Gilbert de Brionne comte d'Eu

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Gilbert or Gislebert "Crispin" de Brionne, comte d'Eu

Also Known As: "Gilbert", "Giselbert", "Count of Eu", "Count of Brionne", "also known as Giselbert ."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kerlouan, Finistere, Bretagne, France
Death: Died in Anjou, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France
Cause of death: said to have been murdered by his cousin, Ralph of Gacé (Raoul de Wace)
Immediate Family:

Son of Geoffrey (Godfrey) fitz Richard de Brionne, comte d'Eu and Geoffroy's wife (de Brionne)
Husband of NN wife of Gilbert de Brionne
Father of Adèle de Brionne, comtesse d'Eu; Richard FitzGilbert de Bienfaite, Lord of Clare and of Tonbridge; Ralph de Tellieres; Baldwin, comte de Brionne; Guillaume de Brionne and 1 other
Brother of N.N. de Brionne
Half brother of Gunnore de Clare

Occupation: Count of Brionne, in Normandy, Count of Brionne (Brienne), COUNT OF EU AND BRIONNE, 2nd Count of Brionne, Count of Eu, Comte, d'Eu, de Brionne, Comte De Brionne, Count Eu Brion, Comte de Brionne, Count, Lord Of Tillie and Gunnore D' Ainon, Lord of Tillie
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Gilbert de Brionne comte d'Eu

Update and disambiguation by Pam Wilson (15 May 2013): Need to distinguish Gilbert Crispin de Bec from Gilbert de Brionne (Comte d'Eu), whose identities are frequently conflated.

There is a great deal of disagreement and there has been much confusion about one or several Gilberts (Giselbertus) who were living in Normandy in the early 11th century, one or more of whom may have been called "Crispin". It appears that some historical sources have merged all of these into one while others keep them separate. The same children (and wives, in many cases) have been attributed to any and all, which males it very difficult to establish any credible family lineages.

One, the most historically prominent, due to his murder, was Gilbert, the Count de Brionne et d"Eu. Another is sometimes attributed as the Baron of Bec, while a fourth title is that of Castellan or Seigneur de Tillieres. Finally, the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy's Medieval Lands Project has a category for "Untitled English Nobility" and includes "Crispin" as among this group [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3.htm#_Toc222722378]. In this research, based on a 12th century manuscript by Miles Crispin, the Gilbert and Gunnora who were the parents of Hesilia (Esilia) who married Sir William Malet were not Gilbert Count of Brionne and Gunnora d'Aunou, as many claim, but were Gislebert Crispin and Gunnora FitzBaldric.

---Pam Wilson, 7-18-2009

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Gilbert, Comte de Brionne

Parents: Geoffroi de Brionne & his (unknown) wife

Spouse:

Children:

  • Richard, married Rohese Giffard
  • Guillaume
  • Bauduoin
  • Adela m. Neel II (IV) de Saint Sauveur, Vct de Cotentin
==============================

Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database (accessed 15 May 2013), http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc352825316:

COMTES d'EU 996-, descendants of GEOFFROY de Brionne

GEOFFROY de Brionne, illegitimate son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his mistress ([953]-[1015]). Guillaume of Jumièges names “unus Godefridus, alter...Willelmus” as the two sons of Richard “ex concubinis”, adding that Geoffroy was “comes...Aucensis”[2102]. Robert of Torigny names "unus Godefridus alter…Willermus" as sons of "Ricardi primi ducis Normanniæ" by concubines[2103]. He is named as son of duke "Richard the elder" by Orderic Vitalis, who specifies that his father gave Brionne "with the whole county" to him[2104]. Comte d'Eu after 996. m ---. The name of Geoffroy's wife is not known.

Geoffroy & his wife had [two] children:

1. GILBERT de Brionne "Crespin" ([979/1000]-murdered [Mar] [1040]). Guillaume of Jumièges records that “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis” inherited his father´s county before he was killed[2105]. Named as son of "Godfrey" by Orderic Vitalis[2106]. Comte d'Eu. "Gislebertus filius Godefridi comitis…" witnessed the charter dated to [1030] under which Robert II Duke of Normandy confirmed rights of Mont Saint-Michel[2107]. Orderic Vitalis records that “tempore Rodberti ducis Gislebertus comes Brionniæ” invaded “in pagum Vimmacensem” [Vimeu] but was repulsed by “Ingelrannus Pontivi comes”, adding that “miles...Herluinus” fled the battle and afterwards founded “in patrimonio suo in loco...Beccus...cœnobium sanctæ Dei genitricis Mariæ”[2108]. Le Prévost dates this event to “antérieure à 1034, époque présumée de la fondation du Bec”[2109]. He was appointed guardian of Guillaume II Duke of Normandy after the death in 1040 of Alain III Duke of Brittany[2110]. He was murdered by his cousin Raoul de Waco, after which Brionne was kept by Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2111]. On the other hand, another passage in Orderic Vitalis records that “Rodbertus de Witot” had been exiled “propter occisionem Gisleberti comitis”[2112]. Robert of Torigny names "Radulfo de Waceio filio Roberti archiepiscopi Rothomagensis" as murderer of "Gislebertus filius…Godefridi"[2113]. Guillaume of Jumièges records that “Gislebertus comes Ocensis filius Godefridi comitis...tutor Willelmi pueri sed domini...cum Fulcoio filio Geroii“ were killed while riding with “Wascelino de Ponte Erchenfredi”, adding that the crime was committed by “Odonis Grossi et audacis Roberti filii Geroii” at the instigation of “Rodulfus de Waceio filii Roberti archiepiscopi”[2114]. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis", undated but listed among other deaths recorded in Mar[2115].

m ---. The name of Gilbert's wife is not known. Gilbert & his wife had four children:

a) RICHARD de Brionne (before 1035-[Apr] [1090], bur St Neots, Huntingdonshire). Guillaume of Jumièges names “Richardum strenuissimum militem” as the son of “comes Gislebertus filius Godefridus comitis”, adding that he donated property to Bec with “filii eius Gislebertus, Rogerius, Walterius, Rodbertus”[2116]. Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2117]. He and his brother are named sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2118]. Seigneur de Bienfaite et d'Orbec, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2119]. Lord of Clare and Tonbridge. Regent of England 1075. See more under section "UNTITLED ENGLISH NOBILITY".

b) GUILLAUME de Brionne (-after 29 Aug 1060). "Milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père by charter dated 29 Aug 1060, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2120].

c) BAUDOUIN de Brionne (-[Feb] 1090). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Richardum et Balduinum” as the two sons of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2121]. He and his brother are named as sons of Gilbert de Brionne by Orderic Vitalis, recording that they took refuge in Flanders after their father was murdered[2122]. Seigneur de Sap et de Meules, Normandy, after Guillaume II Duke of Normandy restored them to him after being requested to do so by his father-in-law Baudouin V Count of Flanders[2123]. Orderic Vitalis names “...Balduinus et Ricardus Gisleberti comitis filii...” among the leading lords under Guillaume II Duke of Normandy[2124]. Orderic Vitalis records that William I King of England built a castle within the walls of Exeter, after he suppressed the town´s rebellion, and appointed “Balduinum de Molis filium Gisleberti comitis” as custodian, dated to early 1067[2125]. After the Norman conquest of England, William I King of England gave Baudouin about 160 lordships in Devon, Dorset and Somerset, among which he became Lord of Okehampton, Devon. “…Halduini [Balduini?] filii comitis Gilberti…” witnessed the charter dated 1082 under which William I King of England granted land at Covenham to the church of St Calais[2126]. Sheriff of Devon 1080 to 1086. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Baldoinus filius comitis", undated but listed among deaths recorded in Feb[2127]. m ALBERADE, daughter of ---. Orderic Vitalis describes Alberade as the daughter of the amita of William II King of England[2128]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” married “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2129]. Her precise parentage has not yet been ascertained. Baudouin & his wife had six children:

i) ROBERT (-after Dec 1101). Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2130]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2131]. Named as son of Baudouin by Orderic Vitalis, who describes him as castellan of Brionne when he defended his right to the castle in [1090/94] after Robert de Beaumont claimed it from Robert III Duke of Normandy. The castle was subsequently stormed by Duke Robert's troops and returned to Robert de Beaumont[2132]. He inherited his brother's English honours in 1096. "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2133].

ii) WILLIAM (-1096). Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2134]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2135]. He succeeded his father as Lord of Okehampton, Sheriff of Devon.

iii) RICHARD (-[Jun] 1137, bur 25 Jun 1137 Brightley Abbey, Devon, transferred to Forde Abbey). Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2136]. Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”[2137]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2138]. He succeeded his brother as Lord of Okehampton. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records the burial “VI Kal Jul 1137” of “domino Ricardo” and the subsequent transfer of his body “de Brightley apud Fordam”, adding that he died childless[2139]. "Robti filii Henrici Regis" confirmed the donation of "totam vineam quam Robtus fil Baldewini et Ricardus frater eius" made to Exeter St Nicholas, with the consent of "Matillidis filiæ Roberti de Avrenchis et heredis Ricardi filii Baldewini", undated[2140].

iv) ADELA (-24 Aug 1142, bur Forde Abbey, Devon). Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2141]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey names “Ricardum et…Adeliciam” as two of the children of “dominus Baldewinus de Brionis” and his wife “Albredam neptem domini Willelmi Bastardi…ducis Normanniæ”[2142]. The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “Adeliciæ…sorori suæ” inherited the lands of “vicecomes Ricardus”, was thereafter called “vicecomitissa” and died “1142 IX Kal Sep” and was buried “apud novum monasterium de Ford”[2143]. m ---. One child:

(a) ALICE . The Fundationis et Fundatorum Historia of Forde Abbey records that “domina Alicia uxor domini Randolphi Avenell filia sua” succeeded “vicecomitissa Adelicia” in “dominio de Okehampton…et castrum Exoniæ”[2144]. m RANDULF Avenell, son of ---.

v) EMMA . Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2145]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m HUGH de Waft, son of ---.

vi) daughter . Guillaume de Jumièges names “tres filios Richardum, Robertum et Willelmum et totidem filias” as the children of "Balduinum”, son of “Gislebertus...filius Godefridi comitis Aucensis”[2146].

Baudouin had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

vii) WIGER (-[1133]). Orderic Vitalis names “Rodbertum et Guillelmum, Richardum, nothumque Guigerium” as the children of “Gisleberti comitis [filius]...Balduinus”, adding that Wiger became a monk at Bec where he lived for about 40 years under abbots Guillaume and Boson[2147].

d) ADELA ). Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by the charter dated 29 Aug 1060 under which "milite…Richardo…fratribus Willelmo…atque Balduino" donated "Gausberti Villa" to Chartres Saint-Père, which states that "Nigello" married "sororem suam", witnessed by "Willelmus filius Osberti, Walterius Giffardus…Rodbertus Bertrannus, Willelmo Marmio…Willelmus Corbucionis filius…Raberius et Willelmus de Vernone…Bernardus filius Vulmari"[2148]. m NEEL Vicomte [de Cotentin], son of NEEL [I] Vicomte [de Cotentin] & his wife --- (-Aug 1092).

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Gilbert, Count of Brionne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert,_Count_of_Brionne

Gilbert, Count of Brionne Noble family de Clare Father Geoffrey, Count of Eu Born 1000 Died c. 1040

Gilbert (or Giselbert) Crispin (1000 – c. 1040) was a Norman noble, Count of Eu, and Count of Brionne in northern France. Was a tutor to young Duke William in his minority.

Gilbert was son of Geoffrey, Count of Eu (b. 962) who was an illegitimate child of Richard the Fearless.[1] He inherited Brionne, becoming one of the most powerful landowners in Normandy. Gilbert was a generous benefactor to Bec Abbey founded by his former knight Herluin in 1031.

When Robert I died in 1035 his illegitimate son William inherited his father's title. Several leading Normans, including Gilbert of Brionne, Osbern the Seneschal and Alan of Brittany, became William's guardians.

Death

A number of Norman barons including Ralph de Gacé would not accept an illegitimate son as their leader. In 1040 an attempt was made to kill William but the plot failed. Gilbert, however, was murdered while he was peaceably riding near Eschafour.[2] It is believed two of his killers were Ralph of Wacy (de Gacé) and Robert de Vitot. This appears to have been an act of vengeance for the wrongs inflicted upon the orphan children of Giroie by Gilbert.,[3] and it is not clear what Ralph de Gacé had to do in the business.[a] Fearing they might meet their father's fate, his sons Richard and his brother Baldwin were conveyed by their friends to the court of Baldwin, Count of Flanders.

Children

  • Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert (Richard de Clare) (bef. 1035–c. 1090), m. Rohese Giffard (1034-aft. 1113), daughter of Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville[4]
  • Baldwin FitzGilbert (d. 1090)[1]

Through these sons Gilbert was ancestor of the English house of de Clare, of the Barons FitzWalter, and the Earls of Gloucester (see Earl of Gloucester) and Hertford (see Earl of Hertford).

Notes

  1. ^ Although, Ralph de Gacé was the brother-in-law of Hawisa d'Échauffour, daughter of Giroie. See: Schwennicke, ES II, 79; ES III/4, 697.

References

  1. ^ a b George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. IV (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1916), p. 308
  2. ^ David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror (Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1964), p. 40
  3. ^ Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. I (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1853), p. 391, n. 2
  4. ^ James Dixon Mackenzie, The castles of England: their story and structure, Vol.1, (The Macmillan Co., 1896), 47.

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Gilbert Crispin de Brionne Posted by Madehlinne on November 7, 2011 at 8:52pm in Medieval England http://www.genealogywise.com/group/medieval-england/forum/topics/gilbert-crispin-de-brionne

[Note: The original source for this material is not clear. It also appears here, perhaps written by Patricia Hellerud: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/l/Patricia-Hellerud-/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1159.html]

Gilbert [Gislebert] was "surnamed Crispin [for his tightly curled hair], earl of Brionne, in Normandy." He succeeded his father at Brionne as well as at Eu. However, after the death of his father, Godfrey, Count of Eu, he soon quarreled with his uncle, Duke Richard II, and was deprived of his patrimony. Eu was given to William--another of Duke Richard II's bastard sons--and Gilbert was left with only the lordship of Brionne. He afterwards regained his position, and in the reign of duke Robert was in high favor at court, when the castle of Brionne was restored to him.

Gilbert assumed the title of count of Brionne while not relinquishing his claim to Eu, but the county of Eu had been in the meanwhile given away by duke Richard II to another member of the family. Neither Gilbert nor his descendants ever recovered possession of Eu. Even so, when count William of Eu died shortly before 1040, Gilbert assumed the land and title. Gilbert was selected in 1035, when Duke Robert was starting for the Holy Land, to be one of the guardians of the young count William {the Conqueror}, and for the next five years he was one of the most powerful nobles in Normandy.

His duty to his ward was not unfaithfully discharged, but he abused his position to plunder the orphan heirs of his neighbour, the sieur de Montreuil, and in revenge the "sons of Giroie" cruelly murdered him in 1040, as he was riding peaceably on his mule near Echaufré, "expecting no evil." His cruel death caused his faults to be forgotten and King William the Conqueror retained to the last a kindly recollection of his guardian. When the King on his death bed was recounting the horrors of his early life, he mentioned Count Gilbert, "the father of his country," among the pillars of the state who were perfidiously murdered by his enemies.

After Gilbert's assassination in 1040, his young sons--Richard and Baldwin--were forced to flee Normandy, finding safety at the court of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders. When William the Conqueror married Count Baldwin's daughter Matilda, he restored Richard and Baldwin to Normandy, but he did not invest them with either Brionne or Eu or a comital title {the title of Comte [Count]}. William granted the lordships of Bienfaite and Orbec to Richard. Although Gilbert's descendants later pressed a claim for Brionne, it was never restored.

Count Gilbert probably married a relation of the count of Flanders, for his infant sons Richard and Baldwin were taken after his death to that country and were brought up under the protection of Count Baldwin. They returned to their native country when William of Normandy married Matilda of Flanders and, by count Baldwin's intercession, were reinstated in as much of their father's fiefdoms as had not been otherwise disposed of.

Both brothers were in attendance on their kinsman during his conquest of England. The one, as Baldwin de Meules, was left in charge of Exeter on its submission (1068) and made Sheriff of Devonshire. Large estates in Devonshire and Somersetshire are entered to him in Domesday as "Baldwin of Exeter" or "Baldwin the Sheriff."

Richard now obtained the fiefdoms of Bienfaite and Orbec and, after the conquest of England, he was rewarded with 176 Lordships, 95 of which were in Suffolk. Richard also received Tonbridge Castle in Kent as compensation for his hereditary claims to the castle of Brionne. He became known to history as Richard FitzGilbert de Clare. At the same time, Le Sap et Meules were given to Baldwin for his share and he was allowed to marry the King's cousin. His wife, Albreda, was a granddaughter of Duke Richard II and was probably a sister of Guy de Burgundy.

Death: The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Gislebertus comes Briognensis" as undated but listed among other deaths recorded in March 1040. --Murdered by assassins hired by Raoul de Gace (son of Archbishop Robert) following Robert I Duke of Normandy's death.

--------------------------------

Died in 1040, said to have been murdered by his cousin, Ralph of Gacé (Wace)

For a short period in the autumn of 1040 following the sudden death (murder?) of Count Alan of Brittany, Gilbert was chief tutor to the young William the Conqueror.

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Count Gilbert "Crispin" de Brionne - was born about 0979 and died about 1040 . He was the son of Duke Godfrey de Brionne.

Count Gilbert married Constance de Eu. She is the daughter of William Eu and Beatrice Goz.

[Note: this marriage to Constance is not proven] --------------------

--------------------

Gilbert may not be Richard's father. Gilbert was the husband of Richard's mother, Herleva, but she also began having an affair with Robert "the Devil" around 1023. Sources as far back as the Annals of the Four Masters claim that Richard's great grandson, Richard "Strongbow", was the direct descendant of Robert "the Devil". Gilbert "Crispin" is a descendant of Robert's cousin, but not Robert himself.

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Gislebert, surnamed Crispin, Earl of Brion, in Normandy, whose eldest son [was] Richard FitzGilbert. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and ExtinctPeerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 118 , Clare, Lords of Clare,Earls of Hertford, Earls of Gloucester]

!CONFLICT: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England between 1623 and 1650 , Frederick Lewis Weis, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992 (STATES Gilbert, Ct. Brienne ) Chapman Family History, Beauchamp William Chapman, private publishing, 1987 (states Gisle bert, Count of Eu and Brionne and a descendent of Emp. CHARLEMAGNE.)

Gilbert, Count of Brionne, who was son of Godfrey, Count of Brionne, illegitimate son of Rich ard I, the Fearless, Duke of Normandy. [Magna Charta Sureties, line 157-1]

Gilbert, Count of Brionne; benefactor of the Abbey of Bec in Normandy. [Burke's Peerage]

Gilbert, Earl of Brion, had two sons, Richard, ancestor of the house of Clare, and Baldwin d e Brionis. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p . 139, Courtenay, Barons Courtenay, Earls of Devon]

Gislebert, surnamed Crispin, Earl of Brion, in Normandy, whose eldest son [was] Richard FitzG ilbert. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 1 18, Clare, Lords of Clare, Earls of Hertford, Earls of Gloucester]

Note: I have Gilbert Crispin of Tillieres and Gilbert Count of Brionne as two different peopl e.

Sources: 1.Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 94 2.Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5t h Edition, 1999 Page: 157-1 3.Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 1069 4.Repository: Name: Family History Library Salt Lake City, UT 84150

Title: Ancestral Roots Of Sixty Colonists Who Came To New England Between 1623 And 1650 Author: Weis, Frederick Lewis Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1992 5.Repository: Name: Sutro Library

Title: Chapman Family History Author: Chapman, Beauchamp William Publication: (a Private Publishing) 1987 6.Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Ed ition, 1999 Page: 157-1 7.Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5t h Edition, 1999 Page: 157

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"For a short period in the autumn of 1040 following the sudden death of Count Alan of Brittany, Gilbert was chief tutor to the young William the Conqueror. Died in 1040, said to have been murdered by his cousin, Ralph of Gacé" "Count Gilbert was one of the guardians of the young Duke William, and was murdered by assassins employed by Raoul de Gacé, as already related in the memoir of the Conqueror. Orderic gives us the name of one of the assassins -- Robert de Vitot; and Guillaume de Jumièges tells us that two of the family of Giroie fell upon and murdered him when he was peaceably riding near Eschafour, expecting no evil."

-------------------- Also called Gilbert Crispin. It is possible his wife was named Gunnora d'Aunou, born 984. Wikipedia: Gilbert however was murdered while he was peaceably riding near Eschafour. It is believed two of his killers were Ralph of Wacy and Robert de Vitot. This appears to have been an act of vengeance for wrongs inflicted upon the orphan children of Giroie by Gilbert, and it is not clear what Raoul de Gacé had to do in the business. Fearing they might meet their father's fate, his sons Richard and his brother Baldwin were conveyed by their friends to the court of Baldwin, Count of Flanders. -------------------- Gilbert was son of Geoffrey, Count of Eu (b. 962) who was an illegitimate child of Richard the Fearless.[1] He inherited Brionne, becoming one of the most powerful landowners in Normandy. Gilbert was a generous benefactor to Bec Abbey founded by his former knight Herluin in 1031.

When Robert I died in 1035 his illegitimate son William inherited his father's title. Several leading aristocrats, including Gilbert of Brionne, Osbern the Seneschal and Alan of Brittany, became William's guardians.

Death[edit]

A number of Norman barons including Ralph de Gacé would not accept an illegitimate son as their leader. In 1040 an attempt was made to kill William but the plot failed. Gilbert however was murdered while he was peaceably riding near Eschafour.[2] It is believed two of his killers were Ralph of Wacy and Robert de Vitot. This appears to have been an act of vengeance for the wrongs inflicted upon the orphan children of Giroie by Gilbert.,[3] and it is not clear what Ralph de Gacé had to do in the business.[a] Fearing they might meet their father's fate, his sons Richard and his brother Baldwin were conveyed by their friends to the court of Baldwin, Count of Flanders.

Children[edit] Sir Richard Fitz Gilbert (Richard de Clare) (bef. 1035–c. 1090), m. Rohese Giffard (1034-aft. 1113), daughter of Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville[4] Baldwin FitzGilbert (d. 1090)[1]

Through these sons Gilbert was ancestor of the English house of de Clare, of the Barons FitzWalter, and the Earls of Gloucester (see Earl of Gloucester) and Hertford (see Earl of Hertford).

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Notes[edit]

a.Jump up ^ Although, Ralph de Gacé was the brother-in-law of Hawisa d'Échauffour, daughter of Giroie. See: Schwennicke, ES II, 79; ES III/4, 697.

References[edit]

1.^ Jump up to: a b George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. IV (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1916), p. 308 2.Jump up ^ David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror (Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1964), p. 40 3.Jump up ^ Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. I (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1853), p. 391, n

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Gilbert de Brionne comte d'Eu's Timeline

979
979
Kerlouan, Finistere, Bretagne, France
1021
1021
Age 42
Brionne, Haute-Normandie, France
1022
1022
Age 43
Normandy, France
1024
1024
Age 45
Saint-Martin-de-Bienfaite-la-Cressonnière, Basse-Normandie, France
1030
1030
Age 51
Capelle-les-Grands, Eure, Upper Normandy, France
1038
1038
Age 59
Whitchurch, Dorset, England
1040
July 2, 1040
Age 61
Anjou, Isere, Rhone-Alpes, France
1935
September 4, 1935
Age 61
September 4, 1935
Age 61
September 4, 1935
Age 61