William V, Duke of Aquitaine

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Guillaume 'le Grand' d'Aquitaine, III Comte de Poitou, V Duc d'Aquitaine

Nicknames: "le Grand", "The Great", "William V", "Aquitaine", "Poitiers", "Guillaume V", "Vilhelm", "o Grande", "Guilherme", "the Great", "The Grand", "Duke D'aquitaine", "El Grande", "The /Great/", "Le Grand", "The /Grand/", "William the /Great/", "Guillermo V de Aquitania", "V Duc d'Aquitaine et I..."
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Died in Ford Abbey (Devonshire) England
Place of Burial: Abbey of St.Cyprian, Ford Abbey (Devonshire) England, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Guillaume 'Fier-à-Bras' de Poitiers, IV Duc d'Aquitaine et II Comte de Poitou; William IV, Duke of Aquitaine de Poitou; Emma de Blois and Emmaline de Poitou
Husband of Agnes of Burgundy, Duchess of Aquitaine,Countess of Anjou; Beatrix de Pierre-Buffière; Almode (Contess of Charroux) de la Marche and Brisce (Sancha) de Gascogne
Father of Beatrix of Poitou; Guillaume VIII (Guy Geoffrey) d'Aquitaine, VIII duc d'Aquitaine et Vl comte de Poitou; Pierre Guillaume 'l'Aigret' ou 'le Hardi' d'Aquitaine, VII Duc d'Aquitaine, V Comte de Poitou; Empress Agnes of Poitou; Guillaume le Gros, VI duc d'Aquitaine et comte IV de Poitiers and 3 others
Brother of Pierre de Chabot; Ebles d'Aquitaine; Guillaume "le Chauve" de Talmond; Emma d'Aquitaine and Blanche d'Aquitaine

Occupation: Duc d'Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou, COUNT OF AQUITAINE V AND POITOU III, 'THE GREAT', Duque de Aquitania, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou, Sieur, des fiefs Chabot, Duc, d'Aquitaine, Comte, de Poitiers, de Poitou, Abbé laïc, de Saint-Hilaire, Hertig
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Guillaume 'le Grand' d'Aquitaine, III Comte de Poitou, V Duc d'Aquitaine

Guillaume le Grand, William the Great, Duc d'Aquitaine V, Comte de Poitou III.

Parents: Guillaume IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duc d'Aquitaine & Emma de Blois

Spouses:

  • Adalemode of Limoges
  1. William, his successor
  • Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca)
  1. Odo, later duke also
  2. Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
  3. Theobald, died young
  • Agnes of Burgundy
  1. Peter William, later duke as William VII
  2. Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII
  3. Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043)

LINKS

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V_of_Aquitaine

MEDIEVAL LANDS

GUILLAUME de Poitou, son of GUILLAUME IV "Fier-à-Bras" Duke of Aquitaine [GUILLAUME II Comte de Poitou] & his wife Emma de Blois ([969]-Maillezais 31 Jan 1030, bur Maillezais, Abbaye de Saint-Pierre). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Willelmum" as son of "Willelmum" (son of "Willelmo Capite stupæ") and his wife "filiam Tetbaldi Campenensis…Emmam"[332]. "Vuillelmus dux Aquitanorum" donated property to Saint-Jean d'Angély for the soul of "…filios meo Vuilelmo…" by charter dated [971][333]. "Willelmus Aquitanorum comes et dux et uxor mea Hemma et filius noster equivocus Willelmus" donated property to Saint-Maixent by charter dated Dec 992[334]. His mother retained custody of Guillaume during her separation from his father, but returned him to Poitiers in May 988[335]. "Guilelmus Aquitaniencum dux" founded a hospital near Saint-Hilaire de Poitiers by charter dated Jan 989, subscribed by "Emma comitissa, Guillelmi filium eius, Guilelmi comitis Engolismæ…"[336]. He succeeded his father in 993 as GUILLAUME V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, GUILLAUME III Comte de Poitou. He summoned a council at Poitiers in 1000 which decided that future disputes should be settled by justice not recourse to arms[337]. Duke Guillaume enjoyed close relations with Emperor Heinrich II, with whom he exchanged gifts[338]. Rebels in Italy, opposed to the election of Konrad II King of Germany in 1024, offered the throne of Italy to Duke Guillaume, who refused the offer[339]. Duke Guillaume maintained an active correspondence with leading churchmen, men of science and political leaders and established a library for which he commissioned the transcription of manuscripts[340]. He abdicated in favour of his eldest son in 1029 and became a monk at the Abbey of Maillezais[341].

m firstly ([997]) as her second husband, ADALMODE de Limoges, widow of AUDEBERT I Comte de La Marche et du Périgord, daughter of GERAUD Vicomte de Limoges & his wife Rothilde de Brosse (-after 1005). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes records that "Aldebertus frater [Helias Petragoricensi comite]" married "sorore Widonis vicecomitis"[342]. Ademar records the second marriage of "Adalmode coniuge…Aldeberti" to Duke William[343]. The Chronicle of Petrus Malleacensis records that Adalmodis was wife of Boson Comte du Périgord and daughter of "Candida", for whom Duke Guillaume promised to expand "fluvium Rhodanum Regni" in return for marrying her daughter[344], but this is not consistent with the other sources. According to the Chronicle of Maillezais, Adalmode was the daughter of Adelaide d'Anjou (presumably by her first husband Etienne de Brioude/Gévaudan), and also widow of Boson Comte du Périgord (brother of Comte Audebert I, whom he survived by several years). Thierry Stasser has shown that this is incorrect[345]. After her first husband was killed, Adalmode sought refuge in the château de Rochemeaux but was forced to surrender by Poitevin forces[346].

m secondly (1011 before 10 Mar) SANCHA [Brisca] de Gascogne, daughter of GUILLAUME SANCHE Duke of Gascony & his wife Urraca de Navarra (-before 1018). The Chronicle of Adémar de Chabannes names "Briscam" as sister of "dux Santii", when recording her marriage to "Willelmi ducis" after the death of the latter's first wife[347]. The Chronicle of Saint-Maixent names "sororem Sancii Ducis Gasconiæ, nomine Briscam" as second wife of Duke Guillaume, in a later paragraph recording the death of "Sancia conjuge Guillermi ducis"[348]. "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Willelmi filii eius, Odoni filii eius, Prisca comitisse" subscribed the charter dated to [1012/18] under which "Ugo Liziniacensis domnus" donated property to St Cyprien, Poitiers[349]. An agreement between the abbots of Jumièges and Bougeuil concerning an exchange of land in Poitou, by charter dated [13 Apr/4 Apr] 1012, is subscribed by "Richardus…filius Ricardi principi magni…Vuillelmus Pictavorum comes et uxor Prisca…"[350].

m thirdly (1019) as her first husband, AGNES de Mâcon, daughter of OTHON GUILLAUME Comte de Mâcon [Bourgogne-Comté] & his first wife Ermentrude de Roucy ([990/95]-Saintes 10 Nov 1068, bur Poitiers, Priory of Saint-Nicolas). Agnes is named as daughter of "Ermentrudis" in the Continuator of Flodoard, which specifies that she was mother of "Wido"[351]. Rodulfus Glaber states that "Willemus…Pictauensis" married one of the daughters of "Willemus, Henrici ducis priuignus, Adalberti Longobardorum ducis filius" & his wife[352]. "Agnes comitissa filia Ottonis cognomento Willelmi comitis Matiscensis, uxor…Wilelmi ducis Aquitanorum" donated property to Cluny by charter dated [1020][353]. She married secondly (1 Jan 1032, repudiated [1049/52]) Geoffroy "Martel" d'Anjou (-9 Nov 1067), who later succeeded as Geoffroy II Comte d'Anjou. The Chronico Sancti Michaelis records that "Gaufredus Martellus Andegavensis comes" married "Agnetem comitissam Pictavensem" incestuously in 1032[354]. The Chronicæ Sancti Albini records the marriage "1032 Kal Jan" of "Gaufridus comes, Agnetem comitissam incesto", indirectly indicating her origin in a later passage which records the marriage "1043 XII Nov" of "Hainricus imperator [et] filiam Agnetis comitissæ"[355]. Her origin is clarified by the Chronicæ Sancti Albini which records the marriage "1043 XII Kal Nov…apud Vesbrianim" of "Henricus imperator…filiam Willelmi comitis Pictavorum et Agnetis"[356]. Geoffroy Comte d'Anjou & his wife founded the abbey of La Trinité de Vendôme by charter dated 31 May 1040, signed by "Goffridi comitis Andegavorum, Agnetis conjugis suæ…"[357]. A powerful personality, she succeeded in defeating her stepson Duke Eudes and installing her own son as Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou. Regent of Aquitaine for her son 1039-1044. She arranged her daughter's marriage with Emperor Heinrich III in 1043 and lived at the imperial court after this time. "Goffredus…comes atque Agnes…uxor" donated property to the monks of La Trinité, Vendôme by charter dated 6 Jan 1049 subscribed by "Willelmi ducis Aquitanorum, Goffredi pueri fratris illius"[358]. "Gaufredus Andegavorum comes…uxor mea Agnes" made a donation to the priory of Saint-Nicholas de Poitiers by undated charter which also names "eius [Agnetis] filii comites…Pictavenses"[359]. A charter dated to [1060/67] recites a prior donation to Saint-Aubin d'Angers by "Hildegardis comitissa", who retained a life interest in the property which, after the death of the donor, was sold in turn to "Agneti comitissa" (recording her divorce from "comitum Gaufridum"), "comitem Gaufridum…Gaufridi nepotem" and finally "fratre eius Fulconi" who restituted it to the abbey[360]. After her separation from her second husband, in 1047 she founded the abbey of Notre-Dame de Saintes, where she became a nun in 1068[361]. "Agnes" founded the abbey of Saint-Nicolas at Poitou with the consent of "ambobus filiis Guillelmi et Gauffrido" by charter dated [1050][362]. "Aquitanorum…dux Gaufridus" confirms in his charter dated [1058/68] that "mea mater Agnes…frater meus Guillelmus" were both buried in the priory of Saint-Nicolas de Poitiers[363]. The necrology of Vendôme La Trinité records the death "IV Id Nov" of "Agnes comitissa"[364].

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WIKIPEDIA (Eng)

William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.

Family

He was married three times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

  1. William, his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

  1. Odo, later duke also
  2. Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
  3. Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

  1. Peter William, later duke as William VII
  2. Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII
  3. Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043)

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V_of_Aquitaine

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Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V_of_Aquitaine

William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from William VIII of Aquitaine)

Jump to: navigation, search

William VIII (1025 – 25 September 1086), born Guy-Geoffrey (Gui-Geoffroi), was duke of Gascony (1052-1086), and then duke of Aquitaine and count of Poitiers (as William VI) between 1058 and 1086, succeeding his brother William VII (Pierre-Guillaume).

Guy-Geoffroy was the youngest son of William V of Aquitaine by his third wife Agnes of Burgundy. He was the brother-in-law of Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor who had married his sister, Agnes de Poitou.

He became Duke of Gascony in 1052 during his older brother William VII's rule. Gascony had come to Aquitanian rule through William V's marriage to Prisca (a.k.a Brisce) of Gascony, the sister of Duke Sans VI Guilhem of Gascony.

William VIII was one of the leaders of the allied army called to help Ramiro I of Aragon in the Siege of Barbastro (1064). This expedition was the first campaign organized by the papacy, namely Pope Alexander II, against a Muslim city, and the precursor of the later Crusades movement. Aragon and its allies conquered the city, killed its inhabitants and collected an important booty.

However, Aragon lost the city again in the following years. During William VIII's rule, the alliance with the southern kingdoms of modern Spain was a political priority as shown by the marriage of all his daughters to Iberian kings.

He married three times and had at least five children. After he divorced his second wife due to infertility, he remarried to a much younger woman who was also his cousin. This marriage produced a son, but William VIII had to visit Rome in the early 1070s to persuade the pope to recognize his children from his third marriage as legitimate.

   * First wife: Garsende of Périgord, daughter of Count Aldabert II of Périgord (divorced November 1058), no children. She became a nun at Saintes.
   * Second wife: Matoeda (divorced May 1068)
  1. Agnes (1052-1078), married Alfonso VI of Castile
   * Third wife: Hildegarde of Burgundy (daughter of duke Robert I of Burgundy)
  1. Agnes (d.1097), married Peter I of Aragon
  2. William IX of Aquitaine, his heir

[edit] Sources

   * Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend.
   * Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree

Preceded by

Bernard II Count of Poitiers

1052 – 1086 Succeeded by

William IX

Preceded by

William VII Duke of Aquitaine

1058 – 1086

Count of Poitiers

1058 – 1086

[hide]

v • d • e

Counts of Poitiers

Guerin · Hatton · Renaud · Bernard I · Emenon · Ranulph I · Ranulph II · Gauzbert · Robert I · Ebalus · Aymar · Ebalus · William I · William II · William III · William IV · Eudes · William V · William VI · William VII · William VIII · Eleanor · Louis* · Henry* · William IX · Otto · Richard · Alphonse · Philip · John I · John II · John III · Charles · François · Deylan

Count of Poitiers Arms.svg

  • Count through marriage

Stub icon This biography of a French peer or noble is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_V._%28Aquitanien%29

Wilhelm V., genannt der Große (Guillaume le Grand) (* 969; † 30. Januar 1030 in der Abtei Maillezais) aus der Familie der Ramnulfiden war seit 995 Herzog von Aquitanien und (als Wilhelm III.) Graf von Poitiers. Er war der Sohn von Wilhelm IV. (II.) und seiner Ehefrau Emma von Blois.

In Deutschland ist Wilhelm V. in erster Linie als Vater der Kaiserin und Regentin Agnes von Poitou bekannt.

Er war ein kultivierter und frommer Herrscher, befreundet mit Fulcher von Chartres, der aus dem wohlhabenden aquitanischen Hof ein intellektuelles Zentrum in Südfrankreich machte, aufgrund seines Mangels an militärischen Fähigkeiten aber auch eine Reihe von Rückschlägen hinnehmen musste. So bat er König Robert II. (regierte 996–1031) um Hilfe, um seinen Vasallen, den Grafen von La Marche in den Griff zu bekommen, der gemeinsame Feldzug endete jedoch mit einem Misserfolg. Von Fulko III., Graf von Anjou wurde er geschlagen, dem er daraufhin die Gegend um Loudun und Mirebeau überlassen musste. Die Wikinger fügten ihm 1006 eine weitere Niederlage zu. Schließlich verkleinerte er sein Gebiet um Confolens, Ruffec und Chabanais, um seinen Vasallen, den Grafen von Angoulême zu belohnen.

Als die Italiener 1024/1025 nach Frankreich kamen, um einen König für ihr Land zu suchen und dabei mit dem König von Frankreich aneinander gerieten, als sie dessen Sohn Hugo ansprachen, wandten sie sich anschließend an Wilhelm, der auch nach Italien reiste, um den Vorschlag zu prüfen, dann aber wegen der unübersichtlichen politischen Lage in Italien für sich und seinen Sohn verzichtete.

Der Chronist Adémar de Chabannes schrieb einen Lobgesang auf Wilhelm, der dennoch ein der wichtigsten Quellen für seine Regierung ist.

Ehen und Nachkommen [Bearbeiten]

Wilhelm war dreimal verheiratet:

   * Agnes von Gévaudan, Witwe von Aldebert I., Graf von La Marche
  1. Wilhelm VI. (IV.) der Dicke (Guillaume le Gros), † 1038, Herzog von Aquitanien und Graf von Poitiers 1030–1038
   * Prisca (Brisque) von Gascogne, † vor 1018, Tochter von Sancho III. Wilhelm Herzog von Gascogne (Haus Gascogne)
  1. Odo (Eudes), X 1039, Herzog von Gascogne 1032–1039, Herzog von Aquitanien und Graf von Poitiers 1038–1039
  2. Adelais ∞ Géraud I. Tranacléon Graf von Armagnac, † 1020
  3. Theobald (Thibault), † jung
   * Agnes von Burgund († 10. November 1068), Tochter von Otto Wilhelm, Graf von Burgund (Haus Burgund-Ivrea); ihr zweiter Ehemann war Gottfried II., Graf von Anjou
  1. Peter Wilhelm (Pierre-Guillaume), als Wilhelm VII. (V.) der Adler (Guillaume l’Aigle) Herzog von Aquitanien und Graf von Poitiers 1039–1058
  2. Guido Gottfried (Guy-Geoffroy), als Wilhelm VIII. (VI.) Herzog von Aquitanien und Graf von Poitiers 1058–1086
  3. Agnes von Poitou (* um 1025; † 14. Dezember 1077); ∞ 1043 Heinrich III. (* 28. Oktober 1017; † 5. Oktober 1056, Herzog von Bayern, Herzog von Schwaben, König von Burgund, Mitkönig im HRR ab 1028, König ab 1039, Kaiser 1046–1056)

Weblinks [Bearbeiten]

   * genealogie-mittelalter.de

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V,_Duke_of_Aquitaine

William V, Duke of Aquitaine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.[citation needed]

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.

[edit] Family

He was married at least 3 times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

  1. William, his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

  1. Odo, later duke also
  2. Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
  3. Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

  1. Peter William, later duke as William VII
  2. Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII
  3. Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043)

[edit] Sources

   * Nouvelle Biographie Générale. Paris, 1859.
   * Owen, D. D. R. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend.
   * Weir, Alison. Eleanor of Aquitaine. 2001.

[edit] See also

   * Dukes of Aquitaine family tree
   * FMG on William the Great

Preceded by

William IV Duke of Aquitaine

1004 – 1030 Succeeded by

William VI

Count of Poitiers

1004 – 1030

[hide]

v • d • e

Counts of Poitiers

Guerin · Hatton · Renaud · Bernard I · Emenon · Ranulph I · Ranulph II · Gauzbert · Robert I · Ebalus · Aymar · Ebalus · William I · William II · William III · William IV · Eudes · William V · William VI · William VII · William VIII · Eleanor · Louis* · Henry* · William IX · Otto · Richard · Alphonse · Philip · John I · John II · John III · Charles · François · Deylan

Count of Poitiers Arms.svg

This page was last modified on 29 June 2010 at 04:44.

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http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guglielmo_V_di_Aquitania -------------------- William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded the abbey of Maillezais (1010) and Bourgueil. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute of England, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V_of_Aquitaine

And in French: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_V_de_Poitiers

William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.

[edit] Family

He was married at least 3 times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

  1. William, his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

  1. Odo, later duke also
  2. Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
  3. Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

  1. Peter William, later duke as William VII
  2. Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII
  3. Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043)

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_V_of_Aquitaine

William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma of Blois, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.


Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec[disambiguation needed], and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.


However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other religious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.


In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.


His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.


The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.


Family


He was married at least 3 times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

1.William VI, his successor

His second wife was Sancha of Gascony [1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

1.Odo, later duke also
2.Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac
3.Theobald, died young

His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

1.Peter William, later duke as William VII
2.Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII
3.Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043)

-------------------- ----- Third Generation -----

3. Duke Guillaume V (III) "The Grand" of Aquitaine - was born in 0975, lived in Poitiers, Aquitaine, France and died on 31 Jan 1030 in France . He was the son of Guillaume IV Aquitaine and Countess Emma of Champagne.

Duke Guillaume married Countess Agnaes de Bourgogne before Mar 1018. Countess Agnaes was born in 0987, lived in Bourgogne, France. She was the daughter of Count Otto Guillaume de Bourgogne and Countess Ermentrude of Rheims. She died on 10 Nov 1068 .

-------------------- William V (969 – 31 January 1030), called the Great (le Grand), was Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou (as William II or III) from 990 until his death. He was the son and successor of William IV by his wife Emma, daughter of Theobald I of Blois. He seems to have taken after his formidable mother, who ruled Aquitaine as regent until 1004. He was a friend to Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, who found in him another Maecenas, and founded a cathedral school at Poitiers. He himself was very well educated, a collector of books, and turned the prosperous court of Aquitaine into the learning centre of Southern France.

Though a cultivated prince, he was a failure in the field. He called in the aid of his suzerain Robert II of France in subduing his vassal, Boso of La Marche. Together, they yet failed. Eventually, Boso was chased from the duchy. He had to contain the Vikings who yearly threatened his coast, but in 1006, he was defeated by Viking invaders. He lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou. He had to give up Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais to compensate William II of Angoulême, but Fulbert negotiated a treaty (1020) outlining the reciprocal obligations of vassal and suzerain.

However, his court was a centre of artistic endeavour and he its surest patron. His piety and culture brought peace to his vast feudum and he tried to stem the tide of feudal warfare then destroying the unity of many European nations by supporting the current Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church. He founded Maillezais Abbey (1010) and Bourgueil Abbey. He rebuilt the cathedral and many other regligious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He travelled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim. Everywhere he was greeted with royal pomp. His court was of an international flavour, receiving ambassadors from the Emperor Henry II, Alfonso V of León, Canute the Great, and even his suzerain, Robert of France.

In 1024–1025, an embassy from Italy, sent by Ulric Manfred II of Turin, came to France seeking a king of their own, the Henry II having died. The Italians asked for Robert's son Hugh Magnus, co-king of France, but Robert refused to allow his son to go and the Italians turned to William, whose character and court impressed many. He set out for Italy to consider the proposal, but the Italian political situation convinced him to renounce the crown for him and his heirs. Most of his surviving six letters deal with the Italian proposal.

His reign ended in peace and he died on the last (or second to last) day of January 1030 at Maillezais, which he founded and where he is buried.

The principal source of his reign is the panegyric of Adhemar of Chabannes.

Family

He was married three times. His first wife was Adalemode of Limoges, widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

1. William, his successor His second wife was Sancha of Gascony[1] (or Brisa/Prisca), daughter of Duke William II Sánchez of Gascony and sister of Duke Sancho VI William. She was dead by 1018. They had two sons and a daughter:

1. Odo, later duke also 2. Adalais, married Count Guiraut I Trancaleon of Armagnac 3. Theobald, died young His third wife was Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. Her second husband was Geoffrey II of Anjou. They had two sons and a daughter also:

1. Peter William, later duke as William VII 2. Guy Geoffrey, later duke as William VIII 3. Agnes (or Ala), married Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor (1043) -------------------- William was the son and successor of William IV, Duke of Aquitaine and Emmaline of Blois, born in 969. Grandson of William III, Duke of Aquitaine his wife, Adele, Theobald I of Blois and Lutgarde of Vermandois.

William was the husband of Adalemode of Limoges, the widow of Adalbert I of La Marche. They had one son:

  • William VI, his successor

Secondly, he was the husband of Sancha of Gascony, the daughter of Duke William II Sanchez of Gascony and his wife, the sister of Sancho VI William. They had two sons and one daughter:

  • Odo, a duke
  • Adalais, wife of Count Guiraut Trancaleon of Armagnac
  • Theobald, died young

Sancha died by 1018.

Thirdly, he married Agnes of Burgundy, the daughter of Otto-William, Duke of Burgundy. They had two sons and a daughter:

  • Peter William, Duke William VII
  • Guy Geoffrey, Duke William VIII
  • Agnes, wife of Henry III, the Holy Roman Emperor

William became Duke of Aquitaine in 990, his father died in 994, and his mother remained regent of Aquitaine until 1004. She was known to be quite formidable and ruled with strength. William was well educated and a book collector, as well as a friend of Bishop Fulbert of Chartres, a prominent teacher. William made the court of Aquitaine the largest learning center in Southern France.

William was no an expert in the field, and was defeated by Boso of La Marche despite assistance from his suzerain, Robert II of France. William was also defeated by the Vikings in 1006 who attacked his coast annually, and lost the Loudunais and Mirebalais to Fulk Nerra, count of Anjou, as well as Confolens, Ruffec, and Chabanais in order to compensate William II of Angoulême.

He was successful through his patronization of the Peace and Truce of God movements initiated by Pope and Church to bring some peace to his highly feudal territories. He founded Maillezais Abbey in 1010 and Bourgueil Abbey, rebuilt the cathedral and many other religious structures in Poitiers after a fire. He traveled widely in Europe, annually visiting Rome or Spain as a pilgrim.

William was approached by the Italians to help rule Italy when their own Henry II died, and six of William's letters involving the proposals survived the decades. William died peacefully as was his realm, on the first or second of January at Maillezais, where he is buried.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Agnes of Burgundy (____ - 1068)*

Children:
 Eudes de Poitou (____ - 1039)*
 Guillaume IV de Poitou (1004 - 1038)*
 Guillaume V Pierre de Poitou (1023 - 1058)*
 Agnes of Poitou (1024 - 1077)*
 Guillaume VI de Poitou (1024 - 1086)*
view all 27

William V, Duke of Aquitaine's Timeline

969
969
Poitou-Charentes, France
990
990
Age 21
Count
990
Age 21
Count
990
Age 21
Count
993
993
- 1030
Age 24
Loire, France
997
997
Age 28
France
1000
1000
Age 31
Aquitaine, France
1004
1004
Age 35
1011
1011
Age 42
1012
1012
Age 43
Aquitaine, France