Hedwig of Babenberg

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Hadwig von Babenberg

Nicknames: "Edwige", "Edith", "Haduich", "Hathui", "Hathwiga", "Hadwith", "Hedwig", "Hedwiga", "Hedwige"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Babenberg Castle, Bamberg, (Present Oberfranken), Herzogtum Bayern (Bavaria), Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
Death: Died in Herzogtum Sachsen, Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Henry of Franconia and Ingeltrude
Wife of Otto I the Illustrious, Duke of Saxony
Mother of (No Name); Oda von Sachsen; Thankmar von Sachsen (870-912); Heinrich I 'der Vogler' von Sachsen; Mechtild von Sachsen and 6 others
Sister of Heinrich von Babenberg (c860-903) and Adalbert I of de Pious, Duke of Franconia

Occupation: Duchess of Saxony, Duchess consort and daughter of Duke of Franconia,
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Hadwig von Babenberg

There is some dispute about her ancestry. She is thought to have been the daughter of a Count Heinrich, accounting for that given name among her descendants. She is sometimes given as a daughter of Louis II, Holy Roman Emperor, but that is a late invention to justify her son's elevation to the throne.

Notes: Stammtafeln says she is the daughter of Henry, Margrave of Mark (d 886), and not Arnulf. There are only 13 years between the aproximate birth of Arnulf and Henry the Fowler, which implies some further re-checking of sources is in order!

For Merges (these are her only family members, the rest are mismerged): Parents: Heinrich von Franconia (d. 886) and Ingeltrudis (or Baba, d. c.864) Siblings: Adalbert (d. 906), Adalhard (d. 903), Heinrich (d. c.903) Husband: Otto "der Erlauchte" von Sachsen (d. 912) Children: 1. (Wife of Ekkehard, b. c.870), 2. Thankmar von Sachsen (d. c.912) 3, Liudolf von Sachsen (d. c.912) 4. Heinrich I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany (c.876-936) 5. Oda von Sachsen (c.884-952, wife of Zwentibold King of Lotharingia, Graf Gerhard, and Eberhard Graf in Oberlahngau) 6. Liutgard, Abbess of Gandersheim (d. 923) 7. Irminburg (d. c.936), wife of Siegfried, Procurator in Saxony under Otto ---------------------- From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Franconia: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/FRANCONIA.htm#Hedwigdied903

HEINRICH, son of --- (-killed in battle Paris [before Sep] 886, bur St Médard at Soissons).

The Annales Fuldenses names "Poppone fratre Henirico et Eginone comitibus"[80].

The Annales Fuldenses record that "Heinricum principum" led the army of Ludwig II "der Deutsche" King of the East Franks into Moravia in 866[81]. The Annales Fuldenses names "Henricum" as "principum militiæ suæ [=Hludowicus Hludowici regis filius]" and as "comitis vassalus" in 871[82].

The Annales Fuldenses records the victory of "Heinricus et Adalhartus" against "Thiotbaldo principe militiæ Hugonis" in 880[83]. The Annales Fuldenses records the civil war between Saxons and Thuringians in 882, through the machinations of "Poppone fratre Heinrici et Egninone comitibus" and Poppo's subsequent conquest of "Thuringis inferior"[84].

The Annales Fuldenses record that "Heinricus frater Popponis" fought the Vikings at "Prumiam" in 883[85].

He was invested as Marquis en Neustrie in 886 by Emperor Karl III "der Dicke", who was at that time briefly King of the West Franks, after the death of Hugues l'Abbé. Abbo's Bella Parisiciæ Urbis records the part played by "Saxonia vir Ainricus" at the siege of Paris in 886[86].

The Annales Fuldenses record that "Heinrico marchensi Francorum" who held Neustria was killed at the siege of Paris in 886[87]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "886 Kal Sep" of "Heinrih com"[88].

m INGELTRUDIS [Baba], daughter of --- (-after 864).

According to the Annalista Saxo, the mother of Adalbert, and therefore wife of Heinrich, was "Baba dicebatur"[89]. The primary source which confirms her name as Ingeltrudis has not yet been identified.

Eckhardt[90] suggests that Ingeltrudis was the daughter of Eberhard Marquis of Friulia & his wife Gisela [Carolingian], and therefore sister of Berengario I King of Italy. However, this appears impossible chronologically given that her daughter Hedwig gave birth to her third child in 876.

Heinrich & his wife had four children: --- 1. HEDWIG [Hathui] ([850/55]-24 Dec 903).

"Hathwiga" is named as wife of Otto in the Annalista Saxo, which in an earlier passage records that Heinrich I King of Germany was the son of the sister of Adalbert [Babenberg][91].

Her birth date is estimated from the birth of her third son in 876.

The necrology of Fulda records the death in 903 of "Hadwih com"[92]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "24 Dec" of "Hathuui mater Heinrici regis"[93].

m OTTO "der Erlauchte" Graf im Sudthüringau und Eichsfeld, son of LIUDOLF [von Sachsen] & his wife Oda [Billung] (-30 Nov 912[94], bur Gandersheim Stiftskirche).

He was chosen to succeed Ludwig "das Kind" [Carolingian] as king of Germany in 911 but, according to Widukind, he declined on the grounds of his advanced age and recommended the election of Konrad ex-Duke of the Franconians[95]. --- 2. ADALBERT (-executed 9 Jun 906). He is named, and his parentage given, in the Annalista Saxo, when recording his struggle with the Konradiner family[96]. Regino records "magna discordianum" between "Rodulfum episcopum Wirziburgensem" and "filios Heinrici ducis, Adalbertum, Adalhardum et Heinricum" in 897[97]. Regino records the war in 902 between "Adalbertus cum fratribus Adalhardo et Heinrico" against "Eberhardum et Gebehardum et Rodulfum fratres"[98]. Regino records that in 903 "Adalbertus Rodulfum episcopum Wiziburgensis ecclesia fugat"[99]. "Adalberti comitis" exchanged property with the abbot of Fulda by charter dated 26 Apr 903[100]. The Annales Alammanicorum record that in 903 "Adalbertus Chonradum bello occidit"[101]. The Annales Laubacenses record that in 906 "Adalbertus filius Heinrichi, ficta fide episcoporum deceptus, capite decollatus est"[102]. Graf. He was executed during the bitter quarrel between the Babenberger and Konradiner families, which marked the breaking of Babenberg power in central Germany[103]. m ---. The name of Adalbert's wife is not known. Adalbert & his wife had one possible child, Henrich (d. c.935)

3. ADALHARD (-executed 903). Regino records "magna discordianum" between "Rodulfum episcopum Wirziburgensem" and "filios Heinrici ducis, Adalbertum, Adalhardum et Heinricum" in 897[114]. Regino records the war between "Adalbertus cum fratribus Adalhardo et Heinrico" against "Eberhardum et Gebehardum et Rodulfum fratres", specifying that "Adalhardus captor…est"[115]. The Annales Alammanicorum record that in 900 "Adalhart et Heimrich frater eius et Eberhardius bello occisi sunt"[116].

4. HEINRICH (-killed in battle [902/03]). Regino records "magna discordianum" between "Rodulfum episcopum Wirziburgensem" and "filios Heinrici ducis, Adalbertum, Adalhardum et Heinricum" in 897[117]. Regino records the war between "Adalbertus cum fratribus Adalhardo et Heinrico" against "Eberhardum et Gebehardum et Rodulfum fratres", specifying that "Heinrich interfectus…est"[118]. The Annales Alammanicorum record that in 900 "Adalhart et Heimrich frater eius et Eberhardius bello occisi sunt"[119]. --- References:

[80] Annales Fuldenses, pars quinta 882, MGH SS I, p. 396. [81] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 866, MGH SS I, p. 379. [82] Annales Fuldenses, pars tertia 866 and 871, MGH SS I, pp. 379 and 383. [83] Annales Fuldensium Pars Tertia, auctore incerto 880, MGH SS I, p. 394. [84] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 882, MGH SS I, p. 397. [85] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 883, MGH SS I, p. 399. [86] Abbonis Bella Parisiacæ Urbis II, MGH Poetæ Latini ævi Carolini IV.I, p. 98. [87] Annales Fuldensium Pars Quinta, auctore Quodam Bawaro 886, MGH SS I, p. 403. [88] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123. [89] Annalista Saxo 902. [90] Eckhardt, K. A. (1963) Genealogische Funde zur allgemeinen Geschichte (Witzenhausen), pp. 49-51, cited in Settipani, C. and Kerrebrouck, P. van (1993) La préhistoire des Capétiens 481-987, 1ère partie, Mérovingiens, Carolingiens et Robertiens (Villeneuve d'Ascq), p. 418 footnote 110. [91] Annalista Saxo 902 and 907. [92] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123. [93] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg. [94] Warner, D. A. (trans.) The Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg (2001) (Manchester University Press) 1.7. [95] Widukind 1.16, pp. 26-27, quoted in Thietmar, p. 71, footnote 20. [96] Annalista Saxo 902. [97] Reginonis Chronicon 897, MGH SS I, p. 607. [98] Reginonis Chronicon 902, MGH SS I, p. 610. [99] Reginonis Chronicon 903, MGH SS I, p. 610. [100] Fulda 651, p. 300. [101] Annales Alamannicorum continuatio Sangallensis altera 903, MGH SS I, p. 54. [102] Annales Laubacenses 907, MGH SS I, p. 54. [103] Reuter (1991), p. 131. [114] Reginonis Chronicon 897, MGH SS I, p. 607. [115] Reginonis Chronicon 902, MGH SS I, p. 610. [116] Annales Alamannicorum continuatio Sangallensis altera 900, MGH SS I, p. 54. [117] Reginonis Chronicon 897, MGH SS I, p. 607. [118] Reginonis Chronicon 902, MGH SS I, p. 610. [119] Annales Alamannicorum continuatio Sangallensis altera 900, MGH SS I, p. 54. ----------------------------- From the German Wikipedia page on the Popponen: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popponen

Die fränkischen Babenberger oder auch Popponen stammen ursprünglich aus dem Grabfeldgau.

Der älteste bekannte Ahn der fränkischen Babenberger war Poppo, der wahrscheinlich von dem Robertiner Cancor abstammt. Insofern sind die Popponen eine frühe Nebenlinie der Robertiner, aus denen das französische Königsgeschlecht der Capetinger hervorging. Nach Poppo wird das Geschlecht auch Popponen genannt. Poppo war im frühen 9. Jahrhundert Graf im Grabfeld, das heute im Grenzgebiet zwischen Bayern und Thüringen liegt. Einer seiner Söhne war Heinrich, der zunächst unter Ludwig dem Jüngeren das Amt des princeps militiae bekleidete. Zur Zeit Karls des Dicken, der die Familie bevorzugte, wurde Heinrich marchio francorum (Markgraf der Franken) und dux Austrasiorum (Herzog der Austrasier). Er fiel 886 im Kampf gegen die Normannen. Sein Bruder, Poppo (II.) war zur gleichen Zeit Markgraf von Thüringen (880-892), wurde aber von Karls Nachfolger Arnulf abgesetzt. Dieser begünstigte statt der Popponen die aus dem Lahngau stammenden Konradiner, die mit seiner Frau Oda verwandt waren.

Die Rivalität zwischen den beiden fränkischen Grafengeschlechtern der Konradiner und fränkischen Babenberger wurde von ihren Bemühungen verstärkt, ihre jeweilige Autorität im mittleren Maingebiet zu intensivieren. Dieser Streit, bekannt als die Babenberger Fehde, erreichte seinen Höhepunkt Anfang des 10. Jahrhunderts während der unruhigen Regierungszeit des Ostfrankenkönigs Ludwig IV., des Kindes. Führer der fränkischen Babenberger waren die drei Söhne von Herzog Heinrich - Adalbert, Adalhard und Heinrich - die sich nach der Babenburg (Castrum babenberch) auf dem Bamberger Domberg benannten, in deren Umgebung ihre Besitzungen lagen.

Als die fränkischen Babenberger im Jahre 902 Teile des Gebiets des Bistums Würzburg ihrem Herrschaftsbereich einverleibten, entzog ihnen König Ludwig IV. im Gegenzug mehrere Güter und gab sie an Bischof Rudolf von Würzburg, einen Konradiner. Das führte zu jahrelanger Fehde zwischen den beiden Geschlechtern. Zunächst vertrieb Graf Adalbert den Bischof aus Würzburg, woraufhin dessen Brüder, die Grafen Konrad, Gebhard und Eberhard, diesem zu Hilfe kamen und der Streit sich bis nach Hessen ausweitete. 906 schließlich, bei einem Überfall der Babenberger auf die Konradiner bei Fritzlar, fielen sowohl Konrad als auch Heinrich von Babenberg im Kampf. Adalhard wurde bald darauf von Gebhard aus Blutrache für den Tod seines Bruders Eberhard getötet.

Der einzig Überlebende der Babenberger Brüder, Adalbert, wurde vom Kanzler und Regenten Hatto I., Erzbischof von Mainz, einem Förderer der Konradiner, an den königlichen Hof gerufen. Er weigerte sich zu erscheinen und hielt für einige Zeit seine Burg Theres (heute Obertheres bei Haßfurt) gegen das königliche Heer, ergab sich aber noch im Jahre 906 und wurde, trotz Hattos Versprechens auf freies Geleit, verurteilt und enthauptet. Der Sohn des oben erwähnten Konrad, Konrad der Jüngere, wurde unangefochtener Herzog von Franken (und im Jahre 911 als Konrad I. König des ostfränkischen Reichs), während die Babenberger einen Großteil ihrer Besitzungen und Ämter in Franken verloren.

Adalberts Sohn Heinrich von Babenberg überlebte die Fehde. Es wird vermutet, dass er der Stammvater der Schweinfurter Grafen und der jüngeren Babenberger Linie war.

Stammliste der fränkischen Babenberger

Heim(e)rich (Heimo), † 5. Mai 795 bei Lüne an der Elbe, 764 Mitstifter von Kloster Lorsch, um 771/785 Graf in der Wetterau, 772/782 Graf im Oberrheingau, 777 Graf im Saalgau, 778 Graf im Lahngau, 784 Abt von Mosbach – Vorfahren siehe Robertiner

1. Ruadbert (Robert), † wohl 805, Graf 780/781 1a. Cancor, Graf 812 1b. Ruadbert (Robert), 817 Graf im Saalgau, Oberrheingau und Wormsgau

2. Heimerich (Heinrich), Graf 750/802-812; ∞ Hadaburg 2a Poppo (I.), 819/839 Graf im Saalgau (brother of Graf Heimerich d. 836) --- From Poppo I:

1. Heinrich, 860 bezeugt, † 28. August 886 vor Paris, 866 princeps militiae, Markgraf (marchio) der Franken, Dux Austrasiorum, begraben in St. Médard in Soissons (brother of Markgraf Poppo II d. 906)

1a. Adalbert, hingerichtet 9. Juni 906, Graf 888 1b. Adalhard, hingerichtet 902, Graf 888 1c. Heinrich, † 902/903, Graf 888 1d. Hadui(ch), † 24. Dezember 903; ∞ um 869/870 Otto der Erlauchte, Herzog von Sachsen, † 30. November 912 (Liudolfinger) - Siehe auch

Grafen von Lauffen http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grafen_von_Lauffen

Weblinks

Die Babenberger Fehde u. die erste urkundliche Erwähnung Bambergs http://www.apfelweibla.de/10__jahrhundert_bamberg_902.htm

Literatur

Zu den fränkischen Babenbergern:

Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln, III.1, T. 54, 1984 http://wiki-de.genealogy.net/Europ%C3%A4ische_Stammtafeln

darin benutzt:

Alfred Friese: Studien zur Herrschaftsgeschichte des fränkischen Adels. Der mainländisch-thüringische Raum vom 7.–11. Jahrhundert. Klett-Cotta, Stuttgart 1979, ISBN 3-12-913140-X (Geschichte und Gesellschaft - Bochumer historische Studien 18), (Zugleich: Bochum, Univ., Habil.-Schr.).

Ferdinand Geldner: Neue Beiträge zur Geschichte der „alten Babenberger“. Meisenbach, Bamberg 1971, ISBN 3-87525-023-0 (Bamberger Studien zur fränkischen und deutschen Geschichte 1).

Wolfgang Metz: Babenberger und Rupertiner in Ostfranken. In: Jahrbuch für fränkische Landesforschung. Band 18, 1958, ISSN 0446-3943, S. 295–304. --- Main text in English:

The Frankish Babenbergers or Popponen originated in the Grabfeldgau (border region between southern Thuringia and northern Bavaria).

The earliest known ancestor of the Frankish Babenbergers was Poppo, probably a son of Cancor of the Robertians. In this sense, the Popponen were an early secondary line of Robertians, from which the French royal family of the Capetians emerged. The Popponen were named from Poppo, who was an early 9th century Graf in Grabfeldgau that lies on the border between Bavaria and Thuringia. One of his sons was Heinrich, the first Princeps Militiae appointed by Louis the Younger (Ludwig dem Jüngeren). In the time of Charles the Fat (Karls des Dicken), Heinrich's family was preferred as Francorum marchio (Margrave of the Franks) and dux Austrasiorum (Duke of the Austrasians). He fought in 886 in a battle against the Normans. His brother, Poppo II, was at the same time Margrave of Thuringia (880-892), but under Charles' successor, Arnulf, his position was discontinued. The position was awarded to the Conradines of Lahngau as a result of Oda's marriage with Arnulf.

The rivalry between the two Frankish Counts of Franconia, the Babenbergers and the Conradines, was intensified by the effort of each to establish their authority in the central Main region. This conflict, known as the Babenberger Feud, reached its peak at the beginning of the 10th century during the troubled East Frankish reign of Louis IV the Child ( Ludwig IV des Kindes).

The leaders of the Frankish Babenbergers were the three sons of Duke Heinrich - Adalbert, Adalhard, and Heinrich - who from Babenburg (Babenberch Castrum) declared the region theirs.

When the Frankish Babenbergers in 902 incorporated parts of the territory of the Diocese of Würzburg as part of their own, King Louis IV, in return for a payment, gave the territory over to Bishop Rudolf of Würzburg, a Conradine. This led to years of feuding between the two Houses. Iniitially, Graf Adalbert drove the Bishop of Würzburg from the territory, which prompted the Conradine Counts Gebhard and Eberhard to come to his aid, sending men into Hesse. Finally in 906, in an attack on the Babenbergers by the Conradines at Fritlar, Conrad and Heinrich fought each other. Gebhard took blood revenge on Adalhard for the death of his brother Eberhard, who was earlier killed by him.

The only survivor among the Babenberger brothers was Adalbert, who was called to answer to the Royal Court for his actions by Chancellor and Regent for Hatto I, Archbishop of Mainz, a supporter of the Conradines. Adalbert refused to appear and held out for some time in his castle (now in Obertheres Haßfurt) against the royal army. Nonetheless, in 906, he was compelled to leave his refuge by Hatto, who despite a promise for safe conduct, captured, convicted, and beheaded him. The son of Conrad, Conrad the Younger, became the undisputed Duke of Franconia (and in 911, as Conrad I, King of the East Frankish Kingdom), while the Babenbergers lost most of their possessions and offices in Franconia.

Adalbert's son, Heinrich von Babenberg, survived the feud. It is believed that he was the father of the Count of Schweinfurt and the progenitor of the younger Babenberger line. ----------------------------- From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Saxony: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAXONY.htm#OttoErlauchtedied912

OTTO "der Erlauchte", son of Graf LIUDOLF & his wife Oda [Billung] (-30 Nov 912, bur Gandersheim Stiftskirche).

The Annalista Saxo records "Otto" as "filius Liudolfi ducis"[142]. "Hludowicus…rex" granted immunities to Kloster Gandersheim, naming "Brun et Otto nostri fideles comites…[et] Liutolf genitor eorum…[et]…Gerbirg soror eorundem comitum" by charter dated 26 Jan 877[143].

Graf im Südthüringau.

"Hludowicus…rex" donated property "Tennisteti et Heriki in pago Suththuringa in comitatu Ottonis" to Kloster Gandersheim by charter dated 26 Jan 877[144]. "Rihdahc" denoted property to Kloster St Maria an der Rosel, in the castle of Coblenz, by undated charter, placed in the compilation with other charters dated [981/89], subscribed by "domini Ottonis Liutolfi filius…"[145].

Graf im Eichsfeld.

Emperor Arnulf confirmed an exchange including property "in pago Eichesfelden in comitatu Ottonis" between the abbot of Fulda and "Chunrado comite" on the intervention of "Ottonis…marchionis" by charter dated 28 Jan 897[146].

Lay Abbot of Hersfeld 908.

He was chosen to succeed Ludwig "das Kind" [Carolingian] as king of Germany in 911, but declined on the grounds of his advanced age and recommended the election of Konrad ex-Duke of the Franconians[147].

"Chuonradus…rex" confirmed privileges to Kloster Murbach by charter dated 12 Mar 913 with the consent of "fidelium nostrorum Hathonis, Salomonis, Thiodolfi, Hildini, Einhardi, Erchangarii, Chuonradi, Hugonis, Ottonis, Heinrici, Bopponis, Udalrici, Eberhardi"[148].

Thietmar records the death of Otto on 30 Nov but does not give the year[149]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "30 Nov" of "Oddo comes pater Heinrici regis Saxonum"[150]. --- m HEDWIG [Hathui], daughter of HEINRICH dux [Babenberg] & his wife Engeltrudis --- ([850/55]-24 Dec 903).

"Hathwiga" is named as wife of Otto in the Annalista Saxo, which in an earlier passage records that the mother of Heinrich was the son of the sister of Adalbert [Babenberg][151]. Her birth date is estimated from the birth of her third son in 876. The necrology of Fulda records the death in 903 of "Hadwih com"[152].

The necrology of Merseburg records the death "24 Dec" of "Hathuui mater Heinrici regis"[153]. --- Mistress (1): ---. The name of Otto's mistress is not known. Graf Otto & his wife had [seven] children:

1. [daughter ([865/70][154]-). "Wundilgartam Henrici regis de filia neptim" is named in the Chronicle of St Gall, which also names her husband[155]. The commentary in the printed text interprets this as "granddaughter of Heinrich I King of Germany", but this is chronologically impossible assuming that the approximate death date of Wundelgart's husband is correct. If there is any truth in the text, it is more likely that Wundelgart was the niece of King Heinrich by his sister, although this is far from certain considering the broad range of interpretation possible for the word "neptis". However, the chronology is tight even for this interpretation, as shown by the estimated birth date range of this daughter, which must mean that she was one of her parents' older children. Another possibility is that she was illegitimate. The same source in a later passage names "Ekkehardo…diacono et Purchardo puero post abate consobrinis suis"[156]. As Wundelgart was the mother of abbot Burkhard, this gives the essential clue about the name of this daughter's husband, who in the same source is named as the father of the sisters who were mothers of the younger Ekkehard and abbot Burkhard. m as his first wife, EKKEHARD [I], son of ---.]

2. THANKMAR (-before 30 Nov 912). "Thancmarus et Liudolfus", sons of Otto & Hathwiga, died before their father according to the Annalista Saxo, which implies they were older than their brother Heinrich who "ecce fratribus defunctis, tota hereditas in ipsum iam ducem derivatur"[157].

3. LIUDOLF (-before 30 Nov 912). "Thancmarus et Liudolfus", sons of Otto & Hathwiga, died before their father according to the Annalista Saxo, which implies they were older than their brother Heinrich who "ecce fratribus defunctis, tota hereditas in ipsum iam ducem derivatur"[158]. m ---. The name of Liudolf's wife is not known. Liudolf & his wife had one child, Ekkehard (d. 936)

4. HEINRICH ([876]-Memleben 2 Jul 936, bur Quedlinburg Stiftskirche). Thietmar records that Heinrich was "born of the noble lineage of Otto and Hadwig"[161]. According to the Annalista Saxo, he was son of the unnamed sister of Adalbert [Babenberg], with whom he and his brothers fought against the Konradiner family, his complete parentage being recorded in a later passage[162]. He was elected as HEINRICH I King of Germany at Fritzlar 6 May 919.

5. ODA ([884][163]-[2 Jul] after 952). Regino records the marriage in 897 of "Ottonem comitem…filiam Odam" and King Zwentibold[164]. Regino records that "Gerhard comes" married "Odam uxorem Zuendiboldi regis" after killing her first husband in battle in 900[165]. "Otto…rex" confirmed the donation of property " in loco Dauindre…in pago…Hamalant in comitatu Vuigmanni" to St Moritz at Magdeburg by "nostra amita…Uota" by charter dated 30 Dec 952[166]. Jackman speculates[167] that Graf Eberhard married Oda as her third husband, Oda von Sachsen, for onomastic reasons as the name of Eberhard's supposed daughter (her affiliation also being based only on his own separate onomastic hypothesis) was that of Oda's maternal grandmother. This is an interesting theory but it accumulates one onomastic hypothesis on another and must be considered highly speculative. m firstly ([Worms] [27 Mar/13 Jun] 897) ZWENTIBOLD King of Lotharingia [Carolingian], illegitimate son of Emperor ARNULF King of Germany & his mistress --- ([870/71]-killed in battle 13 Aug 900, bur [Süsteren or Echternach]). m secondly (900) Graf GERHARD [Matfride], son of --- (-killed in battle 22 Jun 910). [m thirdly (after Jun 910) EBERHARD Graf im Oberlahngau Pfalzgraf, son of KONRAD Graf in der Wetterau und im Wormsgau [Konradiner] & his wife Glismod --- (-killed in battle near Andernach 23 Oct 939).]

6. LIUTGARD [Dodica] (-21 Jan 923). Europäische Stammtafeln[168] names Liutgard as daughter of Otto & his wife, but the primary source which confirms this has not so far been identified. Abbess of Gandersheim 919/923.

7. [IRMINBURG (-before 936). Europäische Stammtafeln[169] names Irminburg as daughter of Otto & his wife, and records her marriage, but the primary source which confirms this has not so far been identified. m as his first wife, SIEGFRIED, son of THIETMAR [Ostmark] & his wife --- (-[3 Dec 936/941]).]

Graf Otto had one illegitimate daughter by Mistress (1), a daughter (b. 932) who married Wido from Thuringia. [170] (Wido von Thuringen)

References:

[142] Annalista Saxo 907. [143] D LJ 3, p. 335. [144] D LJ 4, p. 337. [145] Beyer, H. (ed.) (1860) Urkundenbuch zur Geschichte der, jetzt die Preussischen Regierungsbezirke Coblenz und Trier bildenden Mittelrheinischen Territorien (Coblenz), Vol. I, (“Mittelrheinisches Urkundenbuch, I”), 257, p. 314, consulted at <http:/www.rlb.de/mrHist/> (12 Dec 2007). [146] D Arn 149, p. 226, marked "verunechtet" in the compilation. [147] Widukind 1.16, pp. 26-27, quoted in Thietmar, p. 71, footnote 20. Reuter, T. (1991) Germany in the early middle ages c.800-1056 (Longman), p. 135, suggests that this "should be taken as panegyric rather than history". [148] D K I 13, p. 13. [149] Thietmar 1.7, p. 71. [150] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg. [151] Annalista Saxo 902 and 907. [152] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123. [153] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg. [154] Estimated birth date range based on the likely birth date range of her daughter. [155] Ekkehardi IV Casus S. Galli, MGH SS II, p. 119. [156] Casuum Sancti Galli, Continuatio I, Ekkehardo IV 10, MGH SS II, p. 124. [157] Annalista Saxo 907. [158] Annalista Saxo 907. [161] Thietmar 1.3, p. 68. [162] Annalista Saxo 902 and 907. [163] Speculative birth date suggested by Jackman (1997), p. 88, apparently to fit with his theory about Oda's supposed third marriage. [164] Reginonis Chronicon 897, MGH SS I, p. 607. [165] Reginonis Chronicon 900, MGH SS I, p. 609. [166] D O I 159, p. 240 [167] Jackman (1997), p. 88. [168] ES I.1 10. [169] ES I.1 10. [170] Widukind I.38, MGH SS III, p. 434. ----------------------------- From the Wikipedia page on Hedwiga: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwiga

Hedwiga (also known as Hathui) was the daughter of Henry of Franconia and his wife Ingeltrude. She married Otto I, Duke of Saxony.

They had three sons, Henry (who succeeded his father as Duke of Saxony), Thankmar and Liudolf (who both died young), as well as a daughter, Oda. Oda married Zwentibold, King of Lotharingia.

(No sources cited) ---------------------------- From the Dutch Wikipedia page on Hedwig van Babenberg: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwig_van_Babenberg

Hedwig van Babenberg (rond 856[1] - 24 december 903) was een dochter van Hendrik van Babenberg en van Ingeltrude van Friuli. Zij huwde met Otto I van Saksen, en werd moeder van:

1. mogelijk onbekende dochter (ca. 870) , gehuwd met graaf Ekkehard, grootouders van abt Burkhard van Sankt-Gallen 2. Thankmar, overleden voor Otto 3. Liudolf, overleden voor Otto, vader van Ekkehard, van hem stammen een aantal markgraven van Meißen af. 4. Hendrik de Vogelaar 5. Barbara, gehuwd met Hendrik, de stamvader der Oostenrijkse markgraven (volgens andere bronnen de vader van Otto's echtgenote) 6. Oda (ca. 884 - 2 juli na 952), gehuwd (Worms, 897) met koning Zwentibold, (900) Gerhard van de Metzgau en met (na 910) Eberhard van de Oberlahngau. Zij overleefde al haar echtgenoten die allen in een veldslag om het leven kwamen. 7. Liutgard, 919-923 abdis van Gandersheim mogelijk Irminburg, (ovl. voor 936), gehuwd met Siegfried, zoon van markgraaf Thietmar van Meißen.

Voetnoten

1.↑ kan ook zes jaar eerder of later zijn

In English:

Hedwig of Babenberg (b. c.856 [1] - 24 December 903) was a daughter of Henry of Babenberg and Ingeltrude of Friuli. She married Otto I of Saxony and was mother of:

1. a possible daughter (b. c.870) who married Ekkehard and became grandmother of Abbot Burkhard of St. Gallen. 2. Thankmar, who predeceased Otto 3. Liudolf, who predeceased Otto, father of Ekkehard (a number of his descendants were Markgraves of Meissen) 4. Henry the Fowler 5. Barbara, who married Henry, first Marquis of Austria (according to other sources, parent of Otto's wife - Ben notes: this child isn't listed with FMG) 6. Oda (b. c.884, d. 2 July after 952), married (897) in Worms with King Zwentibold, in 900 with Gerhard of Metzgau, and (after 910) with Eberhard of Oberlahngau. She outlived all her husbands, as they were all killed in battles. 7. Liutgard, Abbess of Gandersheim (919-923) 8. Irminburg, possibly, who married Siegfried (before 936) son of Thietmar, Margrave of Meissen.

Footnotes : 1. Give or take 6 years.

(No sources cited) -------------------- From the English Wikipedia page on Otto I, Duke of Saxony: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_I,_Duke_of_Saxony

Otto's wife was Hathui (Hedwiga), daughter of Henry of Franconia. Otto was and is buried in the church of Gandersheim Abbey. He had two sons, Thankmar and Liudolf, who predeceased him, but his third son Henry succeeded him as duke of Saxony and was later elected king. His daughter Oda married Zwentibold, King of Lotharingia.

Sources (for entire article)

Reuter, Timothy. Germany in the Early Middle Ages 800–1056. New York: Longman, 1991. -------------------- From the German Wikipedia page on Bamberg (place of birth): http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamberg

Die ältesten Relikte der Bamberger Vorgeschichte sind vermutlich die im 19. Jahrhundert gefundenen Bamberger Götzen. Im Jahre 902 wurde zum ersten Mal ein Castrum Babenberch auf dem heutigen Domberg genannt. Es gehörte dem ostfränkischen Geschlecht der älteren Babenberger, die das Lehen 903 in einer blutigen Fehde mit den rheinfränkischen Konradinern verloren. Bei der sogenannten Babenberger Fehde starben drei babenbergische Brüder. Die Besitzungen fielen an den König und blieben bis 973 Königsgut. Kaiser Otto II. schenkte das Castrum seinem Vetter, dem Herzog von Bayern, Heinrich dem Zänker.[2]

In English:

The oldest relics of Bamberg's history were found in the 19th century, called the Bamberger Idols. In 902 was the first mention of a Castrum Babenberch, located on what today is called Cathedral Hill. It belonged to the East Franconian family of the Old Babenberger line that in 903 fought a blood feud with the Rhenish-Frankish Conrad and lost. The so-called Babenberger Feud killed all three Babenberg brothers. Their possessions were confiscated by the king and held as royal estates until 973. Emperor Otto II gave the castle to his brother, Duke Heinrich "The Quarreler" of Bavaria. [2].

Reference:

2. ↑ Heinrich Gottfried Philipp Gengler: Regesten und Urkunden zur Verfassungs- und Rechtsgeschichte der deutschen Städte im Mittelalter, Erlangen 1863, S. 106-122. ---------------------------- German Wikipedia page on Grabfeld (territory of her father): http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grabfeld

Das Grabfeld oder der Grabfeldgau ist eine im Grenzbereich Südthüringens und Nordbayerns befindliche, bis 679 m ü --- Geschichte [Bearbeiten]

Das Grabfeld ist ein ehemaliger ostfränkischer Gau, der 813 zum ersten Mal schriftlich in einer Urkunde erwähnt wurde. In dieser Urkunde wird zwischen einem östlichen und einem westlichen Grabfeld unterschieden. Dem Gau sind auch zahlreiche Untergaue zugeordnet. Fulda jenseits der Rhön war noch dem Grabfeld zugeteilt.

Grafen im Grabfeld waren die fränkischen Babenberger: 1. Poppo (I.), 819/839 Graf im Saalgau 2. Burchard I. 837 bis nach 857 Graf im Grabfeldgau[6] 3. Christian 857 und nach 866 genannt[7] 4. Adalbert, Sohn Poppos (II.), 898/915 Graf im Grabfeld 5. Poppo (III.), † 945, Sohn Adalberts, Graf im Grabfeld und Tullifeld

Der Grabfeldgau wird 1057 von Bischof Adalbero von Würzburg der polnischen Königin Richiza überlassen.[8] Nach ihrem Tod 1063 gelangt der Gau wieder in den Besitz des Hochstifts.

In seinem Lied der Franken erwähnt Joseph Victor von Scheffel den Grabfeldgau in der vierten Strophe:

„...und seh’ die Lande um den Main zu meinen Füßen liegen. Von Bamberg bis zum Grabfeldgau umrahmen Berg und Hügel die breite stromdurchglänzte Au...“

Die Herkunft für den Namen der Landschaft Grabfeld wurde bisher nicht eindeutig geklärt. Es gibt jedoch einige Erklärungsversuche:

1. Das althochdeutsche Wort für Graf ist gravio, grafio oder graphio. Papst Gregor III. nennt die Bewohner der Landschaft in einem Schreiben im Jahr 793 die „Graffelti“. Karl der Große schrieb in verschiedenen Urkunden u.a. im Jahre 776 „Graffelt“ als Bezeichnung für diese Gegend. Auch Ludwig der Fromme bezeichnete die Landschaft 893 mit „Graphelt“. Die Gegend war also das Feld der Grafen, das Grafenfeld.

2. Der Name könnte auch aus dem Slawischen herrühren, da es in dieser Gegend im frühen Mittelalter viele slawische Siedler gegeben hat. Der in Schriften aus dieser Zeit oft vorkommende Begriff „Grapfeld“ bedeutet in der urslawischen Sprache „Hainbuche“. Da es im Grabfeld einst weite Buchenwälder gab und das nördliche Grabfeld auch heute noch „Buchonia“ (= „Buchenland“) bezeichnet wird, ist auch diese Version denkbar.

3. Der Sprachforscher Peter von Polenz vermutet, dass der Name vom althochdeutschen Adjektiv „grao“, das „grau“ bedeutet, herrührt, da weite Teile der Landschaft durch die graue Farbe des Muschelkalks geprägt sind. Landschaftsnamen auf -feld entstammen weitgehend der vorfränkischen Zeit.

4. Eine weitere Deutung geht bis in die La-Tène-Zeit (etwa 5.–1. Jahrhundert v. Chr.) bzw. bis in die Hallstattzeit (etwa 800 - 475 v. Chr.) zurück. Der Begriff „Grabfeld“ bedeutete damals soviel wie „Landschaft mit sumpfigen Gewässern“.

5. Nach der „Ringleinsage“ stammt der Name daher, dass einst eine Königin, die mit ihrem Gatten und dessen Gefolge zur Jagd ritt, ihren Ehering verlor und daraufhin das ganze Gebiet von ihren Bediensteten umgraben ließ, bis der Ring wieder gefunden wurde. Damit wollte sie ihren strengen Gemahl wieder gütig stimmen, der sie verdächtigte, den Ring wegen eines anderen Liebhabers weggeworfen zu haben. An der Fundstelle wurde das Rathaus einer neuen Stadt errichtet − Königshofen. Das Glockenspiel am Erker des Rathauses erinnert an diese Sage. --- Einzelnachweise/Footnotes

6. ↑ Alfred Friese: "Zur Herrschaftsgeschichte des fränkischen Adels" S. 96 7. ↑ Reinhard Wenskus: "Sächsischer Stammesadel und fränkischer Reichsadel" S. 280 8. ↑ Reichsarchiv München: Urkunde 1 aus den Monumenta Castellana castell1/U1. --- In English:

The Grabfeld, or Grabfeldgau, is within the border area of southern Thuringia and northern Bavaria, at an elevation of up to 679 m above sea level. --- History

The Grabfeld is a former Eastern Frankish province, mentioned for the first time in a document from 813. This document distinguishes eastern and western Grabfeld. The provinces are associated with numerous lesser subdivided territories (untergau). Fulda beyond the Rhön was part of the Grabfeld.

The Counts of Grabfeld were the Frankish Babenbergers: 1. Poppo I, 819/839, Count in Saalgau 2. Burchard I, 837-857, Count in Grabfeldgau [6] 3. Christian, 857 and 866, referred to in [7] 4. Adalbert, son of Poppo II, 898/915, Count in the Grabfeld 5. Poppo III, d. 945, son of Adalbert, Count in the Grabfeld and Tullifeld.

The Grabfeldgau was in 1057 ruled by Bishop Adalbero of Würzburg under Polish Queen Richiza [8]. After her death in 1063, the district was again solely the possession of the diocese.

In his song of the Franks, Joseph Victor von Scheffel mentions the Grabfeldgau in the fourth stanza:

"... And see the land around the Main laying at my feet. From Bamberg to Grabfeldgau surround the mountain and hills the general stromdurchglänzte Au ... "

The origin of the name of the Grabfeld was never clearly explained. However, there are some theories:

1. The Old High German word for Graf - gravio, grafio, or graphio. Pope Gregory III called the inhabitants of this region the "Graffelti" in correspondence from 793. Charlemagne wrote in various documents from 776 designating the area as "Graffelt." Even Louis the Pious described the region in 893 as "Graphelt." The area would therefore mean the "Field of the Count," or the "Count's Field."

2. The name could also be Slavic, since the area in the Middle Ages had many Slavic settlers. In the writings of this period, an often occurring term of "Grapfeld" was used, meaning in the proto-Slavic language "hornbeam." In the Grabfeld, beech forests were once widespread, and the northern Grabfeld is still called "Buchonia" (or "Book Land"), conceivably from this term.

3. The linguist Peter von Polenz suggests that the name could derive from the Old High German adjective "grao," the "grau" coming from the gray color of mussels seen in much of the landscape. Regional names in Grabfeld come largely before the Frankish era.

4. Another possibility is that up to the La Tene period (about 5th to 1st century BC) and up to the Hallstatt period (about 800-475 BC), the Grabfeld at that time meant something like "region with marshy waters."

5. Based on the "Ringleinsage," the name comes from the story that at one time a queen, her husband, and his entourage rode through the region on a hunt, where she lost her wedding ring. He had his whole party dig up the area until her ring was found again. But she refused her husband after this, and she was suspected of having another lover, who had thrown the ring away. At the site, a city was built, named Königshofen. The chimes on the balcony of Königshofen's City Hall serve to remind people of this story. -------------------- Hedwiga (also known as Hathui) was the daughter of Henry of Franconia and his wife Ingeltrude. She married Otto I, Duke of Saxony. They had three sons, Henry (who succeeded his father as Duke of Saxony), Thankmar and Liudolf (who both died young), as well as a daughter, Oda. Oda married Zwentibold, King of Lotharingia. Categories: House of Babenberg -------------------- From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps08/ps08_335.htm

She is also known as Ludgarda.

References: [AR7],[Weis1] -------------------- I «Allgemeine deutsche Biographie» uttales at Hedwig stammet fra Karolinerne.

Tekst: Tore nygaard

Kilder:

Allgemeine deutsche Biographie. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 56. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 24, 68. -------------------- Född: Abt 850

 of, , Saxony, Germany 

Family:

1 Otton le Grand

 Children: 
 • Henri (Heinrich) Emperor of Germany, [L'Oiseleur] 

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedwiga

HedwigaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search Hedwiga (also known as Hathui) was the daughter of Henry of Franconia and his wife Ingeltrude. She married Otto I, Duke of Saxony. They had three sons, Henry (who succeeded his father as Duke of Saxony), Thankmar and Liudolf (who both died young), as well as a daughter, Oda. Oda married Zwentibold, King of Lotharingia.

-------------------- From Wikipedia:

Hedwiga (also known as Hathui) was the daughter of Henry of Franconia and his wife Ingeltrude. She married Otto I, Duke of Saxony. They had three sons, Henry (who succeeded his father as Duke of Saxony), Thankmar and Liudolf (who both died young), as well as a daughter, Oda. Oda married Zwentibold, King of Lotharingia. -------------------- Leo, Caroli Magni Progenies, Neustadt an der Aisch, 1977 , Rösch, Siegfried, Reference: 81. -------------------- Great grand daughter of Charlesmagne. --------------------

    He may have actually been a brother but the Saxon Annals do not list a name, birthdate or any title, suggesting he was of no great importance.  However a son is listed next to the slash in the annals, so he lived long enough to have children.  It is possible he entered and then left the priesthood to start a family of his own, but again of no worthy importance to the Annals.
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Hedwig of Babenberg's Timeline

856
856
Bamberg, (Present Oberfranken), Herzogtum Bayern (Bavaria), Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
869
869
Age 13
Sachsen, Germany
870
870
Age 14
Stammesherzogtum Sachsen, Ostfrankenreich (Present Germany)
875
875
Age 19
875
Age 19
Südthüringau (within present Thuringia), Ostfrankenreich (Present Germany)
876
876
Age 20
Memleben, Herrschaft Ostfalen (Present Bugenlandkreis), Herzogtum Sachsen (Present Sachsen-Anhalt), Ostenfrankenreich (Present Deutschland)
876
Age 20
Wittenberg Sachsen, Thuringen, Germany
876
Age 20
Kaiserpfalz, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
890
890
Age 34
Germany
903
December 24, 903
Age 47
Herzogtum Sachsen, Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)