Frederick Chapman Robbins, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1954 (1916 - 2003) MP

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Auburn, AL, USA
Death: Died in Cleveland, OH, USA
Occupation: American pediatrician and virologist. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1954
Managed by: Yigal Burstein / יגאל בורשטיין
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About Frederick Chapman Robbins, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1954

Frederick Chapman Robbins (August 25, 1916 – August 4, 2003) was an American pediatrician and virologist.

He received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1954 along with John Franklin Enders and Thomas Huckle Weller. The award was for his breakthrough work in isolation and growth of the polio virus, paving the way for vaccines developed by Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin, etc. He attended school at the University of Missouri and Harvard University.

In 1952, he was appointed as Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University. Robbins was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1962. From 1966 onwards, Robbins was Dean of the School of Medicine at Case Western. He led the medical school until 1980 when he assumed the Presidency of the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine. Five years later, in 1985, Robbins returned to Case Western Reserve as Dean Emeritus and distinguished University professor Emeritus. He continued to be a fixture at the medical school until his death in 2003. The medical school's "Frederick C. Robbins Society" is named in his honor.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Chapman_Robbins

Frederick Chapman Robbins (August 25, 1916 – August 4, 2003) was an American pediatrician and virologist.

He received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1954 along with John Franklin Enders and Thomas Huckle Weller. The award was for his breakthrough work in isolation and growth of the polio virus, paving the way for vaccines developed by Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin, etc. He attended school at the University of Missouri and Harvard University.

In 1952, he was appointment as Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University. Robbins was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1962. From 1966 onwards, Robbins was Dean of the School of Medicine at Case Western. He led the medical school until 1980 when he assumed the Presidency of the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine. Five years later, in 1985, Robbins returned to Case Western Reserve as Dean Emeritus and distinguished University professor Emeritus. He continued to be a fixture at the medical school until his death in 2003. The medical school's "Frederick C. Robbins Society" is named in his honor.

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Frederick Chapman Robbins was born in Auburn, Alabama, on August 25, 1916. He is the son of William J. Robbins, a plant physiologist, who became Director of the New York Botanical Gardens, and Christine, née Chapman.

He was educated at the University of Missouri, where he took the A.B. degree in 1936 and the B.S. in 1938. In 1940 he graduated from Harvard Medical School and was appointed as resident physician in bacteriology at The Children's Hospital Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He continued his training there until 1942 when he left to serve in the United States Army.

During military service he was assigned to the Fifteenth Medical General Laboratory as Chief of the Virus and Rickettsial Disease Section, and in this capacity served in the United States, North Africa, and Italy. Most of his work during this period consisted of investigations on infectious hepatitis, typhus fever and Q fever, and supervision of a diagnostic virus laboratory. He has also studied the immunology of mumps. In 1945 he received the Bronze Star for Distinguished Service and at the time of discharge from the Army in 1946 held the rank of Major.

Returning to civilian life, Robbins resumed his training at The Children's Hospital Medical Center and completed this in January 1948. From 1948 to 1950 he held a Senior Fellowship in Virus Diseases of the National Research Council and worked with Dr. John F. Enders in the Research Division of Infectious Diseases, The Children's Hospital Medical Center. During this time he was a member of the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School. While he was working with Enders, Robbins chiefly studied the cultivation of poliomyelitis virus in tissue culture and the application of this technique. He also investigated the viruses of mumps, herpes simplex and vaccinia.

While in Boston, he was appointed Associate in Pediatrics on the Faculty of the Harvard Medical School, Associate in the Research Division of Infectious Diseases, and Associate Physician and Associate Director of the Isolation Service at The Children's Hospital Medical Center, and also Research Fellow in Pediatrics at The Boston Lying-in Hospital and Assistant to the Children's Medical Service, Massachusetts General Hospital.1

In May, 1952, he moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where he had been appointed Professor of Pediatrics at Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Director of the Department of Pediatrics and Contagious Diseases, Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, the position which he at present occupies.2

Robbins has served as Chairman of the Committee on Medical Education of Western Reserve University School of Medicine since 1958.

He is an associate member of the Commission on Viral Diseases of the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board, United States Department of Defense, of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the Division of Biologics Standards, Public Health Service, United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare, of the Physician's Council, the Scientific Research Advisory Board of the National Association for Retarded Children; he is also Chairman of District V of the Committee on Medical Education of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and of the Awards Committee of this Academy, and served on the Public Health Council of the Ohio State Department of Health. He is also a consultant to the Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Training Grant Award Committee of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and to the Oregon Primate Research Center.

In 1955, John Carroll University of Cleveland conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Science, and in 1958, the University of Missouri, his alma mater, did the same.

In 1961 he was elected President of the Society for Pediatric Research, and in 1962 a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Robbins married in 1948 Alice Havemeyer Northrop and they have two daughters, Alice Christine and Louise Enders.

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Frederick Chapman Robbins's Timeline

1916
August 25, 1916
Auburn, AL, USA
1948
1948
Age 31
2003
August 4, 2003
Age 86
Cleveland, OH, USA
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