Thomas Mayhew (1593 - 1682) MP

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Place of Burial: Marthas Vineyard, Dukes County, Massachusetts
Birthplace: Tisbury, Wiltshire, UK
Death: Died in Edgartown, Dukes, MA, USA
Occupation: Governor, merchant, Govenor of Mass, Governor Martha's VIneyard, Received original grant to Martha's Vineyard in 1631
Managed by: Vahid Felipe Beebe
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About Thomas Mayhew

The following was obtained from a Mayhew Family Tree, published in 1855, covering all generations from 1631 to 1855:

"Thomas Mayhew, Governor and Patentee of Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and Elizabeth Isles. Removed from Watertown, MA and commenced a settlement at Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard in the year 1642. He gave his son much assistance in the benevolent work of converting the heathen. After the death of his son, he being acquainted with the Indian language and seeing no prospect of procuring a Pastor for them he began himself to preach to the natives as well as the English at seventy years of age preached 23 years and died at the advanced age of 93 years. His last and dying words were, "I have lived by faith and have found God in my son, and there I find him now, therefore, if you would find God, look for him in your son, there he is to be found and nowhere else"."

Thomas Mayhew, bapt. 1 April 1593 in Tisbury, as "Thomas, son of Mathew Maho" (3). Some information on Thomas is provided by (1), citing a variety of sources ((3), (5), (6), (7), and (8)). His father died when he was about 21 and he apparently became a merchant apprentice of Richard Macey (or Masey) of Southampton before emigrating in 1631. It is also stated that he came to Medford, MA in 1635; he seems to have lived at both Watertown and Medford. He was a prominent member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co.

He was first married (in England) to Abigail Parkus (or Parkhurst) in about 1619. His second marriage in about 1634 (presumably in MA?) was to Jane Gallyon, b. 1612, died after 1666. "The name Gallyon (Gallion) was very uncommon in England and may be Scotch. Jane married first to Thomas Payne, probably a London merchant, who predeceased her. She is said to have returned to England to fight a court case for a large sum of money for her children by him" (3). One of her children by this first marriage to Payne would later marry the son of Thomas by his first marriage. Thomas had one son by his first marriage and four daughters by his second marriage (see next section).

Then a settler at Watertown, MA (near Boston), Thomas must have been by then a very successful merhant as he purchased in October 1641, from Lord Stirling and Sir Ferdinando Gorges, the islands of Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the Elizabeth Islands. Thomas would have been about 48 at that time. The now Governor Mayhew sent his son Thomas that same year to settle with a few families and to be a missionary to the Indians.The following year in 1642, the Governor himself came to the island with other settlers and new supplies. Among the ten or so families that were there in 1650, we find the name Folger (a link with my Mayflower line?).

After his son's untimely loss at sea at age 37, the Governor, succeeded him as missionary pastor and "preached to them one day every week as long as he lived. Sparing no pains or fatigue, sometimes walking twenty miles through the woods to Gay Head, to carry on the noble work commenced by his son" (9). Thomas was settled at Edgartown on Martha's Vineyard by 1658-81 (or permanently alone from 1674?). There is a deed in the Edgartown records (9) wherein the Governor attests: "I do sell the island of Nantucket for thitty pounds Stirling and two beaver hats, one for my wife, and one for myself".

He lived to be about 90, dying 25 March 1681 at Edgartown, MA. His wife was living 15 May 1666 but predeceased her husband

-------------------- Thomas Mayhew (governor)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thomas Mayhew, Sr. (March 31, 1593 – March 25, 1682) established the first settlement of Martha's Vineyard in 1642.

He was born in Tisbury, County Wiltshire, in England. He married Anna (also called Hanna and Abigail) Parkhurst, born about 1600, in Hampshire, England, daughter of Matthew Parkhurst. In 1621 they had a son, Thomas, Jr., in Hanna's home town of Southampton, co. Two years later they had another child, Robert Parkhurst Mayhew, in Tisbury, County Wilts, England.

The family left England in 1631 during the Great Migration that brought 20,000 persons to Massachusetts in thirteen years. Thomas had been accepted with the agency of Matthew Cradock of London to manage properties in Medford, Massachusetts, and to engage in trade and shipbuilding. In or around 1633, Anna Parkhurst died. In about 1634, Thomas returned to England for a business meeting with Cradock. While in England, he married Jane Gallion (1602-1666), and brought her back to New England with him. Hannah Mayhew was born in 1635. Three more children - Mary Mayhew(1639), Martha Mayhew (1642), and Bethiah Mayhew - followed.

In 1641, Thomas secured Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, the Elizabeth Islands, and other islands as a proprietorship from Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Lord Sterling. This enabled him to transfer his business operations there. With the help of son Thomas, a settlement was established. Farming and whaling enterprises began. In 1657, Thomas Jr. was drowned when a ship he was riding was lost at sea on a voyage to England. His grandson Matthew and other relatives assisted him in running his business and government.

The Mayhews had great success in regard to Indian policy. Because of the fair treatment of the Indians there, the colony was protected from the bloodshed that occurred elsewhere, in King Phillip's War.

When the venerable Governor Mayhew became ill one Sunday evening in 1682, he calmly informed his friends and relatives that "his Sickness would now be to Death, and he was well contented therewith, being full of Days, and satisfied with Life". His great-grandson, Experience Mayhew, Jonathan's father, was only eight at the time, but he clearly remembered being led to the bedside to receive from the dying man a blessing "in the Name of the Lord." Family leadership then passed to the three grandsons, two of whom deserted the mission, leaving John, the youngest grandson and grandfather of Jonathan, to care for Indian souls.

Contents 1 Colonizing Dukes County 2 Relations with the natives 3 Spreading religion 4 From colony to aristocracy 5 Missionary work 6 References 7 External links


Colonizing Dukes County In 1641, while engaged in business ventures in the vicinity of Boston, Thomas, Sr. happened to acquire the rights to the islands that now constitute Dukes County: (Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, and the Elizabeth Islands). He bought the County for 40 pounds and two beaverskin hats from William Alexander, the 2nd Earl of Sterling. To resolve a conflicting ownership claim, he also paid off Sir Ferdinando Gorges, thereby acquiring a clear title.[1]

Thomas established himself as governor of Martha's Vineyard in 1642 and sent his son, Thomas Jr., with about 40 English families to settle there. He followed four years later. Together he and Thomas Jr. established Martha’s Vineyard’s first settlement and called it Great Harbor, now Edgartown.

Relations with the natives Mayhew and his fellow settlers found a large and economically stable native population of about 3,000 living in permanent villages, led by four sachems (chiefs). Relations between the first settlers and their Wampanoag neighbors were peaceful and courteous. Under the leadership of his son, a minister, they instituted a policy of respect and fair dealing with the Wampanoag natives that was unequaled anywhere. One of the first Mayhew rulings was that no land be taken from the native island people, the Wampanoags, without consent and fair payment. From this time forward, the colonial settlers and Indians lived without the bloodshed that marked American history elsewhere.

From the beginning the elder Mayhew had worked to preserve the original political institutions of the Indians. Religion and government are distinct matters, he told the Indian chiefs. When one of your subjects becomes a Christian, he is still under your jurisdiction. Indian land was guarded against further encroachment by white settlers. So successful were these policies that during the bloody battles of King Philip's War, in 1675-1676, the Vineyard Indians never stirred, although they outnumbered the English on the island twenty to one.[2] By practicing as well as preaching the gospel and by understanding the value of the native institutions, the Mayhews gave Martha's Vineyard a felicitous pattern of Indian-White relations seldom duplicated in the conquest of the North American continent.

Spreading religion By 1660 there were about 85 white people living peaceably among the natives, earning their living by farming and fishing. The Mayhew family, which from that time forth became an integral part of island history, wanted to share their religion with the natives, but the Wampanoags were not too interested, having their own spiritual faith. However, once it was clear that, though Mayhew was the governor, the sachems remained in charge of their people, some became curious about the white man's God. When a native named Hiacoomes expressed an interest, Mayhew invited him into his home and instructed him in English and Christianity.[1] Hiacoomes, in return, taught Mayhew the native language. As soon as Mayhew could converse with the natives, he would some days "walk 20 miles through uncut forests to preach the Gospel...in wigwam or open field". [3]

Change was in the air though, for the world outside this small island was unsettled. There were more visitors from off island and some stayed, challenging the Mayhew government, while Baptists and Methodists arrived to make converts from the established Congregational Church.

From colony to aristocracy Through a maze of conflicting land grants, changing political allegiances, and settler unrest, Thomas Mayhew, self-styled--"Governour Mayhew"-- began to rule his island with an iron hand. The most serious threat to his control came in 1665 when Martha's Vineyard was included in the lands placed under the Duke of York. After much delay a settlement, worked out in 1671, confirmed the Mayhew patent and named Thomas Mayhew "Governour and Chiefe Magistrate" for life. At the same time a patent was issued erecting the Manor of Tisbury in the southwestern part of the island. The Governour and his grandson were made "joint Lords of the Manor of Tisbury," and the inhabitants became manorial tenants subject to the feudal political jurisdiction of the Mayhews. This full-fledged feudal manor appears to have been the only such institution actually established in New England.

The attempt of the Mayhews to create a hereditary aristocracy on the Vineyard met with increasing opposition as more and more colonists arrived. When the Dutch temporarily recaptured New York in 1673, open rebellion broke out and lasted until the English re-won New York and restored the authority of the Mayhews on the island. The old patriarch died in 1682 at eight-nine. Nine years later the political rule of the family ended when Martha's Vineyard was annexed by Massachusetts after the Glorious Revolution in England, but the problem of manorial tenancy remained. Although some of the Mayhews clung to the "pleasant fiction" of their manorial rights almost until the American Revolution and received token quit rents as late as 1732, feudalism on Martha's Vineyard died the same slow, lingering but certain death it did elsewhere in the colonies.

Missionary work Kenneth Scott Latourette has concluded that the Missionary Mayhews of Martha's Vineyard represent what is likely the longest and most persistent missionary endeavor in the annals of all Christendom. Thomas Mayhew, known for his missionary work, was not concerned for Indian souls when he settled on his island; he sought only to improve his social and economic position. The son rather than the father receives credit for launching the Indian mission. Thomas Mayhew, Jr., had emigrated from England with the elder Mayhew. Somewhere he received a liberal education, apparently from private tutors. After moving to the Vineyard to begin the white settlement there, he became pastor of the small English church as well as the acting governor in his father's absence. He soon discovered that he could not refuse the challenge he found among the three thousand Pokanaukets, a branch of the mainland Narragansetts, who far outnumbered the whites, so an effective settlement required friendly relations with the Indians. But Thomas Mayhew, Jr., appears to have been motivated largely by spiritual concern, while his father and other members of the family enjoyed the practical results of the Indian mission. The younger man gradually abandoned most of his secular tasks and spent the remainder of his life among the natives. Progress was slow at first, but by the end of 1652 there were 283 converts, a school for Indian children, and two Indian meetings each Sabbath. The Praying Indians of Martha's Vineyard who said grace before meals became a topic of conversation on both sides of the Atlantic. Thomas Mayhew, Jr., carried on his missionary work with little heed to his personal fortunes. As the elder Mayhew put it, his son had followed this work "when 'twas bare with him for food and rayment, and when indeede there was nothing in sight any waies but Gods promises." The situation was improved somewhat by the formation in 1649 of a London missionary society, usually called the New England Company, which in a few years began to provide substantial aid for the Mayhews and other missionaries.

In the fall of 1657, Thomas Mayhew, Jr., sailed for England on a trip combining an appeal for missionary funds with personal business. After leaving Boston Harbor, the ship was never seen again.[2] The death of his only son at thirty-six was a heavy blow to the father and greatly increased the burdens he carried in old age. He made repeated efforts to find a replacement to continue his son's ministry to the Indians, but no minister who knew the language or was willing to learn could be induced to settle permanently on the island. So Thomas Mayhew, who had started as a merchant, then turned landed proprietor, became at age sixty a missionary in his son's place.[2] For the next twenty-five years he traveled on foot as far as twenty miles to preach once a week at the Indian assembly or to visit the native camps.

[edit] References ^ a b Palfrey, John Gorham. History of New England. Little, Brown (1899), Vol. II, pp. 196-97. ^ a b c Wilson, James Grant, and John Fiske, eds. Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography. Appleton & Co. (1900), Vol. IV, pp. 275-76. ^ Lloyd Hare. Martha's Vineyard: A Short History and Guide. The History of Martha’s Vineyard by Charles Edward Banks. (three-volume) 1911 Called Unto Liberty, A Life of Jonathan Mayhew by Charles W. Akers 1964 Glorious Progress of the Gospel Amongst the Indians in New England by Edward Winslow (1649) -------------------- died bef 1634 & aft May 1631 in England. Bonnie Hubbard's research indicates that he was a a well-to-do London merchant and left a significant estate. He was married to Jane GALLION before 1625. http://www.wheelerfolk.org/keithgen/d644.htm#P1821 -------------------- was born on 31 Mar 1592/93 in Tisbury, Wiltshire, England. He was baptised on 1 Apr 1593 in Tisbury, Wiltshire, England. He died on 25 Mar 1681/82 in Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Dukes Co., MA. He was buried in Tisbury, Dukes, MA. IMMIGRANT Occupation: Merchant. Governor of Martha's Vineyard. Born Tisbury, England in 1591/2; settled Watertown, Mass. 1633; removed to Martha's Vineyard 1647. He was the 13th generation from William Mayhew of Goldynglane, St. Giles, Cripplegate, England, who received a grant of tenement in Manor of Talmage's Parish of Brockley, Suffolk, England 1399-1400. (McCoy) Banks, History of Martha's Vineyard, Vol 1 Of the childhood, education, and early business training of Thomas Mayhew of Tisbury, nothing definite is known. It is presumed that he lived in Tisbury during his youth, and was educated in the parish school under the care of his parents. When his father died, he was twenty-one. We know that he became a merchant, but not where he served his apprenticeship. Daniel Gookin, who knew him personally, says he was "a merchant bred in England, as I take it at Southampton." This seaport town was, in that period, one of the most important commercial centers in England, ranking with Bristol as secondary to the great port of London. Among the great merchants of London, Mr. Matthew Cradock was an early adventurer in American Colonial enterprise and was among the first to support the companies engaged in the colonization of New England. In the course of business it is to be supposed Mayhew became known to Cradock and thus laid the foundation for their later business relations. At the accession of Charles the First in 1625, Thomas Mayhew was thirty-two years old and had probably been in business for himself for about a dozen years, since his father's death. Before 1618 he had married a woman whose name has come down by tradition as Abigail Parkus. Tradition further names her as a member of the Parkhurst family of which George Parkhurst of Watertown, Mass., was the first New England representative in 1643. George was the son of John Parkhurst of Ipswich, England, a clothier, and his sisters, Deborah and Elizabeth, came to this country with him, and were later residents of the Vineyard, the former as wife of John Smith and the latter of Joseph Merry. So far no documentary or recorded confirmation of this tradition has been found, although considerable effort has been spent trying to determine the likely place of the wedding. The couple had only one known child, who would later become the Rev. Thomas Mayhew, missionary to the Indians. No other children are known, or when or where the mother died. In 1628, the records of the Massachusetts Bay Company contain a reference to trade with Thomas Mayhew as follows: March 16, 1628 Bespoke of Mr. Maio at 10 1/2 p yrd for beds & boulsters 20 bed tikes, Scotch Tikeing 3/4 broad & 2 1-16 long & 1 1/2 yrds wide: 11 yrds each bed and boulster. (Mass Col. Records, I) In two years Mayhew determined to follow to New England the "beds & boulsters" he had sold for the emigrants to the colony. In 1631, Matthew Cradock hired Mayhew to go to Massachusetts to act as his agent, making his headquarters at Medford, where he had built a "greate stone house." Whether Mayhew's wife came with him or had died before 1631 is not known, but he presumably brought his young son with him when he emigrated. The first mention of him in the colonial records is when he appears as chairman of a committee appointed by the Court to settle the boundary between Charleston and Newton in March, 1631/2. As this record is the report of the committee, it must have been appointed at an earlier date in the previous year, so he would have arrived sometime in 1631. For the next three years he attended to his employer's business and was admitted a freeman by the General Court on May 14, 1634. At this period, he began the erection of a mill for his principal ... Probably in 1634 he married a second time, but whether he found his new wife in New England or returned home to England for her is not known. Savage, who is usually quite accurate, states that the marriage occurred in London, but on what authority is not known. (Genealogical Dictionary, III, 337. None of the published London parish registers have a record of this marriage.) His new wife was Mrs. Jane (Gallion?) Paine, widow of Mr. Thomas Paine, a London merchant. In London Banks found references to a Gallion family, to which she may have belonged. She brought into the household two children from her former marriage. Thomas Paine had left considerable estates in England for his children Thomas, Jr. and Jane, both minors. Jane was the older of the two and was probably about five or six at the time, Thomas Mayhew, Jr., was about fifteen at the time. In later years, these two were to marry. Their first child, Hannah was born in Medford in 1635. In this year, also, he bought a one-half interest in the mill built by his master, Cradock, and himself. The purchase price was 200 pounds, for which Mayhew gave a bond and a mortgage for 400 pounds with conditions that if the price was paid the bond should be void. He turned his efforts to milling which, according to a man who knew him, "in those times made him a great profit." Late in 1636, his second daughter was born, and was named Bethiah. He was made representative to the General Court this year (a legislature for the Massachusetts colony), and was returned every year until he removed to Martha's Vineyard in 1644-45. During the years he served as representative, his name appears on many important committees. During these years he was acting as miller, a merchant and politician, but apparently none of these jobs was very remunerative, and he was not a very good business man. About this time, Matthew Craddock, Mayhew's principal was becoming dissatisfied with Mayhew's handling of his investments in New England. In his anger, he wrote a letter to Gov. John Winthrop pouring fourth his grievances. From all the circumstances, according to Banks, it does not appear that Mayhew had been guilty of any breach of trust, and no action was taken on Craddock's hysterical letter so we may conclude that the crux of the complaint was poor business judgment at the most. Craddock's new agent, John Jolliffe, arrived in New England in late 1636 or 1637, and terminated Mayhew's employment. Therefore, in 1637, Mayhew and his family left Medford, and moved to Watertown. There he had investments of his own, and for the next seven or eight years he was actively identified with that town. He was chosen selectman in 1637 and was also elected as Deputy to the General Court to represent his new home in the Colonial Assembly. In 1638 he was again chosen selectman and re-elected as Deputy to the General Court. At the same session he was appointed a commissioner, which office was a local magistrate or justice of the peace for trying small causes, the first official of that kind accredited to Watertown. Another daughter was born to him, probably early in the year, who was named Martha. In 1639 he was reelected to all of his offices, and his fourth daughter, Mary was born. He also purchase the other half of the mill from Cradock's new agent, Nicholas Davidson, and mortgaged it back to Cradock with six shares of the "Wear," for L240. The investment must have been a losing one, for in less than a year, on April 28, 1640, he sold the entire property to Deputy Governor Thomas Dudley for L400, subject to the mortgage to Cradock. Dudley paid the money to Cradock, but apparently Mayhew never paid the first 400 pound mortgage to How, because at How's death in 1644, this bond of Mayhew was one of the assets of the estate. This is a hint of the financial troubles which led him to take a risk on Martha's Vineyard. Although he was reelected as selectman and as a Deputy to the General Court in 1640 and 1641, there are occasional references to financial disputes between Mayhew and other businessmen... Apparently the toll bridge that he had constructed was also a loss, for it was absorbed by the towns in December, 1641. He was given 150 acres of land on the south side of the Charles River, perhaps in payment. On the English Origins of the Mayhew name: In Rev. Canon Mayo, vicar of Long Burton, Dorset's Genealogical Account of the Mayo and Elton Families (London, 1882) there is the following account of the Mayhew name: As an English family name it is most frequently met with in the South and West of this island, and few parish registers in the Counties of Hereford, Gloucester,Wilts and Dorset can be opened without presenting us with examples. It is spelt in many ways, varying from the extended form of Mayhowe to that of Mao, and often, as it will frequently appear, clipped down and reduced to May to the loss of its concluding syllable. One lesson is taught by the diversity and variety, viz.: -- the identity of Mayhew and Mayo, and from this consideration a ray of light is thrown upon the derivation of the name. An early occurrence of the name, and in its extended form is found in Glover's Roll of Arms, supposed by Sir Harris Nicholas to date from Between 1245 and 1250. Herbert le Fitz Mayhewe is there mentioned as bearing "party d'azure & de goulz one trois leonseaux rampant d'or," and Woodward in his History of Wales, page 415, narrates that account to the old copy of S. Davids Annals. The Welsh slew Sir Herbert Fitz-Mahu apparently in 1246, near the castle of Morgan Cam. The same Roll of Arms gives the clue to the origin of the name as a Christian name; in the case of Mahewe de Lovayne, Mayhew de Columbers and Maheu de Redmain. There can be little doubt that it is here a soften form of Matthew. Bardsley in his "English Surnames" mentioned two other instances, Adam fil. Maheu, and Mayhew de Basingbourne, from the Parliamentqary Writs. Shakespeare in King "Lear" Act III, scene 4 says: "The Prince of Darkness is a Gentleman Modo he's called Mahu." In the Records of the Commissioners for the United Colonies, there appeared a letter, now in the Connecticut Archives, (Conn. Col. Records, 1678-1689. pp. 504-506) written by Governor Mayhew, sealed with arms which, upon examination, proved to be the arms, with a mullet for difference, of the Mayhew family of Dinton, Wiltshire, a county family of considerable distinction. These facts, taken in connection with the bestowal by Mayhew of the names of Tisbury and Chilmark on two adjoining towns on Martha's Vineyard, and the fact that Tisbury and Chilmark are adjoining parishes in Wiltshire, and separated by a few miles only from Dinton, made it quite evident that this locality was the one which should reveal his family connection. The parish registers of Tisbury are extant from the year 1563 and include the marriage of his parents, Mathew Maow and Ales Barter on Octo. 2, 1587 and his own baptism on April 1, 1593 (Thomas, Son of Mathew Maho). The entry of the baptism of Thomas, son of Mathew Maho, April 1st, 1593, probably within a few days of his birth, is not absolutely conclusive evidence of identity with our Thomas, but taken in connection with the facts relating to the reappearance on Martha's Vineyard of the names of Tisbury Manor (which is situated in the parish of Tisbury, England) and Chilmark the adjoining hamlet, and the name of Matthew, which for succeeding generations appeared in the Martha's Vineyard family, it becomes one of those cases where an affirmative conclusion is clearly inferential. Savage says: First at Watertown. Born early in 1591, came in the Griffin, 1633, if we might so infer from the fact of his taking his oath as freeman May 14, 1634 when Gov. Haynes and Gov. Brenton, besides Cotton, Hooker and Stone, passengers in that ship were admitted. But that inference would be wrong, for in Colonial Records I. 95 is a report signed by him and two other gentleman for setting out the bounds between Watertown and the new town on March 6, 1632, and in July 1633, he was appointed administrator of of Ralph Glover, while Cotton and fellow passengers did not arrive before September next, so that he must have been here in 1631, and he served as a merchant at Southampton, England as Bond relates, and here as representative 1636-44 except 42, was active in trade, first at Medford, afterwards at W. but was induced to remove to the Vineyard about 1647, where he was proprietor's Governor and preacher to the Indians above 33 years. Died 1681, six days only before being 90 years old. It is indistinct pronouncement by tradition that first wife who died in England had been Martha Parkhurst and second was probably brought with him, Grace, widow of Thomas Paine of London, and by her he had Hannah, Bethia and Mary. It is not known that he had any sons but Thomas who he, as brother of the former wife brought from England but some uncertainty is felt as to the relation of father and I do not concur with Bond, 857, in making Jane the last wife of Thomas the elder, but think her widow of the son, nor do I believe that it was the son who was, in 1647, chosen by Thomas Paine, then 15 years old, as, with his wife Grace, guardians for him (McKay) He was married to Abigail\Martha PARKHURST before 1620. http://www.wheelerfolk.org/keithgen/d643.htm#P1818 -------------------- Thomas was the governor of Martha's Vineyard. -------------------- Thomas Mayhew, Sr. (March 31, 1593 – March 25, 1682) established the first settlement of Martha's Vineyard in 1642.

He was born in Tisbury, County Wiltshire, in England. He married Anna (also called Hanna and Abigail) Parkhurst, born about 1600, in Hampshire, England, daughter of Matthew Parkhurst. In 1621 they had a son, Thomas, Jr., in Hanna's home town of Southampton, co. Two years later they had another child, Robert Parkhurst Mayhew, in Tisbury, County Wilts, England.

The family left England in 1631 during the Great Migration that brought 20,000 persons to Massachusetts in thirteen years. Thomas had been accepted with the agency of Matthew Cradock of London to manage properties in Medford, Massachusetts, and to engage in trade and shipbuilding. In or around 1633, Anna Parkhurst died. In about 1634, Thomas returned to England for a business meeting with Cradock. While in England, he married Jane Gallion (1602-1666), and brought her back to New England with him. Hannah Mayhew was born in 1635. Three more children - Mary Mayhew(1639), Martha Mayhew (1642), and Bethiah Mayhew - followed.

In 1641, Thomas secured Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, the Elizabeth Islands, and other islands as a proprietorship from Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Lord Sterling. This enabled him to transfer his business operations there. With the help of son Thomas, a settlement was established. Farming and whaling enterprises began. In 1657, Thomas Jr. was drowned when a ship he was riding was lost at sea on a voyage to England. His grandson Matthew and other relatives assisted him in running his business and government.

The Mayhews had great success in regard to Indian policy. Because of the fair treatment of the Indians there, the colony was protected from the bloodshed that occurred elsewhere, in King Phillip's War.

When the venerable Governor Mayhew became ill one Sunday evening in 1682, he calmly informed his friends and relatives that "his Sickness would now be to Death, and he was well contented therewith, being full of Days, and satisfied with Life". His great-grandson, Experience Mayhew, Jonathan's father, was only eight at the time, but he clearly remembered being led to the bedside to receive from the dying man a blessing "in the Name of the Lord." Family leadership then passed to the three grandsons, two of whom deserted the mission, leaving John, the youngest grandson and grandfather of Jonathan, to care for Indian souls.

-------------------- Arrived in the Winthrop fleet in 1630 -------------------- Wikipedia entry:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Mayhew_(governor) -------------------- THOMAS MAYHEWORIGIN: Tisbury, WiltshireMIGRATION: 1632FIRST RESIDENCE: MedfordREMOVES: Watertown by 1634, Martha's Vineyard by 1647OCCUPATION: Steward. Magistrate.CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: Admission to Watertown church prior to 14 May 1634 implied by freemanship.FREEMAN: 14 May 1634 (as "Mr. Tho[mas] Mahewe") [MBCR 1:369].EDUCATION: His letters to the Winthrops were direct and full of practical business matters [WP 3:169, 6:136]OFFICES: Watertown selectman, 10 October 1636, 30 December 1637, 10 December 1638, 6 December 1639, 29 December 1640, 21 November 1642 [WaTR 2, 3, 5, 6, 8]. Assessor, 20 December 1642 [WaVR 9]. Arbiter, 30 June 1648 [Aspinwall 135]. Appraiser of land, 10 September 1643 [Aspinwall 136]. (Further details of his life and offices, which are, as Banks said, "interwoven with the political and social conditions of the Island," may be found in Martha's Vineyard Hist 1:104-26, 2:30, 3:299-301].)ESTATE: Granted Great Dividend of eighty acres at Watertown, 25 July 1636 [WaBOP 4]. Granted Beaverbrook Plowlands of thirty acres, 28 February 1636/7 [WaBOP 7]. Granted Remote Meadows of thirty acres, 26 June 1637 [WaBOP 10]. In the Watertown Inventory of Grants "Thomas Maihue" held five parcels: "ten acres of upland ... with a pond in it"; thirty acres of plowland in the Further Plain; eighty acres of upland being a Great Dividend; thirty acres in the Remote Meadows; and thirty-one acres and a half beyond the Further Plain [WaBOP 73]. In the Composite Inventory "Thomas Maihew" held six parcels, being the five in the Inventory of Grants, to which is added "a farm of two hundred and fifty acres" [WaBOP 19]. On 8 May 1653 in the first division of common land at Edgartown, Mr. Mayhew received lot number 14 [Martha's Vineyard Hist 2:26]. Following this, he received his proportion in all subsequent divisions. In his will, dated 16 June 1681 and proved 28 March 1682, "Thomas Mayhew of Edgartown upon the Vineyard in this ninetieth year of my age" divided his extensive lands on Martha's Vineyard and elsewhere among "Matthew Mayhew, my grandson" (with conditional provisions for "Thomas and John Mayhew, Jerusha and Jedidah"), "my daughter Hannah" and "her sons Samuel, John and Joshua Daggett," "my daughter Martha," "Thomas and John Harlock, and their sister at Boston," naming also to "my son Daggett" and "my son Tupper" [DukesLR A:326-32].BIRTH: Baptized 1 April 1593 at Tisbury, Wiltshire, son of Matthew and Alice (Barter) Mayhew [Gen Adv 4:1-8].DEATH: Martha's Vineyard 25 March 1682 [Gen Adv 4:4].MARRIAGE: (1) By about 1620 _____ _____; she died before 1635. (2) Jane (Gallion) Paine, widow of Thomas Paine, London merchant [TAG 61:256; Lechford 184-86, 240; Aspinwall 14, 35, 111; Martha's Vineyard Hist 300]. She died after 1666 but before her husband.CHILDREN: With first wife i THOMAS, b. say 1620; m. by about 1648 Jane _____ [Martha's Vineyard Hist 3:301-02; see COMMENTS below]. With second wife ii HANNAH, b. 15 June 1635 [WaVR 4]; m. by about 1652 Thomas Doggett, son of JOHN DOGGETT. iii BETHIAH, b. 6 December 1636 [WaVR 4]; m. (1) by 1658 Thomas Harlock [Martha's Vineyard Hist 2:72]; m. (2) by 1677 as his second wife Richard Way (child b. Boston 13 July 1677 [BVR 143]); she d. by 1678 [TAG 61:256]. iv MARY, b. 14 January 1639[/40] [WaVR 7]; no further record (unless she is the same as Martha below). v MARTHA, b. say 1641; m. Sandwich 27 December 1661 Thomas Tupper [MD 14:69].ASSOCIATIONS: Thomas Macey of Nantucket called Thomas Mayhew his "honored cousin" [Martha's Vineyard Hist 3:301]. A Thomas Mayhew of Southampton was apprenticed to Richard Masey, merchant, and was admitted a free commoner of that town on 9 February 1620[/1] [Martha's Vineyard Hist 300].COMMENTS: The first documented appearance of Thomas Mayhew in New England was on 7 November 1632, under the disguise of "Mr. Mavericke Junior" [MBCR 1:101]. On that date, he, Mr. Alcocke and Mr. Turner were commissioned by the General Court to settle a boundary dispute between Cambridge and Charlestown. When they completed their duties, they reported back to the Court, and their report was recorded in two separate places in the records, in slightly different form. The first time it is entered on its own leaf, and out of chronological sequence [MBCR 1:94-95]; on this occasion the signatures of the members of the committee are appended: "Tho: Mayhewe, Nath: Turner, George Alcocke." The second version is shorter, but in the right place chronologically [MBCR 1:102]. Redating the earlier version of this document removes the presumed evidence for Mayhew's arrival in 1631, the date stated by both Savage and Pope. The likelihood that Thomas Mayhew came to New England in 1632 raises an interesting possibility, based on an Admiralty suit of that year. In the case of Mason v. Gibbs, two sailors testified that the Lyon's Whelp sailed from England in January 1631/2 and arrived at the Isles of Shoals in May 1632, and carried as its only passengers "a man and his wife, their two daughters and their man," and one of the sailors added that this nameless family "were embarked for New England on behalf of Matthew Craddock" [English Adventurers 37-38]. Thomas Mayhew is known to have come to New England as Matthew Craddock's steward [Martha's Vineyard Hist 1:117-26]. About 1640 Mr. Valentine Hill of Boston, merchant, and Mr. Thomas Mayhew of Watertown, gentleman, agreed to an arbitration of their troubles [Lechford 350]. On 10 March 1649[/50] Mr. Bruen informed his friend Mr. John Birke that Mr. Thomas Mayhew was in his debt for twenty thousand of pipe staves [Aspinwall 244-45]. In 1901 Charles Edward Banks published the English ancestry of Gov. Thomas Mayhew [Gen Adv 4:1-8]. Lechford records several documents in which Thomas Mayhew and his wife Jane Mayhew, formerly the wife of Thomas Paine of London, act as guardians for Thomas Paine, Jane's son with her first husband [Lechford 184-86, 240]. Savage introduced confusion by stating that the widow Paine bore the Christian name "Grace" rather than Jane [Savage 3:185]. It may be this confusion that led him to state that the wife of the younger Thomas Mayhew was Jane Paine, allegedly daughter of this non-existent Grace, and therefore his stepsister. Edward Everett Hale Jr., Lechford's editor, showed that Grace did not exist, and also that, based on the documents in Lechford, there is no evidence that the younger Thomas married a stepsister named Jane Paine [Lechford 184].The Great Migration BeginsSketchesPRESERVED PURITAN

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Governor Thomas Mayhew's Timeline

1593
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, UK
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, England
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, England
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, England
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, England
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, ENGLAND
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, England
April 1, 1593
Tisbury, Wiltshire, ENGLAND
1620
1620
Age 26
England, United Kingdom
1623
1623
Age 29
Tisbury, Wiltshire, ENGLAND