George Walton, Signer, "Declaration of Independence"

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George Walton

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cumberland, Virginia
Death: Died in Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States
Place of Burial: Reinterment beneath monument, Greene Street, Augusta, Richmond, Georgia, United States
Yakın Ailesi:

Son of Robert James Thomas Walton, Jr. ve Mary Sarah Walton
Husband of Dorothy Walton
Father of Thomas Camber Walton; George Walton, Jr ve Mary Louise Robertson
Brother of Mary Bond; John Walton; Sarah Watkins; Elizabeth or Sally Morris; Sally Morris ve 1 başka şey daha

Occupation: Carpenter, legislator, planter
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About George Walton

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2787&ref=wvr

The dates in the wiki are wrong!

George Walton signed the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Georgia and also served as the second Chief Executive of that state.

http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=W000114

WALTON, George, (brother of John Walton and cousin of Matthew Walton), a Delegate and a Senator from Georgia; born in Cumberland County, Va., in either 1749 or 1750; apprenticed as a carpenter; attended the common schools; moved to Savannah, Ga., in 1769; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1774 and commenced practice in Savannah, Ga.; secretary of the Provincial Congress in 1775 and a member of the committee of intelligence; member, council of safety in 1775 and later president of that body; member, State house of representatives; member of the Continental Congress 1776, 1777, 1780, and 1781; a signer of the Declaration of Independence; served in the Revolutionary War and was captured at Savannah; colonel in the First Georgia Battalion; Governor of Georgia 1779; commissioner to treat with the Indians and to negotiate a treaty with the Cherokees in Tennessee in 1783; chief justice of Georgia 1783-1789; member of the Augusta Board of Commissioners 1784-1785; represented Georgia in the settlement of the boundary line between South Carolina and Georgia in 1786; elected as a delegate to the convention to frame the Federal Constitution in 1787, but declined; Governor of Georgia 1789; was appointed first judge of the superior courts of the eastern judicial circuit in 1790; appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of James Jackson and served from November 16, 1795, to February 20, 1796, when a successor was elected; trustee of Richmond Academy and of the University of Georgia; moved to Augusta; again appointed judge of the superior circuit of Georgia and served from 1799 until his death at his home, “College Hill,” near Augusta, Richmond County, Ga., February 2, 1804; interment in Rosney Cemetery; reinterment in 1848 beneath the monument in front of the courthouse on Greene Street, Augusta, Ga.

Bibliography

Dictionary of American Biography; Bridges, Edwin. “George Walton: A Political Biography.” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Chicago, 1981; Lamplugh, George R. “George Walton, Chief Justice of Georgia, 1783-1785.” Georgia Historical Quarterly 65 (Summer 1981): 82-91.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/i/l/Larry-M-Wilson/GENE21-0007.html#CHILD15

Notes for JESSE BOND:

Killed at Cowed by Indians, Washington Co. KY

In the summer of 1772 Jesse Bond, Jesse Walton, Edward Rice, William Hightower, and Benjamine Cleveland set out on a trip of hunting and exploring the land of Kentucky. They were attacked by Indians and lost their guns, horses and every thing they had. The story is in a book titled "Kings Mountain and Its Heroes" by Lyman C. Draper, LLD. The "Biological History of warren Co, Ill" states Jesse Bond and family moved top Kentucky where he was killed by Indians.

1. 1778 Washington Co. Kentucky tax poles state of Jesse Bond is 100 Pounds.

2. His best fried is Jesse Walton, His wifes cousin. Also his wifes brother George Walton was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a Gov. of GA.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Walton

Tümünü Gör (18 tane)

George Walton, Signer, "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1741
1741
Cumberland, Virginia
1774
1774
- present
Age 33
Savannah, Georgia, United States
1775
1775
Age 34
1775
- present
Age 34
Georgeia, United States
1776
4 Temmuz 1776
- 1776
Age 35
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States

Descent Only 15 of the 56 signers have male descendants today. These Signers have no descendants: William Whipple, John Hancock, Samuel Huntington, James Smith, James Wilson, Caesar Rodney, George Wythe, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Lynch, Jr. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, and George Walton. These Signers have no same surname (male) descendants: Josiah Bartlett, Matthew Thornton, Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry, William Williams, William Floyd, Francis Lewis, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, George Clymer, George Taylor, George Ross, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, Thomas Stone, Thomas Jefferson, William Hooper and John Penn. These Signers have very doubtful same surname (male) descendants: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Oliver Wolcott, John Witherspoon, Abraham Clark, John Morton, Carter Braxton, Edward Rutledge. The remainder of the Signers is known to have same surname (male) descendants. (Talk about being blown away when you find out almost all of the signers are part of your family's history. You sit back shake your head and wonder am I dreaming. Then you double check in disbelief wondering how that could be. What does that mean for you and your.) =================================================================== Did Your Ancestor Sign the Declaration of Independence? By James Pylant And can you prove it? Kathy M. Cornwell's "Disspelling a Myth and Finding An Ancestor," in Seventeen Seventy-Six, Vol. 2, No. 2 (pp. 69-73), tells of a family tradition that her husband's ancestor, Jane Wilson Cornwell, was the daughter of James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. "Admittedly, there was plausibility for the claim, for descendants of all of Jane's children whom we could locate had heard the story, and firmly believed it. One relative knew it was true because his grandmother told him, and she was Jane's daughter." Her research did reveal her husband's ancestor was the daughter of James Wilson — only that he and the signer were not one and the same. Signer James Wilson, according to one source Cornwell found, had no living descendants. "Our search to prove or disprove it spanned several years," wrote Cornwell, "but at the end of the genealogical journey we found the real ancestor, another James Wilson, who turned out to be just as colorful and fascinating as the celebrated Wilson." Yet, some legends prove to be true. “I too had a family story that the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon was an ancestor," says librarian Beatrice M. Beck. "It took three years to document this story. But it was one hundred percent correct.”* The Rev. Frederick W. Pyne’s Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, a nine-volume series, was published by Picton Press. The author’s work incorporates data from the application files of the Society of the Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, the Frank W. Leach manuscript, and many other published references. In 1987, the LDS Reference Unit at the Family History Library, in Salt Lake City, compiled the "Founding Fathers Project." The project encompasses genealogical data on signers of the Declaration of Independence, signers of the Articles of Confederation (1778), and members of the American Constitutional Convention (1787). The Reference Unit's objective was to identify names of wives, children, and parents. This reference is available on microfilm loan at the various Family History Centers. The film number is 1592751, item 3. However, for more complete data on descendants (up to 1900 in some cases), refer to the following microfilms: 001751: John Adams, Samuel Adams, Josiah Bartlett, William Ellery, Elbridge Gerry,John Hancock, Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Huntington, Robert Treat Paine, Roger Sherman, Matthew Thornton, William Whipple, William Williams, and Oliver Wolcott. 001752: Abraham Clark, William Floyd, John Hart, Francis Lewis, Phillip Livingston, and Lewis Morris. 001753: George Clymer, Benjamin Francis Hopkinson, Robert Morris, John Morton, and John Witherspoon. 001754: Charles Carroll, Samuel Chase, Thomas McKean, William Paca, George Read, Caesar Rodney, George Ross, Benjamin Rush, Thomas Stone, George Taylor, and James Wilson. 001755: Carter Braxton, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Jefferson, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Nelson Jr., and George Wythe. 001756: Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Heyward Jr., William Hooper, Thomas Lynch Jr., Arthur Middleton, John Penn, Edward Rutledge, and George Walton * Beatrice M. Beck to James Pylant, 4 June 2001. http://www.genealogymagazine.com/didyouransig.html
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http://history.org/foundation/journal/Winter11/painting_magnify/

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/goddardsPrinting.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/dunlap.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/signers/

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William Woodruff's Facsimile

An upsurge in public interest in the Declaration of Independence occurred in the early nineteenth century. Among the various editions printed was one by Philadelphian William Woodruff, a journeyman engraver. Allegorical symbols of the new nation surround the text and signatures. The cursive signatures on the printing at the right indicate that it was one produced after Woodruff's initial 1819 printing.

http://research.history.org/pf/viewer.cfm?image=lg_woodruff.jpg&amp...

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July 4th, 2012 at the National Archives: Dramatic Reading of the Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drIdEZ_om9w
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Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9ovu0a6pL8

4 Temmuz 1776
- 1776
Age 35
Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1776
Age 35
1776
- 1781
Age 35
Continental Congress
1783
1783
- 1783
Age 42
Tennessee, United States
1783
- 1789
Age 42
Georgia, United States