Hugh Mackay (c.1640 - 1692) MP

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Birthplace: Sutherland, Scotland
Death: Died in Noord-Brabant, Netherlands, (present-day Belgium)
Cause of death: killed in the Battle of Steenkerque
Managed by: Doug Robinson
Last Updated:

About Hugh Mackay

III. General Hugh Mackay of Scoury, known among his countrymen as An Shenilir Mor, The Great General, to distinguish him from other generals of the name of Mackay. In our memoir of the 3rd Lord Reay we gave an account of his life to which we now refer the reader. He m. at Bommel in Guelderland Clara de Bie, a Dutch lady of noble extraction, and had issue a son and three daus:--—

Hugh, of whom follows. The daus. were :—

  • Margaret, m. George, 3rd Lord Reay, withissue ;
  • Anna Barbara, m. Mr. Reyard, minister of Nimeguen
  • and Mary, m. Mathew Linyindeck, burgomaster of Nimeguen.

pg. 290

THE BOOK OF MACKAY BY ANGUS MACKAY, M.A. (St. Andrews University)

Minister at Westerdale, Caithness EDINBURGH : NORMAN MACLEOD, 

-25 GEORGE IV. BRIDGE CANADA : EDWARD MACKAY, ST. PETER'S MANSE,

MADOC, ONT. M DCCCC VI
===========================

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Mackay

Hugh Mackay (c. 1640 – 3 August 1692) was a Scottish general best known for his service in the Revolution of 1688.


Early military career


Mackay was born in Sutherland around 1640, the son of Hugh Mackay of Scourie. He entered Douglas's (Dumbarton's) regiment of the English army (now the Royal Scots) in 1660 and accompanied it to France when it was lent by Charles II to Louis XIV. Although Mackay succeeded, through the death of his two elder brothers, to his father's estates, he continued to serve abroad.


In 1669 he was in the Venetian service at Crete, and in 1672 he was back with his old regiment, Dumbartons, in the French army, taking part under Turenne in the invasion of Holland. In 1673 he married Clara de Bie of Bommel in Gelderland. Through her influence he became, as historian Gilbert Burnet wrote, "the most pious man that I ever knew in a military way." Convinced that he was fighting in an unjust cause, Mackay resigned his commission to take a captaincy in a Scottish regiment in the Dutch service.


He had risen to the rank of major-general in 1685, when the Scots brigade was called to England to assist in the suppression of the Monmouth rebellion. Returning to Holland, Mackay was one of those officers who elected to stay with their men when James II, having again demanded the services of the Scots brigade, and having been met with a refusal, was permitted to invite the officers individually into his service. As major-general commanding the brigade, and also as a privy councillor of Scotland, Mackay was an important and influential person, and James chose to attribute the decision of most of the officers to Mackay's instigation.


Revolution of 1688 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glorious_Revolution


Soon after this event, William, Prince of Orange, started on his expedition to England. Mackay's division led the invading corps. In January 1689 Mackay was appointed major-general commanding in chief in Scotland. In this capacity he was called upon to deal with the formidable insurrection headed by John, Viscount Dundee. In the Battle of Killiecrankie, Mackay was severely defeated, but the Jacobite victory was nullified by the death of Dundee. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Killiecrankie

Thereafter, Mackay, displaying unexpected energy, subdued the Highlands in one summer. In 1690 he founded Fort William at Inverlochy.


In 1691 he distinguished himself in the brilliant victory at the Battle of Aughrim. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Aughrim

In 1692, with the rank of lieutenant-general, he commanded the British division of the allied army in Flanders.


Death


At the Battle of Steinkeerke, Mackay's division bore the brunt of the day unsupported and the general himself was killed. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Steenkerque


Descendants


Mackay and his wife had three children together:

Hugh Mackay (1681–1708), married Anna Louise de Lannoy
Margaret Mackay (1683–1748), married George Mackay, 3rd Lord Reay
Maria Mackay (1686-1723?), married Matthias Lambertus Singendonck

Cultural significance


Mackay was the inventor of the socket bayonet which soon came into general use, the idea of this being suggested to him by the failure of the plug bayonet to stop the rush of the Highlanders at the Battle of Killiecrankie.


He may be know to some people nowadays from a mention in the song Braes o' Killiecrankie: "O fie Macvkay what gart ye flie".


References

Mackay, John (1836). Life of Lieut. Gen. Hugh Mackay of Scourie. Edinburgh: Lang & Forbes.
==========

THE SCOWRY BRANCH OF MACKAYS.


Hugh Mackay, who was worthily termed the great general, [see p. 484), to whom the succession belonged, married Clara de Bie of Bommelin Guelderland, by whom he had son,

  • Hugh,

and three daughters

  • Margaret,

Margaret, the eldest daughter of General Hugh of Scowry, married George, third Lord Reay

  • Anna-Barbara, and

his second daughter, Anna-Barbara, married Mr Reyerd, minister of Numeguen

  • Mary.

Mary, married Matthew Linyindeck, burgomaster of Numeguen: both of whom died without issue

	

Pg. 562-3 HISTORY THE HOUSE AND CLAN MACKAY,BY ROBERT MACKAY, 1829

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General Hugh Mackay's Timeline

1640
1640
Sutherland, Scotland
1681
1681
Age 41
1692
August 3, 1692
Age 52
Noord-Brabant, Netherlands, (present-day Belgium)
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