Hamelin de Warenne, 4th Earl of Surrey

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About Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet), 4th Earl of Surrey

Person ID # I129623 Source: Wales. Welsh Medieval Database Primarily of Nobility and Gentry.

https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I129623&tree=Welsh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamelin_de_Warenne,_Earl_of_Surrey

Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) aka Hamelyn Warin (c. 1150 - May 7, 1202) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England, Henry II, Richard I, and John.

He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou "Plantagenet", and thus a half-brother of King Henry II, and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John. His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne, in her own right Countess of Surrey. She was the widow of William of Blois. Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164, and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey. In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants. He and Isabella would have four children.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire, a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy.

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade, he took the side of the regent William Longchamp. Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory, in Sussex. He was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. A daughter, named Adela, was the mistress of her cousin King John of England, and by him the mother of Richard Fitz Roy.

Isabella de Warenne Countess of Surrey died 1 on 13 Jul 1199

--------------------

From http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#_Toc186716619

HAMELIN d'Anjou, illegitimate son of GEOFFROI V “le Bel/Plantagenet” Comte d’Anjou & his mistress --- (1130-7 May 1202, bur Chapter House, Lewes).

Benedict of Peterborough names "Hamelinus frater regis Henrici comes Warennæ" among those present at the coronation of King Richard I in 1189[872]. Maybe Vicomte de Touraine. 5th Earl of Surrey 1164 by right of his wife. An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennæ” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warenniæ” with the consent of “Isabellæ comitissæ Warenniæ uxoris meæ et Willielmi de Warennia filii et hæredis mei”, for the souls of “Henrici regis fratris mei et Gaufridi comitis Andegaviæ patris mei”, witnessed by “Willilemus de Warennia filius Reginaldi de Warennia…”[873]. “Hamelinus comes de Warenna” donated property to Slevesholm Priory, with the consent of “Ysabellæ comitissæ uxoris meæ et Willielmi filii nostri”, by undated charter[874]. “Hamelinus comes de Warenna et Hysabella comitissa mea” donated property to St Mary Overey Priory, Southwark, for the souls of “Willielmi primi, secundi et tertii, et…Gundredæ comitissæ et Hisabellæ comitissæ”, by undated charter[875].

m ([Apr] 1164) as her second husband, ISABELLE de Warenne, widow of GUILLAUME de Blois Comte de Boulogne, daughter & heiress of WILLIAM de Warenne Earl of Surrey & his wife Adèle de Ponthieu (-[12 Jul 1203], bur Chapter House, Lewes). Robert of Torigny records the marriage in 1164 of "Hamelinus naturalis frater regis Henrici" and "comitissam de Guarenna, relictam Willelmi comitis Moritoni filii Stephani regis, …filia tercii Willermi comitis de Guarenna"[876]. “Hamelinus comes de Warenna” donated property to Slevesholm Priory, with the consent of “Ysabellæ comitissæ uxoris meæ et Willielmi filii nostri”, by undated charter[877]. An undated charter of ”Johannes comes Warennæ” confirmed earlier donations to Thetford Priory by “Hamelinus comes Warenniæ” with the consent of “Isabellæ comitissæ Warenniæ uxoris meæ et Willielmi de Warennia filii et hæredis mei”[878]. Earl Hamelin & his wife had [five] children

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hamelin d'Anjou, 5th Earl of Surrey was born circa 1129.1 He was the son of Geoffrey V Plantagenet, Comte d'Anjou et Maine and Adelaide of Angers.2 He married Isabella de Warenne, daughter of William III de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey and Ela Talvas, in April 1164.1 He died on 7 May 1202.3 He was buried at Chapter House, Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England.3

    Hamelin d'Anjou, 5th Earl of Surrey gained the title of Vicomte de Touraine.3 He gained the title of 5th Earl of Surrey, in right of his wife.1 In 1164 he was present at the council of Northampton.3 From April 1164, his married name became Hamelin de Warenne.1 In 1173 he supported King Henry II against his sons.3 In 1176 he escorted Joan, daughter of King Henry II, for her marriage to the King of Sicily.3 In 1193 he was one of the treasurers for the ransom of King Richard I.3 In 1200 he was granted a market at Conisborough, Yorkshire.3

Hamelin - seems to have spent more time at his Yorkshire castle than any of the previous earls; he held the earldom for close on forty years, from 1163 until his death in 1202. It was this period that saw the construction of the great stone keep of the castle and its development as a place suitable for royalty - King John, nephew of Hamelin, did actually stay here in 1201. The cylindrical keep probably dates from around 1180, Hamelin seems to have ordered its construction to his own design, there being no other example of this type of keep anywhere in the country. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ EARLDOM OF SURREY (V) HAMELIN illegitimate son of GEOFFREY V, styled "PLANTAGENET," COUNT OF ANJOU, TOURAINE and MAINE, sometime DUKE OF NORMANDY, by an unknown woman, held lands in Touraine, presumably the gift of his half-brother Henry II, and appears to have been styled vicomte of Touraine. He became EARL OF SURREY in consequence of his marriage to the Countess Isabel in 1164; in which year he attended the Council of Northampton. In 1166 he returned his carta, as holding 60 knights' fees. He supported the King against his rebellious sons in 1173; and in 1176 he was one of the nobles who escorted Henry's daughter Joan for her marriage to the King of Sicily. He was present at the 1st Coronation of Richard I, 3 September 1189. In the King's absence he supported the Chancellor against John; in 1193 he was one of the Treasurers for the King's ransom; and in 1194 he was at the Council of Nottingham. At Richard's 2nd Coronation, 17 April 1194, he bore one of the 3 swords; and he was present at the Coronation of King John, 27 May 1199. He was a benefactor, or confirmed previous gifts, to the abbeys of St. Mary's (York), St. Victor-en-Caux, West Dereham and Foucarmont, the priories of Lewes, Nostell, St. Katherine (Lincoln), Southwark, Thetford and Castle Acre, the Hospitallers, and the chapel of St. Philip and St. James in Conisborough Castle. He married, in 1164 (probably in April), Isabel, widow of William (OF BLOIS) 4th EARL OF SURREY, and only daughter and heir of William (DE WARENNE), 3rd EARL OF SURREY, all above-named. He died 7 May 1202 and was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes. Isabel survived him and made gifts for the soul of her late husband to the priory of St. Katherine, Lincoln, and to Lewes Priory. She was living in April 1203 but died probably soon afterwards, possibly 12 July 1203, and was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes (g). (g) By her 2nd husband she had issue, a son William, 6th Earl, and 3 daughters: (1) Ela, who m. 1stly Robert de Newburn, of whom nothing is known, and 2ndly, William FitzWilliam of Sprotborough; (2) Isabel, who m. 1stly Robert de Lascy, and 2ndly Gilbert de Laigle, lord of Pevensey; (3) Maud, who m. 1stly Henry, Count of Eu and lord of Hastings, and 2ndly Henry d'Estouteville or de Stuteville, of Eckington, co. Derby, and Dedham, Essex, lord of Valmont and Rames in Normandy. [Complete Peerage XII/1:499-500] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Children of Hamelin d'Anjou, 5th Earl of Surrey and Isabella de Warenne William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey+ d. 27 May 12401 Isabella de Warenne+ d. b 30 Nov 1234 Ela de Warenne Mary (Mahant) de Warenne+ b. 1163 d.abt 1212 - 12281 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Sources: [S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 53. [S106] Royal Genealogies Website (ROYAL92.GED), online <ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/genealogy/public_html/royal/index.html>. [S79] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry (Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004), page 747 ff. Hereinafter cited as Plantagenet Ancestry. Wikipedia

Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Genealogical Publishing Co. 5th ed. 1999), page 184, line 151-1.
Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists (Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, MD, 7th Ed, 1999), page 82, line 83-26.

The Complete Peerage -------------------- Hameline Plantagenet, natural brother to King Henry II, likewise obtained, jure uxoris, the Earldom of Surrey, and assumed the surname and arms of de Warren. This nobleman bore one of the three swords at the second coronation of Richard I, and in the 6th of the same reign [1195], he was with that king in his army in Normandy. He d. 7 May, 1202, four years after the countess, having had issue, William, Adela, Maud, another dau. who m. Gilbert de Aquila, Isabel, and Margaret. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 569, Warren, Earls of Surrey] ------------------------- Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Warenne or Surrey (d 1202) was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey 'Plantagenet' count of Anjou (d 1151), and was therefore half-brother of Henry II. The name of his mother is unknown. His importance dates from the rich marriage which he was enabled to make by the goodwill of his half-brother, the king. In 1163 or 1164 he married Isabella de Warenne. Robert of Torigny dates the marrige in 1164, but there is a "Comes de Warenne' mentioned in the Pipe Roll of 9 Henry II (1162-3), who can only be Hamelin, and Hamelin as ear occurs in the pipe role of 10 Henry II. Like William of Blois, Isabella's first husband, Hamelin is henceforward called 'Comes de Warenne' and lord of his wife's great estates in Yorkshire, Surrey, Sussex, and Norfolk. He is rarely, if ever, described by contemporaries as 'Earl of Surrey.' Hamelin took a fairly conspicuous part in politics. He was at the council of Northampton in October 1164, and joined in the denunciation of Archbishop Thomas (1118-1170) as a traitor. He was crushed by the archbishop's taunt, 'Were I a knight and not a priest, this hand should prove thee a liar.' After Becket's exile he was sternly rebuked by the primate for withholding the tithe of the monks of Lewes. However, in after years he became a great worshipper of St Thomas, being cured, as was believed, of blindness in one eye by means of the covering of the shrine of the martyr. This established a close connection between him and the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury, who, in their hour of suppreme need, during their contest with Archbishop Baldwin in 1187 and 1188, made urgent appeals to his charity and sympathy. In 1166 Hamelin was returned as possessing sixty knights' fees and in 1171-2 paid a scutage of 60 £ to the exchequer. He was one of the few great nobles who remained faithful to Henry II during the general revolt of the feudal party in 1173-4. In August 1176 he acted as one of the escort of his niece Joan, Henry II's daughter, on her way from England to the court of her husband, King William of Sicily. He accompanied Joan as far as St-Gilles in Provence. He was faithful to his brother in the general desertion that preceded Henry II's death, being with him in June 1189 on the continent. He was present at Richard I's coronation on 3 Sep 1189. He exchanged with Richard his lands at Toron in France for Thetford in Norfolk; the date limits of this charter are 5 Jun 1190 - 27 Nov 1191. During his nephew's absence on crusade Hamelin upheld his government against the intrigues of Earl John. In 1191 he adhered to the chancellor Longchamp against John. He was sent by the chancellor to liberate Archbishop Geoffrey of York from prision. He represented Longchamp at the conference with John's adherents at Loddon Bridge, near Reading. At Winchester on 28 July he was one of the three earls appointed ot represent the chancellor's party who, with other representatives of both sides, sought to appease the feud on conditions nonourable to both parties. In 1193 he was one of the treasurers of Richard's ransom and on Richard's release he attended the great council held by the king at Nottingham in March 1194. He carried the secon of the three swords borne before Richard at his second coronation on 17 Apr 1194.

On 27 May 1199 Hamelin was present at John's coronation and on 21 Nov of the same year witnessed the homage of the king of Scots to John on a hill near Lincoln. In March 1201 he entertained John at Conisborough. He died in April 1202. Isabella de Warenne is said to have died on 13 July 1199 and to have been buried at Lewes, but the order to their tenants to do homage to their son on 12 May 1202 was made 'salva fide matris smace' and a charter printed and facsimiled in Watson's 'Earls of Warren and Surrey' pruports to be issued by her after her husband's death.

Hamelin had a long dispute with the abbots of Cluny as to their respective rights over the priory of Lewes. He was a benefactor of Lewes and other houses. He and Isabella were also benefactors of the Augustinian priory of St Mary Overy, Southwark, and to a small extent of St Mary's, York. He founded an endowment for a priest for the chapel within Coisborough Castle, Probably he was the builder of the magnificent keep of Conisborough. He various grants are collected, though not very critically, in Watson. His high-handed action with regard to his dependent churchmen is seen in a letter to Guy Rufus, rector of Conisborough, printed in 'Historians of the Church of York.'

Hamelin was succeeded by his son, William de Warenne (d. 1240). He was the second founder of the house of Warenne. His paternal origin was forgotten, and the name Warenne became the family name of his descendants. His male line continued to hold the earldom until the death of John de Warenne (1286-1347). He had a daughter married to Guy de Laigle. [Dictionary of National Biography, XX:819-821]

-------------------- Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey was born on 1129 in England to Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou, Touraine, and Maine and Adelaide of Angers. Hamelin married Isabella De Warren, Contessa of Surrey on April 1164 in England and had 5 children: William De Warren, 6th Earl of Surrey; Suzanne De Warren; Ela De Warren; Maud "Matilda" De Warren; and Isabel De Warren. He passed away on May 7, 1202 in Lewes, Sussex, England and is buried in Chapter House of Lewes Priory, Lewes, Sussex, England.

Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey, Count of Varenne is my 27th great grandfather.

SOURCE: Jane MacDaniels Genealogy;

  • 1163 Hamelin Plantagenet, son of Geoffrey, Earl of Anjou, and half brother of King Henry 2nd became the 5th Earl on his marriage to the widowed Isabel. It is accepted that he built the Castle Keep on the site of an earlier wooden stronghold c.1180-90, and probably the curtain wall soon afterwards. Isabel and Hamelin made an endowment of 50/- a year for a priest and a chapel within the castle 1189. Hamelin's nephew, King John, issued a charter at Conisbrough in 1201 and may have lodged in the Keep. Hamelin was one of a number of treasurers responsible for raising 70,000 marks of silver to affect the release of King Richard who had been imprisoned in Austria on his return from the Holy Land. Hamelin himself contributed £40.8.7d. He died in 1201 and was buried at Lewes.

Source: [http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=gonefishin&id=I132170]

HAMELIN de WARENNE, 5th EARL of SURREY

Hamelin de Warenne (1129 - May 7, 1202) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England, Henry II, Richard I, and John. He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou, and thus a half-brother of Henry II, and an uncle of Richard I and John. His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne, in her own right Countess of Surrey. She was the widow of William of Blois. Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164, and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey. In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants. Warenne land in England centered on Connisborough in Yorkshire, a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy. Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1167, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage. He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade, he took the side of the regent William Longchamp. Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199. He died in 1202 and was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. A daughter, named Adela, was the mistress of her cousin King John of England, and by him the mother of Richard Fitz Roy.

Source: [http://www.warrenfamilyhistory.com/Docs/Our%20Warrens%20in%20England.htm]

NOTE:

Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey (sometimes Hamelin of Anjou and, anachronistically, Hamelin Plantagenet[a] (c.1129—1202) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England, Henry II, Richard I, and John.

He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou, and thus a half-brother of King Henry II,[1] and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John.[2] His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne, in her own right Countess of Surrey.[3] She was the widow of William of Blois.[3] Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164,[4] and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey.[5] In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire, a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy.

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade, he took the side of the regent William Longchamp. Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory, in Sussex. He was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.[6]

By his wife Isabel de Warenne he had:

  • William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, he married Maud Marshal.[7]

(Suzanne), was the mistress of her cousin[b] John, King of England, and by him the mother of Richard, Baron of Chilham.[8]

  • Ela, married first Robert de Newburn and secondly William fitz William of Sprotborough.[7]
  • Maud (Matilda), married first Henry Count d'Eu and Lord of Hastings, secondly Henry d'Estouteville, Seigneur de Valmont.[7]
  • Isabel, married first Robert de Lacy of Pontefract, secondly Gilbert de l'Aigle, Lord of Pevensey.[7]

References:

1.^ Malden, Henry Elliot, A History of Surrey, (Eliot Stock, 1900), 105. 2.^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Band II, (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Taflen 46, 82-3 3.^ a b John Guy, Thomas Becket: Warrior, Priest, Rebel (New York: The Random House Publishing Group, 2012), p. 161 4.^ George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Volume XII, Part 1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 5.^ George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Volume XII, Part 1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 n. (h) 6.^ Sussex Archaeological Collections relating to the History and Antiquities of the County, Vol.35, Sussex Archaeological Society, (H. Wolff, 1887), 8. 7.^ a b c d George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Vol. XII/1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 n. g 8.^ Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., 'Royal Bye-Blows, The Illegitimate Children of the English Kings From William I to Edward III', The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 119 (April 1965), p. 98

Notes:

a.^ "It is much to be wished that the surname "Plantagenet," which since the time of Charles II, has been freely given to all descendants of Geoffrey of Anjou, had some historical basis which would justify its use, for it forms a most convenient method of referring to the Edwardian kings and their numerous descendants. The fact is, however, as has been pointed out by Sir James Ramsay and other writers of our day, that the name, although a personal emblem of the aforesaid Geoffrey, was never borne by any of his descendants before Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (father of Edward IV), who assumed it, apparently about 1448. V.G., The Complete Peerage, Vol. 1, p. 183 note (c) b.^ Technically they were half first cousins, both being grandchildren of Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou by different mothers. See Schwenicke, Europaische Stammtaleln (ES), Band II, Tafeln 82, 83; ES, III/3, tafel 355; Sheppard, 'Royal Bye Blows', NEHGR, 119, 97. Her given name is not known for a certainty

Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamelin_de_Warenne,_Earl_of_Surrey]

-------------------- Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey (sometimes Hamelin of Anjou and, anachronistically, Hamelin Plantagenet[a] (c.1129—1202) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England, Henry II, Richard I, and John. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamelin_de_Warenne,_Earl_of_Surrey -------------------- Hamelin de Warenne, Earl of Surrey (sometimes Hamelin of Anjou and, anachronistically, Hamelin Plantagenet[a] (c.1129—1202) was an English nobleman who was prominent at the courts of the Angevin kings of England, Henry II, Richard I, and John. Life[edit]

He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou, and thus a half-brother of King Henry II,[1] and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John.[2] His half-brother Henry gave him one of the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabella de Warenne, in her own right Countess of Surrey.[3] She was the widow of William of Blois.[3] Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164,[4] and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey.[5] In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire, a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy.

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan of England to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade, he took the side of the regent William Longchamp. Hamelin appeared in the 2nd coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory, in Sussex. He was succeeded by his son William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.[6]

Family[edit]

By his wife Isabel de Warenne he had: William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, he married Maud Marshal.[7] (Suzanne), was the mistress of her cousin[b] John, King of England, and by him the mother of Richard, Baron of Chilham.[8] Ela, married first Robert de Newburn and secondly William fitz William of Sprotborough.[7] Maud (Matilda), married first Henry Count d'Eu and Lord of Hastings, secondly Henry d'Estouteville, Seigneur de Valmont.[7] Isabel, married first Robert de Lacy of Pontefract, secondly Gilbert de l'Aigle, Lord of Pevensey.[7]

References[edit]

1.^ Malden, Henry Elliot, A History of Surrey, (Eliot Stock, 1900), 105. 2.^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Band II, (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Taflen 46, 82-3 3.^ a b John Guy, Thomas Becket: Warrior, Priest, Rebel (New York: The Random House Publishing Group, 2012), p. 161 4.^ George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Volume XII, Part 1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 5.^ George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Volume XII, Part 1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 n. (h) 6.^ Sussex Archaeological Collections relating to the History and Antiquities of the County, Vol.35, Sussex Archaeological Society, (H. Wolff, 1887), 8. 7.^ a b c d George Edward Cokayne, The complete peerage; or, A history of the House of lords and all its members from the earliest times, Vol. XII/1, Ed. Geoffrey H. White (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1953), p. 500 n. g 8.^ Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., 'Royal Bye-Blows, The Illegitimate Children of the English Kings From William I to Edward III', The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 119 (April 1965), p. 98

Notes[edit]

a.^ "It is much to be wished that the surname "Plantagenet," which since the time of Charles II, has been freely given to all descendants of Geoffrey of Anjou, had some historical basis which would justify its use, for it forms a most convenient method of referring to the Edwardian kings and their numerous descendants. The fact is, however, as has been pointed out by Sir James Ramsay and other writers of our day, that the name, although a personal emblem of the aforesaid Geoffrey, was never borne by any of his descendants before Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (father of Edward IV), who assumed it, apparently about 1448. V.G., The Complete Peerage, Vol. 1, p. 183 note (c) b.^ Technically they were half first cousins, both being grandchildren of Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou by different mothers. See Schwenicke, Europaische Stammtaleln (ES), Band II, Tafeln 82, 83; ES, III/3, tafel 355; Sheppard, 'Royal Bye Blows', NEHGR, 119, 97. Her given name is not known for a certainty

-------------------- He was an illegitimate son of Geoffrey of Anjou, and thus a half-brother of King Henry II,[1] and an uncle of Richard the Lionheart and King John.[2] King Henry arranged for him to marry the wealthiest heiresses in England, Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess of Surrey.[3] She was the widow of William of Blois.[3] Hamelin and Isabella married in April 1164,[4] and after the marriage he was recognized as Comte de Warenne, that being the customary designation for what more technically should be Earl of Surrey.[5] In consequence of the marriage Hamelin took the de Warenne toponymic, as did his descendants.

Warenne land in England centered around Conisbrough in Yorkshire, a location in which Hamelin built a powerful castle. He also possessed the third penny (entitlement to one third of the fines levied in the county courts) of County Surrey and held the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Normandy.

Hamelin joined in the denunciations of Thomas Becket in 1164, although after Becket's death he became a great believer in Becket's sainthood, having, the story goes, been cured of blindness by the saint's help. In 1176, he escorted his niece Joan to Sicily for her marriage.

He remained loyal to Henry through all the problems of the later part of the king's reign when many nobles deserted him, and continued as a close supporter of his nephew Richard I. During Richard's absence on the Third Crusade, he took the side of the regent William Longchamp. Hamelin appeared in the second coronation of King Richard in 1194 and at King John's coronation in 1199.

He died in 1202 and was buried at the Chapter House at Lewes Priory, in Sussex. He was succeeded by his son, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.[6]

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Hamelin de Warenne, 4th Earl of Surrey's Timeline

1150
1150
Anjou, Pays de la Loire, Rhone-Alpes, France
1150
Norfolk, England, United Kingdom
1152
1152
Age 2
Norfolk, England
1164
1164
Age 14
Surrey, England
1165
1165
Age 15
Surrey, England
1166
1166
Age 16
Surrey, England
1168
1168
Age 18
England
1200
1200
Age 50
1202
May 7, 1202
Age 52
Lewes, Sussex, England
1202
Age 52
Chapter House, Lewes, Sussex, England