Guillaume II le Liberateur, comte de Provence

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Guilhèm II 'lo Liberator', comte de Provença

Nicknames: "William II Count of /Arles+Provence/", "le Libérateur", "the Liberator", "of Provence", "of Arles", "William I Count of /Provence/", "Le Libâerateur", "le Liberateur", "William I "the Liberator" of Provence", "William of /Provence/", "called the Liberator", "William I "Th....."
Birthdate:
Death: Died in Avignon, Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Place of Burial: Church of Saint-Croix, Sarrians, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Boson II, comte d'Arles and Constance of Viennois
Husband of Adelaida de Comenge, vescomtessa consort de Narbona; Adélaïde la Blanche d'Anjou, Reine consort d'Aquitaine and Arsenda
Father of Toda de Provença, comtessa de Besalú; Guillaume III le Pieux, comte de Provence; Constance d'Arles, reine consort de France and Geoffrey Taillefer
Brother of Rotbald II, comte de Provence and Ponç lo Jove d’Arle

Occupation: Comte, d'Arles, de Gévaudan, Marquis, de Provence, 950, 968, , Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. Comte d'Arles et de Provence, Count of Provence, Graf und später Markgraf von Provence sowie als Wilhelm II. Graf von Arles, Died as a Monk
Managed by: Private User
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About Guilhèm II 'lo Liberator', comte de Provença

Guillaume II 'le Liberateur' Comte d'Arles

Parents: Boson Comte d'Arles & Constantia Spouses: 1. Arsinde (no children) 2. Adélaïs d'Anjou Children:

  • Guillaume III Comte de Provence ([986/87]-1018 before 30 May) married Gerberge de Mâcon
  • Constance ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032) married Robert II King of France

------------------------------ From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page for Provence: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#ConstanceArlesMRobertIIFrancedied1031

GUILLAUME [II] “le Libérateur”, son of ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix).

"Boso comes et uxor sua Constantia…illorum filii…Willelmus comes, Rotbaldus comes, Pontius juvenis" signed the charter dated May [963] under which "Gencius et uxor mea Aiburga" donated property "in pago Aquense superiore ad castrum…Ansoyse" to Monmajour[250].

The order of birth of the two sons of Boson is unclear. The May [963] charter suggests that Guillaume was his older son. However, Guillaume is omitted from the charter dated Mar 965 under which "eius filio Rothboldo et fratre eius Wilelmo comite" consented to the charter of "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam"[251], which suggests that Rotbald was older.

Comte de Provence, charters showing that both he and his older brother Rotbald were recorded as counts during the same period, although it is not known whether this was a joint countship or whether there was a geographical split between their jurisdictions.

Marquis de Provence.

"Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[252]. "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[253]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[254].

He became a monk.

m firstly (before Apr 970) ARSINDE, daughter of --- (-after 17 Apr 979). "Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970[255].

"Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[256]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the first wife of Marquis Guillaume was the sister of Adelais, whose first testament dated 4 Oct 978 names her, basing the hypothesis on onomastics and favorable chronology[257].

Under this testament of "Adelais", she donated her foundation "Narbonam…sanctique Salvatoris" to "sororibus meis et domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ", bequeathed "mea hereditas de Vidiliano" to "Arsindi sorori meæ", "alodes de Tolomiano" to "Ermesindi", and "mea hereditas de Artimiciano" to "Garsindi"[258]. The wording suggests that "Arsindi…Ermesindi…Garsindi" were all sisters of the testator, although the relationship is not specified in the case of Arsinde.

It is probable that "domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ" in this document was the wife of Guillaume II Comte de Provence as no other Ctss Arsende has been identified at the time. However, the wording of the passage in which she is named suggests that she was a different person from "Arsindi sorori meæ". Szabolcs de Vajay suggests (as reported by Settipani: the Szabolcs article has not yet been consulted) that the testator was the possible daughter of Arnaud [I] Comte de Comminges.

She can be identified as Adelais, widow of Matfried Vicomte de Narbonne, as the document names the couple´s two sons whose affiliation is confirmed by other primary sources. As explained more fully in the document TOULOUSE, KINGS, DUKES & COUNTS, other primary source documentation suggests that the wife of Vicomte Matfried may have been the daughter of Raymond Pons Comte de Toulouse. If this is correct, the chronology suggests that her sister would have been too old to have married Guillaume II Comte de Provence.

m secondly ([984/86]) as her fourth husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude, secondly of RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife (thirdly) of LOUIS V King of the West Franks, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([945/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles).

Comte Guillaume [II] & his second wife had two children: 1. Guillaume III (b. 986/987, d. 1018, before 30 May, Comte de Provence) 2. Constance (b. 987/989, d. 22 or 25 July 1032 at the Chateau de Melun, buried eglise de l'Abbaye royale de St-Denis, Queen of France)

References:

[250] Manteyer (1908), p. 225, quoting Chantelou Histoire de Monmajour, Revue Historique de Provence, 1ère année, p. 37.

[251] Gallia Christiana Novissima, Marseille, Col. 47-48, no. 66, and Marseille Saint-Victor Tome I, 29, p. 40.

[252] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509.

[253] Cluny Tome III, 1837, p. 80.

[254] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 153, col. 325.

[255] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome I, 598, p. 590.

[256] Marseille Saint-Victor Tome II, Appendix, 1042, p. 509.

[257] Vajay, S. de 'Comtesses d'origine occitane dans la Marche d'Espagne aux 10e et 11e siècles', Hidalguia 28 (1980), p. 756, cited in Settipani (2004), p. 63 footnote 1.


[258] Histoire Générale de Languedoc 3rd Edn. Tome V, Preuves, Chartes et Diplômes, 130, col. 284. --------------------------------------------- From the Wikipedia page on William I of Provence: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Avignon in 962, Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave (Marquis de Provence Arles). He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. (French Wikipedia says that he was Prince of All Provence in 991. He is called William II because of an uncle who carried the same name.)

He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

(According to French Wikipedia, the brothers obtained the shared title after their father Boson and uncle William relinquished the title in their favor between 962 and 966.)

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles.

His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. (French Wikipedia states: Following the removal of the Abbot of Mayeul in July 972 by Saracens who established themselves at Maures in the late 9th century, Count William and his brother Rotbold led the Provencal army, reinforced by troops from Count Ardouin of Turin, against the Moors.) At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence.

He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc (treasury) in Provence.

With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in the early 970s in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

(French Wikipedia states: Like his father Boson, William is advised by a viscount. From 977, he accompanied all his movements. A group of judges rendered justice under William. He moved to Arles in the early 980s. In 991, the Bishop of Frejus, Riculf, begged for a restitution of some of the old estates of the bishopric. William granted half of Frejus and the village of Puget. In 992, he donates important areas of Camargue to the Monastery of St-Jean d'Arles.)

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians.

He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

Marriage and issue

He married first between 968 and April 970 Arsenda, daughter of Arnaud, Comte of Comminges and Arsinde de Carcassonne, and their son was:

1. Odile de Province (or Odilie de Nice, c. 976 to c. 1032) 2. William II of Provence (c. 981 to before May 30, 1018)

He married 2nd (against papal advice as she had just separated from her husband, the future King of France Louis V) in 984 (after Arsinde died in 983 at roughly age 33), Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their children were:

1. Constance of Arles (973 - 1034, OUR ANCESTOR), married Robert II of France 2. Another daughter named Ermengarde of Arles whose parentage is disputed; she later marries Robert I d'Auvergne.

Sources

Lewis, Archibald R. The Development of Southern French and Catalan Society, 718–1050. University of Texas Press: Austin, 1965.

Joseph Hyacinthe Albans - Gallia Christiana Novissima, Volume 3 - Edition 1895 book available on Gallica

Martin Aurell, Jean - Paul Boyer and Noel Coulet - Provence in the Middle Ages -------------------- From the English Wikipedia page on William I of Provence: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence.

He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet.

At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

1. William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their daughter was:

1. Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France -------------------- Guillaume II 'le Libérateur' Comte de Provence, 955-993 also Marquis de Provence, Comte d'Arles

[NOTE: Not to be confused with Guillaume II of Toulouse]

-son of Boson II Comte d'Arles and Constance de Provence -brother of Rotbald

1st married Arsinde (possibly of Comminges)

2nd married Adelais d'Anjou, by whom he had 2 children:

1. Guillaume III, (c.986/87-1018) Comte de Provence

2. Constance d'Arles (c 987/89]-1032, m Robert II King of France

Some sources also name a third child, Ermengarde d'Arles, but this is contested.

------------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm

GUILLAUME [II] “le Libérateur” ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix). "Boso comes et uxor sua Constantia…illorum filii…Willelmus comes, Rotbaldus comes, Pontius juvenis" signed the charter dated May [963] under which "Gencius et uxor mea Aiburga" donated property "in pago Aquense superiore ad castrum…Ansoyse" to Monmajour[250]. The order of birth of the two sons of Boson is unclear. The May [963] charter suggests that Guillaume was his older son. However, Guillaume is omitted from the charter dated Mar 965 under which "eius filio Rothboldo et fratre eius Wilelmo comite" consented to the charter of "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam"[251], which suggests that Rotbald was older.

Comte de Provence, charters showing that both he and his older brother Rotbald were recorded as counts during the same period, although it is not known whether this was a joint countship or whether there was a geographical split between their jurisdictions.

Marquis de Provence. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[252]. "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[253]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[254]. He became a monk.

m firstly (before Apr 970) ARSINDE, daughter of --- (-after 17 Apr 979). "Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970[255]. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[256]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the first wife of Marquis Guillaume was the sister of Adelais, whose first testament dated 4 Oct 978 names her, basing the hypothesis on onomastics and favorable chronology[257]. Under this testament of "Adelais", she donated her foundation "Narbonam…sanctique Salvatoris" to "sororibus meis et domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ", bequeathed "mea hereditas de Vidiliano" to "Arsindi sorori meæ", "alodes de Tolomiano" to "Ermesindi", and "mea hereditas de Artimiciano" to "Garsindi"[258]. The wording suggests that "Arsindi…Ermesindi…Garsindi" were all sisters of the testator, although the relationship is not specified in the case of Arsinde. It is probable that "domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ" in this document was the wife of Guillaume II Comte de Provence as no other Ctss Arsende has been identified at the time. However, the wording of the passage in which she is named suggests that she was a different person from "Arsindi sorori meæ". Szabolcs de Vajay suggests (as reported by Settipani: the Szabolcs article has not yet been consulted) that the testator was the possible daughter of Arnaud [I] Comte de Comminges. She can be identified as Adelais, widow of Matfried Vicomte de Narbonne, as the document names the couple´s two sons whose affiliation is confirmed by other primary sources. As explained more fully in the document TOULOUSE, KINGS, DUKES & COUNTS, other primary source documentation suggests that the wife of Vicomte Matfried may have been the daughter of Raymond Pons Comte de Toulouse. If this is correct, the chronology suggests that her sister would have been too old to have married Guillaume II Comte de Provence.

m secondly ([984/86]) as her fourth husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude, secondly of RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife (thirdly) of LOUIS V King of the West Franks, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([945/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). A manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[277]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[278]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[279].

Comte Guillaume [II] & his second wife had two children:

1. GUILLAUME [III] ([986/87]-1018 before 30 May). Comte de Provence 992, minor until 994.

2. CONSTANCE ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). m ([Sep 1001/25 Aug 1003]) as his third wife, ROBERT II King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

--------------------

Guillaume Ier de Provence Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Guillaume Ier de Provence dit le Libérateur, (né v. 955 - mort en 993, après le 29 août), fils de Boson II, comte d'Arles et de Constance de Provence, il fut successivement comte d'Avignon (962), comte de Provence (972), marquis de la Provence arlésienne (979) et prince de toute la Provence (991)[1]. En raison d'un oncle appelé lui aussi Guillaume[2], il est parfois dénommé Guillaume II de Provence.

Ses premières années

Guillaume et son frère ainé Roubaud, succèdent à leur père Boson et oncle appelé lui aussi Guillaume entre 962 et 966. Le comté de Provence leur appartient en indivision, Guillaume devenant comte d'Avignon et Roubaud comte d'Arles suivant la division opérée à la génération précédente entre leur père et oncle. Il épouse entre 968 et avril 970[3], Arsinde de Comminges[4], fille d'Arnaud, comte de Comminges et d'Arsinde de Carcassonne. Si Arsinde, sa première femme, a été parfois été confondue avec Adelaïde, sa seconde, pour ne lui faire qu'une seule et unique épouse, la controverse est aujourd'hui terminée[5]. De cette première union seraient nés :

   * Odile de Provence dite Odile de Nice (c.976-c.1032)
   * Guillaume II de Provence (c.981-av. 30 mai 1018)[6].

La libération de la Provence et ses conséquences

A la suite à l'enlèvement de l'abbé Mayeul en juillet 972 par les bandes de Sarrasins installées dans le massif des Maures depuis la fin du IXe siècle, le comte Guillaume et son frère Roubaud prennent la tête de l'ost provençal renforcé par les troupes d'Ardouin, comte de Turin. Ils traquent les Maures (quelques centaines d'hommes au mieux) qu'ils écrasent à la bataille de Tourtour en 973, puis les chassent de Provence[7]. Cette campagne militaire contre les Sarrasins conduite sans les troupes de Conrad, masque en fait une mise au pas de la Provence, de l'aristocratie locale et des communautés urbaines et paysannes qui avaient jusque là toujours refusé la mutation féodale et le pouvoir comtal. Elle permet à Guillaume d'obtenir la suzeraineté de fait de la Provence et avec le consentement royal, de contrôler le fisc de la Provence. Il distribue les terres reconquises à ses vassaux, arbitre les différents et crée ainsi la féodalité provençale[8]. Avec Isarn, évêque de Grenoble, il entreprend de repeupler le Dauphiné et autorise un comte italien nommé Ugo Blavia à se fixer près de Fréjus au début des années 970 pour remettre les terres en cultures.

Son gouvernement et sa renommée

Comme son père Boson, Guillaume se fait conseiller par un vicomte qui dès 977 l'accompagne dans tous ces déplacements et il s'appuie sur un groupe important de juges pour rendre la justice. Devenu marquis de Provence en 979, il s'installe à Arles au début des années 980. Sa première femme Arsinde de Comminges (c.950-983) venant à décéder, il épouse en 984 dans cette cité, contre l'avis du pape, Adélaïde d'Anjou qui vient de se séparer de son époux, le futur roi de France, Louis V. Le couple aurait eu deux enfants :

   * Constance d'Arles (986-1032) reine de France par son mariage avec Robert II vers l'an 1000,
   * et une autre fille Ermengarde d'Arles, dont la filiation est plus contestée[9]; Ermengarde d'Arles épouse par la suite Robert Ier d'Auvergne.

Pour tout ceci, il est un personnage important des chroniques de Raoul Glaber qui le traite de duc et il apparaît dans une charte de 992 avec le nom de pater patriae.

La fin de sa vie

À la fin de sa vie Guillaume devient très pieux et restitue de nombreux biens au temporel de l'Eglise. Déjà en 991[10], à la demande de l'évêque de Fréjus, Riculf[11], qui implore à Arles auprès du prince la restitution des anciens domaines de l'évêché, Guillaume accède à cette pétition et lui accorde de surplus la moitié de Fréjus et le village de Puget[12]. En 992, il rend également d’importants domaines en Camargue au monastère Saint-Jean d'Arles. En 993, se sentant mourir dans la ville d'Avignon dont il a été le comte, il prend l'habit de moine et fait appel à l'abbé Mayeul pour soulager son âme. Il fait des restitutions et des offrandes à l'abbaye de Cluny[13], et c'est entouré par la multitude de ses sujets, que Guillaume de Provence passe de vie à trépas dans cette ville, peu après le 29 août 993. Avant de mourir, il avait émis le vœu d'être inhumé à Sarrians, près de Carpentras, dans le prieuré en cours de construction sur la villa offerte à l'abbaye bourguignonne[14].

Voir aussi

Liens internes

   * Liste des souverains de Provence
   * Liste des comtes de Comminges
   * Histoire d'Arles à l'époque haute-médiévale
   * Histoire de la Provence

Liens externes et bibliographie

   * Les comtes de Provence
   * Joseph Hyacinthe Albanés - Gallia christiana novissima, Tome 3 – Edition 1895 ; ouvrage accessible sur Gallica ici
   * Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge

Notes et références

  1. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 13
  2. ↑ Il s'agit du frère de Boson II; Boson était comte d'Arles et Guillaume comte d'Avignon.
  3. ↑ Avant avril 970 d'après Les comtes de Provence [archive]:
         Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970.
  4. ↑ La date de naissance d'Arsinde généralement fixée vers 950 pourrait être plus ancienne compte tenu que les enfants du comte Arnaud, son père, sont nés probablement dans les années 930-945. Arsende serait ainsi bien plus agée que Guillaume.
     La date de sa mort pose aussi des difficultés. On admet qu'elle se situe entre 979 et 983.
  5. ↑ Jean-Pierre Papon, Jules Frédéric Paul Fauris de Saint-Vincens - Histoire générale de Provence ..., page 491 ici [archive] :
         Les historiens ne font pas d'accord sur le nombre de ses femmes ; les uns lui en donnent une, les autres deux , savoir Arsinde et Adélaïde. Ce dernier sentiment est le seul qu'on doive suivre ; car, 1°) depuis l'année 968, jusqu'en 979, la femme de Guillaume eut constamment le nom d'Arsinde ; et depuis l’an 986 jusqu'en 1026, elle s'appella Adélaïde : distinction qui n'auroit pas été exactement observée, si la même personne eût porté les deux noms. 2°) Arsinde étoit déjà mariée à Guillaume I l'an 968 ; et si elle eût été la même qu'Adélaïde , elle auroit été comtesse de Provence pendant plus de cinquante huit ans, ce qui ne doit point être admis sans de fortes preuves.
  6. ↑ Les comtes de Provence [archive] :
         "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus". According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the son of Comte Guillaume by his first wife but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. It is possible that it is speculative in light of his marriage date, which suggests that he was born earlier than the date of his father's second marriage. GUILLAUME [III] Comte de Provence 992, minor until 994 .
     Toutefois la date de décès d'Arsinde, sa mère supposée, que certains historiens fixent autour de 979, entretient la confusion. Pour d'autres, qui situent le décès d'Arsende avant 983, il n'y pas forcément d'impossibilité.
  7. ↑ Des sources tardives comme la Chronique de la Novalaise et la Vie de Saint Bobon donnent des informations romancées de ces événements.
  8. ↑ Jean-Pierre Poly, La Provence et la société féodale (879-1166), Paris, 1976 
  9. ↑ Ermengarde est parfois considérée comme la fille d'Adélaïde et d'Étienne de Gévaudan.
 10. ↑ La GCN, page 333 indique le 6 mars 990
 11. ↑ Neveu de Teucinde d'Arles.
 12. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Povence au Moyen Âge, pages 14-15
 13. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 13
 14. ↑ Ibidem, page 13

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was: William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was: Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence ---------------------

The family of Guillaume II de PROVENCE and Adèle dite Blanche d'ANJOU [128949] PROVENCE (de), Guillaume II (Boso & Constance de PROVENCE [128948]), comte de Provence et d'Arles, born about 950

  • married about 980, from France ? (France)

ANJOU (d'), Adèle dite Blanche (Geoffroy Ier & Adélaïs de VERMANDOIS [129058]) 1) Constance, born 986, died 1032-07, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France, married .. (France) 1003 or 1005 Robert II le Pieux de FRANCE

Bibliographie : Essai sur l'histoire des comtes souverains de Provence; Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française)

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/128/128949.php

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence and in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Ier_de_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. [edit] Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

   * William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was:

   * Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

-------------------- Wilhelm I. genannt der Befreier (französisch: Guillaume I. le Libérateur) († 994) war Graf und später Markgraf von Provence sowie als Wilhelm II. Graf von Arles. Er war der jüngere Sohn der Grafen Boso II. und der Constance von Provence aus dem Haus der Buviniden,

970 war er Graf von Arles und Provence, 979 nahm er den Titel eines Markgrafen von Provence an, was ihn vor allem – gegenüber seinem älteren Bruder Graf Rotbald II. – als Oberhaupt der Familie bezeichnet. Ob damit eine tatsächliche Teilung des Landes oder eine gemeinsame Regierung verbunden war, ist unbekannt.

Er erhielt seinen Beinamen aufgrund seiner Siege über die Sarazenen, durch die er die Provence von dieser Bedrohung befreite, die seit der Errichtung ihrer Basis in Fraxinetum (La Garde-Freinet) beständig war. In der Schlacht von Tourtour 973 verjagte er mit Unterstützung der Grafen aus den Alpen, den Vizegrafen von Marseille und Fos-sur-Mer endgültig aus dem Land. Er reorganisierte das Land östlich der Rhône, das König Konrad III. von Burgund ihm zugesprochen und das er den Sarazenen weggenommen hatte. Mit königlicher Zustimmung kontrollierten er und seine Nachkommen auch den provenzalischen Fiscus. Er und der Bischof von Grenoble Isarn siedelten in der Dauphiné wieder Menschen an. Bei Fréjus wurde 970 ein Italiener namens Ugo Blavia als Graf eingesetzt. Aufgrund seiner Leistungen wird er in Rodulfus Glabers Chronik als Dux und in einem Dokument aus dem Jahr 992 als Pater patriae bezeichnet.

Er beschenkte die Abtei Cluny und zog sich gegen Ende seines Lebens in ein Kloster zurück. Er starb in Avignon und wurde in der Kirche Saint-Croix in Sarrians beerdigt. Sein Nachfolger als Markgraf wurde sein Bruder

Ehen  [Bearbeiten]Er heiratete in erster Ehe Arsenda von Comminges, 984/986 dann in zweiter Ehe – gegen den Willen des Papstes – 984/86 Adelheid (Blanche) von Anjou († 1026), Tochter von Fulko II., Graf von Anjou, die Witwe des Grafen Stephan (Étienne) von Gévaudan und geschiedene Ehefrau des Königs Ludwig V. der Faule (Louis V. le Fainéant) von Frankreich († 22. Mai 987).

Nach Wilhelms Tod heiratete Adelheid vor 1016 in vierter Ehe den Vater ihrer Schwiegertochter, Otto Wilhelm von Burgund († 21. September 1026)

Nachkommen  [Bearbeiten]Aus der ersten Ehe stammt Wilhelms Erbe:

Wilhelm III. (Guillaume III.) (992 minderjährig, † 1018 vor dem 30. Mai) Graf von Provence 994-1018; ? um 1002 Gerberga von Burgund († 1020/23) aus dem Haus Burgund-Ivrea, Tochter des Grafen Otto Wilhelm von Burgund Aus seiner zweiten Ehe stammen seine Töchter:

Konstanze (Constance) († 28. Juli 1032), ? zwischen August 1001 und 25. August 1002 Robert II. der Fromme König von Frankreich (Kapetinger), † 28. Juli 1031 Ermgard, ? Robert I. Graf von Auvergne († vor 1032) Darüber hinaus hatte er vermutlich zwei weitere Kinder:

Odilia de Nizza, wohl aus der ersten Ehe, ? I Miron Vizegraf von Sisteron aus dem Haus Barcelona; ? II um 1004 Laugier Graf von Nizza Toda, wohl aus der zweiten Ehe, ? um 992 Bernhard I. Taillefer (Bernardo I Tallaferro) Graf von Besalú und Ripoli († 1020)

-------------------- Guillaume II 'le Libérateur' Comte de Provence, 955-993 also Marquis de Provence, Comte d'Arles

[NOTE: Not to be confused with Guillaume II of Toulouse]

-son of Boson II Comte d'Arles and Constance de Provence -brother of Rotbald

1st married Arsinde (possibly of Comminges)

2nd married Adelais d'Anjou, by whom he had 2 children:

1. Guillaume III, (c.986/87-1018) Comte de Provence

2. Constance d'Arles (c 987/89]-1032, m Robert II King of France

Some sources also name a third child, Ermengarde d'Arles, but this is contested.

------------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm

GUILLAUME [II] “le Libérateur” ([955]-Avignon 993 after 29 Aug, bur Sarrians, église de Sainte-Croix). "Boso comes et uxor sua Constantia…illorum filii…Willelmus comes, Rotbaldus comes, Pontius juvenis" signed the charter dated May [963] under which "Gencius et uxor mea Aiburga" donated property "in pago Aquense superiore ad castrum…Ansoyse" to Monmajour[250]. The order of birth of the two sons of Boson is unclear. The May [963] charter suggests that Guillaume was his older son. However, Guillaume is omitted from the charter dated Mar 965 under which "eius filio Rothboldo et fratre eius Wilelmo comite" consented to the charter of "Bosoni comitis, filii Rothboldi quondam"[251], which suggests that Rotbald was older.

Comte de Provence, charters showing that both he and his older brother Rotbald were recorded as counts during the same period, although it is not known whether this was a joint countship or whether there was a geographical split between their jurisdictions.

Marquis de Provence. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[252]. "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus"[253]. "Dominus princeps et marchio istius provinciæ…Willelmus cum coniuge sua…Adelaix et filio suo…Willelmo" restored property to the abbey of Saint-Césaire d´Arles by charter dated 992, subscribed by "Domnus Rotbaldus comes…Willelmus comes filius Rotbaldi et uxor sua Lucia, Wilelmus comes Tolosanus et uxor sua Ema…"[254]. He became a monk.

m firstly (before Apr 970) ARSINDE, daughter of --- (-after 17 Apr 979). "Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna" donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970[255]. "Vuilelmus marchius Arelatense Provintie" donated property "in comitatu Avinionense, in agro Rupiano, in loco…la Lona" to Saint-Victor, Marseille by charter dated 17 Apr 979, signed by "Arsinda comitissa"[256]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the first wife of Marquis Guillaume was the sister of Adelais, whose first testament dated 4 Oct 978 names her, basing the hypothesis on onomastics and favorable chronology[257]. Under this testament of "Adelais", she donated her foundation "Narbonam…sanctique Salvatoris" to "sororibus meis et domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ", bequeathed "mea hereditas de Vidiliano" to "Arsindi sorori meæ", "alodes de Tolomiano" to "Ermesindi", and "mea hereditas de Artimiciano" to "Garsindi"[258]. The wording suggests that "Arsindi…Ermesindi…Garsindi" were all sisters of the testator, although the relationship is not specified in the case of Arsinde. It is probable that "domnæ Arsindæ comitissæ" in this document was the wife of Guillaume II Comte de Provence as no other Ctss Arsende has been identified at the time. However, the wording of the passage in which she is named suggests that she was a different person from "Arsindi sorori meæ". Szabolcs de Vajay suggests (as reported by Settipani: the Szabolcs article has not yet been consulted) that the testator was the possible daughter of Arnaud [I] Comte de Comminges. She can be identified as Adelais, widow of Matfried Vicomte de Narbonne, as the document names the couple´s two sons whose affiliation is confirmed by other primary sources. As explained more fully in the document TOULOUSE, KINGS, DUKES & COUNTS, other primary source documentation suggests that the wife of Vicomte Matfried may have been the daughter of Raymond Pons Comte de Toulouse. If this is correct, the chronology suggests that her sister would have been too old to have married Guillaume II Comte de Provence.

m secondly ([984/86]) as her fourth husband, ADELAIS [Blanche] d'Anjou, widow firstly of ETIENNE de Brioude, secondly of RAYMOND IV Comte de Toulouse, divorced wife (thirdly) of LOUIS V King of the West Franks, daughter of FOULQUES II "le Bon" Comte d’Anjou & his first wife Gerberge --- ([945/50]-1026, bur Montmajour, near Arles). A manuscript written by Arnoux, monk at Saint-André-lès-Avignon, records the death in 1026 of "Adalax comitissa"[277]. The necrology of Saint-Pierre de Mâcon records the death "IV Kal Jun" of "Adalasia comitissa vocata regali progenie orta"[278]. An enquiry dated 2 Jan 1215 records that "comitissa Blanca" was buried "apud Montem Majorem"[279].

Comte Guillaume [II] & his second wife had two children:

1. GUILLAUME [III] ([986/87]-1018 before 30 May). Comte de Provence 992, minor until 994.

2. CONSTANCE ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). m ([Sep 1001/25 Aug 1003]) as his third wife, ROBERT II King of France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais d’Aquitaine (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

--------------------

Guillaume Ier de Provence Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Guillaume Ier de Provence dit le Libérateur, (né v. 955 - mort en 993, après le 29 août), fils de Boson II, comte d'Arles et de Constance de Provence, il fut successivement comte d'Avignon (962), comte de Provence (972), marquis de la Provence arlésienne (979) et prince de toute la Provence (991)[1]. En raison d'un oncle appelé lui aussi Guillaume[2], il est parfois dénommé Guillaume II de Provence.

Ses premières années

Guillaume et son frère ainé Roubaud, succèdent à leur père Boson et oncle appelé lui aussi Guillaume entre 962 et 966. Le comté de Provence leur appartient en indivision, Guillaume devenant comte d'Avignon et Roubaud comte d'Arles suivant la division opérée à la génération précédente entre leur père et oncle. Il épouse entre 968 et avril 970[3], Arsinde de Comminges[4], fille d'Arnaud, comte de Comminges et d'Arsinde de Carcassonne. Si Arsinde, sa première femme, a été parfois été confondue avec Adelaïde, sa seconde, pour ne lui faire qu'une seule et unique épouse, la controverse est aujourd'hui terminée[5]. De cette première union seraient nés :

   * Odile de Provence dite Odile de Nice (c.976-c.1032)
   * Guillaume II de Provence (c.981-av. 30 mai 1018)[6].

La libération de la Provence et ses conséquences

A la suite à l'enlèvement de l'abbé Mayeul en juillet 972 par les bandes de Sarrasins installées dans le massif des Maures depuis la fin du IXe siècle, le comte Guillaume et son frère Roubaud prennent la tête de l'ost provençal renforcé par les troupes d'Ardouin, comte de Turin. Ils traquent les Maures (quelques centaines d'hommes au mieux) qu'ils écrasent à la bataille de Tourtour en 973, puis les chassent de Provence[7]. Cette campagne militaire contre les Sarrasins conduite sans les troupes de Conrad, masque en fait une mise au pas de la Provence, de l'aristocratie locale et des communautés urbaines et paysannes qui avaient jusque là toujours refusé la mutation féodale et le pouvoir comtal. Elle permet à Guillaume d'obtenir la suzeraineté de fait de la Provence et avec le consentement royal, de contrôler le fisc de la Provence. Il distribue les terres reconquises à ses vassaux, arbitre les différents et crée ainsi la féodalité provençale[8]. Avec Isarn, évêque de Grenoble, il entreprend de repeupler le Dauphiné et autorise un comte italien nommé Ugo Blavia à se fixer près de Fréjus au début des années 970 pour remettre les terres en cultures.

Son gouvernement et sa renommée

Comme son père Boson, Guillaume se fait conseiller par un vicomte qui dès 977 l'accompagne dans tous ces déplacements et il s'appuie sur un groupe important de juges pour rendre la justice. Devenu marquis de Provence en 979, il s'installe à Arles au début des années 980. Sa première femme Arsinde de Comminges (c.950-983) venant à décéder, il épouse en 984 dans cette cité, contre l'avis du pape, Adélaïde d'Anjou qui vient de se séparer de son époux, le futur roi de France, Louis V. Le couple aurait eu deux enfants :

   * Constance d'Arles (986-1032) reine de France par son mariage avec Robert II vers l'an 1000,
   * et une autre fille Ermengarde d'Arles, dont la filiation est plus contestée[9]; Ermengarde d'Arles épouse par la suite Robert Ier d'Auvergne.

Pour tout ceci, il est un personnage important des chroniques de Raoul Glaber qui le traite de duc et il apparaît dans une charte de 992 avec le nom de pater patriae.

La fin de sa vie

À la fin de sa vie Guillaume devient très pieux et restitue de nombreux biens au temporel de l'Eglise. Déjà en 991[10], à la demande de l'évêque de Fréjus, Riculf[11], qui implore à Arles auprès du prince la restitution des anciens domaines de l'évêché, Guillaume accède à cette pétition et lui accorde de surplus la moitié de Fréjus et le village de Puget[12]. En 992, il rend également d’importants domaines en Camargue au monastère Saint-Jean d'Arles. En 993, se sentant mourir dans la ville d'Avignon dont il a été le comte, il prend l'habit de moine et fait appel à l'abbé Mayeul pour soulager son âme. Il fait des restitutions et des offrandes à l'abbaye de Cluny[13], et c'est entouré par la multitude de ses sujets, que Guillaume de Provence passe de vie à trépas dans cette ville, peu après le 29 août 993. Avant de mourir, il avait émis le vœu d'être inhumé à Sarrians, près de Carpentras, dans le prieuré en cours de construction sur la villa offerte à l'abbaye bourguignonne[14].

Voir aussi

Liens internes

   * Liste des souverains de Provence
   * Liste des comtes de Comminges
   * Histoire d'Arles à l'époque haute-médiévale
   * Histoire de la Provence

Liens externes et bibliographie

   * Les comtes de Provence
   * Joseph Hyacinthe Albanés - Gallia christiana novissima, Tome 3 – Edition 1895 ; ouvrage accessible sur Gallica ici
   * Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge

Notes et références

  1. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 13
  2. ↑ Il s'agit du frère de Boson II; Boson était comte d'Arles et Guillaume comte d'Avignon.
  3. ↑ Avant avril 970 d'après Les comtes de Provence [archive]:
         Wilelmus comes Provincie et coniunx mea Arsinna donated property to Saint-Victor de Marseille by charter dated Apr 970.
  4. ↑ La date de naissance d'Arsinde généralement fixée vers 950 pourrait être plus ancienne compte tenu que les enfants du comte Arnaud, son père, sont nés probablement dans les années 930-945. Arsende serait ainsi bien plus agée que Guillaume.
     La date de sa mort pose aussi des difficultés. On admet qu'elle se situe entre 979 et 983.
  5. ↑ Jean-Pierre Papon, Jules Frédéric Paul Fauris de Saint-Vincens - Histoire générale de Provence ..., page 491 ici [archive] :
         Les historiens ne font pas d'accord sur le nombre de ses femmes ; les uns lui en donnent une, les autres deux , savoir Arsinde et Adélaïde. Ce dernier sentiment est le seul qu'on doive suivre ; car, 1°) depuis l'année 968, jusqu'en 979, la femme de Guillaume eut constamment le nom d'Arsinde ; et depuis l’an 986 jusqu'en 1026, elle s'appella Adélaïde : distinction qui n'auroit pas été exactement observée, si la même personne eût porté les deux noms. 2°) Arsinde étoit déjà mariée à Guillaume I l'an 968 ; et si elle eût été la même qu'Adélaïde , elle auroit été comtesse de Provence pendant plus de cinquante huit ans, ce qui ne doit point être admis sans de fortes preuves.
  6. ↑ Les comtes de Provence [archive] :
         "Willelmus comes" donated property to Cluny by charter dated 28 Aug [990] signed by "Rodbaldus comes, Adalaix comitissa, Wilelmus comes et filius eius Wilelmus". According to Europäische Stammtafeln, he was the son of Comte Guillaume by his first wife but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified. It is possible that it is speculative in light of his marriage date, which suggests that he was born earlier than the date of his father's second marriage. GUILLAUME [III] Comte de Provence 992, minor until 994 .
     Toutefois la date de décès d'Arsinde, sa mère supposée, que certains historiens fixent autour de 979, entretient la confusion. Pour d'autres, qui situent le décès d'Arsende avant 983, il n'y pas forcément d'impossibilité.
  7. ↑ Des sources tardives comme la Chronique de la Novalaise et la Vie de Saint Bobon donnent des informations romancées de ces événements.
  8. ↑ Jean-Pierre Poly, La Provence et la société féodale (879-1166), Paris, 1976 
  9. ↑ Ermengarde est parfois considérée comme la fille d'Adélaïde et d'Étienne de Gévaudan.
 10. ↑ La GCN, page 333 indique le 6 mars 990
 11. ↑ Neveu de Teucinde d'Arles.
 12. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Povence au Moyen Âge, pages 14-15
 13. ↑ Martin Aurell, Jean-Paul Boyer et Noël Coulet - La Provence au Moyen Âge, page 13
 14. ↑ Ibidem, page 13

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was: William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was: Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence ---------------------

The family of Guillaume II de PROVENCE and Adèle dite Blanche d'ANJOU [128949] PROVENCE (de), Guillaume II (Boso & Constance de PROVENCE [128948]), comte de Provence et d'Arles, born about 950

  • married about 980, from France ? (France)

ANJOU (d'), Adèle dite Blanche (Geoffroy Ier & Adélaïs de VERMANDOIS [129058]) 1) Constance, born 986, died 1032-07, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France, married .. (France) 1003 or 1005 Robert II le Pieux de FRANCE

Bibliographie : Essai sur l'histoire des comtes souverains de Provence; Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française)

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/128/128949.php

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence and in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Ier_de_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. [edit] Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

   * William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was:

   * Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

-------------------- Wilhelm I. genannt der Befreier (französisch: Guillaume I. le Libérateur) († 994) war Graf und später Markgraf von Provence sowie als Wilhelm II. Graf von Arles. Er war der jüngere Sohn der Grafen Boso II. und der Constance von Provence aus dem Haus der Buviniden,

970 war er Graf von Arles und Provence, 979 nahm er den Titel eines Markgrafen von Provence an, was ihn vor allem – gegenüber seinem älteren Bruder Graf Rotbald II. – als Oberhaupt der Familie bezeichnet. Ob damit eine tatsächliche Teilung des Landes oder eine gemeinsame Regierung verbunden war, ist unbekannt.

Er erhielt seinen Beinamen aufgrund seiner Siege über die Sarazenen, durch die er die Provence von dieser Bedrohung befreite, die seit der Errichtung ihrer Basis in Fraxinetum (La Garde-Freinet) beständig war. In der Schlacht von Tourtour 973 verjagte er mit Unterstützung der Grafen aus den Alpen, den Vizegrafen von Marseille und Fos-sur-Mer endgültig aus dem Land. Er reorganisierte das Land östlich der Rhône, das König Konrad III. von Burgund ihm zugesprochen und das er den Sarazenen weggenommen hatte. Mit königlicher Zustimmung kontrollierten er und seine Nachkommen auch den provenzalischen Fiscus. Er und der Bischof von Grenoble Isarn siedelten in der Dauphiné wieder Menschen an. Bei Fréjus wurde 970 ein Italiener namens Ugo Blavia als Graf eingesetzt. Aufgrund seiner Leistungen wird er in Rodulfus Glabers Chronik als Dux und in einem Dokument aus dem Jahr 992 als Pater patriae bezeichnet.

Er beschenkte die Abtei Cluny und zog sich gegen Ende seines Lebens in ein Kloster zurück. Er starb in Avignon und wurde in der Kirche Saint-Croix in Sarrians beerdigt. Sein Nachfolger als Markgraf wurde sein Bruder

Ehen  [Bearbeiten]Er heiratete in erster Ehe Arsenda von Comminges, 984/986 dann in zweiter Ehe – gegen den Willen des Papstes – 984/86 Adelheid (Blanche) von Anjou († 1026), Tochter von Fulko II., Graf von Anjou, die Witwe des Grafen Stephan (Étienne) von Gévaudan und geschiedene Ehefrau des Königs Ludwig V. der Faule (Louis V. le Fainéant) von Frankreich († 22. Mai 987).

Nach Wilhelms Tod heiratete Adelheid vor 1016 in vierter Ehe den Vater ihrer Schwiegertochter, Otto Wilhelm von Burgund († 21. September 1026)

Nachkommen  [Bearbeiten]Aus der ersten Ehe stammt Wilhelms Erbe:

Wilhelm III. (Guillaume III.) (992 minderjährig, † 1018 vor dem 30. Mai) Graf von Provence 994-1018; ? um 1002 Gerberga von Burgund († 1020/23) aus dem Haus Burgund-Ivrea, Tochter des Grafen Otto Wilhelm von Burgund Aus seiner zweiten Ehe stammen seine Töchter:

Konstanze (Constance) († 28. Juli 1032), ? zwischen August 1001 und 25. August 1002 Robert II. der Fromme König von Frankreich (Kapetinger), † 28. Juli 1031 Ermgard, ? Robert I. Graf von Auvergne († vor 1032) Darüber hinaus hatte er vermutlich zwei weitere Kinder:

Odilia de Nizza, wohl aus der ersten Ehe, ? I Miron Vizegraf von Sisteron aus dem Haus Barcelona; ? II um 1004 Laugier Graf von Nizza Toda, wohl aus der zweiten Ehe, ? um 992 Bernhard I. Taillefer (Bernardo I Tallaferro) Graf von Besalú und Ripoli († 1020)

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence -------------------- http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_I._%28Provence%29 -------------------- William the Liberator -------------------- William I of Provence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy. In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae. He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. [edit]Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was: William II of Provence He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was: Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence -------------------- William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

[edit] Marriage and issue He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

William II of Provence He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was:

Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France [edit] Sources Lewis, Archibald R. The Development of Southern French and Catalan Society, 718–1050. University of Texas Press: Austin, 1965. Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence"

-------------------- Ulric Manfred II or Olderico Manfredi II (or Manfredo Udalrico; 992 – 29 October 1034) was the Count of Turin and Margrave of Susa in the early eleventh century, one the most powerful Italian barons of his time.

Ulric Manfred was the son of Manfred I. Ulric Manfred inherited a vast march centred on Turin (1000), which had been created from the lands of Arduin Glaber. By a charter dated 31 July 1001, the Emperor Otto III confirmed his possessions and granted him several privileges.[1] This grant was requested by Hugonis marchionis, probably Hugh the Great, margrave of Tuscany.

Ulric Manfred, immediately upon his succession, began to consolidate his power vis-à-vis Arduin of the March of Ivrea on one hand and the Holy Roman Emperor Henry II on the other. In the fight over the regnum Italicum, he gained a great deal of territory at the expense of the Eporedian march. By the preserved notarial deeds of a priest named Sigifred (1021 and 1031), a precise catalogue of the cities under his control can be known: Turin, Ivrea, Albenga, Ventimiglia, Auriate, Tortona, and Vercelli. In all the wars between Arduin and Henry, Ulric Manfred prudently avoided any confrontation with the two leaders and gradually extended his territories by arms (he was at war with the margrave of Tuscany, Boniface III, in 1016) and by increasing his authority within his proper domains. In 1024, following the death of Henry, he opposed the election of Conrad II and instead invited William V of Aquitaine to take the Italian throne, but to no avail.[2]

Ulric Manfred, though his capital was Turin, rarely resided in that strategic, but small city. He lived an itinerant life typical for an early eleventh century feudal lord, moving from castle to castle in order to maintain his control and to effect the administration of his dominions. His daughter Adelaide abandoned Turin as a capital and the itinerant baronial lifestyl for setting up house in Susa.

Ulric Manfred restored the old church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Susa and the monastery of Novalesa. He constructed a new monastery in Susa and a Cathedral of San Giusto (1029) as well. He fortified the villages of Exilles and Bardonecchia. He died at Turin and was buried there in the cathedral of San Giovanni.

Ulric Manfred married Bertha (born 997) of the Obertenghi, daughter of Oberto II, in 1014. That year, the Emperor Henry confirmed their joint donation to the abbey of Fruttuaria. On 29 December 1037, the Emperor Conrad confirmed a donation to San Giusto expressly without her. She must therefore have died in the meanwhile. Other than his aforementioned heir, Adelaide, Ulric Manfred had two other daughters:

Irmgard (also Emilia or Immula; died 28 January 1078), married Otto III, Duke of Swabia Bertha (died after 1050), inherited Vasto and Busco, married Otto, Marquis of Liguria (a great-grandson of Aleram) and was the mother of Boniface del Vasto [edit] Sources Foundation for Medieval Genealogy: Northern Italy, 900–1100. Trillmich, Werner. Kaiser Konrad II und seine Zeit. [edit] Notes 1.^ He is referred to as Odelrico marchioni qui Mainfredus nominatur in this charter. 2.^ Trillmich, p 348. Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulric_Manfred_II_of_Turin" Categories: 992 births | 1034 deaths | Italian nobility -------------------- From Wikipedia:

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

   * William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their daughter was:

   * Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France

-------------------- Conrad the Peaceful (c. 925 – 19 October 993) was the king of Burgundy from 937 until his death. He was the son of King Rudolph II, the first king of a united Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia. Conrad is sometimes numbered Conrad I as king of Burgundy and as Conrad III of Provence, since he inherited Provence in 948.[1]

His reign was peaceful (hence his byname) and he was popular with his subjects. The only war in which he got involved was a simultaneous invasion of Saracens and Magyars in which he played them off against each other. He then routed them in combat.

Conrad's wife, Matilda He married Matilda, daughter of Louis IV of France and Gerberga of Saxony. They had at least five children:

   * Bertha (967 – 16 January 1016), married Odo I, Count of Blois, and then Robert II of France
   * Matilda (born 969), possibly married Robert, Count of Geneva
   * Rudolph (971 – 6 September 1032)
   * Gerberga (born 965), married Herman II, Duke of Swabia

He was secondly married to Adelaide of Bellay. They were parents to at least one daughter:

   * Gisela (975 – 21 July 1006), married Henry II, Duke of Bavaria

Notes

  1. ^ Morby, John E. The Wordsworth Handbook of Kings & Queens. 1989.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_III_de_Bourgogne http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_of_Burgundy http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_III._%28Burgund%29

Conrad III de Bourgogne, dit Conrad le Pacifique[1] (né aux environs de 925 et mort le 19 octobre 993) fut roi d'Arles ou de la Bourgogne Transjurane de 937 à sa mort. De descendance Welf, il était le fils de Rodolphe II de Bourgogne. Son fils, Rodolphe III de Bourgogne, lui succéda.

-------------------- Conrad of Burgundy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Conrad the Peaceful (c. 925 – 19 October 993) was the king of Burgundy from 937 until his death. He was the son of King Rudolph II, the first king of a united Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia. Conrad is sometimes numbered Conrad I as king of Burgundy and as Conrad III of Provence, since he inherited Provence in 948.[1] His reign was peaceful (hence his byname) and he was popular with his subjects. The only war in which he got involved was a simultaneous invasion of Saracens and Magyars in which he played them off against each other. He then routed them in combat. He married Matilda, daughter of Louis IV of France and Gerberga of Saxony. They had at least five children: Bertha (967 – 16 January 1016), married Odo I, Count of Blois, and then Robert II of France Matilda (born 969), possibly married Robert, Count of Geneva Rudolph (971 – 6 September 1032) Gerberga (born 965), married Herman II, Duke of Swabia He was secondly married to Adelaide of Bellay. They were parents to at least one daughter: Gisela (975 – 21 July 1006), married Henry II, Duke of Bavaria -------------------- Conrad the Peaceful (c. 925 – 19 October 993) was the king of Burgundy from 937 until his death. He was the son of King Rudolph II, the first king of a united Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia. Conrad is sometimes numbered Conrad I as king of Burgundy and as Conrad III of Provence, since he inherited Provence in 948.[1]

His reign was peaceful (hence his byname) and he was popular with his subjects. The only war in which he got involved was a simultaneous invasion of Saracens and Magyars in which he played them off against each other. He then routed them in combat.

He married Matilda, daughter of Louis IV of France and Gerberga of Saxony. They had at least five children:

Bertha (967 – 16 January 1016), married Odo I, Count of Blois, and then Robert II of France Matilda (born 969), possibly married Robert, Count of Geneva Rudolph (971 – 6 September 1032) Gerberga (born 965), married Herman II, Duke of Swabia He was secondly married to Adelaide of Bellay. They were parents to at least one daughter:

Gisela (975 – 21 July 1006), married Henry II, Duke of Bavaria -------------------- Wiklopedia: Konrad III. (Burgund) aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie Wechseln zu: Navigation, Suche Das Königreich Hochburgund im 10. Jahrhundert

Konrad III. der Friedfertige († 19. Oktober 993) war König von Burgund 937–993

Konrad war der Sohn und Thronfolger Rudolfs II.. Er war der Bruder der Heiligen Adelheid und wuchs am sächsischen Hof auf.

Gegen ihn erhob Hugo, der König von Italien, nach dem Tod Rudolfs II. 937 Ansprüche auf Burgund, da sein Sohn Lothar Konrads Schwester Adelheid versprochen worden war. Gegen diese Ansprüche wurde Konrad III. durch den sächsischen Herzog und deutschen König Otto I. geschützt.

Nach der Ermordung von Adelheids Gatten Lothar II. 950 und ihrer Gefangensetzung durch den neuen italienischen König Berengar II., der Eroberung Italiens durch den deutschen König Otto I. und dessen Heirat mit Adelheid 951 wurde ihr Bruder Konrad III. der Besitz Niederburgunds, das bereits sein Vater Rudolf II. ab 930 übernommen hatte, endgültig bestätigt.

Konrad III. war dreimal verheiratet. Seine erste Ehefrau war Adelana, die vor dem 23. März 963 verstarb. Mit ihr hatte er zwei Kinder, Kuno († nach 966) und Gisela († 21. Juli 1007), die Ehefrau des Herzogs Heinrich der Zänker von Bayern.

Seine dritte Ehefrau war seit etwa 964 Mathilde (* Ende 943, † 26/27. Januar 981/982), Tochter des westfränkischen Königs Ludwig IV..

Mit ihr hatte er vier Kinder:

   * Mathilde, die Großmutter von Gerold Graf von Genf und der Hildegard vom Egisheim-Dagsburg ∞ Friedrich von Büren, Stammeltern der Staufer
   * Bertha († 16. Januar nach 1016) ∞ I. Odo I. Graf von Blois und Chartres († 12. März 995/996) ∞ II. Anfang 997, geschieden 1003/1005, Robert II. der Fromme († 20. Juli 1031 in Melun) König von Frankreich
   * Gerberga († wohl nach 1016) ∞ I Hermann Graf von Werl 978/985, ∞ II um 988 Herzog Hermann II. von Schwaben († 4. Mai 1003) (Konradiner)
   * Rudolf III. († 5. oder 6. September 1032) 993 König von Burgund, begraben in der Kathedrale von Lausanne ∞ I vor 994 Agaltrudis († zwischen 21. März 1008 und 18. Februar 1011) ∞ II 24. April/28. Juli 1011 Ermengarde († 27. August nach 1057) Witwe des Rotbald III., Graf von Provence

Darüber hinaus hatte er aus einer Beziehung mit Aldiud, der Ehefrau Anselms, einen Sohn, Burchard (Bouchard) († 22. Juni 1030 oder 1031) 953 Propst von St. Maurice d’Agaune, 978 Erzbischof von Lyon. Mütterlicherseits ist Burchard von Lyon der Halbbruder von Anselm Bischof von Aosta, Burchard (Bouchard), Erzbischof von Vienne, und Udalrich, Vogt der Kirche von Vienne.

Während Konrads Herrschaft litt das Reich unter den Einfällen der Ungarn und Fehden und Raubkriegen der Großmächte. Das Machtvakuum nützen auch die Sarazenen für einen Raubzug in den burgundischen Norden, wobei sie 939 das Kloster St. Maurice im unteren Wallis plünderten. Doch gelang es 975, die islamische Herrschaft in der Provence zu beenden.

Konrad III. starb 993 und wurde in Saint-André-de-Bas beerdigt. Nachfolger wurde sein Sohn Rudolf III.. Vorgänger

Rudolf II. König von Burgund 937–993 Nachfolger

Rudolf III. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conrad_of_Burgundy

Conrad of Burgundy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Conrad the Peaceful (c. 925 – 19 October 993) was the king of Burgundy from 937 until his death. He was the son of King Rudolph II, the first king of a united Burgundy and Bertha of Swabia. Conrad is sometimes numbered Conrad I as king of Burgundy and as Conrad III of Provence, since he inherited Provence in 948.[1]

His reign was peaceful (hence his byname) and he was popular with his subjects. The only war in which he got involved was a simultaneous invasion of Saracens and Magyars in which he played them off against each other. He then routed them in combat. Conrad's wife, Matilda

He married Matilda, daughter of Louis IV of France and Gerberga of Saxony. They had at least five children:

   * Bertha (967 – 16 January 1016), married Odo I, Count of Blois, and then Robert II of France
   * Matilda (born 969), possibly married Robert, Count of Geneva
   * Rudolph (971 – 6 September 1032)
   * Gerberga (born 965), married Herman II, Duke of Swabia

He was secondly married to Adelaide of Bellay. They were parents to at least one daughter:

   * Gisela (975 – 21 July 1006), married Henry II, Duke of Bavaria

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ Morby, John E. The Wordsworth Handbook of Kings & Queens. 1989.

Regnal titles Preceded by Rudolph II King of Burgundy 937–993 Succeeded by Rudolph III

This page was last modified on 12 May 2010 at 16:43. -------------------- Conrad the Peaceful -------------------- William (Guillaume) I is sometimes erroneously shown in some records as William II and William III Alternative Date of Death: 1037 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. [edit] Marriage and issue

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

   * William II of Provence

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their daughter was:

   * Constance of Arles (973–1034), married Robert II of France

-------------------- Provence is bordered on the east by Italy, on the south by the Mediterranean Sea, & on the west by the Rone River. -------------------- William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With the Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated the Dauphiny and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:

William II of Provence He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga of Maine, and their daughter was:

Constance of Arles (973 - 1034), married Robert II of France -------------------- Occupation: Count of Toulouse -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Provence

William I (c. 950 – 993, after 29 August), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II, sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine, both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. -------------------- William I (or II) (c. 950 – after 29 August 993), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II were sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine. They both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy. In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae. He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors. Marriage and issue: He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges[1] and their son was:

William II (or III) of Provence. 

He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide-Blanche of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their daughter was:

Constance of Arles (986–1034), married Robert II of France
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Guillaume II le Liberateur, comte de Provence's Timeline