Francis Turner Hulley (c.1819 - 1902)

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Birthplace: Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Mafeking District, North West, South Africa
Managed by: Sharon Lee Doubell
Last Updated:

About Francis Turner Hulley

Francis Turner Hulley (1819 - 1901) came to South Africa as a 1 year old with his 1820 Settler parents, in the Richardson Party on the boat Stentor

Passenger listing:

HULLEY Richard 34 – Occupation:Farmer. Wife: Ann 33. Children: Richard 9, Ann 6, Sarah 4, Francis 1 (the SETTLER HANDBOOK by MD NASH Chameleon Press, Cape Town 1987)

[Francis, the] second son of Richard, was born in Yorkshire in 1819; he spent the early years of his life in the Lower Albany district - Trappe's Valley- and took up his rifle in all the Kaffir War, and first bore arms when a mere lad of 15, in 1834.

From Grahamstown, the family moved to Somerset East. He later married his old flame Elizabeth Wright of Clumber. Subsequently, he moved to the Transvaal and settled on the farm 'Olivedale' near Braamfontein, Johannesburg, where his wife died and was buried on the farm.

When the Boer War was imminent, Francis Turner, with his family, left for Mafeking, then in British territory, and with a large number of British refugees, sons, nephews and grandsons went through the siege. Four of his sons, two nephews, one son-in-law and two grandsons took part in the defence of the town, while several others of his family, of whom two were killed, fought on the British side in various parts of the country.

Colonel C.S. Vyvyan took a great interest in this old settler, and after the trying times of the investment were over, placed the family in charge of the Government dairy farm, which supplied milk and other comforts for the military hospital in Mafeking.

Here Francis Turner lived until his death on 12th May, 1901, at the age of 82. A few days before he died, he predicted that the war would end in a very short time. He was not destined to see his prophesy come true, and expressed a wish that his body be taken to Johannesburg, after peace, for burial on his farm. His last wish was carried out, and his remains were finally laid to rest at Braamfontein. His body was brought across from Mafeking by ox-wagon via Lichtenberg and Potchefstroom, under the charge of his two grandsons, Wycliffe James Hulley and Francis David Thomas Hulley (Mary Pearson -Pearsonfamily @dsl.pipex.com)

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Francis Turner Hulley, Born: 1819, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England; Died 12 May 1902, Willowdam, South Africa Married: 26 Dec 1842, in Bathurst, Cape to Elizabeth Wright, (b. 1824, Cape Colony, (daughter of Joseph Wright and Elizabeth -----) d. 11 Jan 1897, Olivedale, Pretoria district.)

Children:

i. Elizabeth HULLEY b. 25 Apr 1844.

ii. Richard John HULLEY b. 17 Dec 1845.

iii. James Thomas HULLEY b. 3 Sep 1848.

iv. Ann Rebecca HULLEY b. 14 Oct 1850.

v. Mary Jane HULLEY b. 1 Sep 1853.

vi. Sarah Lucy HULLEY b. 4 Dec 1855.

vii. Joseph Edward HULLEY b. 17 Mar 1859.

viii. Francis Wycliffe HULLEY b. 29 Jul 1861.

ix. Walter Herman HULLEY b. 30 Mar 1864, Queenstown, bap. 20 Jul 1864, Wesleyan-Methodist Chapel, Queenstown. Died in infancy.

x. Lilly Clementine HULLEY b. 30 Mar 1864, Queenstown, bap. 20 Jul 1864, Wesleyan-Methodist Chapel, Queenstown. Died in infancy.

xi. David William Turner HULLEY b. 29 Dec 1866.

__________

Richardson's Party on the Stentor'

No. 24 on the Colonial Department list, led by James Richardson, a corn dealer of Heartshead, Sheffield, Yorkshire.

Little information has been traced about this party. Richardson wrote to the Colonial Department in August 1819, proposing to organise a group of families to emigrate from Sheffield 'if they could have their passage free as from the badness of trade they have not in their power to pay'. This was followed a day later with a list of names, including Richardson himself and Charles and William Denton with their families, and eight single men,'all strong and healthy men able and willing to do their duty to themselves and the colony'. All eight dropped out, however, and permission had to be obtained for others to be substituted in their place before the reconstituted party was allowed to board the Stentor at Liverpool.

According to Special Commissioner William Hayward's notes, made when he investigated the settlers' claims to land in 1824, the party originally included seven servants, five employed by Richardson and two by William Denton. It is not clear how the party was organised and funded, or which of the 11 men for whom deposits were paid were under indentures and which free settlers.

The Stentor left Liverpool on 13 January 1820, reaching Table Bay on 19 April. Her charter expired at that port and the five settler parties on board were disembarked. The parties led by Griffith, Neave and White were transported overland to their locations at the Zonder End River and the north-country parties led by Richardson and George Smith were transshipped to HM Store Ship Weymouth, reaching Algoa Bay on 15 May. Richardson's party was located in Albany on the right bank of the George River.

LIST OF RICHARDSON'S PARTY

  • BRADSHAW, John 24. Cutler.
  • Clayton, George 29. Farmer. wife Elizabeth Saunderson 30.
  • Clayton, William 32. Farmer. wife Judith Thorpe 30. children John Clayton 7, Ann Rose Clayton 5 (later married Francis Whittal who was in Bailie's Party , Elizabeth Clayton 3.
  • DENTON, Charles 38. Labourer. w Hannah 39. c Ann 13.
  • DENTON, William 26. Labourer and army pensioner. w Mary 26. c William 1.
  • Hulley, Richard 34. Farmer. w Ann Brangan 33. c Richard 9, Ann 6, Sarah 4, Francis 1.
  • KENNEDY, Jonathan 24. Farmer.
  • MOSLEY, Joshua 20. Cutler.
  • NOON, Richard 21. Farmer.
  • RICHARDSON, James 25. Corn dealer. w Sarah 29. c John 4, Emma 3.
  • SENIOR, Elizabeth 12, James 8 and Martha 8 (stepchildren of James Richardson).
  • WELCH, Luke 25. Farmer. w Mary 30.
  • MOSLEY, George.

Main sources for party list List of settlers under the direction of James Richardson (Cape Archives CO 6138/1,72). This agrees with the list of the party on board the Stentor on 25 December 1819 (Public Record Office, London, CO 48/45,680). According to E Morse Jones, the three older children in James Richardson's family (Elizabeth aged 12, and the 8-year-old twins James and Martha) were his wife's children by a former marriage, surnamed Senior.

  • George Mosley, a stowaway on the Sir George Osborn, claimed to be a member of Richardson's party and attached himself to it after landing (Cape Archives 1/AY 8/71).

References

Hulley Pg: http://barlowd.tripod.com/framehulley.html SETTLER HANDBOOK by MD NASH Chameleon Press, Cape Town 1987)

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Francis Turner Hulley's Timeline

1819
1819
Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
1842
December 26, 1842
Age 23
Bathurst, Albany, Cape Colony, South Africa
1844
April 25, 1844
Age 25
1845
December 17, 1845
Age 26
1848
September 2, 1848
Age 29
1850
October 14, 1850
Age 31
1855
December 4, 1855
Age 36
Cape Province, South Africa
1859
March 17, 1859
Age 40
1861
July 29, 1861
Age 42