Gov. Edward Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger

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Edward Winslow

Also Known As: "Pilgrim", "Edward Winslow Governor", "6th Governor of Plymouth Colony"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England
Death: Died in At sea in the West Indies, between Hispaniola and Jamaica
Cause of death: Fever
Place of Burial: Buried at sea in the West Indies, between Hispaniola and Jamaica
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward Winslow and Magdalene Winslow (Olyver)
Husband of Elizabeth Winslow (Barker), "Mayflower" Passenger and Susanna Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger
Father of Infant Winslow; Edward Winslow; John Winslow; Josiah Winslow, Governor of Plymouth Colony and Elizabeth Curwen (Winslow)
Brother of John Winslow, Sr.; Eleanor Winslow; Kenelm Winslow, I; Gilbert Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger; Elizabeth Winslow and 4 others
Half brother of Richard Winslow and Margaret Winslow

Occupation: Governor Plymouth Colony in 1633, 1636, and finally in 1644. Cromwell's commissioner to West Indies. Mayflower passenger, Printer, Mayflower Pilgrim, Mayflower passeenger, Gov.; JB and BSB 11th great uncle, Govenor of Plymouth Colony
Managed by: Eric Michael ANDERSON
Last Updated:

About Gov. Edward Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger

Edward Winslow (1595-1655)

Mayflower Passenger

http://www.mayflowerfamilies.com/mayflower/edward_winslow_family.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

Edward Winslow (1595 – 1655) was an American Pilgrim leader on the Mayflower. He served as the governor of Plymouth Colony in 1633, 1636, and finally in 1644. His testimony in Mourt's Relation is one of only two primary sources of the "first thanksgiving" in existence.

He was born in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, on October 18, 1595 and attended The King's School, Worcester. Winslow then apprenticed as a printer in London. In 1617 he removed to Leiden, united with John Robinson's church there, and in 1620 was one of the "pilgrims" who emigrated to New England on the Mayflower and founded the Plymouth colony.

His first wife was Elizabeth (Barker) Winslow, whom he married in May 1618 at Leiden. She accompanied him on the Mayflower, and died soon after their arrival in Plymouth. Also accompanying Winslow were his children, George Soule, a teacher for the children, and Elias Story, a servant. Winslow remarried in May 1621 to Mrs Susannah (---) White, the mother of Peregrine White (1620-1704). This was the first marriage in the New England colonies.[citation needed] Winslow later founded what would become Marshfield in the Plymouth Colony where he lived on an estate he called Careswell.

Winslow was delegated by his associates to treat with the Native Americans in the vicinity and succeeded in winning the friendship of their chief, Massasoit (c. 1580-1661). He was one of the assistants from 1624 to 1647, except in 1633-1634, 1636-1637 and 1644-1645, when he was governor of the colony. He was also, in 1643, one of the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England. On several occasions he was sent to England to look after the interests of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colony, and defend these colonies from the attacks of such men as John Lyford, Thomas Morton and Samuel Gorton. He left on his last mission as the agent of Massachusetts Bay, in October 1646, and spent nine years in England, where he held a minor office under Cromwell, and in 1654, was made a member of the commission appointed to determine the value of certain English ships destroyed by Denmark.

In 1655 he was the chief of the three English commissioners whom Cromwell sent on his expedition against the West Indies to advise with its leaders Admiral Venables and Admiral William Penn, but died near Jamaica on 8 May 1655, and was buried at sea. Winslow's portrait, the only likeness of any of the "Mayflower pilgrims" done from life, is in the gallery of the Pilgrim Society at Plymouth, Massachusetts.

His son Josiah Winslow later served as governor of Plymouth colony.

His writings, though fragmentary, are of the greatest value to the historian of the Plymouth colony. They include:

   * Good Newes from New England, or a True Relation of Things very Remarkable at the Plantation of Plimouth in New England (1624);
   * Hypocrisie Unmasked; by a True Relation of the Governor and Company of Massachusetts against Samuel Gorton, a Notorious Disturber of the Peace (1646), to which was added a chapter entitled "A Brief Narration of the True Grounds or Cause of the First Plantation of New England";
   * New England's Salamander (1647); and
   * The Glorious Progress of the Gospel amongst the Indians in New England (1649).

With William Bradford he also is supposed to have prepared a Journal of the Beginning and Proceeding of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England (1622), which is generally known as Mourt's Relation, owing to its preface having been signed by "G. Mourt."

Some of his writings may be found reprinted in Alexander Young's Chronicles of the Pilgrims (Boston, 1841).

[edit] Further reading

   * Dempsey, Jack, editor, 'Good News from New England and Other Writings on the Killings at Weymouth Colony' (Scituate MA: Digital Scanning 2001)
   * Dempsey, Jack, 'Thomas Morton: The Life and Renaissance of an Early American Poet' (Scituate MA: Digital Scanning 2000)
   * 'The Coming of The Pilgrims' and '1621-1630' illustrated pages of historical website http://ancientgreece-earlyamerica.com
   * J. D. Bangs's 'Pilgrim Edward Winslow: New England's First International Diplomat (Boston, 2004);
   * J. B. Moore's Memoirs of American Governors (New York, 1846);
   * David P. and Frances K. Holton's Winslow Memorial (New York, 1877);
   * J. G. Palfrey's History of New England (3 vols., Boston, 1858-1864).
   * Plymouth Archaeological Rediscovery Project "Archaeology of the Edward Winslow Site" www.plymoutharch.com

Also see a paper by W. C. Winslow, Governor Edward Winslow, his Place and Part in Plymouth Colony, in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 1895 (Washington, 1896)

   * See Egerton Ryerson's The Loyalists of America and Their Times for evidence of the differences between the Pilgrim Fathers (Plymouth Rock) and the Puritan Fathers (Massachusetts Bay) with respect to loyalty to the Crown, tolerance of other religions, and treatment of the Native Peoples, and how this schism continued right up to and during the American Revolution.

3rd, 6th & 10th Governor of Plymouth Colony

In office

1633 – 1634

1636 – 1637

1644 – 1645

Preceded by William Bradford (thrice)

Succeeded by Thomas Prence (1634)

William Bradford (1637 & 1645)

Born October 18, 1595

Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England

Died May 8, 1655 (aged 60)

near Jamaica

Nationality English

Religion Puritan

Edward Winslow served as the governor of the Plymouth Colony. He also signed the Mayflower Compact.

--------------------

1st marriage in New England

--------------------

He was traveling in the Low Countries, and subsequently became acquainted with the Pilgrims' church in Leiden. It is quite possible he was assisting William Brewster and Thomas Brewer in their publishing of religious books that were illegal in England.

Edward remarried to the widowed Mrs. Susanna White, on 12 May 1621--the first marriage in the Plymouth Colony.

Winslow quickly became one of the more prominent men in the colony. He was on many of the early explorations of Cape Cod, and led a number of expeditions to meet and trade with the Indians. He wrote several first-hand accounts of these early years, including portions of A Relation or Journal of the Proceedings of the Plantation Settled at Plymouth (London, 1622) and the entirety of Good News from New England (London, 1624).

Edward Winslow became involved in defending the Plymouth and later Massachusetts Bay Colonies from their opponents and adversaries in England, and made several trips back and forth between England and Massachusetts, including trips in 1623/4, 1630, and 1635; on one occasion he was arrested and thrown into the Fleet Prison in London by his adversaries, on grounds that he had performed marriage ceremonies without being ordained (the Pilgrims viewed marriage as an event to be handled by the civil magistrates, not by the Church). Winslow returned to England shortly after the English Civil War, and published a couple of pamphlets in defense of the New England colonies, including Hypocrisy Unmasked (1646) and New England's Salamander Discovered (1647). He also wrote the introduction to the Glorious Progress of the Gospel Amongst the Indians in New England (1649).

In Plymouth, he held a number of political offices, as was routinely elected an assistant to Governor William Bradford; Winslow himself was elected governor of Plymouth on three occasions: 1632/3, 1635/6, and 1644. After Winslow returned to England, he was on several Parliamentary committees; he died in 1655 at sea between Hispaniola and Jamaica, while serving as a commissioner for Oliver Cromwell on a military expedition to retake the island of Hispaniola.

--------------------

Mayflower Passenger

Edward Winslow served as the governor of the Plymouth Colony. He also signed the Mayflower Compact.

4th Great Grand Uncle to William Philo Hibbard

--------------------

Governor Winslow was among the signers of the Mayflower Compact; the one who selected Plymouth as the place of settlement; one of the principal leaders of the struggling colony, and it's third governor. It's a shame that such a dedicated and intelligent leader has so little documented issue. Unfortunately this is true of the early Winslows in general. Furthermore, many Winslows seem to have died early -- in itself, perhaps, an interesting study. Out of five known children, only Josiah and Elisabeth survived to have issue.

Edward Winslow was the son of Edward Winslow, a wealthy owner of a salt boilery, and Magdalene Oliver. Edward Winslow was baptized at Droitwich, Worcester, England on 20 October 1595. Winslow soon joined with the Separatists, and moved to Leyden where he became a printer along with William Brewster, publishing illegal religious pamphlets. His first wife, Elizabeth Barker, was from Chattisham, Suffolk, England.

His second wife was the widow of William White of the Mayflower.

Edward Winslow had four other siblings which came to America, namely Gilbert Winslow (Mayflower, 1620), John Winslow (Fortune, 1621), JOSIAS WINSLOW (White Angel, 1631), and Kenelm Winslow, who married Eleanor (Newton) Adams, who came in the Anne, 1623. Edward Winslow also had several sisters, including Magdalen who married Rev. William Wake on 25 April 1627, in Wareham, Dorset, England.

Edward Winslow is the only Mayflower passenger to have a known portrait in existence--although a questionable sketch of Myles Standish exists. The portrait to the left was painted by Robert Walker in 1651, so Winslow is here 31 years older than he was when he came on the Mayflower at the age of 25. The original portrait is in the possession of the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel Morton in New England's Memorial (1669) writes of Edward Winslow:

He was the son of Edward Winslow, Esq. of the town of Draughtwich, in the county of Worcester. He, travelling into the low countries, in his journeys fell into acquaintance with the church of Leyden, in Holland, unto whom he joined, and with whom he continued until they parted to come into New-England, he coming with that part that came first over, and became a very worthy and useful instrument amongst them, both in place of government and othrwise, until his last voyage for England, being sent on special employment for the government of the Massachusetts, as is aforementioned in this book; and afterwards was employed as one of the grand commissioners in that unhappy design against Domingo in Hispaniola, who taking grief for all ill success of that enterprize, on which, together with some other infirmities that were upon him, he fell sick at sea, betwixt Domingo and Jamaica, and died the eighth day of May, which was about the sixty-first year of his life, and his body was honourably committed to the sea, with the usual solemnity of the discharge of fourty-two pieces of ordinance.

Edward Winslow of the Mayflower was a printer, and assisted William Brewster in running the printing press at Leyden which published illegal pamphlets of a religious nature which were distributed in England. He was one of the more prominent and influential men in the Plymouth Colony, and was the colony's third governor. In the early years of Plymouth, Edward played a prominent role in Indian-Pilgrim relations, and made many diplomatic visits to the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit. One one occasion in 1622 he even managed to "cure" Massasoit of a dreadful sickness--an event which greatly helped Indian-Pilgrim relations.

Winslow also made trips to England in the early years of the Colony to conduct business agreements and make legal arrangements, including trips in 1623-4, 1630, and 1635. In 1646 he returned to live in England and served in the English army under Oliver Cromwell . In 1655 he died of a fever on a military expedition to capture the island of Hispaniola. Upon his death, one of the ship's chroniclers wrote this poem:

The Eighth of May, west from 'Spaniola shore,

God took from us our Grand Commissioner,

Winslow by Name, a man in Chiefest Trust,

Whose Life was sweet, and Conversation just;

Whose Parts and wisdome most men did excell:

An honour to his Place, as all can tell.

Edward Winslow authored several books. He wrote Good News From New England first published in 1624. He authored a good portion of Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth first published in 1622. Winslow also wrote Hypocricie Unmasked (1646), and New England's Salamander (1647), which are both for the most part religious discourses. He also edited several pamphlets.

In August, 1998, Dr. Jeremy D. Bangs of Leiden, Holland stated that he was nearing completion of a biography of Edward Winslow.

THE WILL OF EDWARD WINSLOW

I Edward Winslowe of London. Esquior. being now bound in a voyage to sea in the service of the comon welth do make publish & declare this to be my last will & testamt touching the disposing of my estate. ffirst I doe give will devise & bequeath all my lands & stock in New England & all my possibilities & porcons in future allotmts & divicons to Josia my onely sonne & his heires, hee allowing to my wife a full third parte thereof for her life Also. I give to the poore of the Church of Plymouth in new England Tenn pounds. & to the poore of marshfielde where the chiefest of my estate lyes Tenn poundes., Also I give my lynnen wch I carry wth me to sea to my daughter Elizabeth & the rest of my goods wch I carry wth mee I give to my sonn Josias hee giving to each of my brothers a suite of apparell & I make my said son Josias my executor of this my will, and Colonell venables my overseer of my goods in the voyage & my fower frends Dr Edmond Wilson; mr John Arthur, Mr James Shirley & Mr Richard ffloyde, overseers for the rest of my prsonall estate in England.

witness my hand & Seale the Eighteenth day of December In the yeare of our Lord God one Thousand Six hundred fifty & ffower.

Sealed & subscribed

in the presence of Jon Hooper

Gerald Usher servant to Hen: Colbron

pr me Edw: Winslow

--------------------

Mayflower Passenger

Edward Winslow served as the governor of the Plymouth Colony. He also signed the Mayflower Compact.

--------------------

Edward was one of the Mayflower's Pilgrim leaders and the first Governor of the Plymouth Colony. See link for more info.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

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Mayflower Passenger

bp. Droitwich, Worcestershire, England 20 October 1595, son of Edward and Magdalen (Oliver) Winslow. Died at sea 8 May 1655. He married second (Sus)anna (?Fuller) Winslow 12 May, 1621

Governor Winslow was among the signers of the Mayflower Compact; the one who selected Plymouth as the place of settlement; one of the principal leaders of the struggling colony, and it's third governor. It's a shame that such a dedicated and intelligent leader has so little documented issue. Unfortunately this is true of the early Winslows in general. Furthermore, many Winslows seem to have died early -- in itself, perhaps, an interesting study. Out of five known children, only Josiah and Elisabeth survived to have issue.

Edward Winslow was baptized at Droitwich, co. Worcester, England, Oct 20 1595 and died May 8, 1655 in about the sixty-first year of his life. He was the son of Edward and Magdalene (Oliver) Winslow. Brothers Gilbert (who came on the Mayflower, but returned to England and there died--no known issue), John, Josias and Kenelm all came to Plymouth. At the time of his marriage in Leiden, he was called a printer of London. His first wife died the first winter shortly after the Pilgrims landed. He died on a voyage from Hispaniola to Jamaica and was buried at sea.

--------------------

Mayflower Passenger

Edward Winslow served as the governor of the Plymouth Colony. He also signed the Mayflower Compact.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

Edward Winslow (1595 – 1655) was an American Pilgrim leader on the Mayflower. He served as the governor of Plymouth Colony in 1633, 1636, and finally in 1644. His testimony in Mourt's Relation is one of only two primary sources of the "first thanksgiving" in existence.

He was born in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, on October 18, 1595 and attended The King's School, Worcester. Winslow then apprenticed as a printer in London. In 1617 he removed to Leiden, united with John Robinson's church there, and in 1620 was one of the "pilgrims" who emigrated to New England on the Mayflower and founded the Plymouth colony.

His first wife was Elizabeth (Barker) Winslow, whom he married in May 1618 at Leiden. She accompanied him on the Mayflower, and died soon after their arrival in Plymouth. Also accompanying Winslow were his children, George Soule, a teacher for the children, and Elias Story, a servant. Winslow remarried in May 1621 to Mrs Susannah (---) White, the mother of Peregrine White (1620-1704). This was the first marriage in the New England colonies.[citation needed] Winslow later founded what would become Marshfield in the Plymouth Colony where he lived on an estate he called Careswell.

Winslow was delegated by his associates to treat with the Native Americans in the vicinity and succeeded in winning the friendship of their chief, Massasoit (c. 1580-1661). He was one of the assistants from 1624 to 1647, except in 1633-1634, 1636-1637 and 1644-1645, when he was governor of the colony. He was also, in 1643, one of the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England. On several occasions he was sent to England to look after the interests of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colony, and defend these colonies from the attacks of such men as John Lyford, Thomas Morton and Samuel Gorton. He left on his last mission as the agent of Massachusetts Bay, in October 1646, and spent nine years in England, where he held a minor office under Cromwell, and in 1654, was made a member of the commission appointed to determine the value of certain English ships destroyed by Denmark.

In 1655 he was the chief of the three English commissioners whom Cromwell sent on his expedition against the West Indies to advise with its leaders Admiral Venables and Admiral William Penn, but died near Jamaica on 8 May 1655, and was buried at sea. Winslow's portrait, the only likeness of any of the "Mayflower pilgrims" done from life, is in the gallery of the Pilgrim Society at Plymouth, Massachusetts.

His son Josiah Winslow later served as governor of Plymouth colony.

His writings, though fragmentary, are of the greatest value to the historian of the Plymouth colony. They include:

   * Good Newes from New England, or a True Relation of Things very Remarkable at the Plantation of Plimouth in New England (1624);
   * Hypocrisie Unmasked; by a True Relation of the Governor and Company of Massachusetts against Samuel Gorton, a Notorious Disturber of the Peace (1646), to which was added a chapter entitled "A Brief Narration of the True Grounds or Cause of the First Plantation of New England";
   * New England's Salamander (1647); and
   * The Glorious Progress of the Gospel amongst the Indians in New England (1649).

With William Bradford he also is supposed to have prepared a Journal of the Beginning and Proceeding of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England (1622), which is generally known as Mourt's Relation, owing to its preface having been signed by "G. Mourt."

Some of his writings may be found reprinted in Alexander Young's Chronicles of the Pilgrims (Boston, 1841).

[edit] Further reading

   * Dempsey, Jack, editor, 'Good News from New England and Other Writings on the Killings at Weymouth Colony' (Scituate MA: Digital Scanning 2001)
   * Dempsey, Jack, 'Thomas Morton: The Life and Renaissance of an Early American Poet' (Scituate MA: Digital Scanning 2000)
   * 'The Coming of The Pilgrims' and '1621-1630' illustrated pages of historical website http://ancientgreece-earlyamerica.com
   * J. D. Bangs's 'Pilgrim Edward Winslow: New England's First International Diplomat (Boston, 2004);
   * J. B. Moore's Memoirs of American Governors (New York, 1846);
   * David P. and Frances K. Holton's Winslow Memorial (New York, 1877);
   * J. G. Palfrey's History of New England (3 vols., Boston, 1858-1864).
   * Plymouth Archaeological Rediscovery Project "Archaeology of the Edward Winslow Site" www.plymoutharch.com

Also see a paper by W. C. Winslow, Governor Edward Winslow, his Place and Part in Plymouth Colony, in the Annual Report of the American Historical Association for 1895 (Washington, 1896)

   * See Egerton Ryerson's The Loyalists of America and Their Times for evidence of the differences between the Pilgrim Fathers (Plymouth Rock) and the Puritan Fathers (Massachusetts Bay) with respect to loyalty to the Crown, tolerance of other religions, and treatment of the Native Peoples, and how this schism continued right up to and during the American Revolution.

3rd, 6th & 10th Governor of Plymouth Colony

In office

1633 – 1634

1636 – 1637

1644 – 1645

Preceded by William Bradford (thrice)

Succeeded by Thomas Prence (1634)

William Bradford (1637 & 1645)

Born October 18, 1595

Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England

Died May 8, 1655 (aged 60)

near Jamaica

Nationality English

Religion Puritan

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~dantrogers/pafg2228.htm

Governor Edward Winslow [Parents] was born on 18 Oct 1595 in Droitwich,Worcestershire,England. He died on 8 May 1655 in West Indies. He married Susanna Ann Fuller on 12 May 1621 in Plymouth,Plymouth,Ma .

   Other marriages:
       Barker, Elizabeth

Susanna Ann Fuller [Parents] was born about 1586 in of,Redenhall,Norfolk,England. She died in 1680 in Marshfield,Plymouth,Ma. She married Governor Edward Winslow on 12 May 1621 in Plymouth,Plymouth,Ma .

   Other marriages:
       White, William

They had the following children:

     		M 	i 	Edward Winslow Jr. was born about 1624.
     		M 	ii 	John Winslow was born about 1626.
     		M 	iii 	Governor Josiah Winslow
     		F 	iv 	Elizabeth Winslow

http://homepage.mac.com/james_keller/PS22/PS22_364.HTML

20 October 1595 Edward was baptized in Droitwich, Worcester County, England.

Edward Winslow was the son of Edward Winslow, a wealthy owner of a salt boilery, and Magdalene Oliver. Edward Winslow was baptized at Droitwich, Worcester, England on 20 October 1595. Winslow soon joined with the Separatists, and moved to Leyden where he became a printer along with William Brewster, publishing illegal religious pamphlets. His first wife, Elizabeth Barker, was from Chattisham, Suffolk, England.

His second wife was the widow of William White of the Mayflower. For a description of what is known about her (she is not a Fuller) see William White. - [1]

6 September 1620 Edward and his wife Elizabeth, and his brother Gilbert, were three of the 102 passengers that embarked on the Mayflower, leaving Plymouth, England on this day.

9 November 1620 The passengers and crew aboard the Mayflower sighted land.

11 November 1620 The passengers and crew of the Mayflower made landfall in America. The group of 102 passengers who crowded aboard the Mayflower for the crossing was not homogenous. Many of the passengers were members of the Leiden congregation, but they were joined by a number of English families or individuals who were hoping to better their life situations, or were seeking financial gain. These two general groups have sometimes been referred to as the "saints" and "strangers." Although the Leiden congregation had sent its strongest members with various skills for establishing the new colony, nearly half of the passengers died the first winter of the "great sickness." Anyone who arrived in Plymouth on Mayflower and survived the initial hardships is now considered a Pilgrim with no distinction being made on the basis of their original purposes for making the voyage. - [2]

Edward Winslow had four other siblings which came to America, namely Gilbert Winslow (Mayflower, 1620), John Winslow (Fortune, 1621), Josias Winslow (White Angel, 1631), and Kenelm Winslow, who married Eleanor (Newton) Adams, who came in the Anne, 1623. Edward Winslow also had several sisters, including Magdalen who married Rev. William Wake on 25 April 1627, in Wareham, Dorset, England. - [1]

[NOTE] A photocopy of Edward's signature on the Mayflower Compact is in "Photo Gallery 3" (http://homepage.mac.com/james_keller/PhotoAlbum27.html) of the website.

[NOTE] Edward Winslow is the one we have to thank for our information about the First Thanksgiving. His 1621 letter recorded some details of the harvest celebration and the Native American visitors.

1644 Edward was appointed the Governor of the Massachusetts Colony.

18 December 1654 Edward wrote and signed his will, it read:

I Edward Winslowe of London. Esquior. being now bound in a voyage to sea in the service of the comon welth do make publish & declare this to be my last will & testamt touching the disposing of my estate. ffirst I doe give will devise & bequeath all my lands & stock in New England & all my possibilities & porcons in future allotmts & divicons to Josia my onely sonne & his heires, hee allowing to my wife a full third parte thereof for her life Also. I give to the poore of the Church of Plymouth in new England Tenn pounds. & to the poore of marshfielde where the chiefest of my estate lyes Tenn poundes., Also I give my lynnen wch I carry wth me to sea to my daughter Elizabeth & the rest of my goods wch I carry wth mee I give to my sonn Josias hee giving to each of my brothers a suite of apparell & I make my said son Josias my executor of this my will, and Colonell venables my overseer of my goods in the voyage & my fower frends Dr Edmond Wilson; mr John Arthur, Mr James Shirley & Mr Richard ffloyde, overseers for the rest of my prsonall estate in England.

witness my hand & Seale the Eighteenth day of December In the yeare of our Lord God one Thousand Six hundred fifty & ffower.

Sealed & subscribed

in the presence of Jon Hooper

Gerald Usher servant to Hen: Colbron

pr me Edw: Winslow - [1]

Edward Winslow is the only Mayflower passenger to have a known portrait in existence-although a questionable sketch of Myles Standish exists. The portrait to the left was painted by Robert Walker in 1651, so Winslow is here 31 years older than he was when he came on the Mayflower at the age of 25. The original portrait is in the possession of the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel Morton in New England's Memorial (1669) writes of Edward Winslow:

He was the son of Edward Winslow, Esq. of the town of Draughtwich, in the county of Worcester. He, travelling into the low countries, in his journeys fell into acquaintance with the church of Leyden, in Holland, unto whom he joined, and with whom he continued until they parted to come into New-England, he coming with that part that came first over, and became a very worthy and useful instrument amongst them, both in place of government and othrwise, until his last voyage for England, being sent on special employment for the government of the Massachusetts, as is aforementioned in this book; and afterwards was employed as one of the grand commissioners in that unhappy design against Domingo in Hispaniola, who taking grief for all ill success of that enterprize, on which, together with some other infirmities that were upon him, he fell sick at sea, betwixt Domingo and Jamaica, and died the eighth day of May, which was about the sixty-first year of his life, and his body was honourably committed to the sea, with the usual solemnity of the discharge of fourty-two pieces of ordinance.

Cotton Mather, essentially copying from Morton in his Magnalia Christi Americana (1702) writes:

Mr. Edward Winslow, the Son of Edward Winslow, Esq; of Draughtwich, in the Country of Worcester,... Travelling into the Low-Countries, he fell into Acquaintance with the English Church at Leyden, and joining himself to them, he Shipped himself with that part of them which first came over into America; from which time he was continually engaged in such extraordinary Actions, as the assistance of that People to encounter their more than ordinary Diffculties, called for.

Edward Winslow of the Mayflower was a printer, and assisted William Brewster in running the printing press at Leyden which published illegal pamphlets of a religious nature which were distributed in England. He was one of the more prominent and influential men in the Plymouth Colony, and was the colony's third governor. In the early years of Plymouth, Edward played a prominent role in Indian-Pilgrim relations, and made many diplomatic visits to the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit. One one occasion in 1622 he even managed to "cure" Massasoit of a dreadful sickness-an event which greatly helped Indian-Pilgrim relations.

Winslow also made trips to England in the early years of the Colony to conduct business agreements and make legal arrangements, including trips in 1623-4, 1630, and 1635. In 1646 he returned to live in England and served in the English army under Oliver Cromwell. In 1655 he died of a fever on a military expedition to capture the island of Hispaniola. Upon his death, one of the ship's chroniclers wrote this poem:

The Eighth of May, west from 'Spaniola shore,

God took from us our Grand Commissioner,

Winslow by Name, a man in Chiefest Trust,

Whose Life was sweet, and Conversation just;

Whose Parts and wisdome most men did excell:

An honour to his Place, as all can tell.

[NOTE] Many sites include the above poem and then state that Edward died in Plymouth? Odd.

Edward Winslow authored several books. He wrote Good News From New England first published in 1624. He authored a good portion of Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth first published in 1622. Winslow also wrote Hypocricie Unmasked (1646), and New England's Salamander (1647), which are both for the most part religious discourses. He also edited several pamphlets.

In August, 1998, Dr. Jeremy D. Bangs of Leiden, Holland stated that he was nearing completion of a biography of Edward Winslow. - [1]

[NOTE] MYTH #1: Native Americans were mistreated by the Mayflower passengers, and their land was stolen from them. ANSWER: While in Holland, the Pilgrims had read stories of the savage natives who killed and tortured the white settlers. Because of this, they feared the Indians, and considered them uncivilized savages. When they arrived, and were exploring Cape Cod, they were attacked, and had to defend themselves. Luckily, no one died in this incident, Indian or Pilgrim. The natives were cautious and fearful of white settlers, because previous white explorers to the New England coast had killed, kidnapped, and enslaved them, and destroyed their tribes. The land the Pilgrims chose to settle on was abandoned land that had been settled by the Patuxet tribe, which subsequently was completely wiped out by a plague. The only surviving member of the tribe was Squanto or Tisquantum, who lived out the remainder of his life in peace within the Plymouth Colony. Squanto (Tisquantum), who was introduced to the Pilgrims by another Indian named Samoset, lived with the settlers in the Plymouth Colony. He helped translate, negotiate, and make peace with the surrounding native tribes, including the Wampanoags headed by chief Massasoit. Another Indian that spoke English also lived in the Plymouth Colony with Captain Myles Standish, was named Hobomok. Land was bought from the Indians, and sold with their permission-Native American signatures and marks can be found on many early Plymouth Colony deeds. Trade and other business dealings were common with the Indians as well. MYTH #2: The Pilgrims always wore colorless black and white clothing. ANSWER: Colorless clothing was a Puritan extreme, but not a Separatist extreme. When a colonist died, an inventory was taken by the Court, for purposes of probate. John Howland had two red waistcoats. William Bradford had a green gown, violet cloak, lead colored suit with silver buttons, and a red waist-coat. William Brewster had green drawers, a red cap, and a violet coat. Black, white, grey, and brown were by far the most common color worn by the Pilgrims, but it was definitely not the only colors. MYTH #3: The Pilgrims celebrated Thanksgiving every year. ANSWER: The Pilgrims had the first Thanksgiving, and never had another Thanksgiving again. When William Bradford's journal was discovered in 1854, it brought a lot of interest and attention to the Pilgrims history. President Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a holiday. The original thanksgiving occurred in mid-October and the feasting lasted 3 days-not even close to the last Thursday of November with feasting of one meal as we celebrate it today.

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Married Anna White after her first husband William White died in the first year after coming over on the Mayflower.

Edward was the second Governor of Mass.

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Mayflower Passenger

Edward Winslow was the son of Edward Winslow, a wealthy owner of a salt boilery, and Magdalene Oliver. Edward Winslow was baptized at Droitwich, Worcester, England on 20 October 1595. Winslow soon joined with the Separatists, and moved to Leyden where he became a printer along with William Brewster, publishing illegal religious pamphlets. His first wife, Elizabeth Barker, was from Chattisham, Suffolk, England.

His second wife was the widow of William White of the Mayflower. For a description of what is known about her (she is not a Fuller) see William White.

The ancestry of Edward Winslow is as follows:

(1) Kenelm Winslow of Kempsey (it has been suggested, but not proved, that he married Elizabet Foliot, daughter of John Foliot--see NEHGR 122:175-178)

(2) Edward Winslow, m. Magdalene Oliver

(3) Edward Winslow of the Mayflower

Edward Winslow had four other siblings which came to America, namely Gilbert Winslow (Mayflower, 1620), John Winslow (Fortune, 1621), Josias Winslow (White Angel, 1631), and Kenelm Winslow, who married Eleanor (Newton) Adams, who came in the Anne, 1623. Edward Winslow also had several sisters, including Magdalen who married Rev. William Wake on 25 April 1627, in Wareham, Dorset, England.

Edward Winslow is the only Mayflower passenger to have a known portrait in existence--although a questionable sketch of Myles Standish exists. The portrait to the left was painted by Robert Walker in 1651, so Winslow is here 31 years older than he was when he came on the Mayflower at the age of 25. The original portrait is in the possession of the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel Morton in New England's Memorial (1669) writes of Edward Winslow:

He was the son of Edward Winslow, Esq. of the town of Draughtwich, in the county of Worcester. He, travelling into the low countries, in his journeys fell into acquaintance with the church of Leyden, in Holland, unto whom he joined, and with whom he continued until they parted to come into New-England, he coming with that part that came first over, and became a very worthy and useful instrument amongst them, both in place of government and othrwise, until his last voyage for England, being sent on special employment for the government of the Massachusetts, as is aforementioned in this book; and afterwards was employed as one of the grand commissioners in that unhappy design against Domingo in Hispaniola, who taking grief for all ill success of that enterprize, on which, together with some other infirmities that were upon him, he fell sick at sea, betwixt Domingo and Jamaica, and died the eighth day of May, which was about the sixty-first year of his life, and his body was honourably committed to the sea, with the usual solemnity of the discharge of fourty-two pieces of ordinance.

Cotton Mather, essentially copying from Morton in his Magnalia Christi Americana (1702) writes:

Mr. Edward Winslow, the Son of Edward Winslow, Esq; of Draughtwich, in the Country of Worcester, . . . Travelling into the Low-Countries, he fell into Acquaintance with the English Church at Leyden, and joining himself to them, he Shipped himself with that part of them which first came over into America; from which time he was continually engaged in such extraordinary Actions, as the assistance of that People to encounter their more than ordinary Diffculties, called for.

Edward Winslow of the Mayflower was a printer, and assisted William Brewster in running the printing press at Leyden which published illegal pamphlets of a religious nature which were distributed in England. He was one of the more prominent and influential men in the Plymouth Colony, and was the colony's third governor. In the early years of Plymouth, Edward played a prominent role in Indian-Pilgrim relations, and made many diplomatic visits to the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit. One one occasion in 1622 he even managed to "cure" Massasoit of a dreadful sickness--an event which greatly helped Indian-Pilgrim relations.

Winslow also made trips to England in the early years of the Colony to conduct business agreements and make legal arrangements, including trips in 1623-4, 1630, and 1635. In 1646 he returned to live in England and served in the English army under Oliver Cromwell . In 1655 he died of a fever on a military expedition to capture the island of Hispaniola. Upon his death, one of the ship's chroniclers wrote this poem:

The Eighth of May, west from 'Spaniola shore,

God took from us our Grand Commissioner,

Winslow by Name, a man in Chiefest Trust,

Whose Life was sweet, and Conversation just;

Whose Parts and wisdome most men did excell:

An honour to his Place, as all can tell.

Edward Winslow authored several books. He wrote Good News From New England first published in 1624. He authored a good portion of Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth first published in 1622. Winslow also wrote Hypocricie Unmasked (1646), and New England's Salamander (1647), which are both for the most part religious discourses. He also edited several pamphlets.

In August, 1998, Dr. Jeremy D. Bangs of Leiden, Holland stated that he was nearing completion of a biography of Edward Winslow.

SOURCES:

Ruth C. McGuyre and Robert S. Wakefield, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations: Edward Winslow and John Billington, vol. 5 (Plymouth: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1991).

John G. Hunt, "The Mayflower Winslows," New England Historical and Genealogical Register 121(1967):25-29, 122(1968):175-178, and 124(1970):182-183.

John G. Hunt, "Clues to the Ancestry of Winslow of Droitwich," The American Genealogist 41:168-175.

John G. Hunt, "Governor Edward Winslow's Mother's Family: The Olivers," The American Genealogist 42:52-55.

John G. Hunt, "A Note on the Winslow Births in England," The American Genealogist 42:186-187.

George G. Wolkins. "Edward Winslow: King's Scholar and Printer," Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, 60(1950):237-266.

Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony: Its History and Its People, 1620-1691 (Ancestor Publishers: Salt Lake City, 1986).

Caleb Johnson © 1999

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One of the first to step upon the shores of the new land, Edward Winslow was elected governor of Plymouth in 1633. He was called a printer of London and is believed to be the principal author of Mourt's Relation (1622) and the author of Good News From England, A Relation of Things Remarkable in That Plantation (1624), Hypocrisie Unmasked (1646) and New England's Salamander (1647).

Embarcation of the pilgrims from Delft-Haven in Holland,

July 21st O.S. 1620

He returned to England several times, and in 1624, his first trip, brought back the first cattle of the colony. In 1635 he was jailed in Fleet Prison, London, for seventeen weeks--persecuted for solemnizing marriages as a magistrate. Winslow was the son of Edward and Magdalene (Oliver) Winslow, and the eldest of five sons, all of whom came to Plymouth. His first wife, Elizabeth Barker "dyed in the first winter," and he remarried Susanna White, widow of William White, a fellow Mayflower passenger and who also died in 1621. Of five known children, Josiah ("Josias") and Elizabeth were the only surviving children mentioned in his will. Mayflower Families Through Five Generations,V, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1991.

Edward Winslow was twenty-five years old when he arrived at Plymouth in 1620, and he was thirty-seven when he became governor some twelve years later. One of only two men to alternate as governor with Bradford (the other being Thomas Prence) during the 1630s and 1640s, he was probably the most aristocratic of the Mayflower passengers in upbringing, and certainly in outlook (his correspondence with Bay Governor Winthrop shows a thorough underlying belief that some by birth were intended to govern).

Winslow became the colony's main emissary to England, and he engaged in numerous diplomatic and trade negotiations with the other New England colonies. In 1646 he was chosen by Governor Winthrop and the Bay Colony magistrates to go to England as their representative to defend the Bay General Court from the charges being made to Parliament by William Vassall and Robert Child .

At the time Bradford ended his History, Edward Winslow was still alive in England, and the last words of the History are "So as he [Winslow] hath now bene absente this 4 years, which hath been much to the weakning of this govermente, without whose consente he tooke these imployments [that is, Parliamentarian service] upon him," a double lament. Stratton, Eugene Aubrey, FASG. Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691.

While in England for the last time, Winslow accepted employment in Oliver Cromwell's government and in December of 1654 was appointed commissioner, along with Admiral William Penn and General Robert Venables, of the ill-fated expedition to the West Indies to capture the island of Hispaniola from the Spanish. After the defeat at Santo Domingo, Edward Winslow died of a fever on the voyage from Hispaniola to Jamaica and was buried at sea. "He fell sick at sea betwixt Domingo and Jamaica and died the eighth day of May, which was about the sixty-first year of his life

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Edward Winslow was the son of Edward Winslow, a wealthy owner of a salt boilery, and Magdalene Oliver. Edward Winslow was baptized at Droitwich, Worcester, England on 20 October 1595. Winslow soon joined with the Separatists, and moved to Leyden where he became a printer along with William Brewster, publishing illegal religious pamphlets. His first wife, Elizabeth Barker, was from Chattisham, Suffolk, England.During the first winter in New England, Winslow's wife died. Two months later, he married Susannah White, who had been widowed during the same period. Winslow, who was elected governor of Plymouth colony several times, is best known for negotiating a treaty with the Indian Chief Massasoit. Susanna White was distinguished as the first white woman to give birth in New England, and Winslow and White's wedding was the first in the region.

Edward Winslow of the Mayflower was a printer, and assisted William Brewster in running the printing press at Leyden which published illegal pamphlets of a religious nature which were distributed in England. He was one of the more prominent and influential men in the Plymouth Colony, and was the colony's third governor. In the early years of Plymouth, Edward played a prominent role in Indian-Pilgrim relations, and made many diplomatic visits to the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit. One one occasion in 1622 he even managed to "cure" Massasoit of a dreadful sickness--an event which greatly helped Indian-Pilgrim relations.

Winslow also made trips to England in the early years of the Colony to conduct business agreements and make legal arrangements, including trips in 1623-4, 1630, and 1635. In 1646 he returned to live in England and served in the English army under Oliver Cromwell. Edward did not return to Plymouth after a trip to England in 1646. In 1655, he was sent by Oliver Cromwell as one of three commissioners to superintend the expedition against the Spanish possessions in the West Indies, and he died at sea near Hispaniola later that year. In 1655 he died of a fever on a military expedition to capture the island of Hispaniola. Upon his death, one of the ship's chroniclers wrote this poem:

The Eighth of May, west from 'Spaniola shore,

God took from us our Grand Commissioner,

Winslow by Name, a man in Chiefest Trust,

Whose Life was sweet, and Conversation just;

Whose Parts and wisdome most men did excell:

An honour to his Place, as all can tell.

Edward Winslow authored several books. He wrote Good News From New England first published in 1624. He authored a good portion of Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth first published in 1622. Winslow also wrote Hypocricie Unmasked (1646), and New England's Salamander (1647), which are both for the most part religious discourses. He also edited several pamphlets.

In August, 1998, Dr. Jeremy D. Bangs of Leiden, Holland stated that he was nearing completion of a biography of Edward Winslow.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY:

Edward Winslow is the only Mayflower passenger to have a known portrait in existence--although a questionable sketch of Myles Standish exists. The portrait to the left was painted by Robert Walker in 1651, so Winslow is here 31 years older than he was when he came on the Mayflower at the age of 25. The original portrait is in the possession of the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel Morton in New England's Memorial (1669) writes of Edward Winslow:

He was the son of Edward Winslow, Esq. of the town of Draughtwich, in the county of Worcester. He, travelling into the low countries, in his journeys fell into acquaintance with the church of Leyden, in Holland, unto whom he joined, and with whom he continued until they parted to come into New-England, he coming with that part that came first over, and became a very worthy and useful instrument amongst them, both in place of government and othrwise, until his last voyage for England, being sent on special employment for the government of the Massachusetts, as is aforementioned in this book; and afterwards was employed as one of the grand commissioners in that unhappy design against Domingo in Hispaniola, who taking grief for all ill success of that enterprize, on which, together with some other infirmities that were upon him, he fell sick at sea, betwixt Domingo and Jamaica, and died the eighth day of May, which was about the sixty-first year of his life, and his body was honourably committed to the sea, with the usual solemnity of the discharge of fourty-two pieces of ordinance.

Cotton Mather, essentially copying from Morton in his Magnalia Christi Americana (1702) writes:

Mr. Edward Winslow, the Son of Edward Winslow, Esq; of Draughtwich, in the Country of Worcester, . . . Travelling into the Low-Countries, he fell into Acquaintance with the English Church at Leyden, and joining himself to them, he Shipped himself with that part of them which first came over into America; from which time he was continually engaged in such extraordinary Actions, as the assistance of that People to encounter their more than ordinary Diffculties, called for.

Edward Winslow of the Mayflower was a printer, and assisted William Brewster in running the printing press at Leyden which published illegal pamphlets of a religious nature which were distributed in England. He was one of the more prominent and influential men in the Plymouth Colony, and was the colony's third governor. In the early years of Plymouth, Edward played a prominent role in Indian-Pilgrim relations, and made many diplomatic visits to the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit. One one occasion in 1622 he even managed to "cure" Massasoit of a dreadful sickness--an event which greatly helped Indian-Pilgrim relations.

Winslow also made trips to England in the early years of the Colony to conduct business agreements and make legal arrangements, including trips in 1623-4, 1630, and 1635. In 1646 he returned to live in England and served in the English army under Oliver Cromwell . In 1655 he died of a fever on a military expedition to capture the island of Hispaniola. Upon his death, one of the ship's chroniclers wrote this poem:

The Eighth of May, west from 'Spaniola shore,

God took from us our Grand Commissioner,

Winslow by Name, a man in Chiefest Trust,

Whose Life was sweet, and Conversation just;

Whose Parts and wisdome most men did excell:

An honour to his Place, as all can tell.

Edward Winslow authored several books. He wrote Good News From New England first published in 1624. He authored a good portion of Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth first published in 1622. Winslow also wrote Hypocricie Unmasked (1646), and New England's Salamander (1647), which are both for the most part religious discourses. He also edited several pamphlets.

In August, 1998, Dr. Jeremy D. Bangs of Leiden, Holland stated that he was nearing completion of a biography of Edward Winslow.

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Edward Winslow (1595 – 1655) was an American Pilgrim leader on the Mayflower. He served as the governor of Plymouth Colony in 1633, 1636, and finally in 1644.

He was born in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, on October 18, 1595. In 1617 he removed to Leiden, united with John Robinson's church there, and in 1620 was one of the "pilgrims" who emigrated to New England on the Mayflower and founded the Plymouth colony.

His first wife was Elizabeth (Barker) Winslow, whom he married in May 1618 at Leiden. She accompanied him on the Mayflower, and died soon after their arrival in Plymouth. Also accompanying Winslow were his children, George Soule, a teacher for the children, and Elias Story, a servant. Winslow remarried in May 1621 to Mrs Susannah (---) White, the mother of Peregrine White (1620-1704). This was the first marriage in the New England colonies. Winslow later founded what would become Marshfield in the Plymouth Colony where he lived on an estate he called Careswell.

Winslow was delegated by his associates to treat with the Indians in the vicinity and succeeded in winning the friendship of their chief, Massasoit (c. 1580-1661). He was one of the assistants from 1624 to 1647, except in 1633-1634, 1636-1637 and 1644-1645, when he was governor of the colony. He was also, in 1643, one of the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England. On several occasions he was sent to England to look after the interests of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colony, and defend these colonies from the attacks of such men as John Lyford, Thomas Morton and Samuel Gorton. He left on his last mission as the agent of Massachusetts Bay, in October 1646, and spent nine years in England, where he held a minor office under Cromwell, and in 1654, was made a member of the commission appointed to determine the value of certain English ships destroyed by Denmark.

In 1655 he was the chief of the three English commissioners whom Cromwell sent on his expedition against the West Indies to advise with its leaders Admiral Venables and Admiral William Penn, but died near Jamaica on 8 May 1655, and was buried at sea. Winslow's portrait, the only likeness of any of the "Mayflower pilgrims" done from life, is in the gallery of the Pilgrim Society at Plymouth, Massachusetts.

His son Josiah Winslow later served as governor of Plymouth colony.

His writings, though fragmentary, are of the greatest value to the historian of the Plymouth colony. They include:

Good Newes from New England, or a True Relation of Things very Remarkable at the Plantation of Plimouth in New England (1624);

Hypocrisie Unmasked; by a True Relation of the Governor and Company of Massachusetts against Samuel Gorton, a Notorious Disturber of the Peace (1646), to which was added a chapter entitled "A Brief Narration of the True Grounds or Cause of the First Plantation of New England";

New England's Salamander (1647); and

The Glorious Progress of the Gospel amongst the Indians in New England (1649).

With William Bradford he also is supposed to have prepared a Journal of the Beginning and Proceeding of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth in New England (1622), which is generally known as Mourt's Relation, owing to its preface having been signed by "G. Mourt."

Some of his writings may be found reprinted in Alexander Young's Chronicles of the Pilgrims (Boston, 1841).

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Edward Winslow was born in Droitwich, Worcester in 1595. He was traveling in the Low Countries, and subsequently became acquainted with the Pilgrims' church in Leiden. He was married in Leiden in 1618 to Elizabeth Barker, and was called a printer of London at the time. It is quite possible he was assisting William Brewster and Thomas Brewer in their publishing of religious books that were illegal in England.

Edward Winslow and wife Elizabeth came on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620. Elizabeth died the first winter, and Edward remarried to the widowed Mrs. Susanna White, on 12 May 1621--the first marriage in the Plymouth Colony.

Winslow quickly became one of the more prominent men in the colony. He was on many of the early explorations of Cape Cod, and led a number of expeditions to meet and trade with the Indians. He wrote several first-hand accounts of these early years, including portions of A Relation or Journal of the Proceedings of the Plantation Settled at Plymouth (London, 1622) and the entirety of Good News from New England (London, 1624).

Edward Winslow became involved in defending the Plymouth and later Massachusetts Bay Colonies from their opponents and adversaries in England, and made several trips back and forth between England and Massachusetts, including trips in 1623/4, 1630, and 1635; on one occasion he was arrested and thrown into the Fleet Prison in London by his adversaries, on grounds that he had performed marriage ceremonies without being ordained (the Pilgrims viewed marriage as an event to be handled by the civil magistrates, not by the Church). Winslow returned to England shortly after the English Civil War, and published a couple of pamphlets in defense of the New England colonies, including Hypocrisy Unmasked (1646) and New England's Salamander Discovered (1647). He also wrote the introduction to the Glorious Progress of the Gospel Amongst the Indians in New England (1649).

In Plymouth, he held a number of political offices, as was routinely elected an assistant to Governor William Bradford; Winslow himself was elected governor of Plymouth on three occasions: 1632/3, 1635/6, and 1644. After Winslow returned to England, he was on several Parliamentary committees; he died in 1655 at sea between Hispaniola and Jamaica, while serving as a commissioner for Oliver Cromwell on a military expedition to retake the island of Hispaniola.

http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/EdwardWinslow.php -------------------- Birth: Oct. 18, 1595 Worcestershire, England Death: May 8, 1655, Jamaica

Pilgrim leader. He sailed on the Mayflower and signed the Mayflower Compact in 1620. He traveled to England and other countries numerous times to acquire cattle and tools, enabling Plymouth to flourish while similar ventures failed. Winslow served on the governor's council and authored several books extolling New England, works that were instrumental in convincing European immigrants to relocate to America. He was Plymouth's Governor in 1633, 1636, and 1644. Winslow's portrait is the only contemporary likeness of a Mayflower Pilgrim, and has been a primary source for historians interested in Pilgrim clothing, hairstyles and other cultural questions. He died en route to Jamaica from the West Indies, where he had gone on behalf of England's Cromwell government to reclaim ships siezed by the Dutch. Buried at Sea. -------------------- Mayflower Passenger 1620- Also Governor! -------------------- was a Separatist who traveled on the Mayflower in 1620

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Winslow

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Gov. Edward Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1595
October 18, 1595
Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
St. Peter In The Fields, Droitwich (Worchestershire) England
October 20, 1595
St. Peter In The Fields, Droitwich (Worchestershire) England
October 20, 1595
St Peters, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
St Peters, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
St Peters, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
St Peters, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
St. Peters, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
October 20, 1595
October 20, 1595
St Peters,Droitwich,Worcestershire,England