George Allen, of Sandwich

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George Allen, of Sandwich

Also Known As: "George Allen", "Sr. "The Immigrant"", "George Allen "the elder"", "Alan", "Allan", "and Allyn"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Emigrated from, Weymouth, Dorchester, England
Death: Died in Springhill, Sandwich, New Plymouth, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of unknown father of George Allen, of Sandwich and unknown mother of George Allen, of Sandwich
Husband of 1st wife of George Allen, of Sandwich and Catherine Allen
Father of Joan Briggs; John Allen of Swansea; Ralph 'Wheelright' Allen, Sr., of Sandwich; Rose Newland; Rachel Allen and 15 others

Occupation: sailed from Weymouth March 20, 1635, came to America May 6
Managed by: Angus Wood-Salomon
Last Updated:

About George Allen, of Sandwich

If you have comments about George or his family, please enter them into the Discussion section of the profile. Thank you. Let's keep these sources readable...

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From http://minerdescent.com/2010/08/03/george-allen-the-elder/

"regarding the assertion that our George Allen was the son of Ralph Allen of Thurcaston, England. Even though there were two individuals named Ralph Allen who were associated with our George Allen in New Plymouth Colony, I am not aware of any evidence, other than name similarity, to support this contention either."

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George Allen, the immigrant ancestor, arrived in Massachusetts Bay Colony on 6 May 1635 from England. George's name, along with the names of those he emigrated with, was discovered on a list of passengers who departed from Weymouth, England for the New World on 20 March 1635. The list is slightly imperfect and you can read more about it here =

http://www.immigrantships.net/v3/1600v3/hullcompany16330320.html

Unfortunately, the name of the ship they traveled aboard has never been determined. This party, which was under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull, was granted leave to settle at Wessaguscus Plantation on 8 July 1635 by the General Court at Boston. Wessaguscus was soon given municipal rights, at which time it was renamed Weymouth, and its inhabitants were allowed representation in the General Court at Boston.

George Allen is known to have been married twice while still residing in England, the name of his first wife has not been determined. His second wife, however, was a woman named Katherine. Katherine accompanied George to America, and is believed to have been the mother of his five youngest children. According to the roster of passengers making up the Hull party, Katherine was listed as being thirty years old in 1635, thereby indicating that she had probably been born in about 1605 in England.

It has also been accepted by some that this George Allen was the son of John Allen of Saltford in Somersetshire, England. As with the above assertion, there is absolutely no evidence that I know of to substantiate this. There is, however, strong evidence that indicates that that George Allen was still residing at Saltford in 1638, when he was involved in a court case regarding tenements in the Tything of Saltford. By 1638, this George Allen was already well established at Sandwich on Cape Cod. Aside from the fact that a person named George Allen was identified as living in Saltford, England during the 1630's, any connection to our George Allen appears to be based more on conjecture than supportable facts.

Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jacmac/allen.htm

Also please see the attached documents that can be found at http://minerdescent.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/george-allen-the-elder/

I have transcribed the will of "Henry Allen" which was written in April of 1640. He mentions his brother George, sister Susan Willmott, sister Joane Usher, cousin Joseph Usher (should be nephew), brother John, and wife Susan.

Thanks to the The Records of London's Livery Companies Online => http://www.londonroll.org/ I was able to find some tidbits that help confirm the fact that George Allen the clothmaker was a totally different George than this George who immigrated to Mass.

1. Henricus Allen - London - New apprentice, son of Rici - Monnyer - Turri London, London. Jozeph Ussher - Master Co Clothworker. Start Date: 25/07/1610 Apprentice Bond Length: 10 years.

2. Georgius Allen - London - New apprentice, Son of Rici Allen Monnyer - Turrim London, London. Jozeph Ussher - Master Co Clothworker. Start Date: 30/09/1613 Apprentice Bond Length: 9 years.

3. Georg Allen - New freeman Co Clothworker, Jozeph Usher - Master Co Clothworker, 1620.

4. George Allen the Elder Sheeremaker - Queenehithe Master Co Clothworker, William Johnson - London - New apprentice - Start Date: 11/02/1658.

The age of apprenticeship was usually 14-21. So this would give George Allen, clothworker a birth date of about 1598, which would make him about 26 when he married Katherine Slarks. Since George Allen the clothworker from Queenhithe, London was busy still being a clothworker in 1658, he could not have been the George Allen who traveled to America with Rev John Hull since he died in the year 1648.

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The following was taken from a document provided to me by Mr. Ed Cooper who has collected a huge amount of information on the Allen Family. Some of the information is on line as "The Allen Family Project" - see sources.

[Beginning of Ed Cooper information]

"George Allen who departed Bridgewater, Somersetshire, England in 1636 is the first American link in the chain of Allens who extend over a period of almost 400 years and 15 generations. His is a remarkably well documented descent for an essentially middle-class American family. Among his descendants are Allens who settled on the island of Martha's Vineyard and in town of Fairhaven, Massachusetts--the descendants of his grandson James, through Samuel, who comprise the heart of this record. They "have spread from Maine to California." George's other known sons and "least children," though less well documented, are interesting lines. Among his decedents and in-laws are five American Presidents; Grant, F.D.R., Nixon, Ford and Bush, as well as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

In any event, our progenitor, George Allen, sailed 20 March 1635/6 (Old Style), in a ship whose name or captain were not recorded, out of Weymouth (fifty miles east of Plymouth) the largest port in Dorsetshire, bound for New England. He left with at least 106 other persons from 21 families under the leadership of Rev. Joseph Hall of Somersetshire, England. They landed at Boston, Massachusetts on the 6th of May, 1636--after spending 47 days at sea.

The departure record, which was not discovered until late in the last century; the name of the ship or its captian were not recorded. The record indicates that "George Allin (24) was accompanied by his wife, Katherin Allyn (30) and his sons; George Allyn (16), William Allyn (8) and Mathew Allyn age six." It also says he was traveling with a twenty-six-year-old servant, Edward Poole; early Atlantic voyages were expensive, so he must have been of some means. The sale of a farm might account for the fare but so too might land speculation. Some other of his sons including Ralph, Samuel, Henry and Robert had proceeded their father to America. Other sons, and perhaps a daughter, were born in Plymouth Colony.

Obviously there is something wrong with George's age as recorded in the departure record. George might have been prolific, but he was certainly older than eight when he fathered son George. I am at a loss to explain this; if he was born in 1568 he would have been 68 years old--hardly 24--and 80 at his death. At 68-years-of-age, he would have been the oldest migrant in the records of the first wave of Puritans to the Massachussets Bay. One thing might explain the "24"--perhaps he was dyslexic and wrote the "5" up-side-down which would have made him 54. This is why his birth is recorded in our records as "about 1582."

Massachussetts Bay Colony records indicate that in March 1635/6 George Allen accompanied the "minister aged 40" Joseph Hall [a.k.a. Hull] to Wessagusset, now called Weymouth. George and his son Ralph are recorded as land holders in Weymouth that year but, apparently George did not remain there for long as in 1636 he was in the town of Saugus [unsubstantiated] which became Lynn, Massachusetts in that year. Then in 1637, he is recorded among the founders Sandwich (*see map #2). There his name appears as a member of the First Church of Sandwich in 1638, and one year later, he was admitted freeman and at the same time was appointed a Constable of Sandwich. This is credible proof that he was literate as that was a requirement of the job. In 1640/41 he was appointed the first deputy to the General Court at Plymouth from Sandwich, and he was a member of the committee to divide the land at Sandwich. He, himself, was granted 6 1/2 acres and at a later date, from the second division of land, he acquired another 62 acres of pasture (meadow) in the Sandwich area.

In 1646, two years before his death, he built a substantial house in Sandwich "about a quarter of a mile from the Quaker Meeting House on the Main road to the Cape." This house became a landmark and remained standing until about 1882/1890 at which time it either burned or was torn down and replaced upon the original foundation. During the War of 1812, there is a record that "the George Allen home was hit by Cannon fire from a British Man of War off shore." In 1923 it is recorded that another house "standing on the foundation of the George Allen house is owned by a Mr. Packard."

None the less, George Allen died in closing days of April 1648; he was buried the 2nd of May 1648--that is inscribed in stone, so to speak as the exact location of his burial site is unknown--probably at his homestead. In his will, the record of which exists, the following was written:

"I give to all my children twelve pence apiece. I give unto my sonne Matthew one calfe and five shillings. I give unto my wife the ould cow. I leave my house and household stufe to my wife during the time she continuith unmarried. [If she remarried, as she did--the remaining goods and land were to be divided between "the five least children." There is a record of the lands being transfered to the adult sons.] I give to my five least children a Cow apiece. I give unto my sonn, William, the meadow I bought of Peter Gaunt being in the 2nd Division for my lands and the rest of my meadow I give to my sons Henry and Samuel for my adventure in the barque, Heave to my wife and the least children. Wittness my hand, George Allen. In presence of William Loveridge, John Vincent, Richard Bourne." [End of Ed Cooper information]

There is an Allen monument in the Pierrepoint Manor Village Cemetery, Pierrepoint, NY at the intersection of Rt 11 & Rt 193 about 110 miles north of Syracuse. It says: "Prudent Earl wife of Joseph Allen born at Dartmouth, Massachusetts born Jan14, 1768 and died Dec 27, 1843.

Joseph Allen born Westport, Massachusetts Nov 11, 1758 and died Sept 23,1838.

"He was the first settler of (a place called) Bear Creek (now called Pierrepoint Manor) in 1805. He was a Revolutionary War Vet." On the other side of the Allen monument: George Allen 1568 Weymouth, England, 1635 to Lynn, Massachusetts and died 1648. Ralph Allen died 1698. Joseph Allen born 1642 and died 1704. Joseph Allen born 1667 and died 1735. [Note that this all agrees with other information on this family except for the date of birth of Joseph Allen and George Allen]

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George Allen arrived in Massachusetts Bay Colony with his family: Katherine, his wife and his sons: George, William, and Mathew, also one servant, Edward Poole on 6 May 1635 from England. His name, along with the names of those he came with (106 in all), was found on a list of passengers who departed Weymouth, England for the New World on 20 March 1635. George was later sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644.

George Allen (1568-1648) came from Weymouth, County Dorset, England with Rev Joseph Hull's company, and settled at Lynn, Mass in 1635, later was at Weymouth, Mass. In company with others he obtained a grant in 1637 and founded Sandwich, Mass. He settled there in 1638, and was first deputy of the General Court from 1640 to 1644. He was a constable in 1639, and a freeman.

George Allen's land in Sandwich consisted of two parcels; one of 60 acres of upland at Spring Hill (Plymouth Col. Rec. 2:76) the other of six and a half acres of marshland, granted him in the land division of April 15, 1640 (Plymouth Col. Rec. 1:149).

Proposed for Freeman of New Plymouth Colony March 5, 1638/39 and admitted Freeman in September 1639.

George left an undated will, naming wife Katherine, sons: Matthew, William, Henry, and Samuel and mentions five other children, unnamed. Katherine was named executrix and the will designated Ralph Allen and Richard Bourne as overseers. Residence: Sandwich, MA.

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From Somerset Record Soc. Vol 51, 1936 - Somerset Enrolled Deeds. Roll XXIII p 241. 354:

"At Bridgewater Sep 18 in the 3d year of Charles I (1627) George Allen yeoman/ John Allen, father of George Allen & George his son" [yeoman - in old English law - one having free land of 40 S by the year (previously 5 nobles), who was thereby qualified to serve in juries, vote for knights of the Shire, and do any other act for which the law required one who was "probus et legalis homo", hence one owning (and usually himself cultivating) a small landed property; a free holder]. George ALLEN & wife Katherine with sons George, 16, William, 8 & Matthew, age 6 & servant, Edward Poole, 28 arrived in Boston, MA 6 May 1635. They were members of the Rev. Joseph Hull party from England.

George was one of the original settlers of Sandwich, MA. Before 1637 the territory of Sandwich, MA was a part of the vast uninhabited tract granted to the council of Plymouth. George appears among the members of the first church in Sandwich in 1638. He is said to have been an Anabaptist before leaving England.

On Sept. 3, 1639 George Allen was "admitted freeman and after also sworne constable of Sandwich for the remainder of this year."

On March 3, 1639/40 George Allen was appointed one of two surveyors of the higways for Sandwich. (Many early Friends' Records are in vault at Moses Brown School, Providence, RI)

In 1646 George built a house in Sandwich about a quarter of a mile from the Quaker Meeting House on the main road to the Cape.

Sandwich was the first Quaker Meeting House in America.

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Representative Men & Old Families of South Eastern Mass; J.H. Beers & Co. 1912; Vol.1; pp.350-357:

Like so many of the early shiploads of immigrants to New England, a clergyman was the head of this little company. Sailing on March 20, 1635, this party arrived at Boston on May 6... On July 8, 1635, the General Court at Boston passed this vote: "There is leave granted to 21 ffamilyes to sitt down at Wessaguscus," and Sept. 2, 1635 this vote was adopted: "The name of Wessaguscus is also changed and hereafter to be called Waymothe," ...In a list of the proprietors of Weymouth compiled between Oct. 26, 1642 and May 21, 1644, we find the names of a large number of those who came in Rev. Joseph Hull's party...

In the list made not later than 1644 land is described as of George Allen and also land of Ralph Allen, who, although not coming in the same ship was in all probability his son. -------------------- George Allen, the immigrant ancestor of many of the Allen families found in America today, arrived in Massachusetts Bay Colony on 6 May 1635 from England. His name, along with the names of those he came with (106 in all), was found on a list of passengers who departed Weymouth, England for the New World on 20 March 1635. Unfortunately, the name of the ship they traveled aboard has never been determined. This party, which was under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull, was granted leave to settle at Wessaguscus Plantation on 8 July 1635 by the General Court at Boston. Wessaguscus was soon given municipal rights, at which time it was renamed Weymouth, and its inhabitants were allowed representation in the General Court at Boston.

Although it is not known for sure, George Allen may have been born in either Somersetshire, or Dorsetshire, England, or have at least resided in one of these places prior to emigrating. Lending some support for this belief is the fact that the Rev. Hull, and many of the other families that emigrated with George, appear to have been from one of these shires. Although George Allen is known to have married twice while still residing in England, the name of his first wife has not been determined. His second wife, however, was a woman named Katherine. Katherine accompanied George to America, and is believed to have been the mother of his five youngest children. According to the roster of passengers making up the Hull party, Katherine was listed as being thirty years old in 1635, thereby indicating that she had probably been born in about 1605 in England.

Although no records have been found to verify it, shortly after settling at Wessaguscus (Weymouth), George and his family may have moved to the village of Saugus, Massachusetts (now Lynn, Massachusetts). Sometime during the period 1637/38, however, George and his family again moved, this time to the newly organized settlement in New Plymouth Colony of Sandwich on Cape Cod. George, who was a farmer by trade, was subsequently recommended for "freeman" status in New Plymouth Colony on 5 March 1638/39, and was later admitted as such on 3 September 1639. George was later sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644.

George apparently died during the latter part of April 1648 at Sandwich, New Plymouth Colony, as he was subsequently buried there on 2 May 1648. His will was probated before the New Plymouth Court on 7 June 1648. One year later, on 8 June 1649, his widow, Katherine, furnished an inventory of George's estate to the New Plymouth Court. Sometime after George passed away, Katherine married for a second time to a man named John Collins, who was a shoemaker in Boston.

Although the identities of all of George's children have never been determined beyond all doubt, the names of eight children have been verified through various documents. In addition to these eight, it is highly probable that three other individuals, namely John, Robert, and Francis Allen, are also sons of George. Aside from those children that are known and very probable, some researchers also believe that the Joan Allen who married Clement Briggs at Dorchester in 1630/31, and the Joshua Allen who married Mary Crowell at Yarmouth in 1671, are also George's children. After spending considerable time researching these two individuals, I am not convinced that they are George’s children, and have therefore not included them in this genealogy.

It should also be mentioned that the "five least children" that George referred to in his will have not been verified beyond all doubt either. However, these children, who have been interpreted by most authorities to be the children George Allen had with his second wife, Katherine, are strongly believed to be Matthew, William, Henry, Samuel, and Gideon.

George Allen, probably a son of Ralph Allen, of Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England, was born in 1568, under the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He was probably a farmer near Bridgewater in Somersetshire, and was a member of a company which set sail March 20, 1635, and arrived at Boston on May 6, following.

For a time he resided at Sangus, Lynn, Massachusetts, and in 1637 joined with Edmund Freeman and others in the purchase of the town of Sandwich. When this town was incorporated Mr. Allen was chosen first deputy, the first officer in the town, and served in that capacity several years. He was a member of the church organized in Sandwich in 1638, became freeman in that town June 30, 1639, and constable at the same time.

In 1640 he was surveyor of highways; in 1641 a member of a committee of five to divide the meadow lands, receiving a considerable acreage; in 1646 he built his house, one-fourth mile from the meeting-house, on the road to the Cape, and this stood until 1882. After the purchase of Sandwich, several of his sons removed to that town with their families. He died there May 2, 1648, aged eighty years.

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA700&dq=mehitable+byram+braintree+ma&lr=&ei=6qsFTMrLBpaslASD_tG-DQ&cd=2&id=_c4UAAAAYAAJ#v=onepage&q&f=false


-------------------- George Allen, the immigrant ancestor of many of the Allen families found in America today, arrived in Massachusetts Bay Colony on 6 May 1635 from England. George's name, along with the names of those he emigrated with (106 in all), was discovered on a list of passengers who departed from Weymouth, England for the New World on 20 March 1635. Unfortunately, the name of the ship they traveled aboard has never been determined. This party, which was under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull, was granted leave to settle at Wessaguscus Plantation on 8 July 1635 by the General Court at Boston. Wessaguscus was soon given municipal rights, at which time it was renamed Weymouth, and its inhabitants were allowed representation in the General Court at Boston.

Although it is not known for sure, George Allen may have been born in either Somersetshire, or Dorsetshire, England, or have at least resided in one of these places prior to emigrating. Lending some support for this belief is the fact that the Rev. Hull, and many of the other families that emigrated with George, appear to have been from one of these shires. Although George Allen is known to have married twice while still residing in England, the name of his first wife has not been determined. His second wife, however, was a woman named Katherine. Katherine accompanied George to America, and is believed to have been the mother of his five youngest children. According to the roster of passengers making up the Hull party, Katherine was listed as being thirty years old in 1635, thereby indicating that she had probably been born in about 1605 in England.

Although no records have been found to verify it, shortly after settling at Wessaguscus (Weymouth), George and his family may have moved to the village of Saugus, Massachusetts (now Lynn, Massachusetts). Sometime during the period 1637/38, however, George and his family again moved, this time to the newly organized settlement in New Plymouth Colony of Sandwich on Cape Cod. George, who was a farmer by trade, was subsequently recommended for "freeman" status in New Plymouth Colony on 5 March 1638/39, and was later admitted as such on 3 September 1639. George was later sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644.

George apparently died during the latter part of April 1648 at Sandwich, New Plymouth Colony, as he was subsequently buried there on 2 May 1648. George's will was later probated before the New Plymouth Court on 7 June 1648, and one year later, on 8 June 1649, his widow, Katherine, furnished an inventory of George's estate to the New Plymouth Court. Sometime after George passed away, Katherine married for a second time to a man named John Collins, who was a shoemaker in Boston.

-------------------- In 1635, when the Puritans were emigrating in great numbers to escape persecution under Charles the First, George Allen joined a company of about 100 persons under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull. This company sailed from Weymouth, England, March 20, 1635, in the ship "SPEEDWELL" this name is not known to be correct, and arrived in Boston Harbor May 6, 1635. The ship's passenger list describes the family as George Allen aged (24) (dyslezic?); Katherine Allen, his wife, aged 30; George Allen, his son, aged 16; William Allen, his son, aged 8; Mathew Allen, aged 6 years.

George Allen remained in Boston until July when, with other members of the rev. Hull's company, he went to Wessaguscus or Weymouth, MA, as it was renamed, September 2, 1635. In 1636 George and his family were also in Saugus (now Lynn, Mass.) for awhile and there joined with Emund Freeman and others in the purchase of the township of Sandwich, Barnstable Co., Mass. and settled there in 1637.

Some of George Allen's sons preceded him to America, settling in the Boston area. After purchase of Sandwich, they all moved to that town and settled near their father.

George Allen was much involved in the public life of Sandwich. When Sandwich was incorporated in 1639, he was elected constable, an office of great dignity in the early colonial days, he being charged with the enforcement of all laws. In March 1639, he was chosen Deputy of the General Court, in which capacity he served until 1644. At the same time, he was also appointed one of the surveyor's of highways. His house, built in 1646, was located a fourth of a mile from the Sandwich Meeting House on the main road to the Cape and stood until 1882.

George Allen was a Baptist and a member of the First Church of Sandwich in 1638. The arrival of the Quakers in America in 1656 would have a profound influence on the children of George Allen, as six or seven eventually joined the Friends. George did not live to see this change in the family's faith as he died in Sandwich on May 2, 1648 and was buried there.

The undated will of George Allen was proved at New Plymouth, June 7, 1648, and has been a source of much trouble to the family genealogists. In the will he leaves "all of his children twelve pence apiece", and he names five sons using the expression, "five least children" (minors), the remaining of which is not clear. The five children named were Mathew, Henry, Samuel, George, and William. Other children of George were Ralph, Francis, James, Gideon, Judah and Caleb. It is possible that he was married twice, and that some of his children were by the first wife whose name is unknown. Some authorities say he also had several daughters. His widow, Katherine, married John Collins and moved to Boston.

of exert from "THE ALLEN'S A FAMILY PORTRAIT", PAGE 1

"The Family of George Allen, the Immigrant, and Its Connection with the Settlement of Dartmouth", Walter Spooner Allen, 1907

On March 20, 1635, there sailed from Weymouth England for New England a ship, whose name is unknown, carrying something over 100 persons under the leadership of Rev. Joseph Hull, and in the ship's company was George Allen, Catherine Allen his wife, his sons George, William, and Matthew, and Edward Poole his servant, and from this George Allen came the line of Allens who have been identified with old Dartmouth (Ma).

Like so many of the early shiploads of immigrants to New England, a clergyman was the head of this little company, and from the residences of those already named, it is safe to assume that this party was made up of friends and neighbors living on the borders of Sommersetshire and Dorsetshire, who decided to follow Mr. Hull into the new country across the ocean.

The religious breaking up in England, which began under Henry VIII, and which every year grew more intense, reached it's climax under Charles I, with the appointment of Archbishop Laud, and the persecution of Dissenters and Separtists who chose to meet together and worship in their own way drove many of the best blood of England to seek refuge in Holland and America.

Somersetshire was the hotbed of religious dissent. The people were distinctly republican in thought, and the contest between the Established church, controlled by the King and the Bishops, and the Non-Conformists, who sought a Republican form of ecclesiastical government, was bitter. Each wanted the mastery. Under the episcopates of John Still and James Montague, covering the period from 1592 to 1616, every attempt was made to enforce conformity and submission to authority, and heavy penalties were imposed in the Episcopal courts, but the crisis in the ecclesiastical affairs of this district came in the episcopate of William Piers between 1632 and 1670.

Piers was the son of a hatter, and subverviently followed Archbishop Laud in his attacks on the people. Speaking of this period, and English writer says; "Easily moved by kindness as the people of Somerset are, their resolute will, and their impatience of any assertion of authority over them, rendered the appointment of such a man as Piers to this see a singularly unfortunate one. The special character of the bishop himself and of the people of his diocese probably had, at least as much to do with the resistance to Pier's measures as any difference of principle."

"The Sprague Collection--Genealogies of the Families of Braintree, MA" (Winnetka Library, microfilm)

George Allen, aged 24 (dyslexic) years, Katherine his wife aged 30 years, George his son aged 16 years, William his son, aged 8 years, and Mathew his son, aged 6 years came to New England in the company of Rev. Joseph Hull sailing from Weymouth, England about March 20, 1634/5 and brought Edward Poole aged 20 as his servant. As most of this company came from Somerset Co. or Dorset Co. it is highly probable that George Allen also did.

He had land granted to him at Weymouth and was made a freeman of the Plymouth Colony September 3, 1639. He removed to Sandwich where he was one of the original church in 1638.

--------------------

George Allen "the Immigrant" of Sandwich, MA

Born in England, about 1568. Buried in Sandwich, MA on May 2, 1648. Married twice. First wife's name is unknown. His second wife, Catharine, outlived him and married John Collins after his demise. He had twelve children.

Probably the son of Ralph Allen of Thurcaston, Leicester County. Immigrated to America in 1635 with another 100 people under the leadership of Rev. Joseph Hull. George Allen and his family settled in Lynn, Massachusetts. In 1637 he joined with Edmund Freeman and others in the purchase of the township of Sandwich, Massachusetts, and the same year settled in that town. When Sandwich was incorporated he was chosen deputy to the general court in Plymouth, first office in town, and served in that capacity for several years. T

Children:

  • He had twelve sons and several daughters; some of his sons preceded him to America and settled first in the vicinity of Boston, but after the purchase of Sandwich they all removed to that town and settled near the residence of their father. He died in Sandwich, May 2, 1648, aged about eighty years. In his will, probated June 7, 1648, he named five sons, Matthew, Henry, Samuel, George and William. He made provision in his will for "five least children" without naming them.

Sources and Notes

http://books.google.com/books?id=b4k-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA348&dq=%22George+Allen%22+Sandwich,+Barnstable,+Massachusetts,&hl=en&ei=jF3tTdCaC8bZgAfVlJniCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&sqi=2&ved=0CDgQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%22George%20Allen%22%20Sandwich%2C%20Barnstable%2C%20Massachusetts%2C&f=false

Allen is the name of an ancient ALLEN family in the county of Durham, England, and of another family in the county of Essex. The name in early times was spelled Alon, Alwyne, Alleine, Allyn and many other ways, but in New England, as well as in England, the common spelling is Allen. The Allens of England bore arms, a shield sable, "A cross potent, border engrailed or." Crest: "A demi Lion argent, holding a rudder gules, nooks and nails or." The American ancestor of the Sandwich, Massachusetts, family was George Allen, born in England, about 1568, was probably the son of Ralph Allen of Thurcaston, Leicester county. In 1635, when the Puritans were emigrating in large numbers from the old country to escape the persecution of Archbishop Laud under King Charles I., he came in company with one hundred persons under the leadership of Rev. Joseph Hull. He is supposed to have been an Anabaptist. George Allen and his family settled in Lynn, Massachusetts. In 1637 he joined with Edmund Freeman and others in the purchase of the township of Sandwich, Massachusetts, and the same year settled in that town. When Sandwich was incorporated he was chosen deputy to the general court in Plymouth, first office in town, and served in that capacity for several years. The name of his first wife is not known. His second wife was Catharine, and after his death she married John Collins. He had twelve sons and several daughters; some of his sons preceded him to America and settled first in the vicinity of Boston, but after the purchase of Sandwich they all removed to that town and settled near the residence of their father. He died in Sandwich, May 2, 1648, aged about eighty years. In his will, probated June 7, 1648, he named five sons, Matthew, Henry, Samuel, George and William. He made provision in his will for "five least children" without naming them. He had twelve sons and several daughters; some of his sons preceded him to America and settled first in the vicinity of Boston, but after the purchase of Sandwich they all removed to that town and settled near the residence of their father. He died in Sandwich, May 2, 1648, aged about eighty years. In his will, probated June 7, 1648, he named five sons, Matthew, Henry, Samuel, George and William. He made provision in his will for "five least children" without naming them.

-------------------- George Allen (son of John Allen) was born Abt. 1581 in probablely Somerset, England, and died Bef. May 12, 1648 in Sandwich, Barmstable Co. Mass.. He married (1) Mrs George Allen on Abt. 1600 in England. He married (2) Katherine Starkes on 1624.

Biograghical text for George Allen

From "Anceatral Line Revised"

The first wife of George Allen is unknown, but she died in England before he emigrated to America. He was described as being of London when he married Katherine. George, Katherine and their sons sailed form Weymouth, England about March 20, 1635, with the congregation of Rev. Joseph Hull, with the Holbrook, Hull, and Read families. George probably lived in Saugus(Linn?), Mass. Bay Colony in 1663, then moved to Sandwich with the original proprietors of the town in 1637. The list of freemen of New Plymouth dated March 5, 1638/9 contain his name. He was an Anabaptist, later joined the Quakers, as did seven of his children. Investory of his estate was taken Sept 22, 1648, his will proved June 7, 1649.

From the Ship's list: 46. George Allin age 24(sic) yeare 47. Katherine Allyn his wife age 30 yeare 48. George Allyn his sonne age 16 yeare 49. Willm Allyn his sonne age 8 yeare 50. Mathew Allyn his sonne age 6 yeare 51. Edward Poole his srvant age 26 yeare ("Complete Book of Emigrants" Volune I, by Peter Wilson Coldham.)

From "Settlers of the Beerman Patent" Dutchess Co. NY. Vol. II There were a few members of this family in Beekman and Pawing, where they stayed for many years. There appear to be at least three different branches of Allens of which George Allen was the emigrant ancestor of one.

George Allen was born ca 1568 in Saltford, Somerset, Co. England, the son of John Allen (from research of Somerset Record Society v.51 1936). He married as his second wife Catherine Stark who would later marry John Collins. Geoge and Catherine sailed from Weymouth, England and arrived in Boston in 1635. First settling in Weymouth, Mass. they later settled in Sandwich in 1637. George Allen died in Sandwich April 1648 and was buried May 2, 1648.(This date differs form other research).

He was a Surveyor of Highways in 1640 for Sandwich, Mass.

Notes and References of George Allen

1. Carl Boyer 3rd Compiler, Newhall, CA 1981. "Ancestral Lines Revisied": "Settlers of the Beekman Patent" Dutchess Co. NY: "Pioneers of Massachusetts(Boston, 1900)" Charles Henry Pope: "Civil, Military & Professional List of Plymouth and Rhode Island Colonies" Geanealogical Publishing Co., Ebenezer W. Peirce of Freetown, Mass.

2." New England Marrages Prior to 1700": pg902, 928. Charles Henry Pope " Pioneers of Mass.": " New England Marrages Prior to 1700"

3."Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John 1630" Vol 13. Burton Spear (The Mary & John Clearing House- 1990)

4. "Book a Records of the Twon of Swansea 1662-1705" Alverdo H. Mason, East Braintree, Mass. 1900.

5. "A History of Rehoboth Massachusetts" Rev. George H. Tilton, Published by the author, Boston, 1918.

6. " A Branch of the Allen Family in New England" New England Historical & Genealogical Register X (July 1856, 225-227).

More About George Allen and Mrs George Allen: Marriage: Abt. 1600, England.

More About George Allen and Katherine Starkes: Marriage: 1624

Children of George Allen and Mrs George Allen are:

  • +Samuel Allen, b. 1596, England, d. August 08, 1669, Braintree, Mass..
  • Rose Allen, b. Abt. 1603, England, d. Aft. 1689, England.
  • +Francis Allen, b. Abt. 1607, England, d. 1689, Sandwich, Barmstable Co. Mass..
  • +John Allen, b. Abt. 1610, probablely Somerset, England, d. May 03, 1690, Swansea, Bristol Co. Mass..
  • Joan Allen, b. Abt. 1611, England, d. Bef. 1639.
  • +Ralph Allen, b. Abt. 1613, England, d. March 1698, Swansea, Bristol Co. Mass..
  • +George Allen, b. Abt. 1619, England, d. date unknown.
  • Robert Allen, b. Abt. 1621, probablely Somerset, England, d. 1661, Rehoboth, Bristol Co. Mass.

Children of George Allen and Katherine Starkes are:

  • Willian Allen, b. 1629, England, d. 1705, Sandwich, Barmstable Co. Mass..
  • Matthew Allen, b. 1627, d. 1695, Darthmouth, Bristol Co. MA..
  • Henry Allen, b. Aft. March 20, 1635, d. 1690, Standford, Fairfield Co. CT..
  • Joshua Allen, b. Aft. March 1635, Mass., d. 1699, Windham Co. CT..
  • +Gideon Allen, b. Aft. 1635, d. 1694, Milford, New Haven Co. CT..

-------------------- Most genealogists agree that he married Katherine Davis, daughter of Rice Davis, in 1600 at age 32. She may have been the widow of a man named Watts as she is sometimes referred to as Katherine Watts. He may have had an earlier wife. Katherine Davis died in 1619 after giving birth to at least six children, five of whom were male. In 1624 George reportedly married Katherine Starkes at age 56 and fathered at least six more children. 3 Per usual, it was not first born sons who dared the trip over the ocean, but younger sons with intrepid wives who had the courage to follow a dream of a better life than they would have been locked in the rigid primo genitor and class structure of England. George and his wife Katherine left Weymouth, England in March of 1635 and arrived on the shores of Salem in the Massachusetts Bay Colony on the 6th of May 1635. Unfortunately, we do not have the name of the ship on which they sailed. They traveled with their servant, Edward Poole, who was then 26. George Allen was an Anabaptist, a more liberal form of belief originating in Zurich, Switzerland. Joseph Holway was acquainted with George Allen, who also was in Lynn in 1636. Both men were still in Lynn and Weymouth respectively, when on the 3rd of April 1637 Gov. William Bradford granted permission for a settlement at Sandwich with sufficient land for 60 families to a group of men of Lynn. We do know that in 1637 George Allen joined with Edmund Freeman in the purchase of the Town of Sandwich.

It does appear that many of George’s daughters were discounted in the number of children to

whom he was father.

Although most sources do cite George Allen’s wives as described above, Jack MacDonald has

put together evidence doubting these sources. I refer you to his detailed overview at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jacmac/allen.htm

He and his family arrived with a party of 106 followers of the Reverend Joseph Hull of the Somersett Congregation and who had leave to settle Wessguscus Plantation, which was renamed Weymouth, on July 8th 1635 by the General Court at Boston. We can only imagine why George left the new town of Weymouth to move to Sandwich since he had been granted 30 acres of land there, which he then left to his sons.

George Allen’s more liberal, considered by some to be radical form of religious thought, provided a good foundation of an alternative perception of worship for his children in anticipation of the eventual arrival of Quaker Christopher Holder from England to Sandwich in 1656. The Allen’s were among the founding families of the Sandwich Society of Friends Meeting, which continues today as the longest continuous Meeting in the United States. George’s son, William with his wife Priscilla’s home at Spring Hill became the earliest Meeting place for Quakers. 4 They were the strongest and most determined members of the Society of Friends in spite of suffering fines and imprisonment for their faith.

Although George, who died in 1648, he did not live to see the transformation of East Sandwich into a strong Quaker community, his progeny certainly suffered for their beliefs under the enforced laws of Boston and Plymouth until the reign of Charles II, who put an end to the hanging of Quakers. Mary Dyer, who had at one time sought refuge in Sandwich, was one of the victims of the Boston laws.

Unfortunately, a Petition of 1646 to the Plymouth Court to insure religious tolerance was sidetracked by conservatives and the loss of religious freedom ensued. Previous to this time Church attendance was not required. One did not have to be a Church member to be a Freeman. Miles Standish, a Roman Catholic, had never been a Church member for example.5 George Allen’s home, built in 1646 on Spring Hill Road in East Sandwich, also provided his final resting place. The house stood until 1882. His will, taken on the 22nd of September 1648 by Edward Dillingham and Richard Bourne in which he named his wife Katherine to be his Executrix, was signed in the presence of William Leveridge, John Vincent and Richard Bourne and proved before the court at New Plymouth on the 7th of June 1649. Ralph Allen and Richard Bourne were designated overseers of his will.

By, Kaethe Maguire, Sandwich Historian

Although no records have been found to verify it, shortly after settling at Wessaguscus (Weymouth), George and his family may have moved to the village of Saugus, MA (now Lynn, MA). In 1637/38, however, George and his family again moved, this time to the newly organized settlement in New Plymouth Colony of Sandwich on Cape Cod. George, who was a farmer by trade, was recommended for "freeman" status in New Plymouth Colony on 5 Mar 1638/39, and was later admitted as such on 3 September 1639. George was subsequently sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 Jun 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644.

George apparently died during the last part of April 1648 at

Sandwich, New Plymouth Colony, as he was subsequently buried there on 2 May 1648. His will was probated before the New Plymouth Court on 7 June 1648. One year later, on 8 June 1648, Katherine furnished an inventory of George's estate to the New Plymouth Court. Sometime after George passed away, his widow, Katherine, married for a second time to a man named John Collins, who was a shoemaker in Boston.

Although the identities of all of George's children have never been

determined beyond doubt, the names of eight children have been verified through various documents. In addition to these eight, it is highly probable that three other individuals, namely John, Robert, and Francis Allen, are also sons of George. Aside from those children that are known and very probable, some researchers also believe that the Joan Allen who married Clement Briggs at Dorschester in 1630/31, and the Joshua Allen who married Mary Crowell at Yarmouth in 1671, are also George's children. Even though this position is supported to a certain degree by circumstantial evidence, it was not convincing enough for this writer to include these two individuals in this genealogy at this time.

It should also be mentioned that the "five least children" that George

referred to in his will have not been verified beyond doubt either. These children, interpreted by most authorities to be the children George had with his second wife, Katherine, are strongly believed to be Matthew, William, Henry, Samuel, and Gideon, however.

In 1657, while residing at Sandwich, Quakerism began spreading

throughout the Colony, and (George's son) Ralph and six of his brothers and sisters were apparently among the first to be "convinced". Unfortunately, the adoption of Quakerism by the Allen's resulted in their being persecuted and fined for many years for praticing their faith. Their persecution was particularly acute for refusing to take the Oath of Fidelity which they felt was unlawful." " (taken from the web site of Jack MacDonald) http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jacmac/allen.htm

George Allen was a Quaker in Barnstable, MA. One source for the information on this family is the World Family Tree, #83, #88, and

  1. 6148, vol. 2, and #2406, vol. 1.

George Allen(1568-1648) came from Weymouth, County Dorset, England with Rev Joseph Hull's company, and settled at Lynn, Mass. in 1635, later was at Weymouth, Mass. In company with others he obtained a grant in 1637 and founded Sandwich, Mass. He settled there in 1638, and was first deputy of the General Court from 1640 to 1644. He was a constable in 1639, and a freeman." - WFT, vol. 1, #3991.

Also seen birthplace as Thurcaston, England

WFT #88 says that Ralph Allen is the father of George. Ralph died at Thurcaston, County Leicester, England.

"Passengers for New England, March 20, 1635, from Weymouth: George Allin - age ? Katherin Allyn - age 30, his wife George Allyn - age 16, his son Willm Allyn - age 8, his son Mathew Allyn - age 6, his son Edward Poole - age 26, his servant (This was taken from an Allen Family newsletter - March 1976, vol. 1-3)

WFT # 3785, vol. 1 - "George Allen, b. 1575 - Somerset, England, married 1620 to Katherine. Father: Ralph Allen, b. abt 1553 in England"

"George Allen - Lynn 1636, removed next year to Sandwich, was rep. 1641 and 1642 at Plymouth. He was buried 2 May 1648; and his will, witnessed by Rev. William Leveridge and others, mentions son Matthew, son Henry, son Samuel and son William, besides "five least children" not named and made wife Catharine Executrix. His home built in 1646, it is said, is in good repair and still occupied." (Taken from the Allen Family newsletter - March 1976, vol. 1-3)

"Among the first settlers in Sandwich was George Allen, a man of good standing among the Puritans, notwithstanding he was an Ana baptist. The house which he built at Spring Hill in 1646, is now owned by Mrs. Eliza C. Wing, is in good repair, and will probably last another century. He died in 1648, leaving nine children mentioned in his will, four of whom are named, Matthew, Henry, Samuel and William, the other five least children not named. Brown says that six brothers and sisters of this family were among the earliest who embraced the principles of the Friends. He says that Ralph Allen was his son, and George, Jr., was probably another. The two last named must have been grown when they came to this country, for George had taken the oath of fidelity in England. The Allens settled at Spring Hill, and two or more of their houses yet remain, and are probably as old as any in Massachusetts. The one in which the early quakers met for many successive years, is still standing, and remained in the family till 1862, when it was sold to Frank Kerns, the present owner." (Taken from GENEALOGICAL NOTES OF BARNSTABLE FAMILIES - a book from the SLC library)

•Change Date: 5 May 2004 at 16:05:49

Father: (Ralph) ALLEN b: ABT 1553 in ,,(England)

Marriage 1 UNKNOWN Children 1. (Joan) ALLEN b: 1602/1620 2. Rose ALLEN b: ABT 1609/1610 in ,,England 3. John ALLEN b: 1605/1611 in ,,England 4. Ralph ALLEN b: ABT 1614/1615 in ,,England 5. Robert ALLEN b: ABT 1623 in ,,England 6. George ALLEN Jr. b: 1619 in ,,England 7. Francis ALLEN b: ABT 1636/1643 in Sandwich,Barnstable,MA

Marriage 2 Katherine b: 1605 in ,,(England) •Married: 5 Nov 1624 in London,,England

Children 1. Matthew ALLEN b: 1627 in of Devonshire,,England

2. William ALLEN b: 1629 in ,,England 3. Henry ALLEN b: ABT 1631/1633 in ,,(England) 4. Samuel ALLEN b: ABT 1625/1645 in ,,(England) 5. Gideon ALLEN b: ABT 1635/1645 in Sandwich,Barnstable,MA


-------------------- http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:George_Allen_%288%29

Alt Birth? abt 1585 Weymouth, Dorset, England Citation needed Marriage by abt 1610 to Unknown Unknown Marriage by 1627 to Katherine Unknown Emigration[3] 1635 Residence[3] 1635 Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States Residence[3] 1638 Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Other[3] 3 Sep 1639 Plymouth Colony, Kingdom of England Freeman. Death? 16 Apr 1648 Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Citation needed Burial[3][2] 2 May 1648 Sandwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Religion? Anabaptist Estate Inventory[3] 22 Sep 1648 £44-16; no real estate. Probate[3] 7 Jun 1649 Undated will proved.

George and his wife sailed to America from Weymouth, England on March 20, 1634/5 carrying some 100 persons under the leadership of the Rev. Joseph Hull, arrived in Boston on May 6, 1635. The family is listed as George Allen (age 54), his wife (30yo), son George (16yo), son William (8yo), son Matthew (6yo) and a 20-year-old servant named Edward Poole. This party was granted leave to settle at Wessaguscus Plantation on 8 July 1635 by the General Court at Boston. Wessaguscus was soon given municipal rights, at which time it was renamed Weymouth.

In 1637 George was a first settler in Sandwich, Ma. George was recommended as Freeman status in Plymouth Colony on 5 March 1638/39, and was granted the status on 3 September 1639. George was sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644. He was listed as "Able to bear arms" in 1643 in Yarmouth. His home was built in 1646 and is reported in good repair and still occupied as of 1994.

In 1637 George was a first settler in Sandwich, Ma. George was recommended as Freeman status in Plymouth Colony on 5 March 1638/39, and was granted the status on 3 September 1639. George was sworn in as the Constable of Sandwich on 4 June 1639, and served as Surveyor of Highways in 1640. He also served as a Committeeman for the New Plymouth Court in 1640, 1641, 1642, and 1644. He was listed as "Able to bear arms" in 1643 in Yarmouth. His home was built in 1646 and is reported in good repair and still occupied as of 1994.

In his undated will, proved 7 Jun 1649, "Georg[e] Allen the elder late of Sandwidge" bequeathed to "all my children" 12p; to "my son Matth[e]w" on calf and 5s.; to "my wife" the old cow; "my house & household stuff to my wife during the time that she continueth unmarried but in case she marries again my will is that they shall be disposed of to be divided amongst my five least children"; to "my five least children" a cow apiece; to "my son Will[i]am the meadow I bought of Peeter Gaunt being in the second division"; "for my land & the rest of my meadow I give unto my sons Henry & Samuel"; "my adventure in the park I leave to my wife & the five least children"; wife "Katheren Allen" to be executrix and Ralph Allen and Richard Bourne to be overseers [PCPR 1:1:84; Plymouth Wills 175; MD 9:224-25]

Despite frequent citations to the contrary, this is not the George Allen who married as his second wife, Katherine Slarkes, on 5 November 1624 in All Hallows Church, Honey Lane, London. There is fairly strong evidence that this George was still in London when he was mentioned in his brother Henry’s will in 1640. Also, this George is not the son of John Allen of Saltford in Somersetshire, England. There is strong evidence that indicates that this George was still residing at Saltford in 1638, when he was involved in a court case regarding tenements in the Tything of Saltford. By 1638, this George Allen was already well established at Sandwich on Cape Cod.

Ancestor of Winston Churchill, Presidents Gerald Ford, and Barack Obama. [1]

▼References

 Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England: Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. (Boston: Little, Brown, and Co, 1860-1862), 1:30.

GEORGE, Lynn 1636, rem. next yr. to Sandwich, was rep. 1641 and 2 at Plymouth. He was bur. 2 May 1648; and his will, witness. by Rev. William Leveridge, and others, ment. s. Matthew, Henry, Samuel, and William, beside "five least ch." not nam. and made w. Catharine Extrix. His ho. built, 1646, it is said, is in good repair, and still occup.

↑ Kardell, Caroline Lewis, compiler, and R. A. Lovell. Vital records of Sandwich, Massachusetts to 1885. (Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1996), 1:4. [1648] Gorg Allen senier buried 2cond of may

↑ 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 George Allen, in Anderson, Robert Charles; George F. Sanborn; and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635. (NEHGS, 1999-2011), I:27-35. Origin: Unknown. Migration: 1635. First Residence: Weymouth. Removes: Sandwich 1638. Freeman: Propounded for freeman of Plymouth Colony 5 March 1638/9 [PCR 1:117] and admitted 3 September 1639 [PCR 1:130]. Birth: By about 1585 based on estimated date of first marriage (and not yet 60 in 1643). Death: Buried at Sandwich 2 May 1648 [SandVR 1:4] Marriage: By about 1610, unknown. m2 By 1627 Katherine _____. ("unlikely" but not impossible that this was the couple that married in London in 1624 (George Allen of London, clothworker, and Katherine Starkes of Woking))

Marygould (1635) This ship carried the "Hull Company", a group of settlers traveling with Rev. Joseph Hull, who settled in Weymouth after reaching New England. Some references to this ship consider it unnamed, but more recent Great Migration profiles say those who enrolled at Weymouth on 20 Mar 1634/5 sailed on the Marygould. Sailed: aft 20 Mar 1634/5 from Weymouth, England Arrived: 3 May 1635 at Massachusetts Bay Colony

Passengers: ~100 (Full List) George Allen family - Andrew Hallett - Thomas Holbrook family - Angell Hollard family - Rev. Joseph Hull family - William King family - Robert Lovell family - John Whitmarsh family Resources: Primary Sources: Other information: ISTG Hull Company List

-------------------- Timeline listed on Master Profile have three dates of Christening 1568, 1580, and 1595 - apparently three Georges have become confused. -------------------- Came to America about 1635

view all 40

George Allen, of Sandwich's Timeline

1568
1568
Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England
1580
1580
Weymouth, Dorset, England
1580
Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England
1580
Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England
1580
Thurcaston, Leicestershire, England
1582
1582
Weymouth, Dorchester, England
1595
1595
Age 13
Branton, Devon, England
1602
1602
Age 20
1604
1604
Age 22
Weymouth, Dorchestshire, England
1605
1605
Age 23
England