Garrett van Swearingen (1636 - 1698) MP

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Nicknames: "Swieringh", "Sweringen", "Gerrit van Schweringe", "Gerrett van Swearingen", "Gerrit VanSweringen"
Birthplace: Beemsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
Death: Died in St. Mary's City, St. Mary's, Maryland
Occupation: Innkeeper; Counsell and comissary General for the Citty of Amsterdam
Managed by: Ryan Edward Gee
Last Updated:

About Garrett van Swearingen

"The father of the family went by the name of 'Monsieur' Garret VanSweringen. He was the former Sheriff of the Dutch Colony on the Delaware, who had publicly broken his sword against his knees after the capture of his settlement by the English. In St. Mary's City, in 1672, he owned the Town House within the Fort, and when it burned he had means sufficient to rebuild it with brick."

Issue

By 1st wife: Elizabeth, Zacharias, Thomas. (Maria?) His first family is not mentioned in his 1698 will.

By 2nd wife: Joseph, Charles, Eleanor, Theresa, Dorothy, and a daughter who married William Bladen

His will stipulated that he be buried with full Catholic rites. Due to his wealth, family connections, and his position in the community hierarchy, it is assumed he was among those buried under the Jesuit Catholic Church floor in the Great Brick Chapel, Saint Marys City, St. Mary's County, Maryland, USA

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Sources

  1. Family register of Gerret Van Sweringen and descendants 3rd ed. compiled by a member of the family. Published 1906 by [M. Swearingen] in Muncie, Ind . Written in English. Page 4

Links

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family

Taken from Descendants of David Janse Swieringh

Generation No. 2

2. GARRETT2 VAN SWERINGEN (DAVID JANSE1 SWIERINGH) was born February 04, 1635/36 in Beemsterdam or Reenstwerdam, Unitednetherland, Holland, and died February 04, 1697/98 in St.Mary's, Sommerset or St.Mary's County , Maryland. He married (1) BARBARAH DE BARRETTE March 01, 1658/59 in New Castle, New Castle, Deleware, daughter of ISSAC DE BARRETTE. She was born Abt. 1639 in Valenciennes, Low Countries, now France, and died Abt. 1670 in St. Mary's, Sommerset or St. Mary's County, Maryland. He married (2) MARY SMITH October 05, 1676 in St. Mary's, Maryland. She was born 1635 in St. Mary's, Maryland, and died September 05, 1713 in Rose Croft, St. Mary's, St. Mary's, Maryland.

Notes for BARBARAH DE BARRETTE:

Barbara De Barrette was of Norman-French family. She was born in 'Low countries' (now France).

Source: Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2', 1983, Donald B. Reagan, Page 203

    

Children of GARRETT VAN SWERINGEN and BARBARAH DE BARRETTE are:

  • i. THOMAS3 VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1665, St. Mary's, Somerset, Maryland, or Dutch Colony of New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. March 19, 1709/10, Somerset County or" Prince George's" County, Maryland.
  • ii. ZACHARIS VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1663, New Amstel, New Castle, Deleware; d. Abt. January 27, 1711/12, St. Mary's Parish, Prince George's, Maryland.
  • iii. ELIZABETH VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1661 - 1669, New Amstel, New Castle, Deleware; d. Bet. 1720 - 1736, St. Mary's City, St. Mary, Maryland.
  • iv. MARY (MARIA) VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1667; d. 1734, St. Mary's, Maryland

Children of GARRETT VAN SWERINGEN and MARY SMITH are:

  • v.. SARAH3 VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Abt. 1690, St. Mary's, Maryland; d. Bef. 1718.
  • vi. GARRETT VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1694, ST. Mary's, Maryland; d. 1752.
  • vii. ELEANOR VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1681 - 1683, St. Mary's, Maryland; d. 1721, Calvert County, Maryland.
  • viii. DOROTHY VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1685, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. 1728, Annapolis, Mayland; m. BARNABY LEE.
  • ix. ANNE VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1679 - 1680, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. 1727.
  • x. JOSEPH VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1677 - 1678, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. March 08, 1720/21, St. Mary's, Maryland; m. MARY NEALE EGERTON OR ADDERTON, 1718; b. Abt. 1677.
  • xi. CHARLES VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1679 - 1680, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Bet. 1698 - 1712.
  • xii. THERESA VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1681 - 1683, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. 1727; m. JOHN PARKE.

origins

From PJD blog: Garrett Van Swearingen

"Garrett was born to David Janse Swieringh and Hester Jacobs in Beemsterdam, Holland on February 4, 1636. (A few sources say "Reemstwerdam," but this is almost certainly a typo copied from one fastidious chronicle writer by another. Beemster is a section of Noord Holland County. "Beemsterdam" or "Beemsterwaal" refers to the section of Beemster closer to the inland sea, next to the dike. It is possible that "Reemstwerdam" is a reference to "Amsterdam" a short distance to the south, but I find no geographical precedent for the "ee" instead of "a" between the "r" and the "m" of "Ramsterdam.")"

"At least one of his parents -- we can't tell which -- had him baptized Roman Catholic, and he remained Catholic to the end of his days. His Catholic faith, which he tended to "wear on his sleeve," makes his biography all the more notable, in several ways. We will see that, despite his Catholicism, he was at all points implicitly trusted by the Dutch West India Company. Despite his Catholicism, he will win a fierce political battle over the fate of a murderous debt collector visiting a colony for which Van Swearingen was sheriff and a judge. Despite his Catholicism, Van Swearingen will literally get away with murder, himself. Finally, despite his Catholicism, the English, in an attack upon Swearingen's little American colony, let him live, and probably because of his Catholicism Lord Baltimore gave Van Swearingen a wonderful tract of land in Maryland."

From http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~swearingen/

Re: "Garrett Van Swearingen, son of Dutch noble* family ... * I know of no proof of a noble birth.  I think it more likely he was appointed supercargo to get him out of Holland and to the New World where he might make a name for himself ...

There has been discussion that his origins may have originally been Bavarian.

Biographical summary

From Planning Grant: Permanent Interpretive Exhibit at the Van Sweringen Site, St. Mary’s City, Maryland

Garrett Van Sweringen was an unusually long-lived, energetic, and multi-talented entrepreneur and civic leader. 

Van Sweringen arrived in the American colony of New Amstel (now New Castle, Delaware) from Amsterdam, Holland, in 1656 at the age of twenty.   There he became the first storekeeper, the sheriff, and eventually a councilor of the Dutch colony until an armed English force laid claim to New Amstel in 1664 in the name of the Duke of York, later King James II of England.   As a result of plundering and confiscations, Van Sweringen lost most of his property.  He and his French-born wife Barbara and two young children Zacharias and Elizabeth, together with his brother-in-law, migrated to Maryland in 1666.   A year later they purchased 50 acres within the St. Mary’s City town lands on St. Inigoes Creek.    Although a native of the Netherlands, Van Sweringen rose quickly to prominence and was chosen by Lord Baltimore in 1668 to sit on the City’s first board of aldermen.   He and his family were naturalized as Maryland citizens by act of the General Assembly in 1669.  

During the first years of his residence in St. Mary’s City, Van Sweringen sublet Smith’s Ordinary, a common tavern and lodging house situated near the provincial state house.   In the 1670s Van Sweringen was active both as a merchant and as an innkeeper.  After the death of his first wife, he married a free English woman named Mary Smith and produced additional children whose descendants now number in the tens of thousands.  The Van Sweringen surname is spread today throughout the continental United States and is actively researched by several national geneaological societies.   By 1677, after his remarriage, Garrett Van Sweringen was considering ways to increase his profits and wealth.   He made plans to open a genteel, graciously furnished lodging for gentry who came to the capital when the court and the General Assembly were in session.    He leased the old ordinary building to a tenant and also began setting up an enterprise for brewing beer by placing an enormous order for European provisions including hops, malt and barley.  At this point, disaster struck.   His tenant (to whom he had advanced large sums of money) died suddenly.  His existing inn, Smith’s Ordinary, then burned to the ground in 1678 with all its furnishings.  The merchant through whom he had placed his order for brewing and baking supplies sold those provisions elsewhere, apparently doubting that Van Sweringen still had the ability to pay for them.   Unlike many in the early Chesapeake who suffered failure, Van Sweringen was able to remain and to start over.   He leased a nearby building called the Council Chamber, previously an unheated structure that had been used to store the paper records of the Assembly.  He improved and expanded it into an elegant private lodging house that became heavily patronized by prominent and wealthy members of the Upper House of the Assembly. To it, he added a fashionable coffee house in the structure he formerly used to bake bread and brew beer for sale to coastal shippers. 

During the years when he operated the inn and dining room that was favored by Maryland’s wealthier politicians, Van Sweringen deepened his political influence.  He became Sheriff of St. Mary’s County in the late 1680s and prospered even as the Glorious Revolution deposed Catholic King James II.   However, events in England and Maryland put a damper on his career.  The Council Chamber inn and coffee house lost much of its business after 1695, when Maryland was forced to become a royal colony and the capital moved from St. Mary’s City to Annapolis under the direction of royal Governor Sir Francis Nicholson.   Van Sweringen himself died in 1698 at the then-remarkable age of 62.   His probate inventory survives, and it provides considerable detail on the household’s structures, wealth, and furnishings.  

Notes

Garrett Vann Swearingen, son of Dutch noble family was appointed to the post of 'super cargo' for the ship "Prince Maurice" which was ready to sail for America from Textel, Holand on 25, December, 1656. The ship 'Prince Maurice' was stranded near the coast of Long Island on 8, March, 1657. Shortly after the incident, Garrett Van Swearingen had to charter the ship 'Beaver' at New Amsterdam (now New York) for the voyage to Fort Casimir and surrounding area. On April 25, 1657, Garrett Van Swearingen and the Dutch colonists took Fort Casimir and surrounding area from the Swedes. As one of the founders, Fort Casimir was renamed New Amstel (now New Castle, Deleware).

Garrett Van Swearingen wrote the following letter:

'New Amstel, December 8, 1659

'Noble, Worshipful, Wise, Righ, Prudent Sir:-

'With due respect and reverence, have I hereby taken the liberty to greet you, though bound in duty of gratitude, to devote to you all the days of my life,...I cannot neglect, hereby to communicate my promotion. About a year and a half, after my departure from Patria (my native country), with your Honor's faborable recommendation, I have been appointed Sherriff here subject to the appobation of the Honorables the Principals. Previously, I have taken care of the store as a clerk; and after J. Rynevelt's death, as comissary, from which I have not requested to be discharged, as I have , though unworthy, been recently made Second Councilor, with Sir Alexander Hinojossa, First Counccilor , and Captain of the military here, who intends to go over in the spring, to represent this miserable place.

'If things become worse, I, individually, am ruined, for I have received here some goods from my brothers, all of which I have laid out in a house, horses and mules, which cost me full, four to six thousand guilders, Holland currency.

'Besides that, I am also married,..

"Herewith I commend your Honor to the mercy and protection of the Most High God, and Remain.

'Your obedient, humble servant,

'G. Van Swearingen'

On 20 August, 1660 Garrett Van Swearingen and his family were granted permision to visit Holland.

On 27 August, 1661 the City of AMsterdam in Holland was determined to continue the colony at New Amstel in America. Garrett Van Swearingen was again appointed as the councilor.

Also in a letter to Peter Stuyvestant, Director-General of the New Netherlands from Willaim Beekman, Garrett Van Swearingen was called 'The Honorable President, Van Swearingen.'

In 1664 , Colonel Nicols of England, sent by his majesty, Charles II, and his deputy Sir Robert Carr were to take over the Dutch colony at New Amstel. Garrett Van Swearingen made an deposition in 1684 regarding the conquest of the Dutch possessions at New Amstel by English...

'In the year 1664, arrived Col. Nicholas, sent out by his majesty, King Charles II, whereupon the Fort and country were brought under submission by Sir Robert Carr, and deputied with two ships, for that intent. Sir Robert Carr did often protest to me, that he did not come as an enemy, but as a friend, demanding only in friendship, what was the King's own, in that country. There was taken from the City and the inhabitants thereabout, to the value, so near as I can now remember, of four thousand pound sterling, likewise arms, powder, and shot in great quantity. Four and twenty guns were, the greatest part, transported to New York.

'The Dutch soldiers were taken prisoner, and given to the merchantmen that were there, in recompense of their services: and into Virginia, they were transported to be sold, as were credibly reported by Sir Robert Carr's officers, and other persons there living in town.

"All sorts of tools for handicraftsman, and all plough gear, and other things

to cultivate the ground, which were in great quantity: besides the estate of Governor Debouissa and myself, except some household stuff and a negro I got away: and some other movables, Sir Robert Carr did permit me to sell.

'Colonel Nicholas, understanding what Sir Robert Carr had got at Deleware, took all again from the said Sir Robert Carr, when the said Colonel came there again in person, a I was informed, when I was upon my way to Maryland.'

Swearingen family tradition says that when the Dutch colony at New Amstel surrendered to the English crown, Garrett Van publicly broke his sword across his knees, and throwing it to the left and right, renounced his allegiance.

Shortly after the English's takeover of the Dutch colony at New Amstel, Garrett Van Swearingen and his family migrated to St. Mary's City, St. Mary's County, the province of Maryland.

On 13 April, 1669 a bill was passed by the General Assembly of the province of Maryland for the 'Free Denization and Naturalization of Garrettt Van Swearingen and others,' upon the followingpetition. The petteion was transcribed as follows.

'To the Right, Honorable, the Lord Propietory of the Province of Maryland and Avalon. Lord Baron of Baltimore.

'The petition of Garrett Van Swearingen, Elizabetht De Barette, wife of the said Garrett, Elizabeth and Zacharias Van Swearingen, children of the said Garrett and Barbara... all residents and inhabitanst of this Province, humbly soweth into your Lordship:

'The petition of Garrettt Van Swearingen, was born in Reenstwerdam, Holland, under the dominion of the States of the United Provinces: Barbara De Barette, his wife, in Valenciennes, in the Low countries, belonging to the King of Spain: Elizabeth Van Swearingen and Zacharias Van Swearingen their children in New Amstel, on Deleware Bay, then under the government of the said States General:...and your petitioners being now removed into this province---being invited to come and dwell in this Province upon confidence of your Lordship's Declaration of July 2, 1649, whereby you did empower your Governor to grant lands to any persons of French, Dutch, Spanish, Swedish, or other foreeign descent, in as ample manner, and upon the same term, as to any persons of British or Irish descent.

'And during their abode in this Province your Petitioners have been faithful and obedient to your Lordship's Law: yet for that your Petetioners are not of British or Irish descent they cannot take benefits of the laws and customs of this Province, as the good people of British and Irish descent.

'May it please your Lordship, out of your abundant goodness and care, that your Petitioners shall henceforth be adjudged, as natural born people of this Province of Maryland, or as if they were of British or Irish descent as foresaid, and that they shall be enabled to prosecute and defend all manner af actions and other demands, as liberally and frankly as if they have been naturally born within this Province of Maryland or were British or Irish descent, any Laws or customs of this Province to the contrary notwithstanding.

'And your Petitoners shall as in duty bound pray &c.'

-During the period of 1680 and 1692, the Upper House of the General Assembly of the Province of Maryland held their meeting at Garret Van Swearingen's house in St. Mary's City, St. Mary's County, Maryland.

-On May 12, 1684, Garret Van Swearingen 'Of the City Of St.mary's , Gentleman aged eight and forty years, or thereabouts,'made the deposition regarding the settlement of Deleware Bay and River by the Dutch and Swedes people.

-On may4, 1686, Garrett Van Swearingen was made Sherriff of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Again on May 12, 1687, he was made sherriff for said county for another year.

-In1688 Garret Van Swearingen was appointed as Alderman for the city of St. Mary's, St.Mary's County, Maryland.

-Garret Van Swearingen left a will which was written on October 25, 1698 and probated on February 4, 1698. He mentioned:

1.)'To two sons, viz-Joseph and Charles, equally and heirs, dwelling house; also the Council Room and Coffee House and lands thereunto belonging: 2)'In evnt of death of both sons aforesaid without issue, said estate to pass to daughters (unnamed) by present wife' 3.)Wife (unnamed) to have estate during widowhood, and she is not to be disturbed by children (unnamed) or sons-in-law (unnamed)' 4.)'To daughters aforesaid personalty; son Joseph appointeed guardian of said daughters (unnamed)' 5.)'To priest of Roman Catholic Church, personalty'

Source:'Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2',1983, Donald B. Regan, p.203-206

--------------------

-Garret Van Swearingen left a will which was written on October 25, 1698 and probated on February 4, 1698. He mentioned:

1.)'To two sons, viz-Joseph and Charles, equally and heirs, dwelling house; also the Council Room and Coffee House and lands thereunto belonging: 2)'In evnt of death of both sons aforesaid without issue, said estate to pass to daughters (unnamed) by present wife' 3.)Wife (unnamed) to have estate during widowhood, and she is not to be disturbed by children (unnamed) or sons-in-law (unnamed)' 4.)'To daughters aforesaid personalty; son Joseph appointeed guardian of said daughters (unnamed)' 5.)'To priest of Roman Catholic Church, personalty'

Source:'Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2',1983, Donald B. Regan, p.203-206

Notes for BARBARAH DE BARRETTE:

Barbara De Barrette was of Norman-French family. She was born in 'Low countries' (now France).

Source: Smoky Mountain Clans, Volume 2', 1983, Donald B. Reagan, Page 203

    

Children of GARRETT VAN SWERINGEN and BARBARAH DE BARRETTE are:

3. i. THOMAS3 VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1665, St. Mary's, Somerset, Maryland, or Dutch Colony of New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. March 19, 1709/10, Somerset County or" Prince George's" County, Maryland.

4. ii. ZACHARIS VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1663, New Amstel, New Castle, Deleware; d. Abt. January 27, 1711/12, St. Mary's Parish, Prince George's, Maryland.

5. iii. ELIZABETH VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1661 - 1669, New Amstel, New Castle, Deleware; d. Bet. 1720 - 1736, St. Mary's City, St. Mary, Maryland.

 	iv. 	  	MARY (MARIA) VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1667; d. 1734, St. Mary's, Maryland.
    

Children of GARRETT VAN SWERINGEN and MARY SMITH are:

 	v. 	  	SARAH3 VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Abt. 1690, St. Mary's, Maryland; d. Bef. 1718.
 	vi. 	  	GARRETT VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1694, ST. Mary's, Maryland; d. 1752.

6. vii. ELEANOR VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1681 - 1683, St. Mary's, Maryland; d. 1721, Calvert County, Maryland.

 	viii. 	  	DOROTHY VAN SWEARINGEN, b. 1685, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. 1728, Annapolis, Mayland; m. BARNABY LEE.

7. ix. ANNE VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1679 - 1680, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. 1727.

 	x. 	  	JOSEPH VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1677 - 1678, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. March 08, 1720/21, St. Mary's, Maryland; m. MARY NEALE EGERTON OR ADDERTON, 1718; b. Abt. 1677.
 	xi. 	  	CHARLES VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1679 - 1680, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Bet. 1698 - 1712.
 	xii. 	  	THERESA VAN SWEARINGEN, b. Bet. 1681 - 1683, St. Mary's, Maryland or New Amstel, Deleware; d. Abt. 1727; m. JOHN PARKE.

See:

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=spreng&id=I01459

-------------------- GERRET VANSWERINGEN was born in 1636, in Reensterdwan (or Beemsterdam), Holland. When he was about twenty years old, the Dutch West India Company "sold out its interest to the city of Amsterdam" (Side-Lights on Maryland History, Hester Dorsey Richardson) and the Dutch government appointed Gerret "supercargo" on the "Prince Maurice" which was to go to New Amstel, DE (first called Fort Casimir, now New Castle) in support of the Dutch colonists there. The ship sailed on 25 December 1656 but was severely damaged by storms near the end of the journey. The 180 passengers went ashore at Long Island on 8 March 1657. The ship called "Beaver" was sent from New York and on 25 April 1657 the passengers "tooke possession of the Fort now called Newcastle and the soldiers of the West India Company quitted the same." (Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1684-89)

Gerret married at New Amstel ca 1659, Barbarah de Barrette. This surname appears in some of the colonial papers as de Barrelle. Barbarah was born in Vallenciennes, France (naturalization petition) and was probably sister or daughter of Isaac de Barrette of Haarlem, Holland, who came to America about 1656/57. In the naturalization petition of 1669, Gerret paid court costs for himself, his family, and Isaac de Barrette. Barbarah may also have had a brother, Peter, who was referred to by Gerret in a Talbot Co Deed Book (15 Sep 1668) as "my trusty and well beloved friend and Brother Petter Debarale to be my True and Lawfull Atturney".

Shortly after their marriage in 1659, Gerret and Barbarah returned to Holland where Gerret served as one of the "Counsell and Comissary Generall for the Citty of Amsterdam," his purpose being "to remonstrate the condition of the said Colony and to encourage the Citty of Amsterdam to goe on with their designe..." (Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1684-89)

Until this time the Dutch and Swedish had been regarded as itinerant traders. The Dutch West India Company employing them claimed to have been granted a portion of the Delaware Bay territory by the government of Holland. In the meantime, the English Marylanders began to build and settle in the Bay area and border conflict ensued. The Dutch and Swedish traders wanted to leave, rather than endanger the colonists at New Amstel. But they were ordered by officials of the City of Amsterdam to remain and resist the English, removing them by force if necessary. They stayed only a short time longer, leaving New Amstel and the colonists there to the British. Gerret remained in Amsterdam for a year to try to persuade the Dutch government not to give up entirely on the Delaware colony, but he returned to New Amstel in 1661. He sailed on 24 November 1661 on the ship "the Purmerland Church". The passenger list, signed by G.V. Sweringen, lists a party of four - "Sr Gerrit van Schweringe", with his "wife, man-servant and maid" and 42 other passengers.

After returning to New Amstel, Gerret was a merchant, served as clerk, and later served as sheriff. In October 1664, the citizens were finally forced to submit to the English. Gerret was allowed to continue in office, but about two years later he and his family relocated to a 200 acre plantation in Talbot County, MD, which he had purchased from Michael Powellson Vanderfort. He sold this property on 13 February 1667 to Robert Macklin and from him acquired 100 acres "lying on the East side of wickliffes creeke in St Georges river" in St Mary's Co (Proceedings of the Provincial Court of Maryland 1666-1670). It's interesting to note that the recording of this transaction was requested by "John Vanswearing". A relationship to Gerret has not been established, though he may have been a brother. A letter written by Gerret on 8 Dec 1659 from "New Netherland" stated, "I have received some goods here from my brother". Gerret also bought a 50 acre tract at St Mary's, referred to as "Van Sweringen's Point", surveyed on 18 August of that year (Land Surveys Recorded in Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls for the Various Counties).

Gerret's loyalties had been with the Dutch during the struggle with the English for possession of the Delaware colony. However, after defeat of the Dutch, it was ruled that land could be owned only by British subjects and it became necessary for Gerret to break his allegiance with Holland. On 8 May 1669, Gerret became a naturalized subject of the King of England, along with his wife Barbarah, his children Elizabeth and Zacharias, and Isaac DeBarrette. Apparently, the "a" was inserted in the last name at this time to conform to the English style. In 1670, Barbarah de Barrette died at St Mary's and six years later Gerret married Mary Smith, then about sixteen years old. On 5 Oct 1676, Gerret filed a sizeable ante nuptial settlement on Mary Smith, spinster, of St Mary's Co, which she would receive after his death. The settlement was for "the Sume of Sixty Thousand pounds of Tobacco in Cash" and "such Chaines Braceletts Jewells and Apparells which the said Mary shall fortune to have at the Day of the Death of the said Gerret" (Proceedings of the Provincial Court of Maryland, 1670/1-1675, E. Merritt, Vol 65, p36-37). On 4 Jan 1687, "Mrs Van sweringen" was left "personalty" in the will of Robert Lee of St Mary's Co. On 20 Oct 1703, Mary Van Sweringen was testator to the will of Thomas Grunwyn of St Mary's Co.

When the Vansweringens came to St Mary's City, they probably sublet Smiths Ordinary. Gerret established an inn there in December 1672 when he purchased the lease to the ordinary. He continued there as innkeeper until about 1676 or 1677, at which time Gerret leased the inn out and tried to set up a brewing house. Before the brewery was completed, the inn burned and he was forced to give up the endeavor. Perhaps this was when he built the small dwelling on the Aldermanbury St lot which he had acquired about 1672. In the meantime, the second government meeting house called the State House or Council Chambers building, had been vacated, having been replaced in 1676 by the brick building. Gerret established another inn here, providing elegant lodging and entertainment to visiting government officials until his death. In addition to being an innkeeper, he served in St Mary's as one of the first six aldermen (appointed in 1668) and as sheriff from 1686 to 1688. He apparently supplemented his income by hiring out a servant named Robert Harper, who was practiced in "physick". This is evidenced by court documents describing two cases in which Gerret was forced to sue for payment of medical treatments administered by Harper (Proceedings of the Provincial Court of Maryland 1670/1-1675, edited by Elizabeth Merritt, Vol 65).

In 1684, Gerret compiled an account of his knowledge of the Dutch and English border struggles in the colonies and presented the report on 12 May 1684 to the Council of Maryland.

Gerret Vansweringen died at St Mary's in 1698 and he was buried with Catholic rites in accordance with his will. Mary Smith died in 1713 (Wills follow).

"St Maries Citty", one of the first permanent English settlements in North America and the first capital of the Maryland Colony from 1634 until 1695, has been designated a National Historic Landmark and archaeological studies of the area continue. As part of the 1934 St Mary's City Tricentennial, the brick State House was reconstructed. Among other sites which are being studied are the remains of the wooden Catholic chapel, the brick chapel ca 1660 (near which three lead coffins of the colonial period were recently discovered), and the site of Gerret Vansweringen's "dwelling house".

Garrett Van Swearingen, son of Dutch noble family was appointed to the post of 'super cargo' for the ship 'Prince Maurice' which was ready to sail for America from Texel, Holand on 25 December 1656. The ship 'Prince Maurice' was stranded near the coast of Long Island on 8 March 1657. Shortly after the incident, Garrett Van Swearingen had to charter the ship 'Beaver' at New Amsterdam (now New York) for the voyage to Fort Casimir and surrounding area. On 25 April 1657, Garrett Van Swearingen and the Dutch colonists took Fort Casimir and surrounding area from the Swedes. As one of the founders, Fort Casimir was renamed as New Amstel (now New Castle, Delaware).

Garrett Van Swearingen wrote the following letter:

'New Amstel, December 8, 1659

'NOBLE, WORSHIPFUL, WISE, RIGH, PRUDENT SIR: --

'With due respect and reverence, have I hereby taken the liberty to greet you, though bound in duty of gratitude, to devote to you all the days of my life. ...I cannot neglect, hereby to communicate my promotion. About a year and a half, after my departure from Patria (my native country), with your Honor's faborable recommendation, I have been appointed Sheriff here subject to the approbation of the Honorables the Principals. Previously, I have taken care of the store as clerk; and after J. Rynevelt's death, as Commissary, from which I have not requested to be discharged, as I have, though unworthy, been recently made Second Councilor, with Sir Alexander Hinojossa, First Councilor, and Captain of the military here, who intends to go over in the Spring, to represent this miserable place.

'If things become worse, I, individually, am ruined, for I have received here, some goods from my brothers, all of which I have laid out in a house, horses and mules, which cost me full, four to six thousand guilders, Holland currency.

'Besides that, I am also married. ...

'Herewith I commend your Honor to the mercy and protection of the Most High God, and remain.

'Your obedient, humble servant,

'G. Van Sweringen'

On 20 August 1660, Garrett Van Swearingen and his family were granted permission to visit Holland.

On 27 August 1661, the City of Amsterdam in Holland was determined to continue the colony at New Amstel in America. Garrett Van Swearingen was again appointed as the councilor.

Also in a letter to Peter Stuyvestant, Director-General of the New Neatherlands from William Beekman, Garret Van Swearingen was called 'The Honorable President, Van Swearingen.'

In 1664, Colonel Nicols of England, sent by His Majesty, Charles II, and his duputy Sir Robert Carr were to take over the Dutch colony at New Amstel. Garrett Van Swearingen made an deposition in 1684 regarding the conquest of the Dutch possessions at New Amstel by English...

'In the year 1664, arrived Col. Nicholas, sent out by his Majesty, King Charles II, whereupon the Fort and country were brought under submission by Sir Robert Carr, and duputied with two ships, for that intent. Sir Robert Carr did often protest to me, that he did not come as an enemy, but as a friend; demanding, only in friendship, what was the King's own, in that country. There was taken from the City and the inhabitants thereabout, to the value, so near as I can now remember, of four thousand pound sterling, likewise arms, powder and shot in great quantity. Four and twenty guns were, the greatest part, transported to New York.

'The Dutch soldiers were taken prisoners, and given to the merchantmen that were there, in recompense of their services; and into Virginia, they were transported to be sold, as was credibly reported by Sir Robert Carr's officers, and other persons there living in the town.

'All sorts of tools for handicraftsman, and all plough gear, and other things to cultivate the ground, which were in great quantity; besides the estate of Governor Debouissa and myself; except some household stuff and a negro I got away; and some other movables, Sir Robert Carr did permit me to sell.

'Colonel Nicholas, understanding what Sir Robert Carr had got at Delaware, took all again from the said Sir Robert Carr, when the said Colonel came there again in person, as I was informed, when I was upon my way to Maryland.'

Swearingen family tradition says that when the Dutch colony at New Amstel surrendered to the English Crown, Garrett Van publicly broke hs sword across his knees, and, throwing it to the left and right, renounced his allegiance.

Shortly after the English's takeover of Dutch colony at New Amstel, Garrett Van Swearingen and his family migrated to St. Mary's City, St. Mary's County, the province of Maryland.

On 13 April 1669, a bill was passed by the General Assembly of the province of Maryland for the 'Free Denization and Naturalization of Garrett Van Swearingen and others,' upon the following petition. The petition was transcribed as follows:

'To the Right, Honorable, the Lord Proprietory of the Province of Maryland and Avalon, Lord Baron of Baltimore.

'The Petition of Garrett Van Swearingen, Elizabeth de Barrette, wife of the siad Garrett, Elizabeth and Zacharias Van Swearingen, children of the said Garrett and Barbara ... all residents and inhabitanst of this Province, humbly soweth into your Lordship:

'The Petition of Garrett Van Swearingen, was born in Reenstwerdam, Holland, under the dominion of the States General of the United Provinces: Barbara De Barrette, his wife, in Valenciennes, in the Low Countries, belonging to the King of Spain: Elizabeth Van Swearingen and Zacharias Van Swearingen their children in New Amstel, on Delaware Bay, then under the government of the said States General: ... and your Petitioners being now removed into this Province --- being invited to come and dwell in this Province upon confidence of your Lordship's Declaration of July 2, 1649, whereby you did empower your Governor to grant lands to any persons of French, Dutch, Spanish, Swedish, or other foreign descent, in as ample manner, and upon the same term, as to any persons of British or Irish descent.

'And during their abode in this Province your Petitioners have been faithful and obedient to your Lordship's Law; yet for that your Petitioners are not of British or Irish descent they cannot take benefit of the laws and customs of this Province, as the good people of British and Irish descent.

'May it please your Lordship, out of your abundant goodness and care, that your Petitioners shall henceforth be adjudged, as natural born people of this Province of Maryland, or as if they were of British or Irish descent as aforesaid, and that they shall be enabled to prosecute and defend all manner of actions and other demands, as liberally and frankly as if they have been naturally born within this Province of Maryland or were of British or Irish descent, any Laws or customs of this Province to the contrary notwithstanding.

'And your Petitioners shall as in duty bound pray & c.'

During the period of 1680 and 1692, the Upper House of the General Assembly of the Province of Maryland held their meeting at Garrett Van Swearingen's house in St. Mary's City, St. Mary County, Maryland.

On 12 May 1684, Garrett Van Swearingen 'Of the City of St. Mary's, Gentleman, aged eight and forty years, or thereabouts,' made the deposition regarding the settlement of Delaware Bay and River by the Dutch and Swedes people.

On 4 May 1686, Garrett Van Swearingen was made Sheriff of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Again on 12 May 1687, he was made sheriff for said county for another year.

In 1688 Garrett Van Swearingen was appointed as Alderman for the city of St. Mary's, St. Mary's County, Maryland.

Garrett Van Swearingen left a will which was written on 25 October 1698 and probated on 4 February 1698. He mentioned:

1) 'To two sons, viz - Joseph and Charles, equally, and heirs, dwelling house; also the Council Room and Coffee House and lands thereunto belonging: 2) 'In event of death of both sons aforesaid without issue, said estate to pass to daughters (unnamed) by present wife' 3) 'Wife (unnamed) to have estate during widowhood, and she is not to be disturbed by children (unnamed) or sons-in-law (unnamed)' 4) 'To daughters aforesaid personalty; son Joseph appointed guardian of said daughters (unnamed)' 5) 'To priest of Romand Catholic Church, personalty'

ISSUE of Gerret and Barbarah:

Elizabeth Van Swearingen, born ca 1661, New Amstel, DE.

Zacharias Van Swearingen, born New Amstel, DE (petition), ca 1662. The name as it appears in his will is the anglicized "Zachariah".

Thomas Van Swearingen, born ca 1665, MD, probably in Talbot Co.

Garratt or Garrott Van Swearingen. Inventory of the estate of "Garrot Vansweringgen....of St Mary's County lately Deceased" appraised 1 Oct 1752, by Joseph White and John Milburn. Signing as "Kinn" were Joseph Vanswearingen and Elener Pierce (Inventories, Bk 51, p71-73, Md Hall of Records). (Note: Maryland Probate Records, Prerogative Court Abstracts, 1751-1756, shows James Vanswearinggen, not Joseph Vanswearingen, but I think that is a transcription error.) The final disbursement of the estate was in Sep 1753, with representatives of the estate to receive the balance after funeral and appraisal costs, i.e., Thomas Vansweringen, the accountant (also named administrator), Joseph and Jane Vansweringen, of age, "nephews and Niece to the Deced". (Nephew and niece at that time could have referred to grand nephew/niece. Gerret Vansweringen's son Zacharias had a son Joseph whose children were named Thomas, Joseph and Jane Van Swearingen.) Bernard Beary states: "the main basis for considering him (Garrott or Gerard) to be a son lies in the 4th Add'l Account of Joseph Vansweringen's estate, which shows a payment to Ger'd Vansweringen Brother to ye Dec'd" (Chronicles of St Mary's, May 1981). On 27 Feb 1686" Gerrard Van Sweringen" was made an executor to the will of Edmond Dennis of Calvert Co, MD (Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol II). The will was proved in 1694. Possible wife of Garrott is Ellinor (Grunwyn?). On 20 Oct 1703 "Mrs Ellinor Van Sweringen" was left "personalty" in the will of Thomas Grunwyn of St Mary's Co. "Mary Van Sweringen" was a testator to the will (Maryland Calendar of Wills, Vol III).

Mary or Maria, believed to be a Van Swearingen. Mary married Martin Kirk (died 1709) of St Mary's Co. She was listed as "kin" in the estate inventory of Martha Vansweringen, Zacharias' widow who died in 1712. Mary died in 1734, her will dated 10 Oct 1734, proved 21 Jan 1735, named daughter Mary, son Joseph Kirk, daughter Barbara Calvert (called Barbary in 1733 will of Charles Calvert, she was his second wife), and son James Kirk, executor.

After Gerret's marriage to Mary Smith:

Joseph Van Swearingen, born ca 1677 at St Mary's City, MD. He married ca 1714, Mary Neale (Adderton), born ca 1682, the daughter of James Neale (died 1727) of Charles Co, MD, and Elizabeth Calvert, granddaughter of William Calvert, Lord Baltimore. Joseph died Mar 1720/21, a wealthy man, no children (Maryland Probate Records, Prerogative Court Abstracts, 1751-1756 (FTM CD206): An account of the estate of Joseph Vanswearingen was dated 26 Sep 1721, executrix, Mary Vanswearingen. A final accounting was dated 19 Oct 1738 and the administratrix named was called "Mary Deacon, wife of William Deacon, Esq.". The 4th Add'l Account of Joseph Vansweringen's estate, shows a payment to Ger'd Vansweringen Brother to ye Dec'd" (Chronicles of St Mary's, May 1981). Joseph's widow Mary married ca 1722, William Deacon, Royal Customs Collector for the North Potomac who built a new house for Mary and himself at Chancellor's Point (Van Sweringen's Point) near St Mary's City.

Charles Van Swearingen, born ca 1679, died in 1710.

Tereshea/Teresa Van Swearingen, born ca 1681, St Mary's City, MD. She married (1) after 1713 and before 1727, John Parke. She married (2) Robert Ford.

Elinor Van Swearingen, born ca 1683, married (1) James King Carroll. They had a daughter Mary who married 1st Stephen Higgins of Ann Arundel Co, and 2nd Henry Welsh of Anne Arundel Co. Elinor also had a son whose own son, Thomas King Carroll, became Governor in 1829. Elinor, of Calvert Co, MD, widow of James Carroll, according to the 1729 petition of Stephen Higgins (Test Papers, Box 35, folder 8), married by 1713 (2) John Manning. He died 1723/24.

Dorithy Van Swearingen, born ca 1685, never married, died ca 1729 in Annapolis and left land in Anne Arundel and St Mary's Counties. Administrator of her estate was her sister Teresa.

Ann Van Swearingen, married in 1695, Honorable William Bladen, of Anne Arundel Co, Commissary General of the Province from 1708 to 1718, and they lived in Annapolis. William was born 27 Feb 1673, Yorkshire, England, the son of Isabella Fairfax and Nathaniel Bladen. In 1698 William Bladen was Surveyor and Deputy Collector of the port. In 1701 he was appointed Secretary of the Province by Nathaniel Blackstone, the Royal Governor. On 8 May 1702 he was made Attorney General and he was a Vestryman of St Anne's church in Annapolis. William died 9 Aug 1718. Ann was still living in 1727. Ann and William's children were Anne Bladen, born ca 1696; Thomas Bladen, born ca 1698; and Christopher Bladen. Thomas Bladen, born 1698, married Barbara Janssen, sister of Lady Baltimore, and was the first native Governor of MD, 1742-47. He returned to England, became a member of Parliament, and died there in 1780. A portrait of Barbara Janssen Bladen hangs at the William Paca House in Annapolis, MD.

Ann Bladen, born 1696, married Benjamin Tasker on 31 Jul 1711. Benjamin was born ca 1690, the son of Thomas Tasker. In 1725, Benjamin had a 7,000 acre tract surveyed in Frederick Co, called Taskers Chance, and in 1730 he had a tract of 5,000 acres surveyed called Merryland (Pioneers of Old Monocacy, Grace L. Tracey and John P. Dern). He was an early mayor of Annapolis, and held the office of President of the Council of Maryland for thirty-two years. His will is dated 15 Feb 1766. He named children: Anne Cole, Rebecca Dulany, Elizabeth Lowndes, Frances Carter and Benjamin Tasker (dec'd). Grandchildren: Benjamin Cole, Daniel Dulany; Benjamin Lowndes, Benjamin Carter. Sons-in-law: Christopher Lowndes, Robert Carter of Virginia, Governor Cole. Dau-in-law: Ann Tasker, wife of son Benjamin. Executrix: wife (Quaker).

Benjamin and Ann Tasker's daughter Ann married Samuel Ogle in 1741. Samuel Ogle was Proprietary Governor in 1731-32, 1733-42, and 1747-52 (Scharf's History of Western MD). Ann Tasker died in 1775. Her will was dated 11 May 1770, proved 9 Dec 1775. In her will, Ann named daughters Ann Ogle, Rebecca Dulany, wife of Honorable Daniel Dulany, Elizabeth Lowndes, wife of Christopher Lowndes, and Frances Carter, wife of Robert Carter. She also named grandsons Benjamin Ogle, Benjamin Dulany, Francis Lowndes, Benjamin Carter, and Daniel Dulany and granddaughters Mary Ridout, Melora Anderson, and Anne Dulany.

Sarah Van Swearingen (probably a child of the 2nd marriage). She was shown as "one of ye Daughters of Garret Vansweringen" in the 1720 petition, Testamentary Papers, Box 27, folder 8, MD Hall of Records. Sarah married Gerard Slye by 1727. He later received "1/5 share of Chancelor's Point". Sarah died before 1733. Gerrard married Mary Boarman before he wrote his will in 1733. In the will he named wife Mary, along with children: Ann (married Francis Boarman); Susannah (married Charles Craycroft); and Mary (married Henry Neale, then John Lancaster).

Genealogy of the Welsh and Hyatt Families: Ship Prince Maurice sailed out of the Texell 12.25.1656 and after shipwreck onLong Island and change of vessel, the party came into the Delaware 4.25.1657 and took possession of fort called Newcastel.1659 - on of Council and Commissary General for the City of Amerstadam in New Amstel.1664 - fort under British control and Gerrit removed to MD1684 - 5.12, in "Documents relationg to the Colonial Hisotry of New York, vol 3, pp 342-347, gives age as 48 years.1659 - Nov. and Dec., (ibid vol. 2, 106-108) speaks of himself as Clerk, Schout, Commissary and 2d Councillor and adds "I am now married."

http://fourkings.freeyellow.com/Swearingen.html

-------------------- Younger son of noble family. Received liberal education. In 1656, went with Dutch East India Co. on ship Prince Maurice to Dutch colony on DE River in America; he was appointed super-cargo. Sailed from Amsterdam on 12/21/1656, and was to reach New Amsterdam (NYC), but on 3/8/1657 stranded off Fire Island near southern coast of Long Island. Next day, in freezing weather, passengers and crew took frail boat to barren shore, where stayed several days without fire. On 3rd day saw Indians, who sent word to Gov. Stuyvesant of New Amsterdam, who rescued them in sloop. Took cargo from wrecked ship, arrived in New Amsterdam on 4/21/1657. Gerret asked, and was granted, relief from Co's service. Settled at New Castle (New Amstel); here married Barbarah; served as sheriff, commissary, and council member, as well as "cultivation of some low lands, a duck pond and trade." Went to Holland, with wife, in 1660 on behalf of the colony; stayed 1 yrs. Returned following year; two children born at New Castle.

New Amsterdam was surrendered to British in 1664, and Gerret lost most of his estate, except some house stuff and a negro, and some moveables permitted to be sold. He broke his sword and publicly renounced his allegiance to Dutch authorities, and in 4/1669 was naturallized by Lord Baltimore with rest of family at St. Marys, MD. Is believed to have lived in that area for rest of life.Lived until at least 1684 (age.48). -------------------- http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=adalittle&id=I05611 -------------------- http://www.stmaryscity.org/History/bio%20Garrett%20Van%20Sweringen.html

Many people assume that America was settled mostly by the English, but even within English colonies, there was significant ethnic diversity. Among the immigrants to colonial St. Mary's was Garrett Van Sweringen, a Dutch- man who became a leader in the development of Maryland's first capital city.

Van Sweringen was born in 1636 in Holland but little is known of his early years. He was evidently well educated and multi-lingual, speaking Dutch, English, and French. He came to America in 1657 as an agent for the City of Amsterdam. He sailed as part of an expedition charged with reinvigorating the Dutch colony of New Amstel (now New Castle, Delaware), on the Delaware Bay, but the ship wrecked on the shores of Long Island, resulting in the loss of many of the supplies and personal possessions of the passengers. After finally arriving at New Amstel, Van Sweringen served in several positions, including sheriff, a councilor, and deputy commander of the colony. In this capacity, Van Sweringen had contact with Maryland's leaders and gained some knowledge of that colony.

When English forces invaded and captured the Dutch colony in 1664, he again lost most of his estate, this time from plundering during the conquest. Soon afterward, Van Sweringen moved to St. Mary's City with his wife Barbara, a native of Flanders, and their family. Cecil Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore, appointed him as an alderman on the new city council in 1667, and made Van Sweringen and his family some of the first naturalized citizens of Maryland in 1669. Documents from that year describe Van Sweringen as an innkeeper.

His ordinary was probably located in a structure newly built by William Smith, who died shortly before it was completed. It is likely that Van Sweringen initially leased the building from Smith's widow and her new husband, Daniel Jennifer. In December of 1672, Van Sweringen purchased the Ordinary and began major renovations. The building was doubled in size and had a number of expensive refinements added including plastered walls and decorative tin-glazed tiles. Much of Van Sweringen's trade came from those traveling to the capital city to do business with the government. Many of these visits were subsidized by the state. Evidence of substantial payments to Van Sweringen, in pounds of tobacco, are stored in the Maryland Archives. Like so many immigrants to Maryland, Van Sweringen's wife Barbara died. In 1676 he married Mary Smith, a 17-year old English woman. Van Sweringen ultimately fathered at least ten children by these two wives. The Van Sweringens operated Smith's Ordinary until early in 1677. At that time, the complex with most of its furnishings was leased to John Derry. Court documents indicate that Van Sweringen wanted to give up ordinary keeping so that he could open a private house and engage in brewing. By law, an ordinary had to accept anyone at any time who appeared seeking lodging. The law also set rates that could be charged by ordinaries. A private house was less bound by these regulations and thus potentially more profitable.

In 1677, Van Sweringen acquired the building that had been used as the meeting place for the Governor's Council and public records office. These functions had moved to the new brick State House, which was completed in 1676. There is no question that Van Sweringen's latest venture was designed to appeal to the elite, especially members of the Governor's Council. Archaeology suggests Van Sweringen made a sizable investment in renovations, including building a new kitchen, adding chimneys, plastered walls, and installing a brick veneer. Just as the lodging house was being finished, disaster struck once again. Smith's Ordinary, which he still owned but leased to Derry, burned to the ground. Van Sweringen's loss was a staggering sum yet he recovered from adversity once again.

His new lodging house began attracting the elite of the colony, and it became the most elegant establishment in Maryland. From time to time, the higher charges for feeding and housing the Council members became a subject of contention. Nonetheless, Van Sweringen received very substantial payments for his services. The quality of the food and drink served is suggested in the record of a discussion that took place in the General Assembly in 1682, where rates that would be charged for cider were set. Van Sweringen’s boiled cider was the only exception made to the rates.

"…and therefore Resolved that they be allowed for syder 25 lbs of tob. P Gall except Mr. Vansweringen & he to have for his boyld syder 30 lbds. Tob P Gall…" (Archives of MD 7:429).

Van Sweringen kept sheep at the site, a source of fresh meat for the table and wool for the household. There was a garden containing cabbage and other vegetables. One of the most unexpected documentary references from 17th-century St. Mary's City is found in the 1698 will of Garrett Van Sweringen. In it, he bequeaths to his son, Joseph, "ye Council Rooms and Coffee House and land thereto belonging". Coffee houses were fashionable urban institutions in Europe and of growing popularity in England during the late 17th century. Coffee houses served wine and other beverages but little food. They were places for social interaction. It is surprising to find this reference in early Maryland.

Archaeological evidence suggests that the outbuilding originally built for brewing and baking may have been the coffee house. This outbuilding was fitted out far better than most such structures. The artifacts associated with the building suggest that it was the scene of much smoking and drinking but little food consumption. Other evidence comes from traces of the vanished colonial landscape - fence trenches. They formed an unusual public entry corridor to the Coffee house, probably so that people could come to the structure without going through the private yard.

Scattered references suggest that Van Sweringen had some role in providing medical treatment. Other records show that Van Sweringen was a merchant involved in trade with England, Ireland, Jamaica, and New York. He also provided construction services. In June 1674, Van Sweringen was paid 800 lbs. of tobacco for building the stocks and a whipping post for the colony.

Van Sweringen owned a plantation just south of St. Mary's City, the 1,500 acre St. Elizabeth's Manor. At his death, the inventory lists four enslaved Africans who might have been working in agricultural production. However, there is no direct evidence as to the nature of his plantation operations, aside from cattle-raising and perhaps dairying.

When Garrett Van Sweringen died in 1698, he had amassed a large estate valued at over 300 lbs. sterling, placing him among the top 5% of all the householders in St. Mary's County for his time. His story reflects the hard work, innovation, risk-taking, and the will to succeed which characterizes generations of immigrants to America. His entrepreneurial spirit and persistence took advantage of the many opportunities offered by early Maryland, and set a precedent for future immigrants who still come to these shores.

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Garrett van Swearingen's Timeline

1636
February 4, 1636
Beemsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
1659
January, 1659
Age 22
Nieuw-Amstel, New Castle, Delaware

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Name: Barbarah De Barrette
Gender: Female
Birth Place: Fr
Birth Year: 1630
Spouse Name: Gerret Van Sweringen
Spouse
Birth Place: Hl
Spouse Birth Year: 1636
Marriage
Year: 1659
Marriage State: DE
Number Pages: 2
Source Citation: Source number: ; Source type: Pedigree chart; Number of Pages: 2.
Source Information:
Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.
Original data: This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was derived from an array of materials including pedigree charts, family history articles, querie.

1660
1660
Age 23
New Amstel, New Castle, Delaware
1662
1662
Age 25
New Castle, New Amstel, Delaware
1665
1665
Age 28
New Amstel, Delaware
1669
1669
Age 32
St. Mary's, St. Mary's, Maryland
1669
Age 32
Maryland

U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
Name: Barbara DeBarrette Vansweringen
Arrival Year: 1669
Arrival Place: Maryland
Family Members: Wife Barbara DeBarrette; Son Zecharias; Daughter Elizabeth
Source Publication Code: 3215
Primary Immigrant: Vansweringen, Garret
Annotation: From Bacon's Laws of Maryland. Many British, 1600s-1700s.
Source Bibliography: HODGES, MRS. GEORGE W., contributor. "A List of Persons Naturalized by Particular Acts." In The County Court Note-Book. A Little Bulletin of History and Genealogy. Edited by Milnor Ljungstedt. Reprinted by Genealogical Printing Co., Baltimore, 1972. Vol. 4:1 (Feb. 1925), pp. 6-7.
Page: 7
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.
Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2012.

1671
1671
Age 34
St. Mary's, St. Mary's, Maryland
1676
October 5, 1676
Age 40
St. Mary's, St. Mary's, Maryland
1677
1677
Age 40
St. Mary's City, St. Mary's County, Province of Maryland, (Present USA)