Francis Billington, Mayflower passenger

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Francis Billington

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Spaulding, Lincolnshire, England
Death: Died in Middleborough, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
Place of Burial: Middleborough, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of John Billington, "Mayflower" passenger and Eleanor Armstrong, "Mayflower" Passenger
Husband of Christiana Billington
Father of Elizabeth Patey; Joseph Billington; Mary Sabin; Isaac Billington, Sr.; Desire Bonney and 6 others
Brother of Nicholas Bullington I; Mary Billington; John Billington, Jr., "Mayflower" Passenger and Thomas Billington

Occupation: m. 7/16/1634
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Francis Billington, Mayflower passenger

Birth: About 1606, possibly near Spaulding, Lincolnshire.

Marriage:

Christian (Penn) Eaton, July 1634, Plymouth.


Death: 3 December 1684, Middleboro.

The Billington family may have originated from around Cowbit and Spaulding, in Lincolnshire, England. Francis Longland named young children Francis Billington son of John, and Francis Newton son of Robert, as heirs. In 1650, a survey of lands indicated that Francis was "about 40" and living in New England. Francis' himself stated in a 1674 deposition that he was 68 years old, so he was about 14 years old when he made the voyage on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620 with his parents John and Eleanor, and older brother John.

Francis was clearly an active and troublesome youth. He nearly caused a disaster onboard the Mayflower shortly after arrival, when he shot off his father's musket inside the Mayflower's cabin and sent sparks raining down near an open barrel of gunpowder. After he got to shore, he climbed up a tree and spotted a "great sea," which turned out to be a lake that even today is still known as "Billington's Sea". He and one of the Mayflower's crewmembers went to explore the sea, but became alarmed when they saw some abandoned Indian houses (they were alone with only a single gun).

Francis' father was hanged for murder in September 1630, and his brother John had died not to long before. In July 1634, Francis married Christian Eaton, the widow of Mayflower passenger Francis Eaton who had died the previous year autumn. Christian brought three of her own children, and one step-child from her deceased husband's previous marriage, all under the age of 14. With Francis Billington, she had nine more children. They raised their family at Plymouth, and moved in their later years to Middleboro, where they both died in 1684.


From SIGNERS OF THE MAYFLOWER COMPACT by Annie Arnoux Haxton Pt.! The Billington boys were uncontrollable. The Billington boys were not persons to be suppressed or reduced to the subordination of extinction. The situation on the ship was one their hearts craved and the spirit of April Fool's day was not regulated by the calender. Francis Billington climbed a tree and discovered a body of water in the distance. It proved to provide a great quantity of fresh water and perpetuated his name as the Billington Sea. In 1634 he married Christian Penn, widow of Francis Eaton. they proved to be a thriftless pair ; Their growing family of eight children seemed to be too much for them and they were forced to bind most of them out to secure means for their existence. Francis was occasionally fined and sued and once had the choice of a whipping or a fine of 20 pounds.If the sentence was carried out I greatly fear the family exchequer would require the whipping, However as the years went by he was on committees, boards of reference and other organizations which gave evidence of his standing in the community. For more information on this family look under John Billington his brother and John and Eleanor Billington his father and mother.

http://pharmacy.isu.edu/~cady/genealogy/PS07/PS07_039.HTM


BILLINGTON, FRANCIS-The son of John and Eleanor Billington, Francis accompanied his parents on the 1620 Mayflower. See the three articles under his father for his probable English origin and his American descendants. When the Mayflower was anchored at Cape Cod, "one of Francis [sic, should be John] Billington's Sons [presumably son Francis], who in his Fathers absence, had got Gun-powder, and had shot of a peice or two, and made scuibs, and there being a fowling peice charged in his fathers Cabbin, shot her off in the Cabbin, there being a little barren of powder halfe full, scattered in and about the Cabbin, the fire being within foure foote of the bed betweene the Deckes, and many flints and Iron things about the Cabbin, and many people about the fire, and yet by Gods mercy no harme done" (Mourt's Relation, p. 15). The same source, p. 26, relates how Francis Billington climbed a tree and saw what appeared to be a great sea, but on close inspection it turned out to be a very shallow pond, which is called to this day the Billington Sea. He married Christian (Penn), the widow of Francis Eaton, in July 1634 (PC R 1:31). Source: Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

Francis Billington, the sole surviving son: John's son Francis was one of the first Pilgrims punished for premarital sex. How he and Christian Penn were 'caught' is unknown; their first child Elizabeth wasn't born until a year, to the month, after their marriage. He lived at Plymouth until 1669; then he moved to Middleboro and lived on land granted to him as one of the "First Comers." (Plymouth Colony LR 1:344; 3:129 (Francis Billington) He lived there until his death, except for a few years when he took refuge at Plymouth during the King Philip's War. On 18 April 1642 he apprenticed his daughter Elizabeth (Plymouth Colony Record 2:38) and 14 Jan 1642/3 he bound-out son Joseph, "aged vi or vii" and two daughters, probably Martha and Mary, one five years old and the other even younger. (Plymouth town records) Bradford in his History (446) stated in 1651 that Francis Billington had eight children. In his old age, Francis was dependent on his son Isaac for support and died intestate. No probate record appears, although Isaac petitioned the probate court in 1703/4 for title to his father's Middleboro lands, stating he had had sole care of his parents in their old age. (Plymouth Co. PR) A Plymouth County Court case of Sep 1722, brought by Isaac's daughter Desire (Billington) Bonney and her husband, James, proves that Francis Billington died intestate

leaving issue, two sons and five daughters [see below]. Isaac as the eldest undoubtedly got a double portion as there were a total of eight

shares in the estate. (Plymouth Co. CT Records, 1686-1859, 5:145) A 1719 quitclaim deed from Francis's grandson, Francis Billington (Family #12) reading "my father Francis and grandfather [unnamed] Bilington" seems to imply a son Francis, Jr. But in the absence of any mention of such a son in contemporary Plymouth records, coupled with the fact that Francis's deed evidently transferred the shares of Joseph Billington, we conclude that the deed contains a clerical error. The original must have read "my father Joseph and grandfather Francis Billington." (Ply. Co. LR 14:255) Indications are that the seven children named in the Bonney suit and their progeny were the only survivors of Francis Billington. A more detailed account has been published in the Mayflower Quarterly 52:137-44;

and The Genealogist 3:231-2 vol, 1980.) American families from New Plymouth,~1620 to1790+

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

History of the Town of Middleborough:

"Francis Billington is a son of John Billington, who is a disreputable passenger of the Mayflower, the first settler of Plymouth publicly executed in October 1630, for lying in wait and shooting a young man named John Newcomb. Francis was about fourteen years old when he landed at Plymouth with his parents, and was one of the two passengers of the Mayflower who settled in Middleboro. He is remembered as the discoverer of Billington Sea in Plymouth, in 1621, although Goodwin thinks his father deserves that credit. While climbing a tree, the week before, he had seen what appeared to him a great sea, and on that day, with a mate of the Mayflower, set out to examine his discovery. After travelling about three miles, they found two lakes, with a beautiful island in the center of one, about which the early writers were lavish in their praise. He volunteered in the Pequot War, but was not called into active service. He was one of the twenty-six men who made the purchase of land from the Indians in 1662, as well as the Sixteen Shilling Purchase. He married, July 1634, Christiana Penn Eaton, the widow of Francis Eaton. "They proved a thriftless pair and were forced to bind out most or all of their eight children."* He died December 3, 1684. aged eighty years. His son Isaac Billington, was one of the original members of the First Church, and died December 11, 1709. aged sixty-six years.**" *Goodwin, Pilgrim Republic, p. 344

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

"It has often been pointed out that almost all we know about the Billington Pilgrims was written by William Bradford, who obviously disliked and criticized the entire family from the beginning. The Billingtons were not in sympathy with the aims and tenets of the Plymouth church, but one wonders that they were not more cooperative with those in authority who struggled to establish and maintain such a fragile colony on the hostile New England shore. John Billington, however, stoutly supported individual independence and freedom of speech, raising the voice of opposition when he disagreed with the rule of government. He and his descendants surely contributed to that integral part of the American character!"

Source: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations


BILLINGTON, FRANCIS-The son of John and Eleanor Billington, Francis accompanied his parents on the 1620 Mayflower. See the three articles under his father for his probable English origin and his American descendants. When the Mayflower was anchored at Cape Cod, "one of Francis [sic, should be John] Billington's Sons [presumably son Francis], who in his Fathers absence, had got Gun-powder, and had shot of a peice or two, and made scuibs, and there being a fowling peice charged in his fathers Cabbin, shot her off in the Cabbin, there being a little barren of powder halfe full, scattered in and about the Cabbin, the fire being within foure foote of the bed betweene the Deckes, and many flints and Iron things about the Cabbin, and many people about the fire, and yet by Gods mercy no harme done" (Mourt's Relation, p. 15). The same source, p. 26, relates how Francis Billington climbed a tree and saw what appeared to be a great sea, but on close inspection it turned out to be a very shallow pond, which is called to this day the Billington Sea. He married Christian (Penn), the widow of Francis Eaton, in July 1634 (PC R 1:31). Source: Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

Francis Billington, the sole surviving son: John's son Francis was one of the first Pilgrims punished for premarital sex. How he and Christian Penn were 'caught' is unknown; their first child Elizabeth wasn't born until a year, to the month, after their marriage. He lived at Plymouth until 1669; then he moved to Middleboro and lived on land granted to him as one of the "First Comers." (Plymouth Colony LR 1:344; 3:129 (Francis Billington) He lived there until his death, except for a few years when he took refuge at Plymouth during the King Philip's War. On 18 April 1642 he apprenticed his daughter Elizabeth (Plymouth Colony Record 2:38) and 14 Jan 1642/3 he bound-out son Joseph, "aged vi or vii" and two daughters, probably Martha and Mary, one five years old and the other even younger. (Plymouth town records) Bradford in his History (446) stated in 1651 that Francis Billington had eight children. In his old age, Francis was dependent on his son Isaac for support and died intestate. No probate record appears, although Isaac petitioned the probate court in 1703/4 for title to his father's Middleboro lands, stating he had had sole care of his parents in their old age. (Plymouth Co. PR) A Plymouth County Court case of Sep 1722, brought by Isaac's daughter Desire (Billington) Bonney and her husband, James, proves that Francis Billington died intestate

leaving issue, two sons and five daughters [see below]. Isaac as the eldest undoubtedly got a double portion as there were a total of eight

shares in the estate. (Plymouth Co. CT Records, 1686-1859, 5:145) A 1719 quitclaim deed from Francis's grandson, Francis Billington (Family #12) reading "my father Francis and grandfather [unnamed] Bilington" seems to imply a son Francis, Jr. But in the absence of any mention of such a son in contemporary Plymouth records, coupled with the fact that Francis's deed evidently transferred the shares of Joseph Billington, we conclude that the deed contains a clerical error. The original must have read "my father Joseph and grandfather Francis Billington." (Ply. Co. LR 14:255) Indications are that the seven children named in the Bonney suit and their progeny were the only survivors of Francis Billington. A more detailed account has been published in the Mayflower Quarterly 52:137-44;

and The Genealogist 3:231-2 vol, 1980.) American families from New Plymouth,~1620 to1790+

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

History of the Town of Middleborough:

"Francis Billington is a son of John Billington, who is a disreputable passenger of the Mayflower, the first settler of Plymouth publicly executed in October 1630, for lying in wait and shooting a young man named John Newcomb. Francis was about fourteen years old when he landed at Plymouth with his parents, and was one of the two passengers of the Mayflower who settled in Middleboro. He is remembered as the discoverer of Billington Sea in Plymouth, in 1621, although Goodwin thinks his father deserves that credit. While climbing a tree, the week before, he had seen what appeared to him a great sea, and on that day, with a mate of the Mayflower, set out to examine his discovery. After travelling about three miles, they found two lakes, with a beautiful island in the center of one, about which the early writers were lavish in their praise. He volunteered in the Pequot War, but was not called into active service. He was one of the twenty-six men who made the purchase of land from the Indians in 1662, as well as the Sixteen Shilling Purchase. He married, July 1634, Christiana Penn Eaton, the widow of Francis Eaton. "They proved a thriftless pair and were forced to bind out most or all of their eight children."* He died December 3, 1684. aged eighty years. His son Isaac Billington, was one of the original members of the First Church, and died December 11, 1709. aged sixty-six years.**" *Goodwin, Pilgrim Republic, p. 344

__________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________

"It has often been pointed out that almost all we know about the Billington Pilgrims was written by William Bradford, who obviously disliked and criticized the entire family from the beginning. The Billingtons were not in sympathy with the aims and tenets of the Plymouth church, but one wonders that they were not more cooperative with those in authority who struggled to establish and maintain such a fragile colony on the hostile New England shore. John Billington, however, stoutly supported individual independence and freedom of speech, raising the voice of opposition when he disagreed with the rule of government. He and his descendants surely contributed to that integral part of the American character!"

Source: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations


The Billington family may have originated from around Cowbit and Spaulding, in Lincolnshire, England. Francis Longland named young children Francis Billington son of John, and Francis Newton son of Robert, as heirs. In 1650, a survey of lands indicated that Francis was "about 40" and living in New England. Francis' himself stated in a 1674 deposition that he was 68 years old, so he was about 14 years old when he made the voyage on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620 with his parents John and Eleanor, and older brother John.

Francis was clearly an active and troublesome youth. He nearly caused a disaster onboard the Mayflower shortly after arrival, when he shot off his father's musket inside the Mayflower's cabin and sent sparks raining down near an open barrel of gunpowder. After he got to shore, he climbed up a tree and spotted a "great sea," which turned out to be a lake that even today is still known as "Billington's Sea". He and one of the Mayflower's crewmembers went to explore the sea, but became alarmed when they saw some abandoned Indian houses (they were alone with only a single gun).

Francis' father was hanged for murder in September 1630, and his brother John had died not to long before. In July 1634, Francis married Christian Eaton, the widow of Mayflower passenger Francis Eaton who had died the previous year autumn. Christian brought three of her own children, and one step-child from her deceased husband's previous marriage, all under the age of 14. With Francis Billington, she had nine more children. They raised their family at Plymouth, and moved in their later years to Middleboro, where they both died in 1684.

http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/FrancisBillington.php


Voyaged to America on the Mayflower


On the passenger list of the Mayflower(with his parents).


Arrived here on the Mayflower
Arrived on the ship, "Mayflower."

view all 28

Francis Billington, Mayflower passenger's Timeline

1605
1605
Spaulding, Lincolnshire, England
1620
September 6, 1620
- September 16, 1620
Age 15
Plymouth, England

Mayflower voyage[edit]
Winslow and his wife Elizabeth were part of the Leiden Separatist group who had decided to travel far away from England and the repressive regime of King James I to more freely practice their religious beliefs. Merchant Adventurer investment group agent Thomas Weston assisted in this venture by providing the ship Mayflower for the Pilgrim's journey. Traveling on the Mayflower in company with the Winslows were his brother Gilbert and family servant/employee George Soule and a youth, Elias Story. Also in the care of the family was Elinor (Ellen) More, a girl of eight years. In all there were four unaccompanied More children from Shipton, Shropshire in the care of senior Pilgrims on the Mayflower: Elinor, Jasper, Mary and Richard.[7][8][9] Elinor perished the winter of 1620 with only one brother Richard More surviving.

Signing the Mayflower Compact 1620, a painting by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris 1899
The Mayflower departed Plymouth, England on September 6/16, 1620. The small, 100-foot ship had 102 passengers and the crew is estimated to be approximately 30 but the exact number is unknown.[10] They lived in extremely cramped conditions. By the second month out, the ship was being buffeted by strong westerly gales, causing the ship‘s timbers to be badly shaken with caulking failing to keep out sea water, and with passengers, even in their berths, lying wet and ill. This, combined with a lack of proper rations and unsanitary conditions for several months, attributed to what would be fatal for many, especially the majority of women and children. On the way there were two deaths, a crew member and a passenger, but the worst was yet to come after arriving at their destination when, in the space of several months, almost half the passengers perished in cold, harsh, unfamiliar New England winter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

Not listed on geni currently:
William Holbeck, John Hooke, Desire Minter, Elias Story, Roger Wilder, Humility Cooper,

November 9, 1620
- November 19, 1620
Age 15
Plymouth Rock on the Mayflower

On November 9/19, 1620, after about 3 months at sea, including a month of delays in England, they spotted land, which was the Cape Cod Hook, now called Provincetown Harbor. After several days of trying to get south to their planned destination of the Colony of Virginia, strong winter seas forced them to return to the harbor at Cape Cod hook, where they anchored on November 11/21. The Mayflower Compact was signed that day.[11][12]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

November 1620
Age 15
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts

Excerpt from Desperate Crossing--The Untold Story of the Mayflower. An excellent History Channel overview of the Mayflower journey. It tells about several in the 3 videos Edward Winslow is one of them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pv-_JxApHzo

1620
Age 15
Plymouth, MA, USA
1621
September 21, 1621
- November 11, 1621
Age 16
Plymouth Plantation, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States

Edward Winslow, Mourt's Relation:
"our harvest being gotten in, our governour sent foure men on fowling, that so we might after a
speciall manner rejoyce together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labours ; they foure in one
day killed as much fowle, as with a little helpe beside, served the Company almost a weeke, at
which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Armes, many of the Indians coming
amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoyt, with some ninetie men, whom for
three dayes we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deere, which they
brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governour, and upon the Captaine and others. And
although it be not always so plentifull, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God,
we are so farre from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plentie."
In modern spelling
"our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a
special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day
killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time
amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and
amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we
entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the
Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others. And although it be
not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far
from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty."
http://www.pilgrimhallmuseum.org/pdf/TG_What_Happened_in_1621.pdf
--------------------------------------------------------------

Harvest festival observed by the Pilgrims at Plymouth[edit]
Americans commonly trace the Thanksgiving holiday to a 1621 celebration at the Plymouth Plantation, where the settlers held a harvest feast after a successful growing season. Autumn or early winter feasts continued sporadically in later years, first as an impromptu religious observance, and later as a civil tradition.

Squanto, a Patuxet Native American who resided with the Wampanoag tribe, taught the Pilgrims how to catch eel and grow corn and served as an interpreter for them. Squanto had learned the English language during his enslavement in England. The Wampanoag leader Massasoit had given food to the colonists during the first winter when supplies brought from England were insufficient.

The Pilgrims celebrated at Plymouth for three days after their first harvest in 1621. The exact time is unknown, but James Baker, then Plimoth Plantation vice president of research, stated in 1996, "The event occurred between Sept. 21 and Nov. 11, 1621, with the most likely time being around Michaelmas (Sept. 29), the traditional time." [8] Seventeenth-century accounts do not identify this as a thanksgiving observance, rather it followed the harvest. It included 50 persons who were on the Mayflower (all who remained of the 100 who had landed) and 90 Native Americans.[8] The feast was cooked by the four adult Pilgrim women who survived their first winter in the New World (Eleanor Billington, Elizabeth Hopkins, Mary Brewster, and Susanna (White) Winslow), along with young daughters and male and female servants.[8][9]

"Pilgrims" are often confused with "Puritans". This sculpture The Pilgrim by Augustus St. Gaudens is based on his earlier work The Puritan
Two colonists gave personal accounts of the 1621 feast in Plymouth. The Pilgrims, most of whom were Separatists (English Dissenters), are not to be confused with Puritans who established their own Massachusetts Bay Colony on the Shawmut Peninsula (current day Boston) in 1630.[10][11] Both groups were strict Calvinists, but differed in their views regarding the Church of England. Puritans wished to remain in the Anglican Church and reform it, while the Pilgrims wanted complete separation from the church.

William Bradford, in Of Plymouth Plantation wrote:

They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck a meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to the proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.[12]

The First Thanksgiving 1621, oil on canvas by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1899). The painting shows common misconceptions about the event that persist to modern times: Pilgrims did not wear such outfits, and the Wampanoag are dressed in the style of Native Americans from the Great Plains.[13]
Edward Winslow, in Mourt's Relation wrote:

Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after we had gathered the fruits of our labor. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five deer, which we brought to the plantation and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.[14]

The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth, oil on canvas by Jennie Augusta Brownscombe (1914)
The Pilgrims held a true thanksgiving celebration in 1623[15][16] following a fast,[17] and a refreshing 14-day rain[18] which resulted in a larger harvest. William DeLoss Love calculates that this thanksgiving was made on Wednesday, July 30, 1623, a day before the arrival of a supply ship with more colonists,[17] but before the fall harvest. In Love's opinion this 1623 thanksgiving was significant because the order to recognize the event was from civil authority[19] (Governor Bradford), and not from the church, making it likely the first civil recognition of Thanksgiving in New England.[17]

Referring to the 1623 harvest after the nearly catastrophic drought, Bradford wrote:

And afterwards the Lord sent them such seasonable showers, with interchange of fair warm weather as, through His blessing, caused a fruitful and liberal harvest, to their no small comfort and rejoicing. For which mercy, in time convenient, they also set apart a day of thanksgiving… By this time harvest was come, and instead of famine now God gave them plenty … for which they blessed God. And the effect of their particular planting was well seen, for all had … pretty well … so as any general want or famine had not been amongst them since to this day.[20]

These first hand accounts do not appear to have contributed to the early development of the holiday. Bradford's "Of Plymouth Plantation" was not published until the 1850s. While the booklet "Mourt's Relation" was summarized by other publications without the now familiar thanksgiving story. By the eighteenth century the original booklet appeared to be lost or forgotten. A copy was rediscovered in Philadelphia in 1820, with the first full reprinting in 1841. In a footnote the editor, Alexander Young, was the first person to identify the 1621 feast as "the first Thanksgiving".[21]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving_(United_States)

1634
July 16, 1634
Age 29
Plymouth, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1635
July 10, 1635
Age 30
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA
1636
February 2, 1636
Age 31
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts
1636
Age 31
Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA