Edmund Pendleton Gaines (1777 - 1849)

United States

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Nicknames: "Maj-Gen. Edmund Pendleton /Gaines/"
Place of Burial: United States
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Culpepper, Virginia, United States
Death: Died in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Occupation: Gen. War Of 1812; Arrested Aaron Burr On Charges Of Treason, Soldier
Managed by: Jonathan Blundell
Last Updated:

About Edmund Pendleton Gaines

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_P._Gaines

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0019/g0000040.html#I21614

Gen. Edmund Pendleton GAINES

3 Mar 1777 - 6 Jun 1849

ID Number: I21614

   * TITLE: Gen.
   * OCCUPATION: War Of 1812; Arrested Aaron Burr On Charges Of Treason
   * RESIDENCE: Culpeper Co. VA and NC and AL Territory and New Orleans, LA
   * BIRTH: 3 Mar 1777, Culpeper Co. VA
   * DEATH: 6 Jun 1849, New Orleans, LA
   * RESOURCES: See: [S721] [S747] [S761] [S979] [S1286] 

Father: James Taylor GAINES

Mother: Elizabeth STROTHER

Family 1 : Frances TOULMAIN

Family 2 : Myra CLARK

   * MARRIAGE: 1802, Philadelphia, PA 

Family 3 : Barbara G. BLOUNT

   * MARRIAGE: 7 Aug 1815, of South Carolina 
  1.  Edmund Pendleton GAINES Jr. 

Notes

Gen. Edmund P. Gaines, Commander Fort Erie in the War of 1812 and the officer who arrested Aaron Burr on charges of treason. "Hero of Lake Erie".

Petition of the Inhabitants of the District of Washington, MS Territory: 11 FEB 1809

GAINES, Edmund P.

GAINES, George S.

GAINES, Young

"Edmund Pendleton Gaines was a distinguished General in the War of 1812 and was voted a sword by the Legislature of Tennessee for his victory over the British at Fort Erie, Canada, August 15, 1814; he was also voted swords by the Legislatures of New York and Virginia and a Medal by the United States Congress. General Gaines married three times: The last time to Myra Clark Whitney, the daughter of Daniel Clark, a native of Ireland who came to New Orleans in 1776 as Consul) and his wife, Zulime Carrier des Ganges, a Creole. Mrs Myra Clark Gaines became celebrated for her litigation with the city of New Orleans in order to inherit the property of her father, worth millions of dollars, much of which she recovered. By his marriage to Barbara Blount, General Gaines had a son, Edmund Pendleton Gaines Jr., of Washington D.C. Several towns are named after him, Gainesville, Florida."

from the DAR Application: Page one of the skethc of Gen E.P. Gaines in Vol IV of the National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans. Also page 62 of the lives of Distinguished American Generals in the last war with Great Britain, by John S Jenkins, Auburn NY 1852 fr 286 Vol 1.

The History of the origination fo the army of the US by Fayette Robinson, Philadelphia 1848.

Also Lorings Pictorial field book of the Revolution Vol 2 fr 494, 495, & 497. Also Journal of Congress VII fr 167.

Silver, James Edmund Pendleton Gaines: Frontier General

  1. Bookseller Notes Price

1 AstroLogos Books via Bibliology

[United States] AS NEW - Print-to-order B&W REPRINT of original book published: [Baton Rouge] Louisiana State University Press 1949. ill. 333 Pages Expertly printed on acid-free archival quality paper - Softcover perfect bound (or Hardcover Cloth Buckram binding for additional $10.) Charts photographs & graphics may reproduce less than perfectly & may be reduced to fit pages. SPECIAL ORDER Allow 6 to 8 weeks for delivery. No Refund or Exchange. $124.00

2 Hermitage Book Shop, Member ABAA via ILAB

[United States] N.p.: Louisiana State University Press, 1949. First edition. Maroon cloth titled in gilt. 291 pp. Light bump to upper front board and with thin strip of sunning to upper spine panel, still near fine to fine in chipped and rubbed dust jacket. $300.00

3 Hollingsworth's Books via BiblioDirect

[United States] Description: B&W Illustrations; Signed by Author, Louisiana State University Press; 1949; First Edition; Hardcover;Very Good+ in Very Good dust jacket; Book clean and tight-DJ cleanwith couple of small nicks-in mylar; Inscribed by the author on thefep-clean; 8vo; 291pp pp $300.00

--------------------

Edmund P. Gaines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Edmund Pendleton Gaines (March 20, 1777–June 6, 1849) was a United States army officer who served with distinction during the War of 1812, the Seminole Wars and the Black Hawk War.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Early life
   * 2 Mississippi Territory
   * 3 War of 1812
   * 4 Indian affairs
   * 5 Southwest Frontier
   * 6 Later life
   * 7 See also
   * 8 References
   * 9 External links

[edit] Early life

Gaines was born in Culpeper County, Virginia on March 20, 1777. His father, James, had been captain of a company in the American forces during the Revolutionary War, and after the war his family moved to North Carolina where his father became a state representative. He enlisted in the army in 1799 and was a first lieutenant by 1807.

[edit] Mississippi Territory

In the early 1800s, Gaines surveyed routes and boundaries in the Mississippi Territory including parts of the Natchez Trace. In 1807, Gaines was the commandant of Fort Stoddert. During this time, he arrested Aaron Burr and testified at his trial. Gaines also surveyed the route that would become the portion of the Gaines Trace from the Tennessee River to Cotton Gin Port, Mississippi. He afterwards took a leave of absence from the army to practice law.

[edit] War of 1812

The War of 1812 brought Gaines back to the army and was appointed major of the Eighth U.S. Infantry and in July, 1812, was made a lieutenant colonel in the Twenty-Fourth U.S. Infantry. In 1813, he was promoted to colonel and commanded the Twenty-Fifth Infantry with distinction at the Battle of Crysler's Farm. He became adjutant general and was with General William Henry Harrison's army at the Battle of the Thames. He was promoted brigadier general of regulars on March 9, 1814 and commanded the post at Fort Erie after the U.S. capture. General Jacob Brown was wounded at the Battle of Lundy's Lane and when the U.S. Army of the Niagara returned to the fort, command was passed to Gaines. At the Siege of Fort Erie. Gaines was in command on the fortifications on 15 August 1814, when a British assault was bloodily repulsed. For this victory - the First Battle of Fort Erie - Gaines was awarded the Thanks of Congress, a Congressional Gold Medal, and a brevet promotion to major general. It should be noted, however, that the British assault had already been defeated before Gaines had the opportunity to issue a single order, so he had had no chance to influence the course of the Battle. A few days later, General Gaines was seriously wounded by artillery fire and General Brown, having recovered, returned to command. Gaines' wound ended his active field career for the rest of the war, and he was given command of the Military District Number 6.

[edit] Indian affairs

At the end of the war Gaines was sent of a commissioner to deal with the Creek Indians. The U.S. commanding general, Jacob Brown, died in 1828; and Gaines was one of two ranking generals who could have been considered for the post. However, he and the other general, Winfield Scott, had both publicly quarreled with each other, and Alexander Macomb was promoted over both of them. He commanded the Western Military Department during the Black Hawk War. He was still in command of the department during the Seminole Wars in which he personally led an expedition. At the Battle of Ouithlacoochie he was wounded in the mouth.

[edit] Southwest Frontier

In 1836, he was placed in command of the Southwest Military District. He was given instructions to fortify the border of the Louisiana Territory and Texas in the case that the Mexican army might threaten U.S. territory. He was also given orders to post guards preventing any U.S. soldiers from crossing into Texas and fighting in the rebellion. He was in command of the Army's Western Division at the outbreak of the Mexican-American War. He was reprimanded by the U.S. government for overstepping his authority by calling up Louisiana volunteers for Zachary Taylor's army. He nevertheless called up volunteers from other southwestern states and received a court-martial but was able to successfully defend himself.

[edit] Later life

In the years during and following the Mexican-American War, Gaines was in command of a series of military districts. He was in command of the Western Division when he died at New Orleans, Louisiana on June 6, 1849. He was interred in the Church Street Graveyard in Mobile, Alabama.

A number of places in the United States were named in his honor, including Gainesville, Florida, Gainesville, Texas, Gainesville, Georgia, Gaines Township, Michigan and Gainesboro, Tennessee were all named in his honor, as was Gaines Street in Tallahassee, Florida and Gaines Street in Davenport, Iowa. Fort Gaines, a historic fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama was named for him.

[edit] See also

   * George Strother Gaines, his brother

United States Army portal

[edit] References

   * Elliott, Jack D. and Wells, Mary Ann. (2003). Cotton Gin Port : a frontier settlement on the Upper Tombigbee. Jackson, Mississippi: Quail Ridge Press for the Mississippi Historical Society. ISBN 0-938896-88-1

[edit] External links

   * http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/GG/fga3.html
   * http://virtualology.com/apedmundpendletongaines/

wikipedia.com

--------------------

Edmund P. Gaines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Edmund Pendleton Gaines (March 20, 1777–June 6, 1849) was a United States army officer who served with distinction during the War of 1812, the Seminole Wars and the Black Hawk War.

Contents

[hide]

   * 1 Early life
   * 2 Mississippi Territory
   * 3 War of 1812
   * 4 Indian affairs
   * 5 Southwest Frontier
   * 6 Later life
   * 7 See also
   * 8 References
   * 9 External links

[edit] Early life

Gaines was born in Culpeper County, Virginia on March 20, 1777. His father, James, had been captain of a company in the American forces during the Revolutionary War, and after the war his family moved to North Carolina where his father became a state representative. He enlisted in the army in 1799 and was a first lieutenant by 1807.

[edit] Mississippi Territory

In the early 1800s, Gaines surveyed routes and boundaries in the Mississippi Territory including parts of the Natchez Trace. In 1807, Gaines was the commandant of Fort Stoddert. During this time, he arrested Aaron Burr and testified at his trial. Gaines also surveyed the route that would become the portion of the Gaines Trace from the Tennessee River to Cotton Gin Port, Mississippi. He afterwards took a leave of absence from the army to practice law.

[edit] War of 1812

The War of 1812 brought Gaines back to the army and was appointed major of the Eighth U.S. Infantry and in July, 1812, was made a lieutenant colonel in the Twenty-Fourth U.S. Infantry. In 1813, he was promoted to colonel and commanded the Twenty-Fifth Infantry with distinction at the Battle of Crysler's Farm. He became adjutant general and was with General William Henry Harrison's army at the Battle of the Thames. He was promoted brigadier general of regulars on March 9, 1814 and commanded the post at Fort Erie after the U.S. capture. General Jacob Brown was wounded at the Battle of Lundy's Lane and when the U.S. Army of the Niagara returned to the fort, command was passed to Gaines. At the Siege of Fort Erie. Gaines was in command on the fortifications on 15 August 1814, when a British assault was bloodily repulsed. For this victory - the First Battle of Fort Erie - Gaines was awarded the Thanks of Congress, a Congressional Gold Medal, and a brevet promotion to major general. It should be noted, however, that the British assault had already been defeated before Gaines had the opportunity to issue a single order, so he had had no chance to influence the course of the Battle. A few days later, General Gaines was seriously wounded by artillery fire and General Brown, having recovered, returned to command. Gaines' wound ended his active field career for the rest of the war, and he was given command of the Military District Number 6.

[edit] Indian affairs

At the end of the war Gaines was sent of a commissioner to deal with the Creek Indians. The U.S. commanding general, Jacob Brown, died in 1828; and Gaines was one of two ranking generals who could have been considered for the post. However, he and the other general, Winfield Scott, had both publicly quarreled with each other, and Alexander Macomb was promoted over both of them. He commanded the Western Military Department during the Black Hawk War. He was still in command of the department during the Seminole Wars in which he personally led an expedition. At the Battle of Ouithlacoochie he was wounded in the mouth.

[edit] Southwest Frontier

In 1836, he was placed in command of the Southwest Military District. He was given instructions to fortify the border of the Louisiana Territory and Texas in the case that the Mexican army might threaten U.S. territory. He was also given orders to post guards preventing any U.S. soldiers from crossing into Texas and fighting in the rebellion. He was in command of the Army's Western Division at the outbreak of the Mexican-American War. He was reprimanded by the U.S. government for overstepping his authority by calling up Louisiana volunteers for Zachary Taylor's army. He nevertheless called up volunteers from other southwestern states and received a court-martial but was able to successfully defend himself.

[edit] Later life

In the years during and following the Mexican-American War, Gaines was in command of a series of military districts. He was in command of the Western Division when he died at New Orleans, Louisiana on June 6, 1849. He was interred in the Church Street Graveyard in Mobile, Alabama.

A number of places in the United States were named in his honor, including Gainesville, Florida, Gainesville, Texas, Gainesville, Georgia, Gaines Township, Michigan and Gainesboro, Tennessee were all named in his honor, as was Gaines Street in Tallahassee, Florida and Gaines Street in Davenport, Iowa. Fort Gaines, a historic fort on Dauphin Island, Alabama was named for him.

[edit] See also

   * George Strother Gaines, his brother

United States Army portal

[edit] References

   * Elliott, Jack D. and Wells, Mary Ann. (2003). Cotton Gin Port : a frontier settlement on the Upper Tombigbee. Jackson, Mississippi: Quail Ridge Press for the Mississippi Historical Society. ISBN 0-938896-88-1

[edit] External links

   * http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/GG/fga3.html
   * http://virtualology.com/apedmundpendletongaines/

wikipedia.com

view all

Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines's Timeline

1777
March 3, 1777
Culpepper, Virginia, United States
1802
1802
Age 24
New Orleans, LA
1806
1806
Age 28
1815
August 7, 1815
Age 38
Knox Co, TN
1821
1821
Age 43
1849
June 6, 1849
Age 72
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
????
Mobile, AL, USA