Frederick Fayette Dent (1786 - 1873)

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Birthplace: Cumberland, Allegany, Maryland, United States
Death: Died in White House, Washington DC, United States
Occupation: Slaveowner, planter and merchant.
Managed by: Carlos Federico (Cantarito) Bunge Molina y Vedia
Last Updated:

About Frederick Fayette Dent

Father-in-law of President Ulysses S. Grant

http://famousamericans.net/frederickfdent/

DENT, Frederick F., lawyer, born in Cumberland, Maryland, in 1786; died in Washington, D. C., 15 December 1873. He was trained in commercial pursuits, and became a merchant in Pittsburgh and subsequently in St. Louis, accumulated wealth, "rod had a wide reputation for hospitality. He was the father of Mrs. U. S. Grant. In politics Mr. Dent was a rigid and aggressive democrat, his views coinciding with the Benton Jackson School, and he held these opinions tenaciously to the last of his life. John W. Forney, in his "Anecdotes of Public Men," refers to him as a very interesting old gentleman, kind, humorous, and genteel, indicating an independent spirit in his views, and exhibiting a wonderfully retentive memory for bygone days." Mr. Dent was a member of his son-in-law's household after General Grant became commander of the National armies, and his farm, "White Haven," near St. Louis, became the General's property.

His son, Frederick Tracy Dent, soldier, born in White Haven, St. Louis County, Missouri, 17 December 1820. He was graduated at the U. S. military academy in 1843, made brevet 2d lieutenant, and served on frontier duty and in garrison prior to the Mexican war, which he entered in 1847. He was engaged in the siege of Vera Cruz, the capture of San Antonio, and the battles of Churubuseo, where he was severely wounded, and Molino del Rey, receiving for gallant and meritorious conduct the brevets of 1st lieutenant and captain. He served thereafter on the Pacific railroad survey, on frontier duty in Idaho, in removing the Seminole Indians, and at various points in Texas, Virginia, and Washington territory, until he joined the Yakima expedition in 1856. He participated in the Spokane expedition in Washington territory, being engaged in the combat of "Four Lakes" in 1858, in that of Spokane Plain in the same year, and in the skirmish on that river. After frontier duty at Fort Walla Walla he became g member of the Snake River, Oregon, expedition, to rescue the survivors of the massacre of Sahnon Fall (1860), at which time, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of major, and was in command of a regiment in the Army of the Potomac in 1863, in New York City called to suppress anticipated riots, from September 1863, till January 1864, serving as a member of the military commission for the trial of state prisoners from January till March 1864, becoming then a staff officer with Lieutenant General Grant, having the rank of lieutenant colonel. Aide-de-camp during Grant's whole time as lieutenant general, he was present in the battles and military operations of the Richmond campaign, and as military commander of the City of Richmond, and of the garrison of Washington, D. C., in 1865, and on the staff of the general-in-chief at Washington after 1866, as colonel, aide-de-camp, and secretary to President Grant during his first term. For his gallant and meritorious services in the field during the civil war he was brevetted brigadier general U. S. A. and brigadier general of volunteers. He was transferred to the 14th infantry in 1866, was made lieutenant colonel of the 32d infantry in 1867, colonel of the 1st artillery in 1881, and at his own request, after forty years of service, was retired in December 1883.His brother, Louis, lawyer, born in St. Louis in 1822; died in Washington, D. C., 22 March 1874, received a liberal education in his native City, and studied law. About 1850 he went to California, where he engaged in business, afterward holding the office of judge. In 1862 he returned to St. Louis, and from 1863 till 1867 was engaged in cotton planting in Mississippi and Louisiana. He afterward practiced law in Washington. During the reconstruction period he drifted into southern polities, having removed to Mississippi, and in 1869 was nominated for governor of that state by the National union republicans, a new party, organized on the basis of equal rights, general amnesty, and reconciliation; but, contrary to his own expectation and to those of his friends, he did not receive the support of the administration in the canvass. Prior to his nomination, President Grant wrote to him: " I would regret to see you run for an office and be defeated by my act; but, as matters now look, I must throw the weight of my influence in favor of the party opposed to you." Judge Dent replied, defending the claims of his party. Although the democrats made no nomination, but gave their votes to Mr. Dent, he received only half as many as his opponent, Governor Alcorn, the regular republican nominee. After this he settled in Washington. In December 1873, he became a Roman Catholic.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~blberg/p836.htm#i25057

Frederick Fayette Dent1,2

  1. 25057, b. 6 October 1795

Frederick Fayette Dent|b. 6 Oct 1795|p836.htm#i25057|George Dent|b. bt 1755 - 1756\nd. 2 Dec 1813|p808.htm#i24211|Susanna Dawson|b. 1757|p808.htm#i24215|||||||||||||

         Frederick Fayette Dent, son of George Dent and Susanna Dawson, was born on 6 October 1795 in Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland.1,2
    Frederick married Ellen Bray Wrenshall circa 1815.3
    Frederick Fayette was described as a "Gentleman" on the census in 1850 at St. Louis, Missouri.3
    Ellen and Frederick Fayette Dent lived in 1850 at ward 2 in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children John, Louis, Ellen and Emily, their son-in-law President Ulysses Simpson Grant, their married daughter Julia Boggs Grant, their grandchild Frederick Dent Grant.3
    Frederick is a head of household on the 1850 U. S. Census for ward 2, Missouri. He was identified as a 60-year-old man born in Maryland. He owned personal property valued at $15,000.00. Enumerated with him were: his wife, Ellen Bray, his sons John Cromwell and Louis, his married daughter Julia Boggs Grant, his daughters Ellen Wrenshall and Emily Marbury, his grandson Frederick Dent Grant, his son-in-law President Ulysses Simpson Grant.3
    He lived with his son-in-law, President Ulysses Simpson Grant and daughter, Julia, in 1870 at The White House in Washington, District of Columbia.1
    Frederick was enumerated as the father-in-law of President Ulysses Simpson Grant on the 1870 U. S. Census for The White House, District of Columbia. He was listed as an 84-year-old man born in Maryland.1

Children of Frederick Fayette Dent and Ellen Bray Wrenshall

   * John Cromwell Dent b. 18183
   * George Wrenshall Dent b. 30 Jan 18192
   * Louis Dent b. 12 Mar 18233
   * Julia Boggs Dent+ b. 26 Jan 1826, d. 14 Dec 19021
   * Ellen Wrenshall Dent b. 28 Jun 18283
   * Mary Dent b. 18292
   * Frederick Tracy Dent b. 17 Dec 18292
   * Emily Marbury Dent b. 6 Jun 18363
view all 12

Frederick Fayette Dent's Timeline

1786
October 6, 1786
Cumberland, Allegany, Maryland, United States
1815
1815
Age 28
St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, United States
1816
May 22, 1816
Age 29
Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, United States
1819
January 30, 1819
Age 32
White Haven, St Louis, Missouri, United States
1820
December 17, 1820
Age 34
St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, United States
1826
January 26, 1826
Age 39
White Haven plantation near St. Louis, Missouri, United States
1828
June 28, 1828
Age 41
White Haven, St Louis, Missouri, United States
1836
June 6, 1836
Age 49
St. Louis, MO, USA
1870
1870
Age 83
Washington Ward 1, Washington, District of Columbia
1873
December 15, 1873
Age 87
White House, Washington DC, United States