Geoffrey (Godfrey) fitz Richard de Brionne, comte d'Eu

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Geoffrey (Godfrey) fitz Richard de Brionne, comte d'Eu

Also Known As: "Godfrey", "Geoffrey", "Godefroi", "Godefroy", "Geoffroy"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Brionne, Haute-Normandie, France
Death: Died in Plouigneau, Bretagne, France
Place of Burial: France
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard I, 'The Fearless', Duke of Normandy and Concubine Unk de Normandie, I
Husband of Hawise (Guisnes) Brionne; Hawise (Guisnes) de Brionne and Geoffroy's wife (de Brionne)
Father of Gilbert de Brionne comte d'Eu; Gunnore de Clare; N.N. de Brionne and Adele d'Eu de St. Sauveur
Brother of Papia II de Normandie and Guimara - Wymarche
Half brother of d'Eu & Brionne Geoffrey de Montacuto; Beatrice of Normandy, Abbess of Montvilliers; Miss de Normandie; Guillaume FitzRichard de Normandie, Comte d'Hiémois et Comte d'Eu; Sir William Hiesmes (1º Count of De Hiesmes and 8 others

Occupation: Count, Count of Eu and Count of Brionne, COUNT, First Count of Brionne, 1st Count of Brionne, Count of Brionne. An illegitimate son of Richard II, Count of Brionne, Count Eu Brion, Count of Eu, Comte, de Brionne, d'Eu, après, 996, Comte d'Eu & Brionne
Managed by: Bianca May Evelyn Brennan
Last Updated:

About Geoffrey (Godfrey) fitz Richard de Brionne, comte d'Eu

http://gw.geneanet.org/hpichot?lang=fr;pz=cyril;nz=pichot;ocz=0;p=godefroy;n=de+brionne

Godefroi de Brionne (Crispin), comte d'Eu (Geoffrey, Godfrey or Goeffroy de Brionne)

Parents: Richard I Sans-Peur, Duke of Normandy, and a mistress (not his wife Gunnor)

Spouse: (unknown) perhaps Haloise ou Helvide de Guisnes

Children:

1. Gilbert de Brionne (Crespin) 2. (unknown), parent of daughter who married Baldric and had six or more children.

Geoffrey, Count of Eu From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey,_Count_of_Eu

Arms of the Counts of Eu from the House of Normandy: D'azur, au lion d'or,l'écu semé de billettes d'or Issue: Gilbert Noble family de Clare Father Richard I of Normandy Born 962 Died c. 1010

Geoffrey of Brionne (962 - c. 1010), also called Godfrey was Count of Eu and Brionne[a] in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries.

Life

He was an illegitimate son of Duke Richard I of Normandy,[1] by an unnamed concubine.[2] The county of Eu was an appanage created for Geoffrey by his brother Richard II of Normandy in 996 as part of Richard's policy of granting honors and titles for cadet members of his family.[2] The citadel of Eu played a critical part of the defense of Normandy;[3] the castle and walled town were on the river Bresle, just two miles from the English Channel. It had long been an embarkation point for England and in time of war was often one of the first place attacked.[3]

The castle of Brionne had been held by the Dukes of Normandy as one of their own homes but Richard II also made a gift of Brionne to his half-brother Geoffrey,[b] who held it for life passing it to his son Gilbert and was only returned to the demesne of the Duke after his murder.[4]

Both Geoffrey (Godfrey) and his son Gilbert are styled counts in a diploma to Lisieux given by Duke Richard II, but without territorial designations.[5] Geoffrey died c. 1010.[6]

Issue

Geoffrey was the father of: Gilbert, Count of Brionne, who succeeded his father as Count of Eu & Brionne.[7]

Notes

  1. ^ While there is little doubt Geoffrey (Godfrey) was Count of Eu, there is an open question as to whether Geoffrey was ever "Count" of Brionne. See: Douglas, Earliest Norman Counts, EHS 61, No. 240 (1946), p.134.
  2. ^ Orderic in a speech attributed to Roger, Count of Mullent to Robert II, Duke of Normandy, in asking for the castle of Brionne stated that it was Duke Richard the elder (I) who gave Brionne to his son Geoffrey (Godfrey). See Ordericus Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History, Trans. Forester, Vol. II (1854), p. 490.
  3. [edit]References
  4. ^ J.H. Round, The Family of Clare, The Archaeological Journal, Vol. LVI, Second Series Vol. VI, (1899), pp. 223-4
  5. ^ a b Edmund Chester Waters, The Counts of Eu, Sometime Lords of the Honour of Tickhill, The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal, No. 9 (1886), p. 262
  6. ^ a b Edmund Chester Waters, The Counts of Eu, Sometime Lords of the Honour of Tickhill, The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal, No. 9 (1886), p. 261
  7. ^ The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumieges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni, Vol. II, Ed. & Trans. Elizabeth M.C. Van Houts (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995), pp. 228-9
  8. ^ David Douglas, The Earliest Norman Counts, The English Historical Review, Vol. 61, No. 240 (May, 1946), p. 134
  9. ^ Edmund Chester Waters, The Counts of Eu, Sometime Lords of the Honour of Tickhill, The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal, No. 9 (1886), p. 257
  10. ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, Vol III, Ed. Vicary Gibbs (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1913), p. 242

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#GeoffreyBrionnedied1015B MEDIEVAL LANDS:

GEOFFROY de Brionne, illegitimate son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his mistress ([953]-[1015]).

Guillaume de Jumièges names "Godefroi et Guillaume" as the two sons of Duke Richard by his concubines, recording that the former was Comte d'Eu[1161].

Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[1162]. He is named as son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[1163]. Comte d'Eu after 996.

m ---. The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known.

Geoffroy & his wife had [two] children:

1. GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" ([979/1000]-murdered [Mar] 1040). Guillaume de Jumièges names "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that he was Comte d'Eu after his father before being murdered[1164]. Named as son of "Godfrey" by Orderic Vitalis[1165]. Comte d'Eu. "Gislebertus filius Godefridi comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[1166]. He was appointed guardian of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after the death in 1040 of Alain III Duke of Brittany[1167]. He invaded Le Vimeu but was defeated by Enguerrand Comte de Ponthieu[1168]. He was murdered by his cousin Raoul de Waco, after which Brionne was kept by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[1169]. Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[1170]. Guillaume de Jumièges records that "Raoul de Vacé, fils de Robert l'archevêque…et…Robert fils de Giroie" were those responsible for the murder of Gilbert Comte d'Eu[1171]. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis", undated but listed among other deaths recorded in Mar[1172]. m ---. The name of Gilbert's wife is not known. Gilbert & his wife had three children:

a) RICHARD de Brionne (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richard" as sons of "le comte Gilbert fils du comte Godefroi", recording that he made donations to the church of Bec with his own sons[1173]. He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[1174]. Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[1175]. Lord of Clare and Tonbridge. Regent of England 1075.

b) GUILLAUME de Brionne (-after 29 Aug 1060). "Milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 29 Aug 1060, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[1176].

c) BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090). He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[1177]. Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[1178]. After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon. “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[1179]. Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[1180]. m ALBERADE, daughter of ---. Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[1181]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[1182]. Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained. Baudouin & his wife had six children:

i) ROBERT (-after Dec 1101). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy. The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont[1183]. He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096.

ii) WILLIAM (-1096). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis[1184]. He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.

iii) RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Ford Abbey). Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis[1185]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[1186]. He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless[1187].

iv) ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Ford Abbey, Devon). The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[1188]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford”[1189]. m ---. One child:

(a) ALICE . The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Ford Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ”[1190]. m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---. Randulph & his wife had one child:

v) EMMA . Guillaume de Jumièges records that Baudouin had three daughters but does not name them[1191]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m HUGH de Waft .

vi) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges records that Baudouin had three daughters but does not name them[1192].

Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

vii) WIGER (-[1133]). Named as bastard son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that he became a monk at Bec living there for about 40 years under abbots William and Boso[1193].

d) ADELA ). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[1194]. m NEEL Vicomte [de Cotentin], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-Aug 1092).

2. [--- .] m ---. One child:

a) daughter . m BALDRIC, son of ---. According to Orderic Vitalis[1195], "Baldricus Teutonicus" came to Normandy with his brother Wigerius [Viger/Wigerich] to serve Duke Richard II and married the neptis of Gilbert de Brionne. Her exact parentage is not known. In the same passage, Orderic records that the couple had "six sons and several daughters", naming the sons as "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis", and that he arranged the marriage of "Elizabeth sororem suam" to "Fulconi de Bona-Valle". He held the honour of Bocquencé[1196].

i) NICHOLAS de Baqueville . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1197].

ii) FOULQUES de Aunou . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1198].

iii) ROBERT de Courcy . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1199].

iv) RICHARD de Neufville . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1200].

v) BALDRIC de Bocquencé . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1201].

vi) WIGERIC de Apulia . Orderic Vitalis names "Nicolaus…de Baschevilla et Fulco de Alnou, Rodbertus de Curceio et Ricardus de Nova-Villa, Baldricus de Balgenzaio et Wigerius Apuliensis" as the sons of Baldric and his wife[1202].

vii) GUNNORA . The De nobili genere Crispinorum records that "Gislebertus…Crispini cognomen" married "senioris Fulconis de Alnou germanam…Gonnorem"[1203]. m GILBERT Crispin, son of ---.

viii) daughters .

------------------

Geoffrey or Godfrey was the illegitimate son of Richard I. his son Gilbert "Crispin" succeeded him as Count of Brionne.

Richard I was known to have had several mistresses and produced children with many of them. Known children are:

  • Geoffrey, Count of Brionne, (b. ca. 970)
  • William, Count of Eu (ca. 972-26 January 1057/58) m. Leseline de Turqueville (d. 26 January 1057/58).

---------------------------

Duke Godfrey de Brionne - was born about 0955. He is an illegitimate son of Duke Richard II de Normandie.

Children:

i. Count Gilbert "Crispin" de Brionne was born about 0979 and died about 1040 .

References
   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal ancestors of 300 American Families By Michel L. Call ISBN 1-933194-22-7 (chart 1696

--------------------

Godfrey de BRUINE Count of Eu and Brionne (953-1015) --------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps06/ps06_351.htm

From "A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314", by Michael Altschul, Baltimore, The Johns

Hopkins press, 1965.

The Clares came to England with the Conqueror. Like many other great families which settled in England after the Conquest,

they were related to the dukes of Normandy and had established themselves as important members of the Norman feudal

aristocracy in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries. The origin of the family can be traced to Godfrey, eldest of the

illegitimate children of Duke Richard I (the Fearless), the Conqueror's great-grandfather. While the Duke granted Godfrey

Brionne, he did not make him a count. Godfrey's comital title derives from the grant of the county of Eu made to him after

996 by his half-brother, Duke Richard II. After Godfrey's death, Eu was given to William, another of Duke Richard I's

bastard sons, and Gilbert, Godfrey's son, was left with only the lordship of Brionne. However, under Duke Robert I, father

of William the Conqueror, Gilbert assumed the title of count of Brionne while not relinquishing his claim to Eu. When

Count William of Eu died shortly before 1040, Gilbert assumed the land and title, but he was assassinated in 1040 and his

young sons, Richard and Baldwin, were forced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, Count of

Flanders. When William the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter, he restored Gilbert's sons to Normandy,

although he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title. William granted the lordships of Bienfaite and

Orbec to Richard fitz Gilbert, and Le Sap and Meules to Baldwin. While Gilbert's descendants later pressed a claim for

Brionne, it was never restored.

Richard and Baldwin fitz Gilbert took part in the Norman conquest of England, and both assumed important positions in the

Conqueror's reign. Baldwin was made guardian of Exeter in 1068, and appears in the Domesday Book as sheriff of Devon,

lord of Okehampton and numerous other estates in Devon, Dorset, and Somerset. His sons William and Richard were also

sheriffs of Devon and participated in the abortive Norman penetration of Carmarthen in the early twelfth century.

However, the lasting position of the family in England must be credited to Baldwin's brother, Richard fitz Gilbert I. He was

regent of England jointly with William de Warenne during the Conqueror's absence in 1075, and he served in various other

important capacities for the King. King William rewarded his cousin well, granting him one of the largest fiefs in the

territorial settlement. The lordship centered on Clare (obviously the origin of the Clare family name), Suffolk, which had

been an important stronghold in Anglo-Saxon times. The bulk of Richard fitz Gilbert's estates lay in Suffolk, Essex, Surrey,

and Kent, but comprised holdings in various other counties in the southern and eastern parts of the kingdom as well. In

addition, King William arranged for Richard's marriage to Rohese, sister of Walter Giffard, later Earl of Buckingham, and

her dowry, consisting of lands in Huntingdon and Hertford, became absorbed in the family inheritance.

After Richard's death, his extensive properties in Normandy and England were divided between his two eldest sons. The

Norman fiefs of Bienfaite and Orbec passed to Roger, while Gilbert, inherited the English honors of Clare and Tonbridge.

- the players -

Richard I, Duke of Normandy, died 996 : Godfrey of Brionne and Eu died ca 1015 : Gilbert, count of Brionne died 1040 :

-Richard fitz Gilbert (1035-1090) = Rohese de Giffard : Roger d.s.p. 1130 Gilbert fitz Richard I(ca1066-1117 ) = Adeliz

daughter of Hugh Claremont Walter d.s.p.1138 Richard, abbot of Ely 1100 Robert d.1136 Adelice = Walter Tirel Rohese =

Eudo Dapifer

-Baldwin fitz Gilbert died 1095 : William d.s.p. 1096 Robert d.s.p.1101 Richard d.s.p.1137

While Gilbert fitz Richard I found himself at odds with the Conqueror's successor, William Rufus, he and other members of

the family enjoyed great favor with Rufus' successor King Henry I. Some have suggested that Henry's largesse was due to

the fact that Walter Tirel, husband of Richard's daughter Adelize, shot the arrow which slew Rufus. Proof of this is lacking,

but with certainty the wealth and position of the Clare family increased rapidly during Henry's reign. One of Rohese

Giffards brothers (Walter) was made Earl of Buckingham and another Bishop of Winchester. Gilbert fitz Richard's brothers

were also rewarded: Richard, a monk at Bec, was made abbot of Ely in 1100; Robert was granted the forfeited manors of

Ralph Baynard in East Anglia; Walter, who founded Tintern Abbey in 1131, was given the great lordship of Netherwent

with the castle of Striguil in the southern march, territories previously held by Roger, son of William fitz Osborn, Earl of

Hereford, who had forfeited them in 1075. In 1110 Gilbert was granted the lordship of Ceredigion (Cardigan) in

southwestern Wales, and immediately embarked upon an intensive campaign to subjagate the area.

- the players -

Gilbert fitz Richard I (ca1066-1117)=Adeliz d/o Hugh Claremont : Richard fitz Gilbert II (ante 1100-1136)=Adelize de

Chester Gilbert b. 1100 Baldwin d. 1154 Hervey Walter Margaret=William de Montifichet Alice=Aubrey de Vere

Rohese=Baderon de Monmouth

After Gilbert fitz Richard I died in 1117, his children continued to profit from royal generosity and favorable connections.

His daughters were all married to important barons; William de Montfichet, Lord of Stansted in Essex, the marcher Lord

Baderon de Monmouth, and Aubrey de Vere, Lord of Hedingham in Essex and father of the first Vere Earl of Oxford. Of the

five sons, little is known of two: Hervey, whom King Stephen sent on an expedition to Cardigan abt 1140, and Walter, who

participated in the Second Crusade of 1147. Baldwin established himself as an important member of the lesser baronage by

obtaining the Lincolnshire barony of Bourne through marriage. Richard fitz Gilbert II, the eldest and heir, was allowed to

marry Adeliz, sister of Ranulf des Gernons, Earl of Chester, thus acquiring lands in Lincoln and Northampton as her

marriage portion. He tried to consolidate the gains made by his father in Cardigan, but was killed in an ambush in 1136 and

the lordship was soon recovered by the Welsh.

Of Gilbert fitz Richard I' sons, Gilbert was the only one to achieve any great prominence, being the founder of the great

cadet branch of the family and the father of one of the most famous men in English history. Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare was

high in the favor of Henry I, perhaps because his wife Isabell, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and Earl

of Leicester, was one of Henry's favourite mistresses. When Gilbert's uncle Roger died without heirs, Henry granted

Gilbert the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. When another uncle, Walter, Lord of Netherwent in South

Wales, died without issue in 1138, King Richard? gave Gilbert this lordship in addition to the lordship of Pembroke, which

had been forfeited by Arnulf of Montgomery in 1102. Gilbert was also created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. At his death in

1148, he was succeeded by his son Richard fitz Gilbert, aka "Strongbow" who led the Norman invasion of Ireland and

obtained the great lordship of Leinster in 1171.

Thus, in just two generations, the cadet branch of the Clares became one of the most important families in England.

Strongbow was Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Netherwent, and Lord of Leinster being the most powerful of the marcher and

Anglo-Irish magnates under King Henry II. Strongbow d. in 1176 and son Gilbert d. abt. 1185, ending the male line. In

1189, the inheritance passed to Strongbow's daugther Isabel and her husband, William Marshal.

Meanwhile, the senior side prospered. After Richard fitz Gilbert II died in 1136, Clare, Tonbridge, and other estates passed

to the eldest son Gilbert fitz Richard II, who was created Earl of Hertford by King Stephen. Gilbert died probably unmarried

in 1152, when his younger brother Roger inherited the estates and comital title. Roger resumed the the campaign against the

Welsh in Cardigan where, after 8 years, he was defeated in 1165. However, Roger did add some lands and nine knights'

fees through his marriage to Maud, daughter and heir of the Norfolk baron James de St. Hillary. Roger died in 1173 and his

widow, Maud, conveyed the remainder of the inheritance to her next husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of Arundel. The

Clare estates along with the earldom passed to Roger's son, Richard, who for the next 4 decades until he died in 1217, was

the head of the great house of CLARE, adding immensely to the wealth, prestige, and landed endowment of his line.

Roger's son Richard, hereinafter Richard de CLARE acquired half of the former honor of Giffard in 1189 when King

Richard I, in need of money for the Third Crusade, agreed to divide the Giffard estates between Richard de CLARE and his

cousin Isabel, Strongbow's daughter based on their claims of descendancy to Rohese Giffard. Richard de CLARE obtained

Long Crendon in Buckingham, the caput of the Giffard honor in England, associated manors in Buckingham, Cambridge,

and Bedfordshire, and 43 knights' fees, in addition to some former Giffard lands in Normandy. When Richard de CLARE's

mother Maud died in 1195, he obtained the honor of St. Hilary. Maud's 2nd husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of

Arundel, who had held St. Hilary jure uxoris, d. in 1193, and despite the fact he had a son and heir, the honor reverted to

Maud and after her death escheated to the crown. Richard de CLARE offered 360 and acquired it. The honor later became

absorbed into the honor of CLARE and lost its separate identity.

Richard de CLARE's most important act, however, was his marriage to Amicia, 2nd daughter and eventual sole heir to

William Earl of Gloucester. The Gloucester inheritance included the earldom and honor of Gloucester with over 260 knights'

fees in England, along with the important marcher lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. It was not easy though!! William

died 1183, leaving 3 daughters. The eldest, Mabel, married Amaury de Montfort, Count of Evreux, while the second,

Amicia married Richard de CLARE. King Henry II meanwhile arranged the marriage of the youngest Isabel, to his son

John, Count of Mortain, in 1189. When John became King in 1199, he divorced Isabel to marry Isabelle of Angoulªme, but,

he kept the 1st Isabel in his custody. Then in 1200, John created Mabel's son Amaury Earl of Gloucester. In addition,

Richard de CLARE and his son Gilbert were given a few estates and 10 fees of the honor of Gloucester of Kent; otherwise,

John kept the bulk of the honor, with the great lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. Mabel's son Amaury died without

issue in 1213. Shortly thereafter, John gave the 1st Isabel in marriage to Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, who was

also created Earl of Gloucester. When Geoffrey died, the inheritance was assigned to Hubert de Burgh, the justiciar. Hubert

married Countess Isabel shortly before her death in Oct. 1217, however, he did not retain the estates, since they passed to

Amicia, now recognized as Countess of Gloucesthire, and her husband Richard de CLARE, despite the fact Richard and

Amicia had been separated since 1200.

Richard outlived Isabel by several weeks and by 28 Nov 1217, he was dead, leaving Gilbert, aged 38, as the sole heir to the

Clare and Gloucester estates and title. Gilbert de CLARE assumed the title of Earl of Gloucester and Hertford and was

charged £350 relief for the honors of Clare, Gloucester, St. Hilary and his half of the old Giffard barony. He controlled

some 456 knights fees, far more than any other, and it did not include some 50 fees in Glamorgan and Gwynllwg.

By a remarkable series of fortuitous marriages and quick deaths, the CLARES were left in 1217 in possession of an

inheritance which in terms of social prestige, potential revenues, knights' fees, and a lasting position of great importance

among the marcher lords of Wales. They were probably the most successful family in developing their lands and power

during the 12th century and in many ways the most powerful noble family in 13th century England. By 1317, however, the

male line of Clares became extinct and the inheritance was partitioned. Between 1217 and 1317 there were four Clare

generations.

Gilbert de CLARE, born abt. 1180 had a brother Richard/Roger and a sister Matilda. Richard accompanied Henry III's

brother, Richard of Cornwall, to Gascony in 1225-26 and was never heard from again. Matilda was married to William de

Braose (died 1210 when he and his mother were starved to death by King John), eldest son of the great marcher baron

William de Braose (died 1211), Lord of Brecknock, Abergavenny, Builth, Radnor, and Gower, who was exiled by King

John. Matilda returned to her father and later (1219) sued Reginald de Braose, second son of William, for the family lands,

succeeding only in recovering Gower and the Sussex baronry of Bramber.

Gilbert de CLARE, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford from 1217 to 1230, married Oct. 1214 his cousin Isabel, daughter and

eventual co-heiress of William Marshal (died 1219), earl of Pembroke. Gilbert and Isabel had three sons and two daughters,

with the eldest son and heir Richard, born 4 Aug 1222, thus only 8, when his father died. In 1243, Richard de CLARE

came of age and assumed the estates and titles of his father until he d. 15 July 1262. His brother William, b. 1228 held lands

of Earl Richard in Hampshire and Norfolk for the service of a knight's fee. In June 1258, during a baronial reform program,

William was granted custody of Winchester castle. A month later he died, reportedly by poison administered by the Earl

Richard's seneschal (an official in a medieval noble household in charge of domestic arrangements and the administration of

servants; a steward or major- domo. Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin), Walter de Scoteny, in

supposed collaboration with Henry III's Poitevin half-brothers, who strongly opposed the baronial program and Earl

Richard's participation in it. (Why didn't they poison Richard??)

Earl Gilbert's daughters were very well placed. Amicia, born 1220, was betrothed (promised to be given in marriage) in

1226 to Baldwin de Reviers, grandson and heir to William de Reviers, Earl of Devon (died 1217). Baldwin was only a year

or two older than Amicia and Earl Gilbert offered 2,000 marks to the King for the marriage and custody of some Reviers

estates during Baldwin's minority. The marriage must have been consummated around 1235, since Baldwin's son and heir

(Baldwin) was born the next year. After Baldwin died in 1245, Amicia (died 1283) controlled the lands of her son (died

1262) and was given permission to marry a minor English baron, Robert de Guines/Gynes, uncle of Arnold III, Count of

Guines.

Earl Gilbert's other daughter, Isabel born 1226, married 1240 the Scots baron Robert Bruce, lord of Annandale (d 1295),

and by him was the grandmother of the hero of Bannockburn. Her marriage was probably arranged by her mother Isabel and

uncle, Gilbert Marshal who gave her the Sussex manor of Ripe as a marriage portion.

Isabel Marshal outlived Earl Gilbert de CLARE by ten years, during which time she was busy. In 1231 she married Richard

of Cornwall, to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry III, who was trying to arrange another match for Richard.

She died 1240, after 4 children by Richard, only one of which lived past infancy. According to the Tewkesbury chronicle,

she wished to be buried next to her 1st husband, but Richard of Cornwall had her buried at Beaulieu Abbey in Hampshire,

although as a pious gesture he allowed her heart to be sent to Tewkesbury.

- the players -

Richard de CLARE, Earl of Hertford d. 1217

Richard/Roger d.s.p. 1228

Matilda = (1) William de Braose

(2) ?? 1219 Rhys Gryg died 1233

Gilbert de CLARE (1180-1230) = 1214 Isabel =1231 Richard of Cornwall died 1272

William (1228-d.s.p. 1258)

Gilbert born 1229

Amicia (1220-1283) = (1) 1226 Baldwin de Reviers

(2) 1247 Robert de Guines died 1283

Isabel born 1226 = 1240 Robert Bruce died 1295

Richard de CLARE (1222-1262) = (1) Margaret de Burgh died 1237

(2) Maud de Lacy d. 1289

Thomas (124?-1287) = Juliana of Offaly d. 1300

Bogo (1248-d.s.p. 1294)

Isabel (1240-1271) = 1258 William,Marquis de Montferrat

Margaret (1249-1312) = 1272 Edmund of Cornwall died 130

Rohese (1252-1299+) = 1270 Roger deMowbray died 1297

Eglentina (1257-1257)

Gilbert de CLARE (1243-1295) = 1254 (1) Alice de Lusignan (annulled)

Joan (1264/71-1322+ = 1284 (1) Duncan died 1289, 1302

(2) Gervase Avenel died 1322+

Isabella (1263-1358) = 1316 Maurice de Berkley

1290 (2)

Joan of Acredid died1307

Eleanor (1292-1337)=(1) 1306 Hugh Despenser died1326

(2) 1327

William la Zouche died 1337

Margaret (1293-1342)= (1) 1307 Peter Gaveston d.s.p. 1312

(2) 1317

Hugh D'Audley died 1347

Elizabeth (1295-1360)= (1) 1308 John de Burgh died 1313

(2) 1316 Theobald Verdun d.s.p. 1316

(3) 1317 Roger Damory d.s.p. 1322

{Put together by Dave Utz - copied from the Internet 12/97}

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps06/ps06_351.htm

From "A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314", by Michael Altschul, Baltimore, The Johns

Hopkins press, 1965.

The Clares came to England with the Conqueror. Like many other great families which settled in England after the Conquest,

they were related to the dukes of Normandy and had established themselves as important members of the Norman feudal

aristocracy in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries. The origin of the family can be traced to Godfrey, eldest of the

illegitimate children of Duke Richard I (the Fearless), the Conqueror's great-grandfather. While the Duke granted Godfrey

Brionne, he did not make him a count. Godfrey's comital title derives from the grant of the county of Eu made to him after

996 by his half-brother, Duke Richard II. After Godfrey's death, Eu was given to William, another of Duke Richard I's

bastard sons, and Gilbert, Godfrey's son, was left with only the lordship of Brionne. However, under Duke Robert I, father

of William the Conqueror, Gilbert assumed the title of count of Brionne while not relinquishing his claim to Eu. When

Count William of Eu died shortly before 1040, Gilbert assumed the land and title, but he was assassinated in 1040 and his

young sons, Richard and Baldwin, were forced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, Count of

Flanders. When William the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter, he restored Gilbert's sons to Normandy,

although he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title. William granted the lordships of Bienfaite and

Orbec to Richard fitz Gilbert, and Le Sap and Meules to Baldwin. While Gilbert's descendants later pressed a claim for

Brionne, it was never restored.

Richard and Baldwin fitz Gilbert took part in the Norman conquest of England, and both assumed important positions in the

Conqueror's reign. Baldwin was made guardian of Exeter in 1068, and appears in the Domesday Book as sheriff of Devon,

lord of Okehampton and numerous other estates in Devon, Dorset, and Somerset. His sons William and Richard were also

sheriffs of Devon and participated in the abortive Norman penetration of Carmarthen in the early twelfth century.

However, the lasting position of the family in England must be credited to Baldwin's brother, Richard fitz Gilbert I. He was

regent of England jointly with William de Warenne during the Conqueror's absence in 1075, and he served in various other

important capacities for the King. King William rewarded his cousin well, granting him one of the largest fiefs in the

territorial settlement. The lordship centered on Clare (obviously the origin of the Clare family name), Suffolk, which had

been an important stronghold in Anglo-Saxon times. The bulk of Richard fitz Gilbert's estates lay in Suffolk, Essex, Surrey,

and Kent, but comprised holdings in various other counties in the southern and eastern parts of the kingdom as well. In

addition, King William arranged for Richard's marriage to Rohese, sister of Walter Giffard, later Earl of Buckingham, and

her dowry, consisting of lands in Huntingdon and Hertford, became absorbed in the family inheritance.

After Richard's death, his extensive properties in Normandy and England were divided between his two eldest sons. The

Norman fiefs of Bienfaite and Orbec passed to Roger, while Gilbert, inherited the English honors of Clare and Tonbridge.

- the players -

Richard I, Duke of Normandy, died 996 : Godfrey of Brionne and Eu died ca 1015 : Gilbert, count of Brionne died 1040 :

-Richard fitz Gilbert (1035-1090) = Rohese de Giffard : Roger d.s.p. 1130 Gilbert fitz Richard I(ca1066-1117 ) = Adeliz

daughter of Hugh Claremont Walter d.s.p.1138 Richard, abbot of Ely 1100 Robert d.1136 Adelice = Walter Tirel Rohese =

Eudo Dapifer

-Baldwin fitz Gilbert died 1095 : William d.s.p. 1096 Robert d.s.p.1101 Richard d.s.p.1137

While Gilbert fitz Richard I found himself at odds with the Conqueror's successor, William Rufus, he and other members of

the family enjoyed great favor with Rufus' successor King Henry I. Some have suggested that Henry's largesse was due to

the fact that Walter Tirel, husband of Richard's daughter Adelize, shot the arrow which slew Rufus. Proof of this is lacking,

but with certainty the wealth and position of the Clare family increased rapidly during Henry's reign. One of Rohese

Giffards brothers (Walter) was made Earl of Buckingham and another Bishop of Winchester. Gilbert fitz Richard's brothers

were also rewarded: Richard, a monk at Bec, was made abbot of Ely in 1100; Robert was granted the forfeited manors of

Ralph Baynard in East Anglia; Walter, who founded Tintern Abbey in 1131, was given the great lordship of Netherwent

with the castle of Striguil in the southern march, territories previously held by Roger, son of William fitz Osborn, Earl of

Hereford, who had forfeited them in 1075. In 1110 Gilbert was granted the lordship of Ceredigion (Cardigan) in

southwestern Wales, and immediately embarked upon an intensive campaign to subjagate the area.

- the players -

Gilbert fitz Richard I (ca1066-1117)=Adeliz d/o Hugh Claremont : Richard fitz Gilbert II (ante 1100-1136)=Adelize de

Chester Gilbert b. 1100 Baldwin d. 1154 Hervey Walter Margaret=William de Montifichet Alice=Aubrey de Vere

Rohese=Baderon de Monmouth

After Gilbert fitz Richard I died in 1117, his children continued to profit from royal generosity and favorable connections.

His daughters were all married to important barons; William de Montfichet, Lord of Stansted in Essex, the marcher Lord

Baderon de Monmouth, and Aubrey de Vere, Lord of Hedingham in Essex and father of the first Vere Earl of Oxford. Of the

five sons, little is known of two: Hervey, whom King Stephen sent on an expedition to Cardigan abt 1140, and Walter, who

participated in the Second Crusade of 1147. Baldwin established himself as an important member of the lesser baronage by

obtaining the Lincolnshire barony of Bourne through marriage. Richard fitz Gilbert II, the eldest and heir, was allowed to

marry Adeliz, sister of Ranulf des Gernons, Earl of Chester, thus acquiring lands in Lincoln and Northampton as her

marriage portion. He tried to consolidate the gains made by his father in Cardigan, but was killed in an ambush in 1136 and

the lordship was soon recovered by the Welsh.

Of Gilbert fitz Richard I' sons, Gilbert was the only one to achieve any great prominence, being the founder of the great

cadet branch of the family and the father of one of the most famous men in English history. Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare was

high in the favor of Henry I, perhaps because his wife Isabell, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and Earl

of Leicester, was one of Henry's favourite mistresses. When Gilbert's uncle Roger died without heirs, Henry granted

Gilbert the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. When another uncle, Walter, Lord of Netherwent in South

Wales, died without issue in 1138, King Richard? gave Gilbert this lordship in addition to the lordship of Pembroke, which

had been forfeited by Arnulf of Montgomery in 1102. Gilbert was also created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. At his death in

1148, he was succeeded by his son Richard fitz Gilbert, aka "Strongbow" who led the Norman invasion of Ireland and

obtained the great lordship of Leinster in 1171.

Thus, in just two generations, the cadet branch of the Clares became one of the most important families in England.

Strongbow was Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Netherwent, and Lord of Leinster being the most powerful of the marcher and

Anglo-Irish magnates under King Henry II. Strongbow d. in 1176 and son Gilbert d. abt. 1185, ending the male line. In

1189, the inheritance passed to Strongbow's daugther Isabel and her husband, William Marshal.

Meanwhile, the senior side prospered. After Richard fitz Gilbert II died in 1136, Clare, Tonbridge, and other estates passed

to the eldest son Gilbert fitz Richard II, who was created Earl of Hertford by King Stephen. Gilbert died probably unmarried

in 1152, when his younger brother Roger inherited the estates and comital title. Roger resumed the the campaign against the

Welsh in Cardigan where, after 8 years, he was defeated in 1165. However, Roger did add some lands and nine knights'

fees through his marriage to Maud, daughter and heir of the Norfolk baron James de St. Hillary. Roger died in 1173 and his

widow, Maud, conveyed the remainder of the inheritance to her next husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of Arundel. The

Clare estates along with the earldom passed to Roger's son, Richard, who for the next 4 decades until he died in 1217, was

the head of the great house of CLARE, adding immensely to the wealth, prestige, and landed endowment of his line.

Roger's son Richard, hereinafter Richard de CLARE acquired half of the former honor of Giffard in 1189 when King

Richard I, in need of money for the Third Crusade, agreed to divide the Giffard estates between Richard de CLARE and his

cousin Isabel, Strongbow's daughter based on their claims of descendancy to Rohese Giffard. Richard de CLARE obtained

Long Crendon in Buckingham, the caput of the Giffard honor in England, associated manors in Buckingham, Cambridge,

and Bedfordshire, and 43 knights' fees, in addition to some former Giffard lands in Normandy. When Richard de CLARE's

mother Maud died in 1195, he obtained the honor of St. Hilary. Maud's 2nd husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of

Arundel, who had held St. Hilary jure uxoris, d. in 1193, and despite the fact he had a son and heir, the honor reverted to

Maud and after her death escheated to the crown. Richard de CLARE offered 360 and acquired it. The honor later became

absorbed into the honor of CLARE and lost its separate identity.

Richard de CLARE's most important act, however, was his marriage to Amicia, 2nd daughter and eventual sole heir to

William Earl of Gloucester. The Gloucester inheritance included the earldom and honor of Gloucester with over 260 knights'

fees in England, along with the important marcher lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. It was not easy though!! William

died 1183, leaving 3 daughters. The eldest, Mabel, married Amaury de Montfort, Count of Evreux, while the second,

Amicia married Richard de CLARE. King Henry II meanwhile arranged the marriage of the youngest Isabel, to his son

John, Count of Mortain, in 1189. When John became King in 1199, he divorced Isabel to marry Isabelle of Angoulªme, but,

he kept the 1st Isabel in his custody. Then in 1200, John created Mabel's son Amaury Earl of Gloucester. In addition,

Richard de CLARE and his son Gilbert were given a few estates and 10 fees of the honor of Gloucester of Kent; otherwise,

John kept the bulk of the honor, with the great lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. Mabel's son Amaury died without

issue in 1213. Shortly thereafter, John gave the 1st Isabel in marriage to Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, who was

also created Earl of Gloucester. When Geoffrey died, the inheritance was assigned to Hubert de Burgh, the justiciar. Hubert

married Countess Isabel shortly before her death in Oct. 1217, however, he did not retain the estates, since they passed to

Amicia, now recognized as Countess of Gloucesthire, and her husband Richard de CLARE, despite the fact Richard and

Amicia had been separated since 1200.

Richard outlived Isabel by several weeks and by 28 Nov 1217, he was dead, leaving Gilbert, aged 38, as the sole heir to the

Clare and Gloucester estates and title. Gilbert de CLARE assumed the title of Earl of Gloucester and Hertford and was

charged £350 relief for the honors of Clare, Gloucester, St. Hilary and his half of the old Giffard barony. He controlled

some 456 knights fees, far more than any other, and it did not include some 50 fees in Glamorgan and Gwynllwg.

By a remarkable series of fortuitous marriages and quick deaths, the CLARES were left in 1217 in possession of an

inheritance which in terms of social prestige, potential revenues, knights' fees, and a lasting position of great importance

among the marcher lords of Wales. They were probably the most successful family in developing their lands and power

during the 12th century and in many ways the most powerful noble family in 13th century England. By 1317, however, the

male line of Clares became extinct and the inheritance was partitioned. Between 1217 and 1317 there were four Clare

generations.

Gilbert de CLARE, born abt. 1180 had a brother Richard/Roger and a sister Matilda. Richard accompanied Henry III's

brother, Richard of Cornwall, to Gascony in 1225-26 and was never heard from again. Matilda was married to William de

Braose (died 1210 when he and his mother were starved to death by King John), eldest son of the great marcher baron

William de Braose (died 1211), Lord of Brecknock, Abergavenny, Builth, Radnor, and Gower, who was exiled by King

John. Matilda returned to her father and later (1219) sued Reginald de Braose, second son of William, for the family lands,

succeeding only in recovering Gower and the Sussex baronry of Bramber.

Gilbert de CLARE, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford from 1217 to 1230, married Oct. 1214 his cousin Isabel, daughter and

eventual co-heiress of William Marshal (died 1219), earl of Pembroke. Gilbert and Isabel had three sons and two daughters,

with the eldest son and heir Richard, born 4 Aug 1222, thus only 8, when his father died. In 1243, Richard de CLARE

came of age and assumed the estates and titles of his father until he d. 15 July 1262. His brother William, b. 1228 held lands

of Earl Richard in Hampshire and Norfolk for the service of a knight's fee. In June 1258, during a baronial reform program,

William was granted custody of Winchester castle. A month later he died, reportedly by poison administered by the Earl

Richard's seneschal (an official in a medieval noble household in charge of domestic arrangements and the administration of

servants; a steward or major- domo. Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin), Walter de Scoteny, in

supposed collaboration with Henry III's Poitevin half-brothers, who strongly opposed the baronial program and Earl

Richard's participation in it. (Why didn't they poison Richard??)

Earl Gilbert's daughters were very well placed. Amicia, born 1220, was betrothed (promised to be given in marriage) in

1226 to Baldwin de Reviers, grandson and heir to William de Reviers, Earl of Devon (died 1217). Baldwin was only a year

or two older than Amicia and Earl Gilbert offered 2,000 marks to the King for the marriage and custody of some Reviers

estates during Baldwin's minority. The marriage must have been consummated around 1235, since Baldwin's son and heir

(Baldwin) was born the next year. After Baldwin died in 1245, Amicia (died 1283) controlled the lands of her son (died

1262) and was given permission to marry a minor English baron, Robert de Guines/Gynes, uncle of Arnold III, Count of

Guines.

Earl Gilbert's other daughter, Isabel born 1226, married 1240 the Scots baron Robert Bruce, lord of Annandale (d 1295),

and by him was the grandmother of the hero of Bannockburn. Her marriage was probably arranged by her mother Isabel and

uncle, Gilbert Marshal who gave her the Sussex manor of Ripe as a marriage portion.

Isabel Marshal outlived Earl Gilbert de CLARE by ten years, during which time she was busy. In 1231 she married Richard

of Cornwall, to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry III, who was trying to arrange another match for Richard.

She died 1240, after 4 children by Richard, only one of which lived past infancy. According to the Tewkesbury chronicle,

she wished to be buried next to her 1st husband, but Richard of Cornwall had her buried at Beaulieu Abbey in Hampshire,

although as a pious gesture he allowed her heart to be sent to Tewkesbury.

- the players -

Richard de CLARE, Earl of Hertford d. 1217

Richard/Roger d.s.p. 1228

Matilda = (1) William de Braose

(2) ?? 1219 Rhys Gryg died 1233

Gilbert de CLARE (1180-1230) = 1214 Isabel =1231 Richard of Cornwall died 1272

William (1228-d.s.p. 1258)

Gilbert born 1229

Amicia (1220-1283) = (1) 1226 Baldwin de Reviers

(2) 1247 Robert de Guines died 1283

Isabel born 1226 = 1240 Robert Bruce died 1295

Richard de CLARE (1222-1262) = (1) Margaret de Burgh died 1237

(2) Maud de Lacy d. 1289

Thomas (124?-1287) = Juliana of Offaly d. 1300

Bogo (1248-d.s.p. 1294)

Isabel (1240-1271) = 1258 William,Marquis de Montferrat

Margaret (1249-1312) = 1272 Edmund of Cornwall died 130

Rohese (1252-1299+) = 1270 Roger deMowbray died 1297

Eglentina (1257-1257)

Gilbert de CLARE (1243-1295) = 1254 (1) Alice de Lusignan (annulled)

Joan (1264/71-1322+ = 1284 (1) Duncan died 1289, 1302

(2) Gervase Avenel died 1322+

Isabella (1263-1358) = 1316 Maurice de Berkley

1290 (2)

Joan of Acredid died1307

Eleanor (1292-1337)=(1) 1306 Hugh Despenser died1326

(2) 1327

William la Zouche died 1337

Margaret (1293-1342)= (1) 1307 Peter Gaveston d.s.p. 1312

(2) 1317

Hugh D'Audley died 1347

Elizabeth (1295-1360)= (1) 1308 John de Burgh died 1313

(2) 1316 Theobald Verdun d.s.p. 1316

(3) 1317 Roger Damory d.s.p. 1322

{Put together by Dave Utz - copied from the Internet 12/97}

--------------------

--------------------

Gilbert, Count of Brionne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gilbert or Giselbert "Crispin", (1000-1040) was a Norman noble, Count of Eu, and Count of Brionne in northern France.

Parentage

The reference listed below states he was the son of Geoffrey, Count of Eu (b. 962) who was an illegitimate child of Richard the Fearless. Some sources say Gislebert was the son of Godfrey of Brionne and Eu, others that he was the son of Gilbert, Baron of Bec. Still others claim that his father was Crispin de Bec (b. 940). Gislebert's mother was apparently Haloise de Guînes (b. 942).

--------------------

From "A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314", by Michael Altschul, Baltimore, The Johns

Hopkins press, 1965.

The Clares came to England with the Conqueror. Like many other great families which settled in England after the Conquest,

they were related to the dukes of Normandy and had established themselves as important members of the Norman feudal

aristocracy in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries. The origin of the family can be traced to Godfrey, eldest of the

illegitimate children of Duke Richard I (the Fearless), the Conqueror's great-grandfather. While the Duke granted Godfrey

Brionne, he did not make him a count. Godfrey's comital title derives from the grant of the county of Eu made to him after

996 by his half-brother, Duke Richard II. After Godfrey's death, Eu was given to William, another of Duke Richard I's

bastard sons, and Gilbert, Godfrey's son, was left with only the lordship of Brionne. However, under Duke Robert I, father

of William the Conqueror, Gilbert assumed the title of count of Brionne while not relinquishing his claim to Eu. When

Count William of Eu died shortly before 1040, Gilbert assumed the land and title, but he was assassinated in 1040 and his

young sons, Richard and Baldwin, were forced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, Count of

Flanders. When William the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter, he restored Gilbert's sons to Normandy,

although he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title. William granted the lordships of Bienfaite and

Orbec to Richard fitz Gilbert, and Le Sap and Meules to Baldwin. While Gilbert's descendants later pressed a claim for

Brionne, it was never restored.

Richard and Baldwin fitz Gilbert took part in the Norman conquest of England, and both assumed important positions in the

Conqueror's reign. Baldwin was made guardian of Exeter in 1068, and appears in the Domesday Book as sheriff of Devon,

lord of Okehampton and numerous other estates in Devon, Dorset, and Somerset. His sons William and Richard were also

sheriffs of Devon and participated in the abortive Norman penetration of Carmarthen in the early twelfth century.

However, the lasting position of the family in England must be credited to Baldwin's brother, Richard fitz Gilbert I. He was

regent of England jointly with William de Warenne during the Conqueror's absence in 1075, and he served in various other

important capacities for the King. King William rewarded his cousin well, granting him one of the largest fiefs in the

territorial settlement. The lordship centered on Clare (obviously the origin of the Clare family name), Suffolk, which had

been an important stronghold in Anglo-Saxon times. The bulk of Richard fitz Gilbert's estates lay in Suffolk, Essex, Surrey,

and Kent, but comprised holdings in various other counties in the southern and eastern parts of the kingdom as well. In

addition, King William arranged for Richard's marriage to Rohese, sister of Walter Giffard, later Earl of Buckingham, and

her dowry, consisting of lands in Huntingdon and Hertford, became absorbed in the family inheritance.

After Richard's death, his extensive properties in Normandy and England were divided between his two eldest sons. The

Norman fiefs of Bienfaite and Orbec passed to Roger, while Gilbert, inherited the English honors of Clare and Tonbridge.

- the players -

Richard I, Duke of Normandy, died 996 : Godfrey of Brionne and Eu died ca 1015 : Gilbert, count of Brionne died 1040 :

-Richard fitz Gilbert (1035-1090) = Rohese de Giffard : Roger d.s.p. 1130 Gilbert fitz Richard I(ca1066-1117 ) = Adeliz

daughter of Hugh Claremont Walter d.s.p.1138 Richard, abbot of Ely 1100 Robert d.1136 Adelice = Walter Tirel Rohese =

Eudo Dapifer

-Baldwin fitz Gilbert died 1095 : William d.s.p. 1096 Robert d.s.p.1101 Richard d.s.p.1137

While Gilbert fitz Richard I found himself at odds with the Conqueror's successor, William Rufus, he and other members of

the family enjoyed great favor with Rufus' successor King Henry I. Some have suggested that Henry's largesse was due to

the fact that Walter Tirel, husband of Richard's daughter Adelize, shot the arrow which slew Rufus. Proof of this is lacking,

but with certainty the wealth and position of the Clare family increased rapidly during Henry's reign. One of Rohese

Giffards brothers (Walter) was made Earl of Buckingham and another Bishop of Winchester. Gilbert fitz Richard's brothers

were also rewarded: Richard, a monk at Bec, was made abbot of Ely in 1100; Robert was granted the forfeited manors of

Ralph Baynard in East Anglia; Walter, who founded Tintern Abbey in 1131, was given the great lordship of Netherwent

with the castle of Striguil in the southern march, territories previously held by Roger, son of William fitz Osborn, Earl of

Hereford, who had forfeited them in 1075. In 1110 Gilbert was granted the lordship of Ceredigion (Cardigan) in

southwestern Wales, and immediately embarked upon an intensive campaign to subjagate the area.

- the players -

Gilbert fitz Richard I (ca1066-1117)=Adeliz d/o Hugh Claremont : Richard fitz Gilbert II (ante 1100-1136)=Adelize de

Chester Gilbert b. 1100 Baldwin d. 1154 Hervey Walter Margaret=William de Montifichet Alice=Aubrey de Vere

Rohese=Baderon de Monmouth

After Gilbert fitz Richard I died in 1117, his children continued to profit from royal generosity and favorable connections.

His daughters were all married to important barons; William de Montfichet, Lord of Stansted in Essex, the marcher Lord

Baderon de Monmouth, and Aubrey de Vere, Lord of Hedingham in Essex and father of the first Vere Earl of Oxford. Of the

five sons, little is known of two: Hervey, whom King Stephen sent on an expedition to Cardigan abt 1140, and Walter, who

participated in the Second Crusade of 1147. Baldwin established himself as an important member of the lesser baronage by

obtaining the Lincolnshire barony of Bourne through marriage. Richard fitz Gilbert II, the eldest and heir, was allowed to

marry Adeliz, sister of Ranulf des Gernons, Earl of Chester, thus acquiring lands in Lincoln and Northampton as her

marriage portion. He tried to consolidate the gains made by his father in Cardigan, but was killed in an ambush in 1136 and

the lordship was soon recovered by the Welsh.

Of Gilbert fitz Richard I' sons, Gilbert was the only one to achieve any great prominence, being the founder of the great

cadet branch of the family and the father of one of the most famous men in English history. Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare was

high in the favor of Henry I, perhaps because his wife Isabell, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and Earl

of Leicester, was one of Henry's favourite mistresses. When Gilbert's uncle Roger died without heirs, Henry granted

Gilbert the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. When another uncle, Walter, Lord of Netherwent in South

Wales, died without issue in 1138, King Richard? gave Gilbert this lordship in addition to the lordship of Pembroke, which

had been forfeited by Arnulf of Montgomery in 1102. Gilbert was also created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. At his death in

1148, he was succeeded by his son Richard fitz Gilbert, aka "Strongbow" who led the Norman invasion of Ireland and

obtained the great lordship of Leinster in 1171.

Thus, in just two generations, the cadet branch of the Clares became one of the most important families in England.

Strongbow was Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Netherwent, and Lord of Leinster being the most powerful of the marcher and

Anglo-Irish magnates under King Henry II. Strongbow d. in 1176 and son Gilbert d. abt. 1185, ending the male line. In

1189, the inheritance passed to Strongbow's daugther Isabel and her husband, William Marshal.

Meanwhile, the senior side prospered. After Richard fitz Gilbert II died in 1136, Clare, Tonbridge, and other estates passed

to the eldest son Gilbert fitz Richard II, who was created Earl of Hertford by King Stephen. Gilbert died probably unmarried

in 1152, when his younger brother Roger inherited the estates and comital title. Roger resumed the the campaign against the

Welsh in Cardigan where, after 8 years, he was defeated in 1165. However, Roger did add some lands and nine knights'

fees through his marriage to Maud, daughter and heir of the Norfolk baron James de St. Hillary. Roger died in 1173 and his

widow, Maud, conveyed the remainder of the inheritance to her next husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of Arundel. The

Clare estates along with the earldom passed to Roger's son, Richard, who for the next 4 decades until he died in 1217, was

the head of the great house of CLARE, adding immensely to the wealth, prestige, and landed endowment of his line.

Roger's son Richard, hereinafter Richard de CLARE acquired half of the former honor of Giffard in 1189 when King

Richard I, in need of money for the Third Crusade, agreed to divide the Giffard estates between Richard de CLARE and his

cousin Isabel, Strongbow's daughter based on their claims of descendancy to Rohese Giffard. Richard de CLARE obtained

Long Crendon in Buckingham, the caput of the Giffard honor in England, associated manors in Buckingham, Cambridge,

and Bedfordshire, and 43 knights' fees, in addition to some former Giffard lands in Normandy. When Richard de CLARE's

mother Maud died in 1195, he obtained the honor of St. Hilary. Maud's 2nd husband, William de Aubigny, Earl of

Arundel, who had held St. Hilary jure uxoris, d. in 1193, and despite the fact he had a son and heir, the honor reverted to

Maud and after her death escheated to the crown. Richard de CLARE offered 360 and acquired it. The honor later became

absorbed into the honor of CLARE and lost its separate identity.

Richard de CLARE's most important act, however, was his marriage to Amicia, 2nd daughter and eventual sole heir to

William Earl of Gloucester. The Gloucester inheritance included the earldom and honor of Gloucester with over 260 knights'

fees in England, along with the important marcher lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. It was not easy though!! William

died 1183, leaving 3 daughters. The eldest, Mabel, married Amaury de Montfort, Count of Evreux, while the second,

Amicia married Richard de CLARE. King Henry II meanwhile arranged the marriage of the youngest Isabel, to his son

John, Count of Mortain, in 1189. When John became King in 1199, he divorced Isabel to marry Isabelle of Angoulªme, but,

he kept the 1st Isabel in his custody. Then in 1200, John created Mabel's son Amaury Earl of Gloucester. In addition,

Richard de CLARE and his son Gilbert were given a few estates and 10 fees of the honor of Gloucester of Kent; otherwise,

John kept the bulk of the honor, with the great lordships of Glamorgan and Gwynllwg. Mabel's son Amaury died without

issue in 1213. Shortly thereafter, John gave the 1st Isabel in marriage to Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, who was

also created Earl of Gloucester. When Geoffrey died, the inheritance was assigned to Hubert de Burgh, the justiciar. Hubert

married Countess Isabel shortly before her death in Oct. 1217, however, he did not retain the estates, since they passed to

Amicia, now recognized as Countess of Gloucesthire, and her husband Richard de CLARE, despite the fact Richard and

Amicia had been separated since 1200.

Richard outlived Isabel by several weeks and by 28 Nov 1217, he was dead, leaving Gilbert, aged 38, as the sole heir to the

Clare and Gloucester estates and title. Gilbert de CLARE assumed the title of Earl of Gloucester and Hertford and was

charged £350 relief for the honors of Clare, Gloucester, St. Hilary and his half of the old Giffard barony. He controlled

some 456 knights fees, far more than any other, and it did not include some 50 fees in Glamorgan and Gwynllwg.

By a remarkable series of fortuitous marriages and quick deaths, the CLARES were left in 1217 in possession of an

inheritance which in terms of social prestige, potential revenues, knights' fees, and a lasting position of great importance

among the marcher lords of Wales. They were probably the most successful family in developing their lands and power

during the 12th century and in many ways the most powerful noble family in 13th century England. By 1317, however, the

male line of Clares became extinct and the inheritance was partitioned. Between 1217 and 1317 there were four Clare

generations.

Gilbert de CLARE, born abt. 1180 had a brother Richard/Roger and a sister Matilda. Richard accompanied Henry III's

brother, Richard of Cornwall, to Gascony in 1225-26 and was never heard from again. Matilda was married to William de

Braose (died 1210 when he and his mother were starved to death by King John), eldest son of the great marcher baron

William de Braose (died 1211), Lord of Brecknock, Abergavenny, Builth, Radnor, and Gower, who was exiled by King

John. Matilda returned to her father and later (1219) sued Reginald de Braose, second son of William, for the family lands,

succeeding only in recovering Gower and the Sussex baronry of Bramber.

Gilbert de CLARE, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford from 1217 to 1230, married Oct. 1214 his cousin Isabel, daughter and

eventual co-heiress of William Marshal (died 1219), earl of Pembroke. Gilbert and Isabel had three sons and two daughters,

with the eldest son and heir Richard, born 4 Aug 1222, thus only 8, when his father died. In 1243, Richard de CLARE

came of age and assumed the estates and titles of his father until he d. 15 July 1262. His brother William, b. 1228 held lands

of Earl Richard in Hampshire and Norfolk for the service of a knight's fee. In June 1258, during a baronial reform program,

William was granted custody of Winchester castle. A month later he died, reportedly by poison administered by the Earl

Richard's seneschal (an official in a medieval noble household in charge of domestic arrangements and the administration of

servants; a steward or major- domo. Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin), Walter de Scoteny, in

supposed collaboration with Henry III's Poitevin half-brothers, who strongly opposed the baronial program and Earl

Richard's participation in it. (Why didn't they poison Richard??)

Earl Gilbert's daughters were very well placed. Amicia, born 1220, was betrothed (promised to be given in marriage) in

1226 to Baldwin de Reviers, grandson and heir to William de Reviers, Earl of Devon (died 1217). Baldwin was only a year

or two older than Amicia and Earl Gilbert offered 2,000 marks to the King for the marriage and custody of some Reviers

estates during Baldwin's minority. The marriage must have been consummated around 1235, since Baldwin's son and heir

(Baldwin) was born the next year. After Baldwin died in 1245, Amicia (died 1283) controlled the lands of her son (died

1262) and was given permission to marry a minor English baron, Robert de Guines/Gynes, uncle of Arnold III, Count of

Guines.

Earl Gilbert's other daughter, Isabel born 1226, married 1240 the Scots baron Robert Bruce, lord of Annandale (d 1295),

and by him was the grandmother of the hero of Bannockburn. Her marriage was probably arranged by her mother Isabel and

uncle, Gilbert Marshal who gave her the Sussex manor of Ripe as a marriage portion.

Isabel Marshal outlived Earl Gilbert de CLARE by ten years, during which time she was busy. In 1231 she married Richard

of Cornwall, to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry III, who was trying to arrange another match for Richard.

She died 1240, after 4 children by Richard, only one of which lived past infancy. According to the Tewkesbury chronicle,

she wished to be buried next to her 1st husband, but Richard of Cornwall had her buried at Beaulieu Abbey in Hampshire,

although as a pious gesture he allowed her heart to be sent to Tewkesbury.

--------------------

The Fearless

--------------------

Geoffroy Comte d'Eu & Brionne

born about 0953 Brionne, Normandie

died about 1015

father:

  • Richard I "The Fearless" Duke of Normandy

born 0933 Fâecamp, Normandie

died 0996 Fâecamp, Normandie

mother:

  • Papia concubine of Richard I

born about 0935 Normandie

(end of information)

siblings:

  • Fredistina (Fredesende) de Normandie born about 0960 Normandy
  • Espriota de Normandie

Muriella de Normandie died 1020


children:

  • Gilbert "Crispin" Comte de Brionne born about 0979 Normandy, France
  • Adela d'Eu born about 1021 St. Saveur, Normandie, France
  • son of Geoffroy Comte d'Eu & Brionne

--------------------

Godfrey* DE BRIONNE (Count De Eu)

0963 - 1027

   * TITLE: Count De Eu
   * BIRTH: 0963
   * DEATH: 1027 

Father: Richard I** DE NORMANDY

Mother: Gonnor* DE CREPON

Family 1 : Hawise* Heloise DE GUINES

  1. +Gilbert I* CRISPIN
  2.  Emma D'EU
  3. +Adela* D'EU 

-------------------- See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p58.htm#i7084 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Godfrey d'Eu held the title Comte de Brionne [Normandy]. He was also known as Godfrey, Comte de Brionne. -------------------- Gilbert, Count of Brionne, who was son of Godfrey, Count of Brionne, illegitimate son of Rich ard I, the Fearless, Duke of Normandy. [Magna Charta Sureties, line 157-1]

----------------------

Turton has Geoffrey (Godfrey Comte d'Eu as a legitimate son of Richard & Gunnora, which confu sed me for awhile and I had him as a 2nd person (father of Adele only). However I believe Tu rton is wrong, and Godfrey was an illegitimate son (in fact the eldest illegitimate son).

----------------------

The following is the first part of a post to SGM, 29 Aug 1996, by Dave Utzinger:

From: Dave Utzinger (UTZ@AOL.COM) Subject: CLARE FAMILY Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval Date: 1996/08/29

From "A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314", by Michael Altschul, Bal timore, The Johns Hopkins press, 1965.

The Clares came to England with the Conqueror. Like many other great families settled in Eng land after the Conquest, they were related to the dukes of Normandy and had established thems elves as important members of the Norman feudal aristocracy in the late tenth and early eleve nth centuries.

The origin of the family can be traced to Godfrey, eldest of the illegitimate children of Duk e Richard I (the Fearless), the Conqueror's great-grandfather. While the Duke granted Godfre y Brionne, he did not make him a count. Godfrey's comital title derives from the grant of th e county of Eu made to him after 996 by his half-brother, Duke Richard II. After Godfrey's de ath, Eu was given to William, another of Duke Richard I's bastard sons, and Gilbert, Godfrey' s son, was left with only the lordship of Brionne. However, under Duke Robert I, father of W illiam the Conqueror, Gilbert assumed the title of count of Brionne while not relinquishing h is claim to Eu. When Count William of Eu died shortly before 1040, Gilbert assumed the lan d and title, but he was assassinated in 1040 and his young sons, Richard and Baldwin, were fo rced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, count of Flanders. When Will iam the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter, he restored Gilbert's sons to Normandy, a lthough he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title. William grante d the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec to Richard fitz Gilbert, and Le Sap and Meules to Bald win. While Gilbert's descendants later pressed a claim for Brionne, it was never restored. Ancestral File Number: 8WKN-20

Sources: 1.Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 94 2.Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com Page: D. Spencer Hines, 5 Aug 2000 3.Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 94, 107 4.Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5t h Edition, 1999 Page: 157-1 5.Repository: Name: Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150

Title: Americans Of Royal Descent Author: Browning, Charles H. Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1969 6.Repository: Name: Sutro Library

Title: Chapman Family History Author: Chapman, Beauchamp William Publication: (a Private Publishing) 1987 7.Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Ed ition, 1999 Page: 157-1 8.Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: Dave Utzinger, 29 Aug 1996 9.Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5t h Edition, 1999 Page: 157

-------------------- He was an illegitimate son of Duke Richard I of Normandy[1], by an unnamed concubine.[2] The county of Eu was an appanage created for Geoffrey by his brother Richard II of Normandy in 996 as part of Richard's policy of granting honors and titles for cadet members of his family.[2] The citadel of Eu played a critical part of the defense of Normandy[3]; the castle and walled town were on the river Bresle, just two miles from the English Channel. It had long been an embarkation point for England and in time of war was often one of the first place attacked.[3] The castle of Brionne had been held by the Dukes of Normandy as one of their own homes but Richard II also made a gift of Brionne to his half-brother Geoffrey[b], who held it for life passing it to his son Gilbert and was only returned to the demesne of the Duke after his murder.[4] Both Geoffrey (Godfrey) and his son Gilbert are styled counts in a diploma to Lisieux given by Duke Richard II, but without territorial designations.[5] Geoffrey died c. 1010.[6] -------------------- He was a son of Duke Richard I of Normandy,[1] by an unnamed wife or concubine.[b][5] The county of Eu was an appanage created for Geoffrey by his brother Richard II of Normandy in 996 as part of Richard's policy of granting honors and titles for cadet members of his family.[5] The citadel of Eu played a critical part of the defense of Normandy;[6] the castle and walled town were on the river Bresle, just two miles from the English Channel. It had long been an embarkation point for England and in time of war was often one of the first places attacked.[6]

The castle of Brionne had been held by the Dukes of Normandy as one of their own homes but Richard II also made a gift of Brionne to his half-brother Geoffrey,[c] who held it for life passing it to his son Gilbert and was only returned to the demesne of the Duke after his murder.[7]

Both Geoffrey (Godfrey) and his son Gilbert are styled counts in a diploma to Lisieux given by Duke Richard II, but without territorial designations.[8] Geoffrey died c. 1010.[9]

Issue[edit]

Geoffrey was the father of: Gilbert, Count of Brionne, who succeeded his father as Count of Eu & Brionne.[10]

Portal icon Normandy portal

Notes[edit]

a.Jump up ^ While there is little doubt Geoffrey (Godfrey) was Count of Eu, there is an open question as to whether Geoffrey was ever "Count" of Brionne. See: Douglas, Earliest Norman Counts, EHS 61, No. 240 (1946), p.134. b.Jump up ^ The early Normans followed the Viking custom of marriage called more danico that they considered a legitimate form of marriage.[2] It was the Church that considered this the same as concubinage.[3] Legitimacy would not have been an issue at this time.[4] c.Jump up ^ Orderic in a speech attributed to Roger, Count of Mullent to Robert II, Duke of Normandy, in asking for the castle of Brionne stated that it was Duke Richard the elder (I) who gave Brionne to his son Geoffrey (Godfrey). See Ordericus Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History, Trans. Forester, Vol. II (1854), p. 490.

References[edit]

view all 32

Geoffrey (Godfrey) fitz Richard de Brionne, comte d'Eu's Timeline

953
953
Brionne, Haute-Normandie, France
974
974
Age 21
Brionne, Eure, Upper Normandy, France
976
976
Age 23
[alternate birth date]
979
979
Age 26
Kerlouan, Finistere, Bretagne, France
980
980
Age 27
989
989
Age 36
France
997
997
Age 44
Eu, Normandie, West Francia (now France)
1015
July 21, 1015
Age 62
Plouigneau, Bretagne, France
1015
Age 62
France
1924
March 4, 1924
Age 62