Francis McCall, Sr (1710 - 1794) MP

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Nicknames: "John"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ulster, Antrim, Ireland
Death: Died in Mecklenburg, NC
Occupation: Planter, royal land grant recipient, militia, constable, militiaman and constable
Managed by: Shelley Chrystal Mactyre
Last Updated:

About Francis McCall, Sr

The McCall's were Scots who migrated to Ireland where they settled for two generations. The McCall, Harris and Calhoun families migrated together to Pennsylvania and then to New River, VA.

Francis McCall was listed as head of household in the New River Settlement (now Botetouret Co.) in southwestern Virginia. In 1749 the Indians, supported and compensated by the French Army, made their first attach on the New River settlers. Virginia sent Lt. Col. George Washington and his militiamen, who were supported by the South Carolina militia, to counterattack. Washington and his militiamen, faired poorly against the French and Indians and they retreated to the Great Meadows and hastily fortified limited improvements there. Washington named it Fort Necessity and it is located on present day Route 40, just east of the Summit Inn and just west of Farmington, Fayette Co, PA. The fort was built in the middle of a meadow near two densely wooded hills. On 3 July 1754 the French and Indians attacked the fort. The battle ended in Washington's first defeat when he surrendered to the French. Fort Necessity National Battlefield, with a recreation of the original fort, commemorates that early battle and preserves the site.

Again unprotected, the colonists were repeatedly attached by the Indians. On 8 July 1755 a large party of Shawnee braves slaughtered many of the Calhoun family. Some survivors, including Francis McCall, fled southward into Mecklenburg Co, NC. Some migrated to South Carolina where they formed the Calhoun settlement.

On 14 March 1774 Francis McCall, planter, and his wife Mary sold to William Houston, planter, for 50 pounds proc, 200 acres lying on both sides of Cedar Fork of Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC, about half a mile above McCall's plantation. Said land was patented to McCall 5 April 1767. Witnesses: John Osburn, John McCall and Thomas McCall. Proved in January 1778 Court by John Osburn. Sam Martin, CMC.

On 3 March 1779, Governor Caswell sold to Francis McCall for 50 Shillings, 50 acres on Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC adjoining other lands of McCall. This was NC Land Grant 10 and was issued at Kinston, Vol. 38, p. 10. Recorded in Secretary's office by William Shepard, Deputy Secretary.

On 3 March 1779, Governor Rd. Caswell sold to Francis McCall for 50 Shillings, the 100 acres and 200 acres on Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC adjoining lands of James Briton and other lands of McCall. This was NC Land Grant 24 and was issued at Kinston, Vol. 38, p. 24. Recorded in Secretary's office by William Shepard, Deputy Secretary.

A Francis McCall was listed in the 1790 US Census for Mecklenburg Co, NC as head of household with one male over 16 and 3 females.

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    Francis "John" McCall came from Ireland and was of Scotch descent.  He was in the Shippensburg/Cumberland Valley area of Pennsylvania in 1731, where he married.  He moved to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, and was a member of the colonial militia in 1766.  He was a patriot in the American Revolution and a constable in 1779.

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following is excerpted from

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=irisheyes&id=I03216

(Thanks, Pamela!)

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Name: Francis "John" MCCALL

Sex: M

Birth: 11 NOV 1710 in Ulster, County Antrim, IRELAND

Death: 10 APR 1794 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina USA

Will: 25 NOV 1793 Mecklenburg County, NC

Religion: Presbyterian

Immigration: 1730 Removed to Pennsylvania (America) from Ireland.

Burial: 12 APR 1794 North Carolina

Event: Note FRANCIS McCALL and MARY HARRIS are Pamela's 5th paternal great-grandparents.

Note:

Will Book "B"; Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; pg 74

McCall, Francis

25 Nov 1793, probated in Apr 1794 Court.

Dau, Jane Porter

Sons, Thomas, Joseph, and Francis

Dau, Elizabeth [wf of Thomas Walker]

Dau, Mary [wife of John Gibbens]

Dau, Libby [wife of Michael Secrest]

Exr; Jane Porter

Wit; John McCorkle and Samuel Jones

The McCalls were Scots who migrated to Ireland where they settled for two generations. The McCall, Harris and Calhoun families migrated together to Pennsylvania and then to New River, VA.

Journal of the Lancaster County History Society, all name index - no McCall.

Bell McKinney Hayes Swope: Middle Spring Presbyterian Church, Middle Spring, PA, 1738 - 1900; History of, (Times Steam Printing House, Newville, PA, 1900). No mention of McCall. But the records are very spotty, and none from before 1750. The church was established 1738 - 1740 (dispute) but there may have been an informal group prior to that.

Francis McCall was listed as head of household in the New River Settlement (now Botetouret Co.) in southwestern Virginia. In 1749 the Indians, supported and compensated by the French Army, made their first attach on the New River settlers. Virginia sent Lt. Col. George Washington and his militiamen, who were supported by the South Carolina militia, to counterattack. Washington and his militiamen, faired poorly against the French and Indians and they retreated to the Great Meadows and hastily fortified limited improvements there. Washington named it Fort Necessity and it is located on present day Route 40, just east of the Summit Inn and just west of Farmington, Fayette Co, PA. The fort was built in the middle of a meadow near two densely wooded hills. On 3 July 1754 the French and Indians attacked the fort. The battle ended in Washington's first defeat when he surrendered to the French. Fort Necessity National Battlefield, with a recreation of the original fort, commemorates that early battle and preserves the site.

Again unprotected, the colonists were repeatedly attacked by the Indians. On 8 July 1755 a large party of Shawnee braves slaughtered many of the Calhoun family. Some survivors, including Francis McCall, fled southward into Mecklenburg Co, NC. Some migrated to South Carolina where they formed the Calhoun settlement.

On 14 March 1774, Francis McCall, planter, and his wife Mary sold to William Houston, planter, for 50 pounds proc, 200 acres lying on both sides of Cedar Fork of Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC, about half a mile above McCall's plantation. Said land was patented to McCall 5 April 1767. Witnesses: John Osburn, John McCall and Thomas McCall. Proved in January 1778 Court by John Osburn. Sam Martin, CMC.

On 3 March 1779, Governor Caswell sold to Francis McCall for 50 Shillings, 50 acres on Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC adjoining other lands of McCall. This was NC Land Grant 10 and was issued at Kinston, Vol. 38, p. 10. Recorded in Secretary's office by William Shepard, Deputy Secretary.

There's more at .... URL:

http://bz.llano.net/gowen/hussey_millenium/mccallms022.htm

On 3 March 1779, Governor Rd. Caswell sold to Francis McCall for 50 Shillings, the 100 acres and 200 acres on Twelvemile Creek, Mecklenburg Co, NC adjoining lands of James Briton and other lands of McCall. This was NC Land Grant 24 and was issued at Kinston, Vol. 38, p. 24. Recorded in Secretary's office by William Shepard, Deputy Secretary.

A Francis McCall was listed in the 1790 US Census for Mecklenburg Co, NC as head of household with one male over 16 and 3 females.

ULSTER

Francis McCall was born about 1710 in Ulster of Scotch parents. He arrived in Pennsylvania in 1730 and settled in Cumberland Valley near Shippensburg. He was a member of Middle Spring Presbyterian Church located at Big Spring, Pennsylvania, about two miles northwest of Shippensburg. In 1746 he removed to the New River settlement in western Virginia. Indian depredations during the French and Indian War forced him to move his family to Mecklenburg County [then Anson County], North Carolina.

Francis McCall received a land grant in Craven County, South Carolina in 1758, according to Ettie Augusta Tidwell McCall. He was the recipient of a land grant of 150 acres in South Carolina "between the main branch of Duncans Creek and Bush River from King George II January 22, 1759, according to "Secretary of State Grant Book," Volume 9, page 33.

He received a royal grant of land on Twelve Mile Creek in Anson County, NC, in 1762 and made his home there, according to Mecklenburg County Deed Book 13, page 343. Francis McCall was a member of the North Carolina militia from 1764 to 1766. He was appointed constable in his district in 1777 and served in the militia at that time. In 1781 and in 1787 his home was used as a polling place for inhabi­tants in the southeast portion of Mecklenburg County, according to "State Records of North Carolina." He was enumer­ated in the 1790 census of the county. He wrote his will November 25, 1793, and it was recorded in Mecklenburg County Will Book B, page 74. He named his daughter Jean McCall Porter as executrix, and she probated the will which is on file with North Carolina Historical Commission, Raleigh, in April 1794.

Father: Joshua MCCALL b: ABT 1686 in Ulster, County Antrim, IRELAND

Mother: Julianna TRUBY b: ABT 1691 in Ulster, County Antrim, IRELAND

Marriage 1 Mary HARRIS b: ABT 1712 in Ulster, County Antrim, IRELAND

Married: 1730 in Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania USA

Children

1..James MCCALL b: 1731 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

2..Charles "R. S." MCCALL b: 1732 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

3..George MCCALL b: 1735 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

4..Francis MCCALL b: 1737 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

5..Thomas MCCALL b: 1739 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

6..Jane MCCALL b: 1739 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

7..Joseph MCCALL b: 1741 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

8..Iber MCCALL b: 1745 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

9..Elizabeth MCCALL b: 1745 in Middle Springs, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

10..Mary MCCALL b: 1747 in New River, Pulaski County, Virginia

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-------------------- Records of Middle Spring Presbyterian Church Session Book, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, 1742-1748

The following concerns a riotous quarrel involving members of Middle Spring and Big Springs congregations. Robert Finley complained that George M'Elwain had assaulted him and tore his handkerchief. William Carnachan complained that William McCall assaulted him first. Other persons involved: Joseph Carnachan, James Laughlane, Junr., James Jake, Saml. Smith, John Jake, John Smith, Alexander Fairbairn, Francis McCall, John McCall. Sponsors: Gustavus Henderson, John Curry re a squablle at John Lackey's wedding when some came to see if the bride and groom were in bed; mentions Wm. McCall, Senr. and his son Wm. McCall, John Wiley, Saml. Culbertson. William and John McCall state that someone had mixed stilled liquor in their beer.

Ancestry.com Member Story:

Joshua MCCALL and Julianna TRUBY were married. Joshua MCCALL and Julianna TRUBY had the following children.

Francis MCCALL (Joshua-1) was born on 11 Nov 1710 in Ulster, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. He died on 10 Apr 1794 in Cheraw District, South Carolina or Mecklebnburg Co., North Carolina. Francis McCall was born about 1710 in Ulster of Scotch parents. He arrived in Pennsylvania in 1730 and settled in Cumberland Valley near Shippensburg. He was a member of Middle Spring Presbyterian Church located at Big Spring, Pennsylvania, about two miles northwest of Shippensburg. He married in Pennsylvania.

In 1746 he removed to the New River settlement in western Virginia in order to obtain more and better lands. But Indian raids during the French and Indian War forced him to leave this settlement. He moved with his family to North Carolina and settled in Anson County (now Mecklenbury County). Francis McCall received a land grant in Craven County, South Carolina in 1758, according to Ettie Augusta Tidwell McCall. He was the recipient of a land grant of 150 acres in South Carolina "between the main branch of Duncans Creek and Bush River from King George II January 22, 1759, according to "Secretary of State Grant Book," Volume 9, page 33.

He received a royal grant of land on Twelve Mile Creek in Anson County in 1762 and made his home there, according to Mecklenburg County Deed Book 13, page 343. Francis McCall was active in politics, and was a member of the Colonial militia from 1764 to 1766, and an influential man in the community. In 1781 and in 1787 his home was used as a polling place for inhabi¬tants in the southeast portion of Mecklenburg County, according to "State Records of North Carolina." He was enumer¬ated in the 1790 census of the county. He wrote his will November 25, 1793, and it was recorded in Mecklenburg County Will Book B, page 74. He named his daughter Jean McCall Porter as executrix, and she probated the will which is on file with North Carolina Historical Commission, Raleigh, in April 1794.

Early recorded data of the McCall family locates it in the vicinity of Loch Fyne in Argyll County, Scotland. It was an offshoot of the Clan Choola and was associated with the powerful McDonald Clan, according to "The Clan McCall" by Kate Sturm McCall Rotan of Waco, Texas. According to "McCall Genealogy" by A. M. McCall, "Members of the McCall family were engaged in commercial pursuits in Glasgow, but being Presbyte¬rians, became involved in the religious troubles and escaped to County Antrim, Ulster, Ireland."

By 1638 thousands of border Scots, many of them younger sons of prominent families, had accepted the offer of James I of Scotland and occupied great bodies of land in Ul¬ster which had been forfeited by the crown in consequence of the ill-fated rebellion of Tyrone which began in 1594 and collapsed in 1603. Many McCall households appeared among the transplanted Scots. The Scotch of Ireland, or the Scotch-Irish, were indus¬trious and prospered in their new home. The British Parliament, seeing this unexpect¬ed success commenced to burden them with high taxes and to persecute them for their religion. In a century of abuse their patience was exhausted, and they yearned to es¬cape the oppressive burden.

Family after family the Scotch-Irish began to sail for the American colonies. Scarcely a ship sailed for America from about 1730 that did not carry emigrants from the nine counties of Ulster. Members of the McCall family sailed with other persecuted cove¬nanters to New Jersey where a Scotch colony had been obtained from the Duke of York. On landing in America they found that their assigned land was claimed by the Dutch and the colony was broken up. Legendarily three McCall brothers were among the emigrants. Legendarily one brother, James McCall elected to go to Massachusetts; one chose Penn¬sylvania and one removed to Virginia.

During the next 50 years, thousands of the Scotch-Irish landed at Philadelphia and then spread southward into Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, according to "History of the Scotch-Irish in America" by A. J. McKelway. He wrote:

"From 1739 to 1746 many members of the McCall family moved from Pennsylvania to New River settlement, Virginia. The idea of offering the dissenters from the Church of England inducements to settle the lands west of the Allegheny Moun¬tains had often been suggested to prominent men in the Colony of Virginia, but no move in that direction had been taken until about the time of the first set¬tlement of the lower valley, at and after which time the governor and council of Virginia permitted the erection of dissenting churches in the valley and en¬couraged the emigration of settlers wherever possible. The result of this ac¬tion was a flood of settlers from Ireland and Scotland who came by way of Penn¬sylvania, mostly Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in belief. They passed into and settled the Valley, and in a few years the Valley from Harpers Ferry to New River was populated with a progressive and liberty-loving people. Numerous tracts of New River were occupied. Lands held by many of these settlers were known as 'cornrights,' that is under the law each settler acquired title to a hundred acres for every acre planted by him in corn."

About 1746 Francis McCall, William McCall, James McCall and Thomas McCall, all re¬lated, were heads of households in the New River settlement, now Botetourt County in southwestern Virginia. In 1749 the Indians, supported and compensated by the French army, made their first attack on the New River settlers. Virginia reacted by sending Lt. Col. George Washington and his militiamen supported by the South Carolina militia to counterattack. Constantly hounded by the guerilla tactics of the Indians and beset by the superior French regulars the militia had to entrench in hastily con¬structed Ft. Necessity on the Allegheny River, near the present site of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Besieged and cut off from the arrival of any sup¬port from the seaboard colonies Wash¬ington was forced to surrender his fort and his militiamen in 1754.

The colonists appealed for help from England and prepared for the long struggle with the French and Indians which would continue until their victory nine years later. King George II responded by sending 800 British regulars under Gen. Edward Braddock to face the French regulars and Indians who were consolidating the gains all along the Virginia-Pennsylvania frontier controlled by a strong garrison at Ft. Duquesne.

On July 8, 1755 a large party of Shawnee braves fell upon the colonists remaining in the New River area and slaughtered them. The torch, the rifle and the tomahawk wiped the colony out of existence with only a few members escaping, according to "South-West Virginia" by Lewis Preston Summers. On the following day the French and Indians am¬bushed Braddock and scattered his army, along with 600 Virginians under Lt. Col. George Washington, that had been sent to clear the enemy from the confluence of the Ohio, Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers.

The McCalls and many of the Scotch-Irish fled southward into Mecklenburg [then Anson] County, North Carolina on the South Carolina border. There they resettled on Rocky River, Sugar Creek, in the Wachaw and on the Broad River in South Carolina. The only road in the area was an Indian trail through Mecklenburg from the Yadkin River to the Catawba Indian nation. The county had been named in honor of Princess Charlotte who had come about this time from Old Mecklenburg in Germany to England to be queen by marriage to George III.

Prime Minister William Pitt convinced Parliament of the importance winning the war in America, and they gave him a blank check to raise and equip new regiments to rush to the aid of the colonies. These regiments were raised primarily among the Highland Scots. The reorganized troops under Generals Henry Bouquet and Forbes were successful in 1758, and the tide of the war began to turn in the favor of the British.

Francis McCall, James McCall and Thomas McCall in 1758 served in the North Carolina militia, perhaps participating in the battle for Ft. Duquesne. Ironically the same men, less than 20 years later, would fight against their former comrades in the Revo¬lutionary War. King George III appeared to fade from a benefactor into an oppressor.

Francis McCall and James McCall, two of the New River settlers, also served as Revolu¬tionary soldiers from Mecklenburg County. After the Revolutionary War ended the younger McCalls extended the family across South Carolina and into Georgia. A genera¬tion later the McCall men spread into Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi, frequently marrying Indian women from among the five civilized tribes.

-------------------- Francis McCall was born in Ireland of Scotch parentage about 1710; came to America in 1730, and settled in Cumberland Valley, near Shippensburg, Pennsylvania.

In 1746 he removed with his family to the New River settlement in southwest Virginia in order to obtain more and better lands for his growing family. But in the Indian raids forced him to leave this settlement and he moved with his family to North Carolina and settled in Anson county (now the Salisbury District, Mecklenburg County). He obtained a royal Grant of land on Twelve Mile creek, Anson County, in 1762.

His name appears in the 1790 census of Mecklenburg County. He made his will November 25, 1793 and it was probated April, 1794 (will is in Book B, page 74. Mecklenburg County, North Carolina).

The McCall family has played an important part in Georgia since 1784, materially, politically and religiously. It is of Scotch ancestry; members of this family had to flee from Scotland to Ireland on account of religious persecution, and after remaining many years in Ireland, they emigrated to America. About 1730 many members of this McCall family came to America and settled in Pennylvania. They were scotch-Irish Presbyterians, and many settled in the Cumberland valley, near where the town of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania now is; about two and a half miles from this place was the Middle Springs Presbyterian Church where the McCall family worshipped.

http://www.redbirdacres.net/mccall.html -------------------- The McCalls were Scots who migrated to Ireland where they settled for two generations.

He arrived in Pennsylvania in 1730 and settled in Cumberland Valley near Shippensburg. He was a member of Middle Spring Presbyterian Church located at Big Spring, Pennsylvania, about two miles northwest of Shippensburg. In 1746 he removed to the New River settlement in western Virginia.

Francis McCall was listed as head of household in the New River Settlement (now Botetouret Co.) in southwestern Virginia. In 1749 the Indians, supported and compensated by the French Army, made their first attach on the New River settlers. Virginia sent Lt. Col. George Washington and his militiamen, who were supported by the South Carolina militia, to counterattack. Washington and his militiamen, faired poorly against the French and Indians and they retreated to the Great Meadows and hastily fortified limited improvements there. Washington named it Fort Necessity and it is located on present day Route 40, just east of the Summit Inn and just west of Farmington, Fayette Co, PA. The fort was built in the middle of a meadow near two densely wooded hills. On 3 July 1754 the French and Indians attacked the fort. The battle ended in Washington's first defeat when he surrendered to the French. Fort Necessity National Battlefield, with a recreation of the original fort, commemorates that early battle and preserves the site.

Francis McCall received a land grant in Craven County, SC in 1758, according to Ettie Augusta Tidwell McCall. He was the recipient of a land grant of 150 acres in SC "between the main branch of Duncans Creek and Bush River from King George II January 22, 1759, according to "Secretary of State Grant Book," Volume 9, page 33.

He received a royal grant of land on Twelve Mile Creek in Anson County in 1762 and made his home there, according to Mecklenburg County Deed Book 13, page 343. Francis McCall was a member of the NC militia from 1764 to 1766. He was appointed constable in his district in 1777 and served in the militia at that time. In 1781 and in 1787 his home was used as a polling place for inhabiÙwtants in the southeast portion of Mecklenburg County, according to "State Records of North Carolina." He was enumerÙwated in the 1790 census of the county. He wrote his will November 25, 1793, and it was recorded in Mecklenburg County Will Book B, page 74. He named his daughter Jean McCall Porter as executrix, and she probated the will which is on file with NC Historical Commission, Raleigh, in April 1794.

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Francis "John" McCall Sr's Timeline

1710
November 11, 1710
Ulster, Antrim, Ireland
1730
1730
Age 19
Pennsylvania
1731
1731
Age 20
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1732
1732
Age 21
Middle Spring, Lancaster (now Cumberland) Co, PA
1735
1735
Age 24
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1737
1737
Age 26
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1739
1739
Age 28
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1739
Age 28
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1741
1741
Age 30
Middle Springs, Cumberland, Pennsylvania
1745
1745
Age 34
Middle Springs, Cumberland Co., NC