhin brachte Philipp III. 1604 einen Frieden mit England zustande und beendete so den kostspieligen Krieg. Er griff in den beginnenden Dreißigjährigen Krieg ein, indem er Kaiser Ferdinand II. Truppen sandte. 1621 starb Philipp III. 43-jährig nach 23 Regierungsjahren, nachdem er bereits seit längerer Zeit gesundheitlich angeschlagen war.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

[Anzeigen]

   * 1 Nachkommen
   * 2 Vorfahren
   * 3 Literatur
   * 4 Weblinks
   * 5 Einzelnachweise

Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Am 18. April 1599 heiratete er Margarete von Österreich (1584–1611), mit der er die folgenden Kinder hatte:

   * Anna von Österreich (1601–1666) ∞ 1615 Ludwig XIII. (1601–1643) König von Frankreich,
   * Maria (* 1603 † als Kleinkind),
   * Philipp IV. (Spanien) (1605–1665) König von Spanien
        1. ∞ 1615 Isabella von Bourbon (1602–1644)
        2. ∞ 1649 Maria Anna von Österreich (1634–1696)
   * Maria Anna von Spanien (1606–1646) ∞1631 Ferdinand III. (1608–1657) Kaiser des Heiligen Römischen Reiches
   * Karl von Österreich (1607–1632)[1]
   * Ferdinand von Spanien (1609–1641) Statthalter der habsburgischen Niederlande, Kardinal
   * Margarethe (*1610 † als Kleinkind),
   * Alfons (*1611 † als Kleinkind)

Siehe auch: Geschichte Portugals, Zeittafel Portugal

Literatur [Bearbeiten]

   * Paul C.Allen : Philip III and the Pax Hispanica, 1598 - 1621. The failure of grand strategy. Yale University Press, New Haven [u. a.] 2000, ISBN 0-300-07682-7.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * Druckschriften von und über Philipp III. (Spanien) im VD 17
   * Literatur über Philipp III. (Spanien) im Katalog der Deutschen Nationalbibliothek (Datensatz zu Philipp III. (Spanien) • PICA-Datensatz • Apper-Personensuche)

Einzelnachweise [Bearbeiten]

  1. ↑ Constantin von Wurzbach: Karl, Infant von Spanien. Nr. 135. In: Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich.  Bd 6. Verlag L. C. Zamarski, Wien 1856–1891, S. 364 (auf Wikisource).

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Philipp II. König von Spanien

1598–1621 Philipp IV.

König von Neapel

1598–1621

König von Sizilien

1598–1621

König von Sardinien

1598–1621

Herzog von Mailand

1598–1621

Herzog von Luxemburg

1598–1621

Philipp I. König von Portugal

1598–1621 Philipp III.

Diego von Österreich und Österreich Fürst von Asturien

1584–1598 Philipp von Österreich und Österreich-Steiermark

Normdaten: PND: 118593846 – weitere Informationen | LCCN: n81139456 | VIAF: 87958694 | SELIBR: 326334

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Felipe III el Piadoso, rey de España y Portugal's Timeline

1578
April 14, 1578
Madrid, Spain
1599
April 18, 1599
Age 21
Valencia, Valencia, Spain
1601
September 22, 1601
Age 23
Valladolid, Castilla y León, España
1603
February 1, 1603
Age 24
Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain
1605
April 8, 1605
Age 26
Valladoloid, Spain
1606
August 18, 1606
Age 28
Valladolid, Castile, Espahña
1607
September 15, 1607
Age 29
Madrid, Community of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
1609
May 16, 1609
Age 31
San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Community of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
1610
May 24, 1610
Age 32
Lerma, Burgos, Spain
1611
September 22, 1611
Age 33
El Escorial, Madrid, Spain