Guillaume 'Tête d'étoupe' d'Aquitaine, III Duc d'Aquitaine, I Comte de Poitou

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Guillaume 'Tête d'étoupe' d'Aquitaine, III Duc d'Aquitaine, I Comte de Poitou

Nicknames: "William 'Towhead'", "Guillaume III", "Guillermo", "Wilhelm Stryhode", "William I", "Tête D'Etoupes", "Duke D'aquitaine", "Towhead of /Poitou/", "Guillame", "Guillaume //", "Towhead (French: Tête /d'étoupe)/", "Towhead", "William III "Towhead" Count of Poitiers and Auvergne......"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
Place of Burial: Poitou-Charentes, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Ebles II Manzer, duc d'Aquitaine and Émilienne de Poitou, NOT Ealgyth
Husband of Adele de Poitou; Maud de Gamaches and Adelene of Normandy
Father of Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou and Adélaïde d'Aquitaine, reine des Francs

Occupation: Comte de Poitou (934-962), Comte d'Auvergne et de Limoges (955-962), Duc d'Aquitaine (962), DEscent also through his son, William IV, Duke of Aquitaine. Died 990., Count of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine, (dit souvant à tort, Duc d'Aquitaine, Greve Av poitier
Managed by: Sally Gene Cole
Last Updated:

About Guillaume 'Tête d'étoupe' d'Aquitaine, III Duc d'Aquitaine, I Comte de Poitou

Guillaume (William) III (915–3 April 963) was called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair.

Son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne.

Married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William/Guillaume Fier-à-Bras, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

He was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950.

The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#GuillaumeIPoitoudied963

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_III_de_Poitiers

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He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

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Guillaume III de Poitiers, dit Guillaume Tête d'Étoupe, (né en 910 - mort le 3 avril 963 à Saint-Maixent, Deux-Sèvres), comte de Poitiers sous le nom de Guillaume Ier à partir de 934, et duc d'Aquitaine sous celui de Guillaume III. Il succède à son père Ebles Manzer. On le surnomme également le Pieux.

Jamais reconnu duc d'Aquitaine par la chancellerie royale, il porta à partir de 959 le titre de comte du duché d'Aquitaine, puis celui de duc d'Aquitaine après 962. Fidèle à Louis d'Outremer, il obtient la charge d'abbé de Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, charge qui resta attachée à celle de comte de Poitiers par la suite.

Il fit don du pays d'Herbauges et de celui de Tiffauges à Alain Barbetorte, duc de Bretagne en échange d'une aide armée.

Il épouse Adèle, fille de Rollon, duc de Normandie. Il en a deux enfants :

   * le duc Guillaume IV Bras-de-Fer (935 - 993)
   * la princesse Adélaïde d'Aquitaine (952-1004) épouse du roi de France Hugues Capet.

Il crée une librairie (bibliothèque) ducale dans son palais de Poitiers.

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GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of EBALUS "Mancer" Comte de Poitou & his [second wife Emillane ---] ([900]-Poitiers 3 Apr 963, bur Saint-Cyprien).

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmus…cognomento Caput stupe" as one of the two sons of "Eblo duce", specifying that he was "Arvernis, Vallatis, Lemovice et Pictavis comes…dux Aquitaniæ"[282].

The Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ names "Willelmum Caput-stupæ" as son of "Ebles Dux Aquitaniæ et Pictaviæ Comes" & his wife Adellia[283].

Ademar names "Willelmum Caputstupæ" as son of Eble and "Adelam, filiam Rosi Rotomagensis", but evidently confuses the latter with Guillaume's own wife[284].

He succeeded his father in 934 as GUILLAUME I “Tête d'Etoupes/Caput-stupæ” Comte de Poitou. He was appointed lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers in Jan 942[285]. From the start of his reign, his possession of Poitou was disputed by Hugues "le Grand" Duc des Francs [Capet][286]. "Guillelmus comes vel abba summi pontificis domni nostri Hylarii" donated property "in pago Pictavo in viccaria Pictavis" to the church of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jun 941 or 942[287]. Louis IV King of France confirmed the property of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, in the presence of "Guillelmus comes et marchio et frater eius Ebolus atque Rotgarius comes", by charter dated 5 Jan 942[288]. Comte d'Auvergne et de Limoges 955. Around this same time, Lothaire King of France extended the authority of Comte Guillaume over the whole of Aquitaine.

Although known to history as GUILLAUME III Duke of Aquitaine, charters record him as "Guillelmus…Aquitanici ducatus comes"[289] and "Guillelmus…Pictavensium sive Lemovicensium necne et Arvernensium comes insuper etiam Aquitainiæ comes palati"[290] as well as "Willelmi duci Aquitanorum cognomento Caput-Stupæ"[291]. He abdicated in 962, and became a monk at Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers[292].

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Willelmo Capite stupæ" was buried "apud ecclesiam Sancti Cypriani"[293].

m (935) ADELA [Gerloc] de Normandie, daughter of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Popa [de Bayeux] (-after 969). Guillaume de Jumièges names "Guillaume et…Gerloc" as children of Rollo and Poppa, in a later passage recording her marriage to "Guillaume comte de Poitou"[294].

Robert of Torigny also names "Willermum Longum Spatam et Gerloch" as children of "Rollo dux Northmannorum" and Poppa[295]. The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "filius Ranulfi Eblus" and "Adelam filiam Rosi Rotomagensis"[296].

The Chronico Richardi Pictavensis also records that "Heblus…Pictavorum Comes et Dux Aquitaniæ duxit Adelam filiam Rolli Rothomagensis"[297]. This information is contradicted by other sources, is difficult to sustain from a chronological point of view, and is presumably in error. She adopted the name ADELA when baptised. "Guillelmi comitis, Adeleidis comitisse" subscribed a charter recording a donation to Cluny dated [963][298]. On 14 Oct 962, Lothaire King of France granted her the right to dispose of extensive property in Poitiers, la Cour de Faye, effectively putting an end to the long dispute between her husband and the family of Hugues "Capet". She used the property to found the Monastery of Sainte-Trinité[299]. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…matre mea Addela…" by charter dated [971][300].

Duke Guillaume III & his wife had two children:

1. GUILLAUME de Poitou ([937]-Saint-Maixent [end 995/early 996], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent[301]). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ" when recording that he succeeded his father[302]. "Ebulus…Lemovicensium sedis episcopus" donated property including "alodum…meum Baidon" to Saint-Maixent "pro remedio animæ…fratris mei Guillelmi, sive pro consolatione nepotism mei equivoci Guillelmi Aquitanorum ducis" by charter dated Jan [965/66][303]. He succeeded his father in 963 as GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou, lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers. "Guilelmus…Aquitanensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "clericus…Rodgarius" by charter dated Mar 967[304]. "Wilelmus…Aquitaniensium dux et cœnobii…Hylarii abbas" donated property to "Mainardo", at the request of "patruus noster domnus Ebolus, sancte Lemovicensis sedis episcopus atque…beati Hylarii archiclavus", by charter dated Jan 969, subscribed by "Adraldo vicecomes, Arbertus vicecomes, Kadeloni vicecomes…"[305]. At first a powerful duke, he led a dissolute life after the departure of his wife, became increasingly ill and fell under the influence of Madelme, an Italian doctor, whom he rewarded with a vast estate near Fontenay[306]. Duke Guillaume became increasingly religious following the return of his wife in 988, and under her influence the couple made donations to numerous religious establishments. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[307]. It appears that a reaction to these religious excesses set in, and the duke's wife left him once more together with their older son in 991[308]. Duke Guillaume abdicated in Jan 993 in favour of his son, and retired to the Abbey of Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers, later transferring to the Abbey of Saint-Maixent where he became a monk on his deathbed[309].

m ([968]) EMMA de Blois, daughter of THIBAUT I "le Tricheur" Comte de Blois & his wife Luitgard de Vermandois ([953]-1 Aug, 1004 or after). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records the marriage of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[310]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maxence names "filiam Tetbaudi Campanensis…Emmam sive Emelinam" as the wife of "Willelmu duce…Caput Stupæ…filium eius Willelmum"[311]. She inherited property near Vernon in eastern Normandy from her mother which she gave to the Abbey of Bourgueil in Aquitaine[312]. Her dowry in 968 was Chinon. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…uxore mea Emma…" by charter dated [971][313]. She fled Poitou between 976 and 988 because of the adulterous behaviour of her husband[314]. "Ledgardis" donated property to "Sancti Petri Carnotensis ecclesiam", for the souls of "senioris mei…comitis Tedbaldi…patris mei Heirberti, Trecassini comitis", with the consent of "archipresule…Hugone et…comite Odone, filiis meis", by charter dated 5 Feb 978, signed by "…Emma comitissa Pictavæ urbis…"[315]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[316]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[317]. "Emme matris eius" subscribed the donation by "Willelmus dux Aquitanorum" of property to St Cyprien, Poitiers by charter dated [990/1004][318]. She confirmed her son's 27 Dec 1003 donation of Bretignolle to the Abbey of Bourgueil, but according to Richard she was still alive when her first grandson was born in 1004[319].

A necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "Kal Aug" of "Emma comitissa, Burgulii"[320]. Mistress (1): --- de Thouars, daughter of ---[321]. The primary source which confirms her parentage and relationship with Duke Guillaume IV has not yet been identified.

Duke Guillaume IV & his wife had two children:

a) GUILLAUME d'Aquitaine ([969]-Maillezais 31 Jan 1030, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and his wife "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[322]. He succeeded his father in 993 as GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou.

b) EBLES d'Aquitaine (-after 997). He is named only in an act dated to the early part of the reign of Robert II King of France[323].

2. [ADELAIS de Poitou ([950/55]-[1004]). There is uncertainty about this origin of Adelais, wife of Hugues Capet, which is stated directly only in the 11th century Translation de Saint-Magloire[324]. This Poitevin origin is also suggested by Richer who records that King Robert "ob nepotem suum Wilelmum" besieged "in Aquitania…Hildebertum"[325]. It is assumed that such a relationship between King Robert and Duke Guillaume would be through the king's mother as no family connection through his father has been established.

The Chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes, on the other hand, recounts the dispute between "Dux Aquitanorum Willelmus" and King Hugues, as well as the subsequent peace agreed between the parties in 990, without mentioning that the duke was the king's brother-in-law[326], all the more surprising if the Poitevin origin is correct as Ademar concentrates on Poitevin affairs and also includes genealogical details in his narrative. Helgaud's Vita Roberti Regis names "Rex Francorum Rotbertus…patre Hugone, matre Adhelaide", specifying that "ab Ausonis partibus descenderat"[327]. Settipani equates "Ausonia" with Rome or Italy[328], although no other reference to an Italian origin for Adelais has yet been identified.

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines refers to the mother of "rex Francorum Robertus" as "superiorem regum Anglie soror"[329] but it is difficult to see to whom this could refer or how it could be correct. The paucity of references in contemporary sources to the wife of Hugues Capet and her origin contrasts sharply with the frequent references to his mother and to the wives of his son King Robert I. This suggests that the background of Queen Adelais may have been obscure and that her family had little political influence at the time, although this would be surprising as her husband was already enjoying a position of some power at the Carolingian court at the time of his marriage. Maybe her family was prominent when the couple married but suffered a subsequent decline by the time her husband was elected king. Nevertheless, an Aquitainian marriage would have fitted the political circumstances of the time. After several decades of dispute between the Capet and Poitou families, a permanent peace appears to have been established from about the time the marriage took place[330]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVII Kal Jul" of "Adelaidis regina"[331].

m ([968]) HUGUES Duc des Francs, son of HUGUES “le Grand” Duc des Francs & his third wife Hedwig of Saxony [Germany] ([940]-Les Juifs, near Prasville, Eure-et-Loire 24 Oct 996, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis). He was elected HUGUES "Capet" King of France by an assembly of nobles at Senlis 29 May 987.]

from Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

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Guillaume III, Duc d'Aquitaine (1)

M, #106618, b. circa 915, d. 3 April 963

Last Edited=13 Jul 2005

    Guillaume III, Duc d'Aquitaine was born circa 915. He is the son of Ebalus, Duc d'Aquitaine. (1) He married Adele de Normandie, daughter of Rollo Ragnvaldsson, 1st Duc de Normandie and Poppa of Normandy de Valois, in 935. (2) 

He died on 3 April 963.

    Guillaume III, Duc d'Aquitaine also went by the nick-name of William 'Towhead'. (3) He was a member of the House of Poitiers. (1) He succeeded to the title of Duc d'Aquitaine in 934. He gained the title of Comte de Poitou. (2)

Children of Guillaume III, Duc d'Aquitaine and Adele de Normandie

-1. Guillaume IV, Duc d'Aquitaine+ b. c 937, d. bt 995 - 996 (2)

-2. Adelaide de Poitou+ b. c 945, d. bt 1004 - 1005 (3)

Forrás / Source:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10662.htm#i106618

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William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

From www.wikipedia.org at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

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William III, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

Ebalus Duke of Aquitaine

935 – 963 Succeeded by

William IV

Count of Poitiers

935 – 963

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WILLIAM III OF AQUITAINE

From Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue:

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son

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Aquitaine, the région encompassing the départements of Dordogne, Gironde, Landes, Lot-et-Garonne, and Pyrénées-Atlantiques in southwestern France. The name Aquitaine is probably a form of Auscetani, which in turn is a lengthened form of Ausces and is thus cognate with the words Basque and Wasconia (Gascony). The capital is Bordeaux. In Julius Caesar's description of Gaul, 'Aquitania' was an area extending from the Pyrenees to the Garonne River. The Roman emperor Augustus(reigned 27 BC-AD 14) made it a Roman administrative district, and its borders were extended as far north as the Loire River and east to the Massif Central. A Visigothic province in the 5th century, Aquitaine came under Frankish rule in the 6th century, retaining a measure of provincial identity exploited by local rulers. Long resistant in the 8th century, it was finally subdued by Charlemagne, who bestowed it (less Gascony) as a kingdom upon his son Louis (the future emperor Louis I). It remained a kingdom under Louis's son Pepin I and the latter's son Pepin II, its chief towns being Toulouse, Limoges, and Poitiers. Devastation by the Normans in the 9th century resulted in political and social upheavals during the course of which various feudal domains were established. A little before 845, the title Duke of Aquitaine, was revived, and in 893 King Charles III ordered that Count Rainulf II, who then held Aquitaine,should be poisoned, after which the King bestowed the duchy upon William the Pious, Count of Auvergne, founder of the Abbey of Cluny. He was succeeded by his nephew, Count William II, in 918, and there followed along line of dukes. In the first half of the 10th century the counts of Auvergne, of Toulouse, and of Poitiers each claimed this ducal title, but it was eventually secured by William I, count of Poitiers (William III of Aquitaine). The powerful house of the counts of Poitiers retained Aquitaine during the 10th and 11th centuries. William IV fought against Hugh Capet, King of France; William VI added Cascony; and William IX became famous as a crusader and troubadour. Then, on the death without heirs of the last duke, William X (William VIII of Poitiers), in 1137,his daughter Eleanor united Aquitaine to the kingdom of France by her marriage with Louis VII. When Louis divorced her, however, Eleanor of Aquitaine married in 1152 the count of Anjou, Henry Plantagenet, who two years later became king of England as Henry II. The duchy thus passed toher new husband, who, having suppressed a revolt there, gave it to his son, Richard the Lion-Heart (later Richard I of England), who spent most of his life in Aquitaine, often subduing rebellious vassals. When Richard died in 1199, the duchy reverted to Eleanor, and, on her death five years later, it was united to the English crown and henceforward followed the fortunes of the English possessions in France. Aquitaine, as it came to the English kings, stretched as of old from the Loire to the Pyrenees, but its extent was curtailed on the southeast bythe wide lands of the counts of Toulouse. The name Guyenne (or Guienne), a corruption of Aquitaine, seems to have come into use about the 10thcentury, and the subsequent history of Aquitaine is merged in that of Gascony and Guyenne, which were completely reunited to France by the end of the Hundred Years' War.

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue:

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son

--------------------

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

--------------------

William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.

[edit] Family

He was married at least 3 times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

1.William, his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

1.Odo, later duke also

2.Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac

3.Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

1.Peter William, later duke as William VII

2.Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII

3.Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor

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William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

--------------------

William III, Duke of Aquitaine

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Antony Gray was named duke of Aquitaine, however he was a much better ruler then his father. many people say Williams best decision was for Antony to come to power. he did things like free the slaves, abolish racism, the autocracy did not rule, the middle and working classes became much more powerful. he was nicknamed 'the player' for his fantastic display in chess and how he delt with women. it is believed he had sex with over 900 women.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

William III of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

[edit] See also

Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Preceded by

Ebalus Duke of Aquitaine

935 – 963 Succeeded by

William IV

Count of Poitiers

935 – 963

--------------------

William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

--------------------

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

From Wikipedia:

William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. 

He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Aquitaine:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Adelaisdied1004

GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of EBALUS "Mancer" Comte de Poitou & his [second wife Emillane ---] ([900]-Poitiers 3 Apr 963, bur Saint-Cyprien).

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmus…cognomento Caput stupe" as one of the two sons of "Eblo duce", specifying that he was "Arvernis, Vallatis, Lemovice et Pictavis comes…dux Aquitaniæ"[306]. The Chronico Comitum Pictaviæ names "Willelmum Caput-stupæ" as son of "Ebles Dux Aquitaniæ et Pictaviæ Comes" & his wife Adellia[307]. Ademar names "Willelmum Caputstupæ" as son of Eble and "Adelam, filiam Rosi Rotomagensis", but evidently confuses the latter with Guillaume's own wife[308].

He succeeded his father in 934 as GUILLAUME I “Tête d'Etoupes/Caput-stupæ” Comte de Poitou.

He was appointed lay abbot of Saint-Hilaire-de-Poitiers in Jan 942[309].

From the start of his reign, his possession of Poitou was disputed by Hugues "le Grand" Duc des Francs [Capet][310].

"Guillelmus comes vel abba summi pontificis domni nostri Hylarii" donated property "in pago Pictavo in viccaria Pictavis" to the church of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jun 941 or 942[311]. Louis IV King of France confirmed the property of Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers, in the presence of "Guillelmus comes et marchio et frater eius Ebolus atque Rotgarius comes", by charter dated 5 Jan 942[312].

Comte d'Auvergne et de Limoges 955. Around this same time, Lothaire King of France extended the authority of Comte Guillaume over the whole of Aquitaine.

Although known to history as GUILLAUME III Duke of Aquitaine, charters record him as "Guillelmus…Aquitanici ducatus comes"[313] and "Guillelmus…Pictavensium sive Lemovicensium necne et Arvernensium comes insuper etiam Aquitainiæ comes palati"[314] as well as "Willelmi duci Aquitanorum cognomento Caput-Stupæ"[315].

He abdicated in 962, and became a monk at Saint-Cyprien de Poitiers[316].

The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Willelmo Capite stupæ" was buried "apud ecclesiam Sancti Cypriani"[317].

m (935) ADELA [Gerloc] de Normandie, daughter of ROBERT I [Rollo] Comte [de Normandie] & his [second] wife Popa [de Bayeux] (-after 969).

Duke Guillaume III & his wife had two children:

1. GUILLAUME de Poitou ([937]-Saint-Maixent [end 995/early 996], bur Abbaye de Saint-Maixent[325], succeeded as Guillaume IV "Fier-a-Braz" Duke of Aquitaine, Guillaume II Comte de Poitou, m. Emma de Blois in 968)

2. ADELAIS de Poitou ([950/55]-[1004], parentage not completely certain, m. Hugues des Francs, first King of France, OUR ANCESTOR - presumably.)

From the Wikipedia page on William III, Duke of Aquitaine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

William III (915 – 3 April 963, French Wikipedia says 910), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950.

The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death (French Wikipedia says that it was never recognized - he was the Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine in 959 and then considered Duke of Aquitaine after 962).

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV d'Outremer (with whom he was loyal). He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated.

In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them.

King Lothair, Louis d'Outremer's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers. (French Wikipedia also says that he donated the Country of the Herbauges and Tiffauges to Alain Barbetorte, Duc de Bretagne, in return for his military support.)

Family background, marriage and issue

His father was duke Ebles Manzer, who already was a man in his middle years when he was born in about 913. According to the chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes, his mother was daughter of Rollo of Normandy. On the other hand, the less reliable Dodo has William III himself to marry in about 936 a daughter of Rollo. The lady (more likely his mother) was Geirlaug, in gallic usage Gerloc.

William III married a lady named or renamed Adele, perhaps about 936, which might have been a match arranged by William I of Normandy for him.

With his wife Adeleid, they had at least one child whose filiation is clearly attested:

1. William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

Many genealogies accept the high likelihood that their daughter was:

1. Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

But her parentage is not reliably testimonied in documentation of their epoch, instead it is regarded only as a good possibility by usual modern genealogical literature.

--------------------

William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

William III, Duke of Aquitaine

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William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

Ebalus Duke of Aquitaine

935 – 963 Succeeded by

William IV

Count of Poitiers

935 – 963

[hide]

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Counts of Poitiers

Guerin · Hatton · Renaud · Bernard I · Emenon · Ranulph I · Ranulph II · Gauzbert · Robert I · Ebalus · Aymar · Ebalus · William I · William II · William III · William IV · Eudes · William V · William VI · William VII · William VIII · Eleanor · Louis* · Henry* · William IX · Otto · Richard · Alphonse · Philip · John I · John II · John III · Charles · François · Deylan

Count of Poitiers Arms.svg

  • Count through marriage

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_III._%28Aquitanien%29

Wilhelm III. (Aquitanien)

aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie

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Wilhelm Werghaupt von Aquitanien (lateinisch: Caput stupe, französisch: Tête d'Etoupe; * um 900 oder 915; † 3. April 963) war ein Graf von Poitou (als Wilhelm I.) und Herzog von Aquitanien (als Wilhelm III.) aus der Familie der Ramnulfiden.

Leben [Bearbeiten]

Wilhelm war der älteste Sohn von Ebalus Mancer, dem er nach dessen Tod 934 im Poitou nachfolgte. Wilhelm war ein Feind der Robertiner, dessen Oberhaupt Hugo Magnus sich 936 Poitiers bemächtigte. Unter Ausnutzung des Konfliktes Hugos mit König Ludwig IV. dem Überseeischen konnte Wilhelm die Stadt 938 zurückerobern. 942 wurde er vom König zum Laienabt der Abtei von St. Hilaire ernannt, die seither im Besitz der Familie blieb.

Seinen vorrangigsten Kampf führte Wilhelm gegen den Grafen Raimund Pons von Toulouse, der ihm die Herrschaft über die Auvergne streitig machte. Nach dem Tod König Ludwigs IV. (954) huldigte ihm aber die Noblesse der Auvergne, 955 erlangte er die Herrschaft über die Grafschaft Limoges. Seine Position als Herzog von Aquitanien war jedoch umstritten: Einerseits durch die Grafen von Toulouse, die 935 das Herzogtum von König Rudolf verliehen bekamen, und vor allem durch Hugo Magnus, der seinen dominierenden Einfluss auf König Lothar geltend machte und sich von diesem mit dem aquitanischen Herzogtum belehnen ließ. 955 zog Hugo Magnus mit einem königlichen Heer vor Poitiers und schlug Wilhelm in einer Feldschlacht. Poitiers konnte aber erfolgreich verteidigt werden. 956 starb Hugo Magnus und obwohl dessen Sohn Hugo Capet die Politik des Vaters aufnahm, sollte die Herrschaft Wilhelms in Aquitanien nicht mehr gefährdet werden. Erst jetzt war er unbestrittener „Herzog der Aquitanier“.

Kurz vor seinem Tod wurde Wilhelm Mönch in der Abei von Saint-Cyprien, wo er auch bestattet wurde.

Wilhelm war seit 935 mit Gerloc-Adele († nach 969) verheiratet, einer Tochter des normannischen Grafen Rollo. Sie hatten zwei Kinder:

   * Wilhelm Eisenarm (* um 937; † 995/996), Graf von Poitou (Wilhelm II.) und Herzog von Aquitanien (Wilhelm IV.)
   * Adelheid (Aelis) (* wohl 950; † 15. Juni 1006)
         o ∞ im Sommer 968 mit Hugo Capet, Herzog von Franzien und ab 987 König von Frankreich

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * genealogie-mittelalter.de

Vorgänger Amt Nachfolger

Ebalus Mancer Graf von Poitou

935–963 Wilhelm Eisenarm

Herzog von Aquitanien

935–963

--------------------

William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

--------------------

William Towhead

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Towhead -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Towhead -------------------- William III (915–3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly aftered the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son. -------------------- William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

and in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_III_de_Poitiers

William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

[edit] Marriage and issue

He married Gerloc (renamed Adele), daughter of Rollo of Normandy. They had at least two children:

   * Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet
   * William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_III_of_Aquitaine

William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers. -------------------- William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges. William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death. Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed. After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair. He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers. Family background, marriage and issue: His father was duke Ebles Manzer, who already was a man in his middle years when he was born in 915. According to the chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes, his mother was daughter of Rollo of Normandy. On the other hand, the less reliable Dodo has William III himself to marry in about 936 a daughter of Rollo. The lady (more likely his mother) was Geirlaug, in gallic usage Gerloc. William III married a lady named or renamed Adèle, perhaps about 936, which might have been a match arranged by William I of Normandy for him. With his wife Adèle, he had at least one child whose filiation is clearly attested: William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son. Many genealogies accept the high likelihood that their daughter was: Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet -------------------- William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges. William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death. Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed. After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair. He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers. Family background, marriage and issue: His father was duke Ebles Manzer, who already was a man in his middle years when he was born in about 913. According to the chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes, his mother was daughter of Rollo of Normandy. On the other hand, the less reliable Dodo has William III himself to marry in about 936 a daughter of Rollo. The lady (more likely his mother) was Geirlaug, in gallic usage Gerloc. William III married a lady named or renamed Adèle, perhaps about 936, which might have been a match arranged by William I of Normandy for him. With his wife Adèle, he had at least one child whose filiation is clearly attested: William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son. Many genealogies accept the high likelihood that their daughter was: Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet -------------------- William III (915 – 3 April 963), called Towhead (French: Tête d'étoupe, Latin: Caput Stupe) from the colour of his hair, was the "Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine" from 959 and Duke of Aquitaine from 962 to his death. He was also the Count of Poitou (as William I) from 935 and Count of Auvergne from 950. The primary sources for his reign are Ademar of Chabannes, Dudo of Saint-Quentin, and William of Jumièges.

William was son of Ebalus Manzer and Emilienne. He was born in Poitiers. He claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine from his father's death, but the royal chancery did not recognise his ducal title until the year before his own death.

Shortly after the death of King Rudolph in 936, he was constrained to forfeit some land to Hugh the Great by Louis IV. He did it with grace, but his relationship with Hugh thenceforward deteriorated. In 950, Hugh was reconciled with Louis and granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine. He tried to conquer Aquitaine with Louis's assistance, but William defeated them. Lothair, Louis's successor, feared the power of William. In August 955 he joined Hugh to besiege Poitiers, which resisted successfully. William, however, gave battle and was routed.

After the death of Hugh, his son Hugh Capet was named duke of Aquitaine, but he never tried to take up his fief, as William reconciled with Lothair.

He was given the abbey of Saint-Hilaire-le-Grand, which remained in his house after his death. He also built a library in the palace of Poitiers.

Family background, marriage and issue[edit]

His father was duke Ebles Manzer, who already was a man in his middle years when he was born in about 913. According to the chronicle of Ademar de Chabannes, his mother was daughter of Rollo of Normandy. On the other hand, the less reliable Dodo has William III himself to marry in about 936 a daughter of Rollo. The lady (more likely his mother) was Geirlaug, in gallic usage Gerloc.

William III married a lady named or renamed Adèle, perhaps about 936, which might have been a match arranged by William I of Normandy for him.

With his wife Adèle, he had at least one child whose filiation is clearly attested: William, his successor in Aquitaine. He abdicated to the abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers and left the government to his son.

Many genealogies accept the high likelihood that their daughter was: Adelaide, who married Hugh Capet

But her parentage is not reliably testimonied in documentation of their epoch, instead it is regarded only as a good possibility by usual modern genealogical literature.

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Guillaume 'Tête d'étoupe' d'Aquitaine, III Duc d'Aquitaine, I Comte de Poitou's Timeline

915
April 3, 915
Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
915
Poitiers Veienna France
934
934
- October 14, 962
Age 18
Poitiers, Poitou, France
935
935
Age 19
Aquitaine, France
935
- 963
Age 19
France
940
940
Age 24
Poitiers, Vienne, Poitou-Charentes, France
950
950
Age 34
Ducjy de Aquitaine (now Aquitaine, France)
950
- 963
Age 34
France
955
955
- October 14, 962
Age 39
Auvergne and Limoges, France
962
October 14, 962
- 963
Age 47
St-Hilaire-le-Grand, France