Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou

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Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou

Nicknames: "William", "Vilhelm", "Fier-à-Bras", "Iron Arm", "Fierebras o Fierebrace", "Ironarm of /Poitou/", "/Fier-a-Bras/", "called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm"", "from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace", "/Ironarm/", "IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou", "Fie..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in St-Maixent-l'École, Département des Deux-Sèvres, Poitou-Charentes, France
Place of Burial: Abbatiale St-Maixent, St-Maixent-l'École, Département des Deux-Sèvres, Poitou-Charentes, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Guillaume 'Tête d'étoupe' d'Aquitaine, III Duc d'Aquitaine, I Comte de Poitou; William III, Duke of Aquitaine de Poitou; Adelene of Normandy and Adele de Poitou
Husband of Emmaline de Poitou and Emma de Blois
Father of William V, Duke of Aquitaine; Pierre de Chabot; Ebles d'Aquitaine; Guillaume "le Chauve" de Talmond; Emma d'Aquitaine and 1 other
Brother of Adélaïde d'Aquitaine, reine des Francs

Occupation: Duc d'Aquitaine (963-993) Comte de Poitou (963-993), Graf von Poitou (als Wilhelm II.) und Herzog von Aquitanien (als Wilhelm IV.), Hertig i Aquitanien 963-995, greve i Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine (963-995), Count of Poitiers
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Adelaisdied1004

GUILLAUME de Poitou ([937]-Saint-Maixent [end 995/early 996], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent[325]).

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ" when recording that he succeeded his father[326]. "Ebulus…Lemovicensium sedis episcopus" donated property including "alodum…meum Baidon" to Saint-Maixent "pro remedio animæ…fratris mei Guillelmi, sive pro consolatione nepotism mei equivoci Guillelmi Aquitanorum ducis" by charter dated Jan [965/66][327].

He succeeded his father in 963 as GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou, lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers.

"Guilelmus…Aquitanensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "clericus…Rodgarius" by charter dated Mar 967[328]. "Wilelmus…Aquitaniensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "Mainardo", at the request of "patruus noster domnus Ebolus, sancte Lemovicensis sedis episcopus atque…beati Hylarii archiclavus", by charter dated Jan 969, subscribed by "Adraldo vicecomes, Arbertus vicecomes, Kadeloni vicecomes…"[329].

At first a powerful duke, he led a dissolute life after the departure of his wife, became increasingly ill and fell under the influence of Madelme, an Italian doctor, whom he rewarded with a vast estate near Fontenay[330]. Duke Guillaume became increasingly religious following the return of his wife in 988, and under her influence the couple made donations to numerous religious establishments.

"Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[331]. It appears that a reaction to these religious excesses set in, and the duke's wife left him once more together with their older son in 991[332].

Duke Guillaume abdicated in Jan 993 in favour of his son, and retired to the Abbey of Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers, later transferring to the Abbey of Saint-Maixent where he became a monk on his deathbed[333].

m ([968]) EMMA de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois & his wife Luitgard de Vermandois ([953]-1 Aug, 1004 or after).

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[334]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "filiam Tetbaudi Campanensis…Emmam sive Emelinam" as the wife of "Willelmu duce…Caput Stupæ…filium eius Willelmum"[335].

She inherited property near Vernon in eastern Normandy from her mother which she gave to the Abbey of Bourgueil in Aquitaine[336]. Her dowry in 968 was Chinon.

"Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…uxore mea Emma…" by charter dated [971][337].

She fled Poitou between 976 and 988 because of the adulterous behaviour of her husband[338].

"Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[339]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[340]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[341]. "Emme matris eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004][342].

She confirmed her son's 27 Dec 1003 donation of Bretignolle to the Abbey of Bourgueil, but according to Richard she was still alive when her first grandson was born in 1004[343].

A necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Aug" of "Emma comitissa, Burgulii"[344].

Mistress (1): --- de Thouars, daughter of ---[345]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with Duke Guillaume IV has not yet been identified.

Duke Guillaume IV & his wife had two children:

1. GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine ([969]-Maillezais 31 Jan 1030, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre, succeeded as Guillaume V "Le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, Guillaume III Comte de Poitou).

2. EBLES d'Aquitaine (-after 997).

From the Wikipedia page of William IV, Duke of Aquitaine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV,_Duke_of_Aquitaine

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy.

His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley.

William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals.

She banished his paramours (including Aldearde de Thouars), they separated twice for long periods (Aldearde was the cause of one of the separations), and finally he retired to a monastery (around 993), as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004.

Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

Notes

1.^ Nouvelle Biographie Générale. The date of 5 February 995 probably comes from Owen.

Sources

Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen and Legend. 1993.

Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

----------------------

Aquitaine (Occitan: Aquitània; Basque: Akitania), archaic Guyenne/Guienne (Occitan: Guiana), is one of the 26 regions of France, in the south-western part of metropolitan France, along the Atlantic Ocean and the Pyrenees mountain range on the border with Spain. In the Middle Ages it was a kingdom and later a duchy, with boundaries considerably larger than the modern ones.

According to the French Wikipedia page on the Abbatiale de Saint-Maixent-l'École:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbatiale_de_Saint-Maixent-l%27%C3%89cole

The abbey in which Guillaume was buried had originated in the 5th century, and became prestigious under the Merovingians, but suffered under Viking onslaught in the 9th century. The abbey was rebuilt in Guillaume's lifetime (thus perhaps his choice of dying and being buried there), but suffered during an earthquake in 1059, and from a number of fires that swept through the town over the following century. Still in 1134, it was restored for at least another four centuries - when the Protestants destroyed it in the late 1500s. The modern abbey was finally established in August 1682 and has been in use since.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV_of_Aquitaine

William IV, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from William IV of Aquitaine)

Jump to: navigation, search

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Nouvelle Biographie Générale. The date of 5 February 995 probably comes from Owen.

[edit] Sources

   * Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen and Legend. 1993.
   * Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

William III Duke of Aquitaine

963 – 995 Succeeded by

William V

Count of Poitiers

963 – 995

[hide]

v • d • e

Counts of Poitiers

Guerin · Hatton · Renaud · Bernard I · Emenon · Ranulph I · Ranulph II · Gauzbert · Robert I · Ebalus · Aymar · Ebalus · William I · William II · William III · William IV · Eudes · William V · William VI · William VII · William VIII · Eleanor · Louis* · Henry* · William IX · Otto · Richard · Alphonse · Philip · John I · John II · John III · Charles · François · Deylan

Count of Poitiers Arms.svg

  • Count through marriage

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_IV._%28Aquitanien%29

Wilhelm IV. (Aquitanien)

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche

Wilhelm IV. von Aquitanien, genannt Eisenarm (lateinisch: Fera brachia, französisch: Fier-à-Bras; † 995/996) war ein Graf von Poitou (als Wilhelm II.) und Herzog von Aquitanien (als Wilhelm IV.) aus der Familie der Ramnulfiden. Er war ein Sohn des Herzogs Wilhelm III. Werghaupt und dessen Ehefrau Gerloc-Adele von der Normandie.

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Wilhelm stand zunächst unter der Vormundschaft seines Onkels, des Bischofs Ebalus von Limoges. Nach der Regierungsübernahme näherte sich Wilhelm den Kapetingern unter seinem Schwager Hugo Capet an. Deshalb verschlechterte sich aber sein Verhältnis zum karolingischen König Lothar Der König schickte seinen Sohn, Ludwig den Faulen, 982 nach Aquitanien, um dort als Unterkönig zu herrschen, was Wilhelms eigene Position in Frage stellte. Dieser Konflikt endete allerdings 984 mit der Abberufung Ludwigs.

Nachdem Sturz der Karolinger 987 und der Wahl Hugo Capets weigerte sich Wilhelm, den neuen König anzuerkennen. Im Jahr darauf verteidigte er Poitiers gegen Hugo Capet, worauf er sich mit ihm versöhnte und auch als König anerkannte. Der Dynastiewechsel auf dem französischen Thron leitete für die weitere Geschichte Aquitaniens einen neuen Abschnitt ein, da das neue Königtum seither kaum noch Präsenz im Raum südlich der Loire zeigte und sich hauptsächlich auf das Gebiet der alten Francia beschränkte. Robert II. der Fromme war überhaupt der letzte König für die folgenden einhundert Jahre, der aquitanischen Boden betrat. Für Wilhelm bedeutete dies das Erreichen einer faktisch unabhängigen Position. Zugleich wurde in seiner Regentschaft die herzogliche Gewalt durch eine zunehmende Feudalisierung Aquitaniens geschwächt. Zum Beispiel erhoben sich Wilhelms Vizegrafen in der Auvergne eigenmächtig zu Grafen, ohne dass er dagegen etwas unternehmen konnte.

Wilhelm heiratete um 968 Emma von Blois († 27. Dezember 1003), eine Tochter des Grafen Theobald I. Tricator von Blois. Beider Sohn war Wilhelm der Große. Seine Ehe und seine Herrschaft wurden jedoch durch zahlreiche außereheliche Beziehungen belastet, die seine Ehefrau dazu brachte, ihn zu verlassen. Er wird in den Chroniken dann nicht mehr erwähnt, vermutlich weil die Mönche sich weigerten, über einen ehelich untreuen Adligen zu schreiben. Nach einer vorübergehenden Versöhnung mit Emma taucht er in den Dokumenten wieder auf, um schließlich endgültig zu verschwinden.

Zum Ende seines Lebens zog sich Wilhelm in die Abtei von Saint-Maixent zurück, wo er auf dem Sterbebett das Mönchsgewand anlegte. Er wurde dort auch bestattet. Seit der Versöhnung mit seiner Frau galt Wilhelm als freigiebiger Förderer religiöser Einrichtungen. 989 gründete er die Benediktinerabtei von Maillezais.

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * genealogie-mittelalter.de

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Wilhelm Werghaupt Graf von Poitou

936–995 Wilhelm der Große

Herzog von Aquitanien

936–995

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV_of_Aquitaine

William IV, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from William IV of Aquitaine)

Jump to: navigation, search

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Nouvelle Biographie Générale. The date of 5 February 995 probably comes from Owen.

[edit] Sources

   * Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen and Legend. 1993.
   * Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

William III Duke of Aquitaine

963 – 995 Succeeded by

William V

Count of Poitiers

963 – 995

[hide]

v • d • e

Counts of Poitiers

Guerin · Hatton · Renaud · Bernard I · Emenon · Ranulph I · Ranulph II · Gauzbert · Robert I · Ebalus · Aymar · Ebalus · William I · William II · William III · William IV · Eudes · William V · William VI · William VII · William VIII · Eleanor · Louis* · Henry* · William IX · Otto · Richard · Alphonse · Philip · John I · John II · John III · Charles · François · Deylan

Count of Poitiers Arms.svg

This page was last modified on 24 July 2010 at 18:44.

--------------------

William IV of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

Notes

^ Nouvelle Biographie Générale. The date of 5 February 995 probably comes from Owen.

[edit]Sources

Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen and Legend. 1993.

Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

--------------------

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

[edit] Notes

^ Nouvelle Biographie Générale. The date of 5 February 995 probably comes from Owen.

[edit] Sources

Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen and Legend. 1993.

Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

[edit] See also

Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

William III Duke of Aquitaine

963 – 995 Succeeded by

William V

Count of Poitiers

963 – 995

--------------------

William IV (937 – 3 February 994), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV_of_Aquitaine -------------------- William IV (937 – 3 February 994), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV_of_Aquitaine

And in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_IV_de_Poitiers

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Iron Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.

William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.

In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.

In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997. -------------------- Guillaume IV Pierebrace d'Aquitaine -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_IV,_Duke_of_Aquitaine

William IV (937 – 3 February 994[1]), called Fierebras or Fierebrace (meaning "Proud Arm", from the French Fier-à-bras or Fièrebrace, in turn from the Latin Ferox brachium), was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou from 963 to his retirement in 990.


William's father, William III, abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to Fierebras. His mother was Gerloc, the daughter of Duke Rollo of Normandy. His sister was Adelaide, wife of Hugh Capet, the king against whom William later battled for his duchy. His early reign was characterised by many wars. He fought frequently against the counts of Anjou, the first time against Geoffrey Greymantle, who had taken Loudun.


In 988, he went to war with the newly-elected king of France, Hugh Capet, whom he refused to recognise. Capet had been granted Aquitaine by King Lothair before the latter had been reconciled to William's father. Capet renewed his claim on the great duchy and invaded it that year. A royal army was defeated on the plain of the Loire Valley. William sheltered the young Louis, the son of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, the last legitimate Carolingian heir. He opened the palace of Poitiers to him and treated him as royalty, regarding him as the true heir to the French throne.


In 968, he married Emma or Emmeline, daughter of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgarde of Vermandois. Their marriage was stormy, in part because of William's indulgence in the pursuit of women and, a hunting aficionado, wild animals. She banished his paramours, they separated twice for long periods, and finally he retired to a monastery, as his father had done, leaving Emma to rule Aquitaine in the name of their son William until 1004. Their second son, Ebles, died sometime after 997.

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Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou's Timeline

940
940
Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
963
963
- 993
Age 23
Poitiers, Poitou, France
963
- 993
Age 23
Aquitaine, France
965
965
Age 25
France
968
968
Age 28
France?
969
969
Age 29
Poitou-Charentes, France
970
970
Age 30
Quitaine,France
977
977
Age 37
Aquitaine, France
984
984
Age 44
France
993
993
- 996
Age 53
St-Cyprien, France