Frederick "Michael" See

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Frederick "Michael" See

Also Known As: "Frederick Sea"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mohawk Valley, Schoharie, NY, USA
Death: Died in Muddy Creek,Greenbrier,West Virginia,USA
Cause of death: killed by Indians
Place of Burial: Greenbrier, West Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of George Ludwig See and Margaret See
Husband of Catherine Vanderpool
Father of Margaret Roach; Lois Van Bibber; Mary Catherine Cornstalk; Michael See; Elizabeth Shoemaker and 2 others

Managed by: Juanita Millhouse
Last Updated:

About Frederick "Michael" See

Frederick " Michael" SEE (ZEH) was born about 1710, Schoharie County, NY and died on Jul 1763, Muddy Creek, Greenbriar County, Virginia, killed by Indians.

  • parents: George (Johann)Ludwig SEE (ZEH) (~1689-1751) & Margaret TSCHUDI (JUDY) (-ca1758)

Married

  1. about 1744 in Virginia or Pennsylvania to Catherine VANDERPOOL died 1806

Children

  1. Michael (1750-1792)
  2. John (1757-1837)
  3. Lois (1747-)
  4. Mary (1761-)
  5. Elizabeth (Twin) (1754-)
  6. Catherine (Twin) (~1754-)
  7. George (1755-)
  8. Margaret (~1745-)

Notes for Frederick "Michael" SEE (ZEH) It is generally thought that Frederick "Michael" married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness’.were among the first settlers of that region.

Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbriar river on what was called Muddy Creek. In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia. In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area. They were wrong.

The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic. The following account of what has become known as “The Muddy Creek Massacre” has been gleaned from various accounts, primarily “A Chronicle of the See family and their Kindred”, written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892-1963).

On Saturday, July 16, 1763, a party of 80 or 90 Shawnees, led by Chief Cornstalk and assisted by the great War Chief Puksinwah, having crossed over the Ohio River, swept up the Kanawha on a murderous rampage. Simultaneously they hit the Frederick See family, and the Felty Yocum family (Felty was a cousin of Frederick Michael See) whose cabin was nearby. According to all accounts, the Indians suddenly appeared at the Frederick See cabin, with all of the appearance of friendship. The Sees welcomed them, and as it was near to mealtime they offered to share their food with the Indians. The Shawnees agreed, no doubt building cooking fires out of doors in order to feed such a large number of people. The meal finished, the Indians lounged around for a bit and rested. Suddenly with a whoop the Indians fell upon their hosts, killing the father (Fredrick Michael) , his son-in-law (Littleberry Roach) and Felty Yocum , scalping them before the eyes of their families. It is not known why Frederick and Catherine’s son George wasn't also killed as he was 22 years old at the time. Perhaps he offered no resistance. Other men and older boys were killed.

The women and children of these and other victims of this massacre were taken prisoners. Leaving the dead where they were slain, the Indians began marching their prisoners back to their camp. On the way to Oldstown, in Ohio, these women and children who were unable to keep up were killed. The first born child of Margaret (See) Roach, a boy, was killed in a most brutal fashion after being snatched from her breast. Accounts related by James Olson, also told by a descendant, was that Frederick See's children held up for two to three days. The smallest, John, was quite weak and Catherine feared for his life. Seeing a warrior riding their horse, Catherine indicated to him that she wanted it. When he refused, she picked up a club and attempted to knock him off the horse. About to kill her, the amused Indians prevented the warrior from doing so, calling her a "fighting squaw." Once they reached the Indian campgrounds in what is now Ross County, Ohio, it is said the Shawnee had a celebration. The women were forced to sing for them, and Catherine was called upon to run the gauntlet. Grabbing a stick she began making whirling moves swinging the stick which pleased all the warriors greatly. Captives now for several months, soon cold weather was upon them. There was not enough room inside for all the prisoners, and was crowded by old Indian squaws they shared a tent with. A child of Catherine's, a son, had to sleep outside with the dogs to keep warm. One day the warriors went off hunting leaving Catherine in charge of all the old Indian squaws sitting around the campfire. One had a fainting spell, falling into the fire. Catherine let her fall, thus making room for her children in the tent, a bravery which helped her family to survive, intact.

Catharine See and her children were taken to Old Town and kept there by the Shawnees until there was a treaty and an exchange of prisoners about a year later. A document written by Colonel Henry Bouquet to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, on November 15, 1764, stated all Indian tribes led by Chief Cornstalk had at last agreed to release the prisoners, not only from the incident at the See home but a number of other similar incidents at other family homes on the South Branch.

Catherine and at least some of her children must have been separated during their captivity, because her youngest child, John, was adopted by an Indian family who had lost their son. The couple repeatedly told John that he would be burned alive if retaken by the whites. John became very fond of his new Indian parents, and the year with the Shawnees apparently did much to erase from his mind the memory of his natural family and his former life. When the time arrived for the Indians to release their prisoners, all of the See family except the twin, nine-year-old Elizabeth, were freed. Cornstalk would not agree to let her go, but kept her for nine more years during which time his young son took her as his squaw and, according to family tradition, she had an Indian child by him. Later she escaped or was ransomed, because she eventually left the Indians, and married a white man named Peter Shoemaker.

After being released from the Indians the party traveled about nine miles before darkness overtook them, and made camp for the night. Young John made his bed between two of his sisters, but he did not sleep. He lay awaken until he was certain everyone else was asleep, then crept out of camp and hurried back to his adopted Indian family. Here he stayed for some time. One version indicates one year, while another says four years. Eventually his uncle, Michael Adam See ( brother of Frederick Michael and husband of Barbara Rebecca Harness). ransomed his nephew John and took him back to Hampshire County, Virginia where the rest of the See family was then living.

NOTE: The return prisoner list included Catherine See and her children Michael, George, John, Mary, Margaret and Lois...along with Margaret, George, Elizabeth and Sally Yocum (Yoakum).

Frederick See's widow is believed to have later remarried a man named John Hardy, a Hardy County pioneer. Last Modified 28 Jan 2005Created 29 Jul 2007 using Reunion for Macintosh Contents · Index · Surnames · Contact · Web Family Card

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Fredrick and his brother Littleberry were Killed on July 15,1763 by Shawnee at muddy creek Green brier Co. Va. now W.Va.

-------------------- Birth 1720 Schoharie, New York, USA

Marriage 1744 Warwick, , New Jersey, USA

Death 1763 Muddy Creek, Greenbrier, West Virginia, USA

Story: A Chronicle Of The See Family And Their Kindred

Posted by burton2401 Report abuse <p>It is generally thought that Frederick Michael married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness'.were among the first settlers of that region.</p><p>Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbriar river on what was called Muddy Creek.<br>In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia. In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area. They were wrong.</p><p>The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic. The following account of what has become known as "The Muddy Creek Massacre" has been gleaned from various accounts, primarily "A Chronicle of the See family and their Kindred", written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892-1963). </p><p>On Saturday, July 16, 1763, a party of 80 or 90 Shawnees, led by Chief Cornstalk and assisted by the great War Chief Puksinwah, having crossed over the Ohio River, swept up the Kanawha on a murderous rampage. Simultaneously they hit the Frederick See family, and the Felty Yocum family (Felty was a cousin of Frederick Michael See) whose cabin was nearby. According to all accounts, the Indians suddenly appeared at the Frederick See cabin, with all of the appearance of friendship. The Sees welcomed them, and as it was near to mealtime they offered to share their food with the Indians. The Shawnees agreed, no doubt building cooking fires out of doors in order to feed such a large number of people. The meal finished, the Indians lounged around for a bit and rested. Suddenly with a whoop the Indians fell upon their hosts, killing the father (Fredrick Michael) , his son-in-law (Littleberry Roach) and Felty Yocum , scalping them before the eyes of their families. It is not known why Frederick and Catherine's son George wasn't also killed as he was 22 years old at the time. Perhaps he offered no resistance. Other men and older boys were killed.</p><p>The women and children of these and other victims of this massacre were taken prisoners. Leaving the dead where they were slain, the Indians began marching their prisoners back to their camp. On the way to Oldstown, in Ohio, these women and children who were unable to keep up were killed. The first born child of Margaret (See) Roach, a boy, was killed in a most brutal fashion after being snatched from her breast. Accounts related by James Olson, also told by a descendant, was that Frederick See's children held up for two to three days. The smallest, John, was quite weak and Catherine feared for his life. Seeing a warrior riding their horse, Catherine indicated to him that she wanted it. When he refused, she picked up a club and attempted to knock him off the horse. About to kill her, the amused Indians prevented the warrior from doing so, calling her a "fighting squaw." Once they reached the Indian campgrounds in what is now Ross County, Ohio, it is said the Shawnee had a celebration. The women were forced to sing for them, and Catherine was called upon to run the gauntlet. Grabbing a stick she began making whirling moves swinging the stick which pleased all the warriors greatly. Captives now for several months, soon cold weather was upon them. There was not enough room inside for all the prisoners, and was crowded by old Indian squaws they shared a tent with. A child of Catherine's, a son, had to sleep outside with the dogs to keep warm. One day the warriors went off hunting leaving Catherine in charge of all the old Indian squaws sitting around the campfire. One had a fainting spell, falling into the fire. Catherine let her fall, thus making room for her children in the tent, a bravery which helped her family to survive, intact.</p><p>Catharine See and her children were taken to Old Town and kept there by the Shawnees until there was a treaty and an exchange of prisoners about a year later. A document written by Colonel Henry Bouquet to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, on November 15, 1764, stated all Indian tribes led by Chief Cornstalk had at last agreed to release the prisoners, not only from the incident at the See home but a number of other similar incidents at other family homes on the South Branch.</p><p>Catherine and at least some of her children must have been separated during their captivity, because her youngest child, John, was adopted by an Indian family who had lost their son. The couple repeatedly told John that he would be burned alive if retaken by the whites. John became very fond of his new Indian parents, and the year with the Shawnees apparently did much to erase from his mind the memory of his natural family and his former life. When the time arrived for the Indians to release their prisoners, all of the See family except the twin, nine-year-old Elizabeth, were freed. Cornstalk would not agree to let her go, but kept her for nine more years during which time his young son took her as his squaw and, according to family tradition, she had an Indian child by him. Later she escaped or was ransomed, because she eventually left the Indians, and married a white man named Peter Shoemaker. </p><p>After being released from the Indians the party traveled about nine miles before darkness overtook them, and made camp for the night. Young John made his bed between two of his sisters, but he did not sleep. He lay awaken until he was certain everyone else was asleep, then crept out of camp and hurried back to his adopted Indian family. Here he stayed for some time. One version indicates one year, while another says four years. Eventually his uncle, Michael Adam See ( brother of Frederick Michael and husband of Barbara Rebecca Harness). ransomed his nephew John and took him back to Hampshire County, Virginia where the rest of the See family was then living.</p><p>NOTE: The return prisoner list included Catherine See and her children Michael, George, John, Mary, Margaret and Lois...along with Margaret, George, Elizabeth and Sally Yocum (Yoakum). </p><p>Frederick See's widow is believed to have later remarried a man named John Hardy, a Hardy County pioneer.</p> Comment

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"The Indians breaking out again in 1763, came up the Kanawha in a large body to the number of sixty, and coming to the house of Frederick See on Muddy creek, were kindly entertained by him and Felty Yolkcom ; not suspecting their hostile design, they were suddenly killed and their families with many others made prison ers" Lewis, Virgil Anson. History of West Virginia. Philadelphia: Hubbard Bros., 1889. Page 537

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For one reason or another, it appears that all the settlers were assembled at Clendenin's on that fateful July 15,1763. Several historians have it that Clendenin had bagged three fat elk and had invited his neighbors in for a feast. Another one states that the neighbors flocked to Clendenin's through curiosity to see the Indians. Strangely enough, the John Ewing story as handed down by Holcomb makes no mention of any feast or of any other prearranged meeting of the neighbors. Yet, the neighbors, were there - all of them - as it has repeatedly been written that Con Yoakum was the only man of the settlement to escape slaughter. He hastened to the Jackson River settlements east of the divide and gave the alarm that frustrated the Indian attack upon the settlement at Carr's Creek. Otherwise, the "cleanup" of the Big Levels was as complete as the one the day before at Muddy Creek. Certain it is that the Big Levels people had not heard of the Muddy Creek disaster. It also seems improbable that the entire neighborhood could have congregated after the Indians arrived, moved by curiosity, for how did they know the Indians were there? There is plenty of room for speculation pro and con, and the student of the event is free to draw his own conclusions.

Let Captain John Stuart speak: "From Muddy Creek the Indians passed over into the Levels where some families were collected at Clendenin's, numbering between fifty and one hundred persons, men, women, and children. There they were entertained as at Muddy Creek, in the most hospitable manner. Clendenin had just arrived from a hunt with three fat elk, and they were plentifully feasted." This massing of neighbors - whatever the reason - made it easy for theShawnees. Instead of breaking up into small parties and visiting each household separately, as at Muddy Creek, they found their quarry rounded up for them. Great luck for the Shawnees!

Hear Captain Stuart again: "In the meantime an old woman with a sore leg was showing her distress to an Indian and inquiring if he could administer to her relief; he said he thought he could, and drawing his tomahawk instantly killed her and all the men almost that were in the house." Withers adds: "This seemed to be a signal of a general massacre, and promptly was it obeyed. Nearly every man of the settlement was killed and the women and children taken captive."

Hear Holcomb: "Her (Ann Clendenin's) story of the surprise was as follows: On the day of the capture, while she was getting dinner, a seemingly friendly Indian entered, and soon after him another, followed at intervals by still others, until the house was filled with nineteen Shawnee warriors. Then Clendenin saw their imminent danger, and determined to make his escape. Watching his chance, he darted through the open door and ran. But he was too late. Almost the same instant two Indians fired, both balls hitting him in the back, and he fell forward on his face dead."

Bear in mind this is the story claimed to have been handed down by John Ewing himself, and it is noticeable that no mention is made of any general slaughter. Nor did John Ewing witness the slaughter. As the story goes, he was out of sight of the house hoeing corn with two negro boys. About noon they heard a rifle shot (probably the two fired simultaneously at Clendenin) in the direction of the house. While surprised, they were not frightened, as they thought Clendenin might be shooting wild turkeys or other game. Hear Holcomb: "However, they determined to go to the house. On arriving at the top of the hill they saw several Indians near the house. Even this did not alarm them, as it was common for friendly Indians to visit the settlements. John and one negro (Tom) proceeded to the house, fearing no danger. On their approach, two of the Indians met them in the most friendly manner, greeting them in broken English with 'how de do?' and offering to shake hands. The boys found themselves in the clutches of a foe. Then they realized the horror of their situation.

"Mrs. Clendenin was bound to a shaving horse in the yard, her little boy and girl clinging to her in terror, while one of the Indians was swinging her helpless infant in the air. When she saw her brother, she exclaimed: 'Oh, John, they have killed Archie. Why have you come, too?' Just at that moment one of the warriors came up with the reeking scalp of her husband and slapped it against the side of the burning dwelling." As stated by Captain Stuart: "Mrs. Clendenin did not fail to abuse the Indians, calling them cowards, etc., although the tomahawk was drawn over her head with threats of instant death, and the scalp of her husband lashed about her jaws."

Without doubt, the "Clendenin Massacre" was a midday affair. The men were killed, the women and children made captives, the homes plundered and burned, and the horses stolen. It was a day of fiendish terror, especially to the survivors. Stuart says: "The prisoners were all taken over to Muddy Creek and a party of Indians detained them there till the return of the others (warriors) from Carr's Creek, when the whole were taken off together."

http://www.wvculture.org/history/cornstalkraid.html

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Frederick "Michael" See's Timeline

1710
1710
Schoharie, NY, USA
1744
1744
Age 34
Warwick,,New Jersey,USA
1745
1745
Age 35
Augusta, Virginia, United States
1747
1747
Age 37
Augusta , Virginia
1748
1748
Age 38
Augusta, Virginia
1750
1750
Age 40
Augusta, Virginia, United States
1754
February 26, 1754
Age 44
Augusta, Virginia
1756
1756
Age 46
Augusta, Virginia
1757
October 10, 1757
Age 47
South Branch,, Hardy, Virginia, United States
1763
July 15, 1763
Age 53
Muddy Creek,Greenbrier,West Virginia,USA