Godfried I van Brabant (van Leuven), comte de Louvain, Duke of Lorraine (c.1074 - 1139) MP

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Nicknames: "Godfrey the Bearded", "the Bearded", "Godfrey I Duke Of Lorraine Count Of /Brabant/", "Count /de Louvain/", "A La Barbe", "Godfrey /de Brabant/", "Duke of Lorraine Godfrey "A /la Barbe"/", "le Caplif the Bearded", "der Bärtige", "Godfrey the /Bearded/Van Leuven/", "met de..."
Birthplace: between 1060 and 1080, Lorraine Inferie, France
Death: Died in Jerusalem, Holy Land
Occupation: *Also Count of Brabant & the Swan in "Lohengrin"!, Duke of Lorraine, "The Bearded", Greve i Löwen, greve av Bryssel, landgreve i Brabant, markgreve i Antwerpen och hertig i Niederlothringen, DUKE OF LORRANE, BRABANT, AND 2 OTHERS
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Godfried I van Brabant (van Leuven), comte de Louvain, Duke of Lorraine

GODEFROI de Louvain

Parents:

HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [Adelheid] in der Betuwe (-25 Jan 1139, bur Afflighem Abbey). 

Partners & Children

m firstly ([1105]) IDA de Chiny

m secondly ([1125]) as her second husband, CLEMENCE de Bourgogne, widow of ROBERT II Count of Flanders

Mistress (1): ---.

Duke Godefroi V & his first wife had five children

1. GODEFROI de Louvain

2. HENRI de Louvain

3. ADELISA de Louvain

4. IDA de Louvain

5. CLARISSA de Louvain

Duke Godefroi V had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

6. JOSCELIN de Louvain

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRABANT,%20LOUVAIN.htm

GODEFROI de Louvain, son of HENRI [II] Comte de Louvain & his wife Adela [Adelheid] in der Betuwe (-25 Jan 1139, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Chronicon Affligemense names "Heinrico et Godefrido" as the two sons of "Adela comitissa Lovaniensis"[88]. "Henricus…Bracbatensis patriæ comes et advocatus" founded Afflighem abbey by charter dated 1086 which also records the donation of property "juxta in villa…Asca" made by "fraterque meus Godefridus"[89]. He succeeded his brother in 1095 as GODEFROI Comte de Louvain. He was in conflict with Richer Bishop of Liège over the county of Brugeron in 1095/96[90]. Markgraaf van Antwerpen 1105. Heinrich V King of Germany invested him as GODEFROI V "le Barbu" Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1106. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ, Comes Lovaniensis et Bruxellensis Marchio sacri Regni” founded Afflighem Abbey where he was buried[91]. Vogt of Afflighem 1107. The Gesta Abbatem Trudonensium records the abdication in 1128 of "Godefridum Lovaniensem comitem de ducatu Lotharingie" and his substitution by "Waleramnum comitem Lemburgie"[92]. Vogt of Gembloux and Nivelles 1129. "Ducem Godefridum seniorem eiusque filium…Godefridum iuniorem" donated property "in parochia Braniensi…Dudinsart" to Gembloux by charter dated 1131, witnessed by "Godefridus comes Namucensis eiusque filius Henricus, Henricus minor filius ipsius ducis, Wilhelmus advocatus de Namuco eiusque frater Anselmus…"[93]. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1139 of "Godefridus maior dux Lotharingiæ"[94]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death of "Godefridus Barbatus Lovaniensis dux Lothariensis" and his burial at Afflighem[95]. The necrology of Brogne records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Godefridus dux Lovaniensis, frater nostre societatis"[96].

m firstly ([1105]) IDA de Chiny, daughter of OTTO [II] Comte de Chiny & his second wife Alix de Namur (-1117/25). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified.

m secondly ([1125]) as her second husband, CLEMENCE de Bourgogne, widow of ROBERT II Count of Flanders, daughter of GUILLAUME I Comte de Bourgogne & his wife Etiennette --- ([1078]-[1133]). "Clementie Flandrarum comitisse" is named as wife of "Robertus iunior" in the Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin[97]. Orderic Vitalis names her as wife of Count Robert but does not give her origin[98]. Her origin is confirmed by the Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana which names "Clementiam filiam Willelmi comitis Burgundionum cognomento Testahardith" as wife of "Rodbertus Rodberti filius"[99]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. Clemence could not have been born much later than 1078, given the birth of her first child (by her first husband) in 1093. She was appointed regent in Flanders during the absence of her first husband on crusade[100]. She promoted the monastic movement and introduced Cluniac rule into several abbeys in Flanders[101]. She founded Bourbourg Abbey with her first husband in [1103]. "Balduinus Flandrensium comes et Clementia comitissa" confirmed the donation of the church of Saint-Bertin to Cluny made by "dominus meus Rotbertus comes", by charter 12 Apr 1112[102]. She opposed the succession in 1119 of Count Charles, supporting the candidature of Guillaume d'Ypres[103]. The Cartulaire de Saint-Bertin records the death in [1133] of "Clementia Roberti iunioris vidua" and specifies that "eatenus pene terciam partem Flandrie dotis loco tenuit"[104], although it is curious that this does not refer to her second husband who was still alive when she died.

Mistress (1): ---. The name of Duke Godefroi's mistress is not known.

Duke Godefroi V & his first wife had five children:

1. GODEFROI de Louvain (-[11 Nov/31 Dec] 1142, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre). "Ducem Godefridum seniorem eiusque filium…Godefridum iuniorem" donated property "in parochia Braniensi…Dudinsart" to Gembloux by charter dated 1131, witnessed by "Godefridus comes Namucensis eiusque filius Henricus, Henricus minor filius ipsius ducis, Wilhelmus advocatus de Namuco eiusque frater Anselmus…"[105]. He was installed in 1140 as GODEFROI VI Duke of Lower Lotharingia by his wife's brother-in-law Konrad III King of Germany. Duke of Louvain 1141. The Annales Blandinienses record the death in 1142 of "Godefridus minor dux Lotharingiæ"[106]. The Oude Kronik van Brabant records the death in 1143 of "Godefridus Medianus dux Lotharingie" and his burial "Lovanii in templo Sancti Petri"[107]. m ([1139]) as her first husband, LUTGARDIS von Sulzbach, daughter of BERENGAR [I] Graf von Sulzbach & his second wife Adelheid von Wolfratshausen (-after 1163). The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names "Ludgarde ducissa de Saltzebach" as the wife of "Godefridus…secundus dux"[108]. She married secondly (1143) Hugo [XII] Graf von Dagsburg und Metz. Her second marriage is suggested by the undated charter under which her son "Adelbertus…comes Metensis et de Dasbourch" appointed "nepotem meum ducem Lotharingiæ" as his heir "de castro meo Dasbourgh…"[109]. Duke Godefroi VI & his wife had one child:

a) GODEFROI de Louvain (1142-10 Aug 1190, bur Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre). The Annales Parchenses name "Godefridus unius anni puer" as successor of "Godefridus dux iunior frater Heinric comitis"[110]. He succeeded his father in 1142 as GODEFROI VII Duke of Lower Lotharingia. Duke of Louvain 1147. Graaf van Brabant 1153.

2. HENRI de Louvain (-Affligem Abbey 27 Sep 1141, bur Afflighem Abbey or Louvain, église collégiale de Saint Pierre). "Ducem Godefridum seniorem eiusque filium…Godefridum iuniorem" donated property "in parochia Braniensi…Dudinsart" to Gembloux by charter dated 1131, witnessed by "Godefridus comes Namucensis eiusque filius Henricus, Henricus minor filius ipsius ducis, Wilhelmus advocatus de Namuco eiusque frater Anselmus…"[111]. Comte de Louvain. Monk at Afflighem. "Henricus filius Godefridi Ducis Lotharingiæ et comitis Lovanii" donated property on entering Afflighem abbey as a monk, for the souls of "…Claritiæ sororis nostræ" and for "fratre meo Duce Godefrido et sororibus meis Aleide regina Angliæ et Ida comitissa", by charter dated to [1141][112]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Henricus comes…Godefridi” became a monk at Afflighem where he was buried[113]. The Annales Parchenses record the death in 1141 of "Heinricus comes filius eius [=Godefridi ducis magni]"[114].

3. ADELISA de Louvain ([1103/06]-Afflighem Abbey 23/24 Mar or 23 Apr 1151, bur Afflighem Abbey). The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[115]. The Balduini Ninovensis Chronicon records the marriage of "Henricus rex Anglorum" and "Athelam filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingie" in 1121[116]. The Continuator of Florence of Worcester records the marriage "IV Kal Feb" [1121] of King Henry and "Atheleidem filiam Godefridi ducis Lotharingæ puellam virginem" and her coronation as queen "III Kal Feb"[117]. Orderic Vitalis names her and her father[118]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” married “Regi Angliæ” in 1121, died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[119]. The castle and honour of Arundel was settled on Queen Adelisa after her first husband died. Robert of Torigny records that "Willermi de Albinaio quem vocant comitem de Arundel" married "Aelizam reginam relictam Henrici senioris regis Anglorum"[120]. She became a nun at Affleghem Abbey, near Aalst in Brabant in [1149/50]. The Annals of Margan record the death in 1151 of “Adelidis, regina secunda Henrici regis”[121]. The Continuatio Chronici Afflegemiensis records that “Godefridus cum barba Dux Lotharingiæ…filia…Aleidis” died “IX Kal Mai” and was buried at Afflighem after the death of her second husband[122]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 Mar" of "Adelicia regina"[123]. m firstly (Royal Chapel, Windsor Castle 29 Jan or 2 Feb 1121) as his second wife, HENRY I King of England, son of WILLIAM I King of England & his wife Mathilde de Flandre (Selby, Yorkshire Sep 1168-Saint-Denis le Ferment, Forêt d’Angers near Rouen 1/2 Dec 1135, bur Reading Abbey, Berkshire). m secondly ([1136/Sep 1139]) WILLIAM d’Aubigny [de Albini], son of WILLIAM d’Aubigny Lord of the manor of Buckenham, Norfolk & his wife Maud le Bigod (-Waverley Abbey, Surrey 12 Oct 1176, bur Wymondham Priory, Norfolk). He was created Earl of Arundel [1142].

4. IDA de Louvain (-27 Jul before 1162). The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[124]. "Theodericus comes in Cleue et Aleidis uxor mea" donated property to Kloster Bedburg, for the anniversaries "X Kal Mar…patris mei Arnoldi comitis et VI Kal Aug matris mee Ide comitisse", by charter dated 1162[125]. m ([1128]) ARNOLD [I] Graf von Kleve, son of DIETRICH [I] Graf von Kleve & his wife --- (-20 Aug after 1147, bur Bedburg).

5. CLARISSA de Louvain (-before [1141]). The Genealogia Ducum Brabantiæ Heredum Franciæ names (in order) "Alaida…Anglorum regina…comitissa de Cleves Ida…[et] Clarissia virgo" as the three daughters of "Godefridus Cum-barba"[126]. "Henricus filius Godefridi Ducis Lotharingiæ et comitis Lovanii" donated property on entering Afflighem abbey as a monk, for the souls of "…Claritiæ sororis nostræ" and for "fratre meo Duce Godefrido et sororibus meis Aleide regina Angliæ et Ida comitissa", by charter dated to [1141][127].

Duke Godefroi V had one illegitimate child by Mistress (1):

6. JOSCELIN de Louvain (-1180). His parentage is confirmed by a manuscript genealogy of the Percy family which names “Matildem et Agnetem” as the daughters and heiresses of “Willielmus de Percy”, adding that Agnes married “Goselino Lovayn fratri Ducis Brabantiæ”[128]. It appears likely that he was illegitimate. If it is correct that he married after 1154, he would have been rather old at that date to have been born from Duke Godefroi´s first marriage. On the other hand, Duke Godefroi´s second wife was probably too old to have given birth to children after her marriage with the duke. Joscelin accompanied his half-sister Adelisa to England when she married King Henry I in 1121. He received the honour of Petworth, Sussex from Queen Adelisa before 1151. See ENGLISH NOBILITY. EARLS of NORTHUMBERLAND.

The following person was related to the above family but the precise connection has not yet been found:

1. MELISENDE, daughter of --- . A kinswoman of Queen Adelisa, who gave her the manor of Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire on her second marriage[129]. Her origin is not known. m firstly ROBERT Marmion [III], son of ROGER Marmion & his wife --- (-[1143/44]). m secondly as his second wife, RICHARD de Camville, son of --- & his wife --- [130]de Vere (-in Sicily 1176).

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http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godefroid_Ier_de_Louvain

http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/barbatus.htm

Godefroid Ier de Louvain, dit le Barbu, le Courageux ou le Grand, né vers 1060, mort le 25 janvier 1139, fut comte de Louvain, de Bruxelles et landgrave de Brabant de 1095 à 1139, puis duc de Basse-Lotharingie de 1106 à 1125 (sous le nom de Godefroid V) et marquis d'Anvers de 1106 à 1139. Il était fils d'Henri II, comte de Louvain et de Bruxelles, et d'Adèle et succéda à son frère Henri III, comte de Louvain et de Bruxelles en 1095.

Son premier conflit fut contre l'évêque de Liège Otbert à propos du comté de Brunengeruz que les deux revendiquaient. L'arbitrage de l'empereur Henri IV attribua en 1099 le comté à l'évêque, qui le confia à Albert III, comte de Namur. Il arbitra ensuite un litige entre Henri IV, comte de Luxembourg et de Limbourg, et Arnould Ier, comte de Looz, à propos de la nomination de l'abbé de Saint-Trond. Il se montre partisan de l'empereur en Lotharingie et défend ses intérêts face au comte de Flandre qui envahit le Cambraisis en 1102.

L'empereur Henri IV meurt en 1106. Le nouvel empereur, Henri V, qui s'était révolté contre son père, décida de se venger des partisans de son père. Il emprisonna Henri de Limbourg et lui retira le duché de Basse-Lotharingie pour le donner à Godefroy. Evadé, Henri tenta de reprendre son ancien duché et prit Aix-la-Chapelle, mais Godefroy le vainquit.

En 1114, à l'occasion d'une brouille entre l'empereur et le pape Pascal II, une insurrection éclata en Germanie, à laquelle prit part le duc Godefroy. Ce ne fut qu'en 1118 que l'empereur Henri V rallia Godefroy à sa cause. L'année suivante mourut le comte de Flandre Baudouin VII à la Hache. N'ayant pas de fils, la Flandre fut disputé entre plusieurs héritiers, dont Guillaume d'Ypres qui avait épousé une nièce de la seconde femme de Godefroy. Godefroy le soutint, mais ne réussit pas à l'imposer face à Charles de Danemark.

Cette même anné mourut Otbert, évêque de Liège, deux candidats furent élus pour lui succéder, et se firent la guerre, dans laquelle intervint Godefroid, qui fut également du côté du perdant. Mais peu après débuta une période où, par ses alliances, il dominait la Lotharingie, maria sa fille avec le roi d'Angleterre, lequel était le beau-père de l'empereur. Mais ce dernier mourut en 1125, et deux seigneurs briguèrent le trône impérial : Lothaire de Supplimbourg et Conrad de Souabe. Godefroy soutint Conrad, et Lothaire fut élu. Celui-ci retira la Basse-Lotharingie à Godefroy pour la donner à Waléran de Limbourg, mais Godefroy parvint à conserver le marquisat d'Anvers et le titre ducal.

En Flandre, Charles le Bon fut assassiné en 1127, et la succession fut revendiquée par plusieurs seigneurs. Guillaume Cliton est choisi, mais son autorité cause rapidement du mécontentement et des révoltes, et Godefroy intervint à nouveau dans la lutte, sans grand succès et finit par s'allier avec le vainqueur, Thierry d'Alsace. Il eut encore l'occasion de se battre, contre l'évêque de Liège, puis contre le comte de Namur.

Godefroid meurt le 25 janvier 1139 et fut enterré à l'abbaye d'Affligem. Certains auteurs le disent mort en 1140, mais cette datation est fausse. Son fils Godefroid II de Louvain lui succéda.

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Godfrey I, Count of Louvain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_I,_Count_of_Louvain

Godfrey I

Duke of Lower Lorraine

Landgrave of Brabant

Count of Leuven

Count of Brussels

Spouse Ida of Chiny

Clementia of Bourgogne

Issue

Adeliza of Louvain

Godfrey II of Louvain

Clarissa

Henry

Ida

Joceline of Louvain

Titles and styles

The Duke of Lower Lorraine

The Landgrave of Brabant

The Count of Louvain and Brussels

Noble family House of Reginar

Father Henry II, Count of Louvain

Mother Adèle

Born 1060

Died 25 January 1139 (aged 69)

Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Louvain from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

Biography

Godfrey was the son of Henry II and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

   * Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, 23 April 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109–before 1151).
   * Godfrey II of Louvain (b. 1107–d. 13 June 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Louvain. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.
   * Clarissa (d. 1140).
   * Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.
   * Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

   * Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the Percy family, and took her surname.[1] Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza.

Notes

  1. ^ Tate, George, The History of the Borough, Castle, and Barony of Alnwick, Vol.1, (Henry Hunter Blair, 1866), 113.

Sources

   * Académie royale de Belgique, Biographie Nationale, v. 7, Brussels, 1883.
   * FMG on Godfrey I, Count of Louvain
   * Tate, George, The History of the Borough, Castle, and Barony of Alnwick, Vol.1, Henry Hunter Blair, 1866.

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Henry of Limbourg Austria coat of arms simple.svg Duke of Lower Lorraine

1106 – 1128 Succeeded by

Walram

Preceded by

Henry III of Louvain Austria coat of arms simple.svg Count of Louvain

1095 – 1139 Succeeded by

Godfrey II of Louvain

Coat of arms of Brabant.svg Landgrave of Brabant

1095 – 1139

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Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (or Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

Godfrey was the son of Henry II of Leuven and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, April 23, 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109–before 1151).

Godfrey II of Leuven (b. 1107–d. June 13, 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Leuven. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.

Clarissa (d. 1140).

Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.

Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the Percy family, and took this surname. Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza.

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Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (or Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

[edit] Biography

Godfrey was the son of Henry II and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

[edit] Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, 23 April 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109–before 1151).

Godfrey II of Leuven (b. 1107–d. 13 June 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Leuven. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.

Clarissa (d. 1140).

Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.

Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the Percy family, and took her surname. Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza.

[edit] Sources

Académie royale de Belgique, Biographie Nationale, v. 7, Brussels, 1883.

FMG on Godfrey I, Count of Louvain

Template:Succession box one to two

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Henry of Limbourg Duke of Lower Lorraine

1106–1128 Succeeded by

Walram

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_I,_Count_of_Leuven"

Categories: Dukes of Lower Lorraine | Counts of Louvain | 1060s births | 1139 deaths | House of Reginar

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Godfrey "the Bearded", of Brabant, descends from French King Louis IV, German King Henry I "the Fowler", Charlemagne, the Mergovingian Kings of France (from Merovaeus, c.411-458, who defeated Atilla the Hun); his wife Ida of Namur descends from the royal Norwegian house and the early counts of Lorraine and of Namur.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_I,_Count_of_Louvain

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_III,_Duke_of_Lower_Lorraine

Godfrey III (c. 997–1069), called the Bearded, was the eldest son of Gothelo I, duke of Upper and Lower Lorraine. By inheritance, he was count of Verdun and he became margrave of Antwerp as a vassal of the duke of Lower Lorraine. The Holy Roman Emperor Henry III authorised him to succeed his father as duke of Upper Lorraine in 1044, but refused him the ducal title in Lower Lorraine, for he feared the power of a united duchy. Instead Henry threatened to appoint a younger son, Gothelo, as duke in Lower Lorraine. At a much later date, Godfrey became duke of Lower Lorraine, but he had lost the upper duchy by then.

Family

By Doda, he had:

1. Godfrey, succeeded him in Lower Lorraine

2. Ida of Lorraine, married Eustace II, Count of Boulogne

3. Wiltrude, married Adalbert of Calw

Godfrey rebelled against his king and devastated land in Lower Lorraine, as well as the city of Verdun, which, though his by inheritance, Henry had not given him. He was soon defeated by an imperial army and was deposed imprisoned together with his son (Gibichenstein, 1045). When his son died in prison, the war recommenced. Baldwin V of Flanders joined Godfrey and Henry gave Thierry, Bishop of Verdun, the eponymous county. Godfrey surprised the bishop (who escaped) and sacked Verdun, burning the cathedral. On 11 November 1048 at Thuin, Godfrey fell on Adalbert, his replacement in Upper Lorraine, and defeated him, killing him in battle. Henry immediately nominated the young Gerard of Chatenoy to replace Adalbert at the Diet of Worms. In his subsequent campaigns to take the Moselle region, Godfrey met with stiff resistance from Gerard and was forced to renounce his claims and reconcile with the bishop. He even assisted in rebuilding the cathedral he had destroyed.

In 1053, his first wife Doda having died, Godfrey remarried Beatrice of Bar, the widow of Boniface III of Tuscany and mother of Matilda, Boniface' heir. Henry arrested Beatrice and her young son Frederick and imprisoned her in Germany, separate from either husband or son, who died within days. The emperor claimed the marriage had been contracted without his consent and was invalid. Young Frederick died a short while later. Nevertheless, Godfrey took over the government of the Tuscany in right of Beatrice and Matilda.

Baldwin V then rebelled, carrying the war to Trier and Nijmegen. Henry responded by devastating Flanders and ravaging Lille and Tournai (1054). In this war, Godfrey captured Frederick of Luxembourg, Duke of Lower Lorraine, who had received that duchy, including Antwerp, from Henry III.

In 1055, Godfrey besieged Antwerp, but Frederick was delivered by the Lorrainers, no longer loyal to Godfrey. Henry died in 1056 and his successor, Henry IV, was only six years old. In that year, Baldwin made peace and did homage to the new king. In 1056 and 1059, by the treaties of Andernach, Baldwin received the march of Ename in the Landgraviate of Brabant, probably in exchange for giving up the march of Valenciennes, which was confiscated by emperor Henry III in 1045.

In 1057, Godfrey was exiled to Tuscany, where he joined Beatrice and co-governed with her. He was enfeoffed with the Duchy of Spoleto (1057) by Pope Stephen IX, his brother. In January 1058, Leo de Benedicto Christiano threw open the city gates to him and Beatrice after the election of Pope Nicholas II. Possessing the Tiber and assaulting the Lateran, Godfrey succeeded in expelling the antipope Benedict X on 24 January. During the papal reign of his brother and his brothers reforming successors, he played an important rôle in the politics of central and northern Italy, including Sardinia, where he interfered on behalf of Barisone I of Logudoro against the Republic of Pisa, indicating his authority over both.

In 1065, he was recalled to become duke of Lower Lorraine after the death of Frederick. He was also given Antwerp again. He installed his court at Bouillon and died on Christmas Eve 1069.

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He never used the tile "King"

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Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Godfrey III[1] (c. 997–1069), called the Bearded, was the eldest son of Gothelo I, duke of Upper and Lower Lorraine. By inheritance, he was count of Verdun and he became margrave of Antwerp as a vassal of the duke of Lower Lorraine. The Holy Roman Emperor Henry III authorised him to succeed his father as duke of Upper Lorraine in 1044, but refused him the ducal title in Lower Lorraine, for he feared the power of a united duchy. Instead Henry threatened to appoint a younger son, Gothelo, as duke in Lower Lorraine. At a much later date, Godfrey became duke of Lower Lorraine, but he had lost the upper duchy by then.

Godfrey rebelled against his king and devastated land in Lower Lorraine, as well as the city of Verdun, which, though his by inheritance, Henry had not given him. He was soon defeated by an imperial army and was deposed imprisoned together with his son (Gibichenstein, 1045). When his son died in prison, the war recommenced. Baldwin V of Flanders joined Godfrey and Henry gave Thierry, Bishop of Verdun, the eponymous county. Godfrey surprised the bishop (who escaped) and sacked Verdun, burning the cathedral. On 11 November 1048 at Thuin, Godfrey fell on Adalbert, his replacement in Upper Lorraine, and defeated him, killing him in battle. Henry immediately nominated the young Gerard of Chatenoy to replace Adalbert at the Diet of Worms. In his subsequent campaigns to take the Moselle region, Godfrey met with stiff resistance from Gerard and was forced to renounce his claims and reconcile with the bishop. He even assisted in rebuilding the cathedral he had destroyed.

In 1053, his first wife Doda having died, Godfrey remarried Beatrice of Bar, the widow of Boniface III of Tuscany and mother of Matilda, Boniface' heir. Henry arrested Beatrice and her young son Frederick and imprisoned her in Germany, separate from either husband or son, who died within days. The emperor claimed the marriage had been contracted without his consent and was invalid. Young Frederick died a short while later. Nevertheless, Godfrey took over the government of the Tuscany in right of Beatrice and Matilda.

Baldwin V then rebelled, carrying the war to Trier and Nijmegen. Henry responded by devastating Flanders and ravaging Lille and Tournai (1054). In this war, Godfrey captured Frederick of Luxembourg, Duke of Lower Lorraine, who had received that duchy, including Antwerp, from Henry III.

In 1055, Godfrey besieged Antwerp, but Frederick was delivered by the Lorrainers, no longer loyal to Godfrey. Henry died in 1056 and his successor, Henry IV, was only six years old. In that year, Baldwin made peace and did homage to the new king. In 1056 and 1059, by the treaties of Andernach, Baldwin received the march of Ename in the Landgraviate of Brabant, probably in exchange for giving up the march of Valenciennes, which was confiscated by emperor Henry III in 1045.

In 1057, Godfrey was exiled to Tuscany, where he joined Beatrice and co-governed with her. He was enfeoffed with the Duchy of Spoleto (1057) by Pope Stephen IX, his brother. In January 1058, Leo de Benedicto Christiano threw open the city gates to him and Beatrice after the election of Pope Nicholas II. Possessing the Tiber and assaulting the Lateran, Godfrey succeeded in expelling the antipope Benedict X on 24 January. During the papal reign of his brother and his brothers reforming successors, he played an important rôle in the politics of central and northern Italy, including Sardinia, where he interfered on behalf of Barisone I of Logudoro against the Republic of Pisa, indicating his authority over both.

In 1065, he was recalled to become duke of Lower Lorraine after the death of Frederick. He was also given Antwerp again. He installed his court at Bouillon and died on Christmas Eve 1069.

[edit]Family

By Doda, he had:

-1. Godfrey, succeeded him in Lower Lorraine

-2. Ida of Lorraine, married Eustace II, Count of Boulogne

-3. Wiltrude, married Adalbert of Calw

Source / Forrás:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_III,_Duke_of_Lower_Lorraine

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German / Deutsch

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gottfried_III._(Niederlothringen)

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Acceeded: 1106

Stammtafeln shows that Ida was Adeliza's mother and other works agree. Brenan in his History of the House of Percy suggests that Clemantine was her mother and Ida was Jocleyn's mother. Stammtafeln does not list Jocelyn at all!

The Complete Peerage, V.x,p445,note.l, says that Jocelyn's mother is unproven.

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Godefroi I de Louvain, Duc de Basse-Lorraine also went by the nick-name of Godefroi 'le Barbu' (or in English, Geoffrey 'the Bearded'). He gained the title of Duc de Basse-Lorraine. He gained the title of Comte de Brabant. He gained the title of Comte de Louvain.

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Godfrey I, called "the Bearded," or "the Courageous," or "the Great," was the Landgrave of Brabant, and Count of Brussels and Leuven (or Louvain) from 1095 to his death. He was Duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also Margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

Godfrey succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz, which both claimed. In 1099, Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV (also our ancestor) allotted the county to the Bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the Abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had five children, including our ancestors Godfrey and Adeliza. Later, he married Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue. He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Godfrey was in favor with the Emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the Emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the Emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the Emperor and the Duke were reconciled.

In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to King Henry I of England (also our ancestor), who was also the father-in-law of the Emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. (She later married our ancestor William d'Aubigny, and became our ancestor through him.) However, Emperor Henry V died in 1125, and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the Duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title.

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

Godfrey was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his son Godfrey and his daughter Adeliza, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfrey_I_of_Leuven for more information.

--------------------

Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (or Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

Godfrey was the son of Henry II of Leuven and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, April 23, 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109–before 1151).

Godfrey II of Leuven (b. 1107–d. June 13, 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Leuven. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.

Clarissa (d. 1140).

Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.

Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the Percy family, and took this surname. Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza. -------------------- From: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Godfrey_I_of_Leuven

Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of BrabantDuke of Brabant

The Duchy of Brabant was formally erected in 1183/1184. The title "Duke of Brabant" was created by the German Emperor Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor Barbarossa in favor of Henry I, Duke of Brabant, son of Godfrey III of Leuven....

, and count of BrusselsBrussels

Brussels is the capital of Belgium, the French Community of Belgium, the Flemish Community, the Flemish Region and the main seat of the European Union's institutions....

and LeuvenLeuven

Leuven is the capital of the Belgium province of Flemish Brabant. The actual municipality comprises the historical city of Leuven and the adjacent villages of Heverlee, Kessel-Lo, a part of Korbeek-Lo, Wilsele and Wijgmaal....

(or Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margraveMargrave

Margrave is the English language and French language form of the German language title Markgraf and certain equivalent nobiliary titles in other languages....

of AntwerpAntwerp

The city and municipality of Antwerp is a centre of commerce in Flanders and Belgium and the capital city of Antwerp province, in Flanders, one of Belgium's three regions....

from 1106 to his death.

Biography

Godfrey was the son of Henry II of Leuven and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry IIIHenry III of Leuven

Henry III of Leuven was count of Leuven from 1078 to 1095.He was allied by marriage to most of the nearby lords: he was brother in law of Baldwin II of Hainaut, and son-in-law of Robert I of Flanders....

in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-TruidenSint-Truiden

Sint-Truiden is a municipality located in the province of Limburg, Flemish Region, Belgium and is near the towns of Hasselt and Tongeren....

.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry VHenry V, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry V, Holy Roman Empire, was the fourth and last ruler of the Salian dynasty. In 1099, his father Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor had him elected List of German Kings and Emperors in place of his older, rebel son Conrad of Italy....

, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower LorraineHenry, Duke of Lower Lorraine

Henry I was the count of Limburg and Arlon from 1082 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine between 1101 to 1106....

was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured AachenAachen

Aachen is a spa city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany....

, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal IIPope Paschal II

Paschal II, born Ranierius, was Pope from August 13, 1099 until his death. A monk of the Abbey of Cluny, he was created Cardinal Priest of the Titulus Basilica di San Clemente by Pope Gregory VII about 1076, and was consecrated Pope...

, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, of which William of YpresWilliam of Ypres

William of Ypres styled count of Flanders, , was Stephen of England of England's chief lieutenant, during the English civil wars of 1139–54 known as the Anarchy....

had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter AdelizaAdeliza of Louvain

Adeliza of Leuven, also called Adela and Aleidis, was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of King Henry I of England....

to Henry I of EnglandHenry I of England

King Henry I of England , called Henry Beauclerc was the fourth son of William I of England commonly known in both England and Normandy as William the Conqueror....

, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of HohenstaufenConrad III of Germany

Conrad III was the first Germany king of the Hohenstaufen dynasty. He was the son of Frederick I, Duke of Swabia, Duke of Swabia and Agnes of Germany, a daughter of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor....

, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to WaleranWaleran, Duke of Lower Lorraine

Waleran II or Walram II, called Paganus meaning "the Pagan", probably due to a late baptism....

, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of BrabantDuke of Brabant

The Duchy of Brabant was formally erected in 1183/1184. The title "Duke of Brabant" was created by the German Emperor Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor Barbarossa in favor of Henry I, Duke of Brabant, son of Godfrey III of Leuven....

).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William ClitoWilliam Clito

William Clito was the son of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, by his marriage with Sibylla of Conversano....

prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against LiègeLiege

Liege means:* In Western feudalism, a liege is a party in the vassalic oath of allegiance to someone: both the vassal and, more usually, his liege lord....

and NamurNamur (city)

Namur is a city and municipality, capital of the province of Namur and of the Communities, regions and provinces of Belgium of Wallonia in southern Belgium....

.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of AffligemAffligem

Affligem is a municipality located some 20 km west-north-west of Brussels in the Belgium province of Flemish Brabant, not far from the town of Aalst and the important railway junction of Denderleeuw....

. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

Adeliza of LouvainAdeliza of Louvain

Adeliza of Leuven, also called Adela and Aleidis, was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England from 1121 to 1135, the second wife of King Henry I of England....

(b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, April 23, 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of ArundelWilliam d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel

William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel was son of a senior William d'Aubigny and Maud le Bigod, daughter of Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk....

(1109–before 1151).

Godfrey II of LeuvenGodfrey II of Leuven

Godfrey II was the count of Leuven and Brussels, Duke of Brabant, and margrave of Antwerp by inheritance from 23 January 1139....

(b. 1107–d. June 13, 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Leuven. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.

Clarissa (d. 1140).

Henry (d. in the abbey of AffligemAffligem

Affligem is a municipality located some 20 km west-north-west of Brussels in the Belgium province of Flemish Brabant, not far from the town of Aalst and the important railway junction of Denderleeuw....

, 1141), monk.

Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the PercyPercy Percy may refer to:People:People with the last, or sur, name of Percy:* Charles Harting Percy, businessman, special ambassador, politician, Senator Illinois-R... family, and took this surname. Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza. Joscelin is an ancestor of U.S presidents Franklin PierceFranklin Pierce Franklin Pierce, Sr. was an Politics of the United States and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857.... and George W Bush

Sources

Académie royale de Belgique, Biographie Nationale, v. 7, Brussels, 1883.

FMG on Godfrey I, Count of Louvain

-------------------- Godfrey I, Count of Louvain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Godfrey I of Louvain)

Godfrey I

Duke of Lower Lorraine

Landgrave of Brabant

Count of Leuven

Count of Brussels

Spouse Ida of Chiny

Clementia of Bourgogne

Issue

Adeliza of Louvain

Godfrey II of Louvain

Clarissa

Henry

Ida

Joceline of Louvain

Detail Titles and styles

The Duke of Lower Lorraine

The Landgrave of Brabant

The Count of Louvain and Brussels

Noble family House of Reginar

Father Henry II, Count of Louvain

Mother Adèle

Born 1060

Died 25 January 1139 (aged 69)

Godfrey I (c. 1060 – 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Louvain from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey V or VI) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

Contents [hide]

1 Biography

2 Family and children

3 Notes

4 Sources

[edit]Biography

Godfrey was the son of Henry II and a countess called Adela (origin unknown). He succeeded his brother Henry III in 1095. He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders, who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran, the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Thierry of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

[edit]Family and children

He married Ida, daughter of Otto II of Chiny and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children:

Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103–d. abbey of Affligem, 23 April 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109–before 1151).

Godfrey II of Louvain (b. 1107–d. 13 June 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia, Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Louvain. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach, daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.

Clarissa (d. 1140).

Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.

Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).

Later, he married to Clementia of Bourgogne but had no issue.

He also had a son from an unknown mistress:

Joceline of Louvain (d. 1180); he accompanied his half-sister Adeliza to England and married Agnes, heiress of the Percy family, and took her surname.[1] Probably the same as Gosuinus, mentioned in 1143 together with his sister Adeliza.

[edit]Notes

^ Tate, George, The History of the Borough, Castle, and Barony of Alnwick, Vol.1, (Henry Hunter Blair, 1866), 113.

[edit]Sources

Académie royale de Belgique, Biographie Nationale, v. 7, Brussels, 1883.

FMG on Godfrey I, Count of Louvain

Tate, George, The History of the Borough, Castle, and Barony of Alnwick, Vol.1, Henry Hunter Blair, 1866.

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Henry of Limbourg Duke of Lower Lorraine

1106 – 1128 Succeeded by

Walram

Preceded by

Henry III of Louvain Count of Louvain

1095 – 1139 Succeeded by

Godfrey II of Louvain

Landgrave of Brabant

1095 – 1139

Categories: Dukes of Lower Lorraine | Counts of Louvain | 1060s births | 1139 deaths | House of Reginar

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Godfried I van Brabant, comte de Louvain, Duke of Lorraine's Timeline

1040
1040
Lower-Lorraine,,,France
1074
1074
Lorraine Inferie, France
1095
February 5, 1095
Age 21
Leuven, Flemish Region, Belgium
1095
Age 21
Brabant, Belgium
1099
1099
Age 25
Belgium
1103
1103
Age 29
1105
1105
Age 31
Louvain, Brabant, Belgium
1105
Age 31
Leuven, Flemish Region, Belgium
1110
1110
Age 36
1112
1112
Age 38
Namur, Flanders, France