Frances Amelia Guthrie (Lamson) (1861 - d.)

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Birthplace: New York City, USA
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Managed by: June Barnes
Last Updated:

About Frances Amelia Guthrie (Lamson)

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5811/87694.html Martin Williams Member Username: martin_williams

"The youngest of the Lamson sisters , Frances - also had an interesting career. Six or seven years after the death of her first husband, Frederick Lehmann, she was remarried to Pittsburgh steel magnate Charles S. Guthrie. The wedding took place in October 1900 at the home of her sister, Malvina - her brother-in-law, Judge Robert C. Cornell, gave her away. The congregation was small, composed primarily of close friends and family, and the bride wore a subdued but tasteful ensemble of pale mauve crepe-de-chine with trimmings of yellow lace, a matching hat of velvet and tulle, and discreet pearl jewellery. According to the Society columns, the union between Guthrie and Mrs Lehmann had been the subject of rumour for some time; he had been a business associate of the late Mr Lehmann, whilst she had made an independent living as a successful house furnisher and decorator. Sadly, the marriage was not to last long: by 1906, Frances - aged only forty-five - had been widowed for a second time, and by the spring of 1911, she was living in Paris, close to her sisters, Elizabeth Drummond and Katherine de Florez. It was here, in her house on the rue de l'Universitie, that she hosted a glittering 'musicale', attended by (among others) Lady Drummond, Mrs Stanford White (J. Clinch Smith's sister), Ambassador Bacon (who cancelled his passage on the 'Titanic' at the last minute), Mrs Marshall Field and Mrs Harry Payne Whitney. However, despite spending a considerable amount of time on the Continent, Frances kept up a country house in the States, Meadow Court, overlooking Long Island Sound. Embowered by flowers, and set in landscaped grounds designed by architect Frederick Olmstead, the mansion (built in 1902) was in the Mediterranean style and provided a fitting venue for weekend parties and dances. Indeed, in 1912, 'American Homes and Gardens' magazine stated that:

“There are few homes in America more attractively situated than the property of Mrs. Charles S. Guthrie, in New London, CT. This is the embodiment of the ideas of what a house should be.”

Presumably, Meadow Court would have been visited regularly by Mrs Appleton, Mrs Cornell and Mrs Brown, as it stayed in Mrs Guthrie's possession until 1925. It was subsequently converted to a hotel, the Lighthouse Inn, which it remains to this day".

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