Gundred de St. Omer, Countess of Surrey (c.1063 - 1085) MP

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Nicknames: "Gundred Of /Flanders/", "Gundred", "Gundreda", "Gundrada", "the Fleming", "Gundred of England Countess of /Surrey/", "Countess of Surrey", "5th desputed daughter of King William I of England"
Birthplace: Flanders, Belgium
Death: Died in Castle Acre, Norfolk, England
Occupation: Countess of Surrey, buried in Priory, Lewes, Sussex England, probably born in Flanders, sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester, Gundred 'the Fleming', Princess of England, Title: Princess of England, Princess Gundred of England
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Gundred de St. Omer, Countess of Surrey

http://www.lewespriory.org.uk/gundrada_chapel http://sussexpast.co.uk/properties-to-discover/lewes-castle _________________________________________________________________________________ Gundred, sister of Gerbod the Fleming

Parents: unknown, NOT Matilda of Flanders, see evidence below.

Decisive negative evidence as to a relationship with William, seems to exist as a letter from Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, to king Henry I, in which Anselm refuses to condone the marriage of Gundreda's son (William de Warenne) to a daughter of the king, because they were related in the fourth generation on one side and the sixth generation on the other ["Quærit consilium celsitudo vestra quid sibi faciendum sit de hoc quia pacta est filiam suam dare Guillelmo de Vuarenne; cum ipse et filia vestra ex una parte sint cognati in quarta generatione, et ex altera in sexta." Anselm, Epistolæ, iv, 84, PL 159: 245].

Had Gundreda been a daughter of Matilda, then she would be a sister (or half-sister) of Henry, making the betrothed first-cousins, and Anslem would have had better grounds for objection.

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LINKS

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm

MEDIEVAL LANDS

Brother and sister, parents not known. As noted below, one charter suggests that Gundred´s mother was Mathilde de Flandre, wife of William I King of England, by an earlier husband who is not otherwise recorded, but this information is dubious as discussed further below:

1. GERBOD (-after 22 Feb 1071). William I King of England granted the city of Chester and large areas surrounding it to Gerbod, avoué of the abbey of St Bertin in Flanders, in early 1070, whereby he is considered to have been created Earl [of Chester]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Gerbod was "continually molested by the English and Welsh alike"[10]. He returned to Flanders where he fought and was captured at the battle of Cassel 22 Feb 1071[11].

2. GUNDRED (-Castle Acre, Norfolk 27 May 1085, bur Lewes Priory). Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis who also specifies that she was Gerbod´s sister[12]. "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes [et] Gundrada uxor mea" founded Lewes Priory as a cell of Cluny by charter dated 1080[13]. This charter also names "domine mee Matildis regine, matris uxoris mee", specifying that the Queen gave "mansionem quoque Carlentonam nomine" to Gundred. It is presumably on this basis that some secondary works claim, it appears incorrectly, that Gundred was the daughter of William I King of England. Weir asserts that the charter in question "has been proved spurious"[14], although it is not certain what other elements in the text indicate that this is likely to be the case. Assuming the charter is genuine, it is presumably possible that "matris" was intended in the context to indicate a quasi-maternal relationship, such as foster-mother or godmother. The same relationship is referred to in the charter dated to [1080/86] under which William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suæ Gundfredæ filiæ meæ”[15]. Gundred died in childbirth. m (1070) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Warenne, son of RODULF [Raoul] de Warenne & his first wife Beatrix --- (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory). He was created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088[16], although he and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne".

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Gundred, Gundreda, or Gundrada (died 27 May 1085) was probably born in Flanders, sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester. She is explicitly so called by Orderic Vitalis, as well as the chronicle of Hyde Abbey.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred

http://www.chesterwiki.com/Gherbod_the_Fleming

Gundred was NOT the daughter of William I of England/Normandy and Matilda of Flanders.

Late Lewes Priory tradition made her daughter of William the Conqueror by his spouse Matilda of Flanders (Bannerman, vol.IV, p.207-209; Burke,The Royal Families vol.1, "Descendants of William the Conqueror", p.iv-v & pedigree LXVIII; Burke,The Roll of Battle Abbey, p.106; Barlow, pages 16 and 160), but this being impossible, Stapleton argued she was daughter of Matilda, born prior to her marriage to William. Waters and Freeman showed that this too could not be supported (Waters, Freeman). See Chandler for an extensive discussion.

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. 20 June 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.[2] [3]

The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

   * William II de Warenne (d. 11 May 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.[5] [6]
   * Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.[7]
   * Edith de Warenne, married, firstly, Gerard, Baron de Gournay.[8]

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

In the course of the centuries which followed both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), whose father John was Clerk of the Kitchen to King Henry VII, and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, the nearest place to its original site, and placed inside and at the south-west corner of the church, where, until 1847, it could be seen on the floor between pews with a very fine inscription detailing its origins etc.

In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the South Coast Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered, and deposited temporarily, for the next two years, beneath Gundred's tombstone. In 1847 a Norman Chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both cysts were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New cysts were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. Gundred's remains in a good state of preservation although the Earl's has lost some lead. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black marble.[4]

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There is some evidence that Gerbod the Fleming had a sister Gundred. The relationship is said to be evidenced by both Orderic Vitalis ("... et Guillelmo de Guarenna qui Gundredam sororem Gherbodi coniugem habebat ..." OV Book iv (2: 264)) and by the chronicle of Hyde abbey ("Quo tempore comes Cistrensis decessit Gerbodo, frater Gundradæ comitissæ, Flandriamque veniens, inimicorum præventus insidiis miserabiliter periit." (Chron. Monast. Hyde, 296)). However there is much dispute as to who the sister married and whether, if at all, Gherbod was related to William I. Decisive negative evidence as to a relationship with William, seems to exist as a letter from Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, to king Henry I, in which Anselm refuses to condone the marriage of Gundreda's son (William de Warenne) to a daughter of the king, because they were related in the fourth generation on one side and the sixth generation on the other ["Quærit consilium celsitudo vestra quid sibi faciendum sit de hoc quia pacta est filiam suam dare Guillelmo de Vuarenne; cum ipse et filia vestra ex una parte sint cognati in quarta generatione, et ex altera in sexta." Anselm, Epistolæ, iv, 84, PL 159: 245].

Had Gundreda been a daughter of Matilda, then she would be a sister (or half-sister) of Henry, making the betrothed first-cousins, and Anslem would have had better grounds for objection.

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Gundred, Gundreda, or Gundrada (died 27 May 1085) was probably born in Flanders , sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.[1]

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. 20 June 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.[2] [3]

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

   * William II de Warenne (d. 11 May 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.[5] [6]
   * Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.[7]
   * Edith de Warenne, married, firstly, Gerard, Baron de Gournay.

References

   * Bannerman, W.Bruce, FSA., editor, Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, 4th series, London, 1912
   * Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1012 - 1216, London, 1955
   * Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey, London, 1848
   * Burke, John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England Scotland and Wales, with Their Descendants etc., vol. 1 (1848), vol. 2 (1851), London
   * Chandler, Victoria, "Gundrada de Warenne and the Victorian Gentleman-Scholars", Southern History 12 (1990):68-81
   * Dunbar, Sir Archibald, Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899
   * Freeman, Edward A., "The parentage of Gundrada, wife of William of Warren", English Historical Review 3 (1888):680-701
   * Stapleton, Thomas, "Observations in disproof of the pretended marriage of William de Warren, Earl of Surrey, with a daughter begotten of Matildis, daughter of Baldwin, Comte of Flanders, by William the Conqueror, and illustrative of the origin and early history of the family in Normandy", The Archaeological Journal 3 (1846):1-26
   * Waters, Edmond Chester, "Gundreda de Warrenne", The Archaeological Journal 41 (1884):300-312

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Gundrada of NORMANDY

   * Father: William The CONQUEROR
   * Mother: Matilda Queen of ENGLAND
   * Birth: 1055, Normandy, France
   * Death: 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, Norfolk, England
   * Burial: Gundrada Chapel, Lewes, England
   * Partnership with: William DE WARENNE
         o Child: Edith DE WARENNE Birth: 1075, Surrey, England
         o Child: William II DE WARENNE Birth: 1078, Surrey, England
         o Child: Reginald DE WARENNE Birth: 1085

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   * BURIAL: Chapter-house, Priory Of Lewes, Sussex, England
   * BIRTH: 1053, France Or Flanders
   * DEATH: 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, England 

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred

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Gundred (c. 1063 – 1085), wife of William de Warenne (c. 1055 – 1088), was formerly thought of as being yet another of Matilda's daughters, with speculation that she was William I's full daughter, a stepdaughter, or even a foundling or adopted daughter. However, this connection to William I has now been firmly debunked.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Flanders

Gundred, Gundreda, or Gundrada (died 27 May 1085) was probably born in Flanders , sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.[1]

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. 20 June 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.[2][3]

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred

--------------------

http://thepeerage.com/p448.htm#i4478

Gundreda (?)

F, #4478, d. 27 May 1085

Last Edited=7 Dec 2005

    Gundreda (?) married William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, son of Rudolph de Warenne and Beatrice (?).1 She died on 27 May 1085.

Child of Gundreda (?) and William I de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey

William II de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey+2 d. c 11 May 1138

Citations

[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 494. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 496.

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http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/de-warenne.htm

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http://www.todmar.net/ancestry/warren_main.htm

William de Warren, son of William was born abt. 1055 in Bellencombe, Seine Inferieure, France. He married Gundred, 4th daughter of William, the Conqueror, and his wife Matilda of Flanders. (It has been said that Gundred was not the daughter of William, the Conqueror, but that she was the daughter of Matilda of Flanders by, perhaps, a previous marriage. The Invincible Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 5, p. 26, says that the inseription on Gundred's tombstone describes her as wife of William de Warren and daughter of Wm., the Conqueror. Also in Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerage, pp. 154, 568 and 588, she is called daughter by Wm., the Conqueror, in a charter signed by Wm., William de Warren and Henry I, son of William, the Conqueror. Thus proving this much discussed question. E. E. W.) For the important part that William de Warren took in the Conquest of England he received 300 lordships in the counties of Salop, Essex, Suffolk, Oxford, Hants, Cambridge, Bucks, Norfolk, Lincoln and York.

Gundred

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gundred, Countess of Surrey (died May 27, 1085) was probably born in Flanders, sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.[1]

It has been said that Gundred was not the daughter of William I of England, the Conqueror, but that she was the daughter of Matilda of Flanders by, perhaps, a previous marriage. The Invincible Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 5, p. 26, says that the inseription on Gundred's tombstone describes her as wife of William de Warren and daughter of Wm., the Conqueror. Also in Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerage, pp. 154, 568 and 588, she is called daughter by Wm., the Conqueror, in a charter signed by Wm., William de Warren and Henry I, son of William, the Conqueror. Thus proving this much discussed question. [2]

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. June 20, 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.[3] [4]

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

In the course of the centuries which followed both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), whose father John was Clerk of the Kitchen to King Henry VII, and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, the nearest place to its original site, and placed inside and at the south-west corner of the church, where, until 1847, it could be seen on the floor between pews with a very fine inscription detailing its origins etc.

In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the South Coast Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered, and deposited temporarily, for the next two years, beneath Gundred's tombstone. In 1847 a Norman Chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both cysts were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New cysts were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. Gundred's remains in a good state of preservation although the Earl's has lost some lead. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black marble.[5]

The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

William II de Warenne (d. May 11, 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.[6] [7]

Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.[8]

Edith de Warenne, married, firstly, Gerard, Baron de Gournay.[9]

Notes

^ She is explicitly so called by Orderic Vitalis, as well as the chronicle of Hyde Abbey. Historically, she has been made a daughter of William the Conqueror by his spouse Matilda of Flanders, (Bannerman, vol.IV, p.207-209; Burke,The Royal Families vol.1, "Descendants of William the Conqueror", p.iv-v & pedigree LXVIII; Burke,The Roll of Battle Abbey, p.106; Barlow, pages 16 and 160) or of Matilda alone (Stapleton), but Waters and Freeman showed that this could not be supported (Waters, Freeman). See Chandler for an extensive discussion. Other sources suggest that she is daughter of Matilda from a relationship with Gerbod the Fleming prior to her marriage to William the Conqueror.

^ Genealogy of Family Warenne

^ Burke, The Roll of Battle Abbey, pps: 57, and 105-106

^ Bannerman, vol.IV, p.208

^ Bannerman, vol.IV, p.208 - 210

^ Burke, The Royal Families , vol. 1, pedigrees III and LXVIII, plus vol.2 (1851) pages iv, xlvii, and pedigree XXIX.

^ Dunbar, pps: 65 &71.

^ Burke, The Royal Families of England , vol. 2, page v.

^ Burke, The Royal Families , vol. 2, pages v and vii.

References

Bannerman, W.Bruce, FSA., editor, Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, 4th series, London, 1912

Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1012 - 1216, London, 1955

Burke, John Bernard, The Roll of Battle Abbey, London, 1848

Burke, John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England Scotland and Wales, with Their Descendants etc., vol. 1 (1848), vol. 2 (1851), London

Chandler, Victoria, "Gundrada de Warenne and the Victorian Gentleman-Scholars", Southern History 12 (1990):68-81

Dunbar, Sir Archibald, Bt., Scottish Kings, a Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005 - 1625, Edinburgh, 1899

Freeman, Edward A., "The parentage of Gundrada, wife of William of Warren", English Historical Review 3 (1888):680-701

Stapleton, Thomas, "Observations in disproof of the pretended marriage of William de Warren, Earl of Surrey, with a daughter begotten of Matildis, daughter of Baldwin, Comte of Flanders, by William the Conqueror, and illustrative of the origin and early history of the family in Normandy", The Archaeological Journal 3 (1846):1-26

Waters, Edmond Chester, "Gundreda de Warrenne", The Archaeological Journal 41 (1884):300-312

--------------------

Gundred, Gundreda, or Gundrada (died May 27, 1085) was probably born in Flanders , sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. June 20, 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

In the course of the centuries which followed both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), whose father John was Clerk of the Kitchen to King Henry VII, and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, the nearest place to its original site, and placed inside and at the south-west corner of the church, where, until 1847, it could be seen on the floor between pews with a very fine inscription detailing its origins etc.

In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the South Coast Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered, and deposited temporarily, for the next two years, beneath Gundred's tombstone. In 1847 a Norman Chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both cysts were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New cysts were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. Gundred's remains in a good state of preservation although the Earl's has lost some lead. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black marble.

The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

William II de Warenne (d. May 11, 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.

Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.

Edith de Warenne, married, firstly, Gerard, Baron de Gournay.

--------------------

Gundred

Parents unknown Possibly but doubfully, Mathilda (w/o William I) and an earlier unknown husband

From Medlands:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#GundredMWilliamWarenne

Brother and sister, parents not known. As noted below, one charter suggests that Gundred´s mother was Mathilde de Flandre, wife of William I King of England, by an earlier husband who is not otherwise recorded, but this information is dubious as discussed further below:

1. GERBOD (-after 22 Feb 1071). William I King of England granted the city of Chester and large areas surrounding it to Gerbod, avoué of the abbey of St Bertin in Flanders, in early 1070, whereby he is considered to have been created Earl [of Chester]. According to Orderic Vitalis, Gerbod was "continually molested by the English and Welsh alike"[10]. He returned to Flanders where he fought and was captured at the battle of Cassel 22 Feb 1071[11].

2. GUNDRED (-Castle Acre, Norfolk 27 May 1085, bur Lewes Priory). Her marriage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis who also specifies that she was Gerbod´s sister[12]. "Willelmus de Warenna…Surreie comes [et] Gundrada uxor mea" founded Lewes Priory as a cell of Cluny by charter dated 1080[13]. This charter also names "domine mee Matildis regine, matris uxoris mee", specifying that the Queen gave "mansionem quoque Carlentonam nomine" to Gundred. It is presumably on this basis that some secondary works claim, it appears incorrectly, that Gundred was the daughter of William I King of England. Weir asserts that the charter in question "has been proved spurious"[14], although it is not certain what other elements in the text indicate that this is likely to be the case. Assuming the charter is genuine, it is presumably possible that "matris" was intended in the context to indicate a quasi-maternal relationship, such as foster-mother or godmother. The same relationship is referred to in the charter dated to [1080/86] under which William I King of England donated property in Norfolk to Lewes priory, for the souls of “…Gulielmi de Warenna et uxoris suæ Gundfredæ filiæ meæ”[15]. Gundred died in childbirth. m (1070) as his first wife, WILLIAM de Warenne, son of RODULF [Raoul] de Warenne & his first wife Beatrix --- (-Lewes 24 Jun 1088, bur Lewes Priory). He was created Earl of Surrey in [late Apr] 1088[16], although he and his immediate successors usually styled themselves "Earl de Warenne".

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Princess Gundred - It has been said that Gundred was not the daughter of William, the Conqueror, but that she was the daughter of Matilda of Flanders by, perhaps, a previous marriage. The Invincible Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 5, p. 26, says that the inseription on Gundred's tombstone describes her as wife of William de Warren and daughter of Wm., the Conqueror. Also in Burke's Dormant and Extinct Peerage, pp. 154, 568 and 588, she is called daughter by Wm., the Conqueror, in a charter signed by Wm., William de Warren and Henry I, son of William, the Conqueror. Thus proving this much discussed question. E. E. W)

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Said to have also been Countess of Surrey 

Gundred, Princess of England de St Omer of Flanders Born: Bef 1050, Normandy, France

Married Bef 1077, Normandy, France, to William I, Earl of Warrenne de Warenne

Died: 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, Acre, Norfolk, England

buried Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England

Gundreda is believed to have been the daughter of *Queen Matilda she died in 1085. This theory is supported by a charter of *William de Warren to Lewes Priory, in which he states that his donations, among others, were for Queen Matilda, the mother of his wife. It is conjectured that Grundreda and Gherbold the Fleming, created Earl of Chester, her brother, were the children of Queen Matilda by a former marriage, probably clandestine, and therefore not reported by the historians of the day.

Children with: William I, Earl of Warrenne de Warenne

Children:

Reginald de Warren

Editha de Warenne

Siblings:

Henry I Beauclerc King of England

Constance Princess of England

Adaile (Alice) of Normandy Princess of England

-------------------------------------------

Gundred Princess Of was born about 1063 in , , Normandy, France.  Gundred Princess Of's father was Guillaume I "Le Conquberant" De NORMANDIE and her mother was Matilda Countess Of Flanders Queen Of ENGLAND.  Her paternal grandfather was Robert I "The Magnificent" Duke Of NORMANDY and her paternal grandmother is Harlette De FALAISE; her maternal grandparents were Baudouin V Count Of FLANDERS and Adaele (Alix) Princess Of FRANCE. 

She had four brothers and six sisters, named Robert II Prince Of, Richard Prince Of, William II "Rufus" King Of, Henry I "Beauclerc" King Of, Cecilia Princess Of, Alice Or Adbelahide de, Mathilda Princess Of, Constance Princess Of, Adaele (Alice) Princess Of and Agatha Princess Of.

She was the nineth oldest of the eleven children.

She died on May 27th, 1085 in Castle Acre, Acre, Norfolk, England. Her burial was in Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England.

William De and Gundred Princess Of were married in a religious ceremony before 1077 in , , Normandy, France. They had two sons and two daughters, named William II De, Reginald De, Edith De and Gundred De.

===================

She has been listed as dau. of Gherbod Advocate of the Abbey of SAINT BERTIN

Matilda, Queen of England of FLANDERS

ABT 1031 - 2 Nov 1083

BURIAL: Church Holy Trinity, Caen, Calvados, France

BIRTH: ABT 1031, Flanders

DEATH: 2 Nov 1083, Caen, Calvados, France

RFN: 1159

Father: Baldwin V, Count of FLANDERS

Mother: Adelaide (Alix ADELE), PRINCESS OF FRANCE

Family 2 : Gherbod Advocate of the Abbey of SAINT BERTIN

MARRIAGE: ABT 1050, Flanders

+Gundred, Princess of England, of FLANDERS

Gherbod, Earl of Chester, of FLANDERS 

Family 1 : William the Conqueror King of England of NORMANDY

MARRIAGE: 1053, Castle Of Angi, Normandy

Robert III Duke of NORMANDY 
Richard of NORMANDY 
Cecilia of NORMANDY 
Adelidis "Alice" of NORMANDY 
Margaret of NORMANDY 
William II "Rufus", King of ENGLAND 
Constance of NORMANDY 
Agatha Matilda of NORMANDY 
Anna of NORMANDY 

Henry I "Beauclerc", King of ENGLAND

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"Gundred,'s tombstone at St. John's Church, Southover, Lewes reads: "Within this Pew stands the tombstone of Gundrad, daughter of William the Conqueror, and wife of William, the First Earl of Warren, which having been deposited over her remains in the Chapter-House of Lewes Priory and lately discovered in Iffield Church, was removed to this place at the expense of William Burrell Esq. in 1775 A.D. Gundred died in childbirth at Castle Acre May 27, 1085, and was buried in the Priory of Lewes in County Sussex."

from /www.spaldinggenealogy.com

--------------------

Sources:

Keats-Rohan, K.S.B. Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166, II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. The Boydell Press, 2002. p. 777.

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Gundred (also known as Gundreda or Gundrada) of Flanders, Countess of Surrey, was probably born in Flanders. She was the sister of Gerbod the Fleming, who became Earl of Chester.

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

Gundred was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her son William and through her daughter Edith, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred for more information.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred

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Title: Book: Royalty For Commoners

     Author: Roderick W. Stuart
     Publication: Revised Second Editon, @1988, by Genealogical Publishing Company.
     Note: ABBR Book: Royalty For Commoners
     Page: Page 70   

Interred: Chapter House, Lewes, Sussex

   At one time it was thought that Gundred was the Daughter of William the Conqueror. This has since been disproved. It is now accepted that Gundred, the wife of William de Warenne, was not a daughter of either William I (The Conqueror) or his wife Matilda 

-------------------- Gundred, Gundreda, or Gundrada (died May 27, 1085) was probably born in Flanders , sister of Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester.

Gundred married William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. June 20, 1088), who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. In 1078 he and Gundred founded a Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, where both were buried.

The Countess had died at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates.

In the course of the centuries which followed both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), whose father John was Clerk of the Kitchen to King Henry VII, and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, the nearest place to its original site, and placed inside and at the south-west corner of the church, where, until 1847, it could be seen on the floor between pews with a very fine inscription detailing its origins etc.

In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the South Coast Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered, and deposited temporarily, for the next two years, beneath Gundred's tombstone. In 1847 a Norman Chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both cysts were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New cysts were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. Gundred's remains in a good state of preservation although the Earl's has lost some lead. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black marble.

The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

William II de Warenne (d. May 11, 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.

Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.

Edith de Warenne, married, firstly, Gerard, Baron de Gournay. -------------------- Sister of Richard Goet, or Gouet

http://www.red1st.com/axholme/getperson.php?personID=I1750044511&tree=Axholme

According to the Plantagenet Ancestry, an illegitimate daughter of Matilda of Flanders (wife of William the Conquerer)

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3254.htm

or a first marriage

http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3119.htmhttp://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/3/3119.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundred,_Countess_of_Surrey

Gundrada de Warenne d. 1085, wife of William de Warenne, first Earl of Surrey, was long supposed to have been a daughter either of William the Conqueror and his Queen Matilda of Flanders, or of Matilda by an earlier marriage with Gerbod, advocate of St. Bertin. There is, however, no contemporary evidence for either of these hypotheses, while there is a good deal that tells strongly, though indirectly, against both (Engl. Hist. Rev. No. xii. 680-701). All that is really known about Gundrada's parentage is that she was sister to Gerbod the Fleming, Earl of Chester 1070-71 (Ord. Vit. ed. Duchesne, 522 A. C.; Liber de Hyda, p. 296), and therefore probably daughter of another Gerbod who was advocate of St. Bertin, 1026-67 (Archaeological Journal, iii. 16, 17). The date of her marriage with William de Warenne is not ascertained, but their second son was old enough to command troops in 1090 (Ord. Vit. 690 A); and that they were married before 1077 is also shown by the appointment in that year of the first prior of St. Pancras at Lewes (Ann. Bermondsey, s.a. 1077), the earliest Cluniac house in England, of which they were joint founders. It is said that they had started on a pilgrimage to Rome, but owing to the war between the Pope and the Emperor they were obliged to content themselves with visiting divers monasteries in France and Burgundy; they made a long stay at Cluny, and the outcome of their gratitude for the hospitality which they experienced there was the foundation of Lewes priory (Monast. Angl. v. 12; Duckett, Charters of Cluni, i. 47, 48). The story comes from a fifteenth-century copy of a charter which purports to have been granted by William de Warenne himself, but which in its present form has almost certainly received interpolations; there seems, however, no reason to doubt the genuineness of this part of it. Gundrada had two sons, William, afterwards second Earl of Warenne and Surrey (Ord. Vit. 680 D), and Rainald (ib. 690 A and 815 A), and a daughter, Edith, wife, first of Gerald de Gournay, and secondly of Drogo of Moncey (Cont. Will. of Jumièges, l. viii. c. 8). Dugdale (Baronage, i. 74) gives her another daughter, married to Erneis de Colungis or Coluncis, but the Roger, Erneis's son, who was "nepos Guillelmi de Garenna," was clearly something more than a boy when he entered the monastery of St. Evroul before 1089 (Ord. Vit. 574 C, 600 B), and must therefore have been not Gundrada's grandson, but her husband's nephew. She died in child-birth, 27 May 1085, at Castle Acre, and was buried in the chapter-house at Lewes (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 74, from register of Lewes). Her tombstone was found in Ifield Church (whither it had apparently been removed at the dissolution) at the end of the last century, and placed in St. John's Church, Southover (Lewes), where it now is; it is of black marble and bears an inscription in Latin verse, beginning "Stirps Gundrada ducum" (Watson, Mem. of Earls of Warren and Surrey, i. 59-60). Her remains, enclosed in a chest with her name on the lid, were discovered side by side with those of her husband on the site of Lewes priory in October 1845. The inscriptions on the lid and the tombstone seem to date from the early thirteenth century; the remains were probably removed from their original place and re-interred at that time, perhaps when the Church was rebuilt, 1243-68 (Journ. Archaeol. Assoc. i. 347-350).

Sources To the references given above it need only be added that Mr. Freeman has enumerated all the materials for the Gundrada controversy, examined all that has been written about it, and summed up its results in the English Historical Review, No. xii. pp. 680-701, October 1888.

-------------------- Gundred's epitaph at Lewes Priory, 12th century. Victoria County History, Sussex, vol.7, p.49; the gravestone is now in Southover Church in Lewes.

+ STIRPS . GVNDRADA . DVCV' . DEC[VS] . EVI . NOBILE . GERMEN : INTVLIT . ECCLESIIS . ANGLORV' . BALSAMA . MORV' . MARTIR ... [F]VIT . MISERIS . FVIT . EX . PIETATE . MARIA . PARS . OBIIT . MARTHE . SVP'EST . PARS . MAGNA . MARIE . O. PIE . PANCRATI . TES[TIS . PIE]TATIS . ET . EQ[VI] . TE . FACIT . HEREDE' . TV . CLEMENS . SVSCIPE . MATREM . SEXTA . KALENDARV' . IVNII . LVX . OBVIA . CARNIS . I'FREGIT . ALABASTRV' ...

http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/gundred/gundocs.shtml#epitaph

-------------------- Possible daughter of William. Disputed by various parties, who view her as a possible step-daughter or illegitimate daughter of a concubine.

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Gundred de St. Omer, Countess of Surrey's Timeline

1063
1063
Flanders, Belgium
1071
1071
Age 8
Lewes, Sussex, England
1082
1082
Age 19
Sussex, England
1084
1084
Age 21
1085
May 27, 1085
Age 22
Castle Acre, Norfolk, England
1085
Age 22
Gournay, Normandy, France
1085
Age 22
Of,,Sussex,England
1085
Age 22
Cluniac Priory at Southover, adjoining Lewes, England
1118
1118
Age 22
England
1932
December 31, 1932
Age 22