Hannah Hale (c.1765 - c.1818)

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Birthplace: Fort Rogers, Taliaferro, GA, USA
Death: Died in Autauga Town, Monroe , Alabama, United States
Managed by: Mike Neese
Last Updated:

About Hannah Hale

=============

From FindAGrave:

Wife of: Far off Warrior Tustenuggee Hopaithele Haujo

Mother of:

1. Mary "Polly" Hale

2. Infant Daughter Hale

3. Jane "Jennie" Hale

4. David Hale

5. Samuel Hale

Hannah Hale is believed to have been born near present-day Taliaferro County, Georgia in about the year 1765.

In the year 1777 when Hannah was 11 or 12 years old, she was abducted by the Creek Indians at a place called Roger's Fort on the Ogeechee River in present-day Taliaferro County, Georgia.

Taking the Creek Path through the Lower Creek villages and then heading northward along the Coosa River, a Creek war party arrived with Hannah Hale at their village which the traders had named the Fish Ponds.

The village was actually named Thlotlogalgua, or Laloakalka. The Indian Agent Benjamin Hawkins, traveling through the Creek country in the year 1799, came to this village where he found Hannah Hale living with her five children. She had married the head man of this town, Far off Warrior.

Samuel and his brother David Hale received land in Monroe County, Alabama in the Treaty of Fort Jackson, due to their being the sons of a Creek "Head Man," or chief.

On January 29, 1817, heirs of Hannah Hale made requests to the House of Representatives of the United States in the 14th Congressional session. These heirs were asking for an Indemnity for losses in the Creek Wars which was passed by the Ways and Means Committee on March 3, 1817, but rejected by the Claims Committee in 1818.

In 1828, Samuel and David Hale went before the Public Lands committee to receive confirmation of a title to the lands on which they resided. This title would be given to them for as long as they lived but would not pass to their heirs.

David would die in the Creek Indian Removal of 1837 in Pass Christian, Mississippi, en route to Oklahoma. Samuel is believed to have been the youngest of the five children. He, more fortunate than his brother David, survived the removal to the Oklahoma Territory where his descendants lived. All children would keep their mother's last name which was Hale.

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See also this discussion: http://boards.ancestry.com/thread.aspx?mv=flat&m=3084&p=localities.northam.usa.special.secreeks

from which comes:

"Hannah Hale would have five children in all, three daughters and two sons, by the Mad Far Off Warrior. A daughter, Jennie, was born in about the year 1790 and she married Simeon Strickland.

Another daughter, Mary "Polly" Hale, married a man named John Miles who died before 1832. Polly is listed on the 1832 Creek Indian Census, living in Autauga Town.

The two sons were named David and Samuel. Samuel and his brother David Hale received land in Monroe County, Alabama in the Treaty of Fort Jackson, due to their being the sons of a Creek "Head Man," or chief. David would die in the Creek Indian Removal of 1837 in Pass Christian, Mississippi, enroute to Oklahoma. Samuel is believed to have been the youngest of the five children. He, more fortunate than his brother David, survived the removal to the Oklahoma Territory where his descendents lived. All children would keep their mother's last name which was Hale."

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-------------------- I have other notes I lean more toward than this info, but I'm posting this just for info:

HANNAH HALE

LifeNotes: See her page. In the year 1777, when Hannah was 11 or 12 years old, she was abducted by the Creek Indians at a place called Roger's Fort on the Ogeechee River in present-day Taliaferro County, Georgia.

Chris Clark shares this with us:

In his book "Sketch of the Creek Country", Benjamin Hawkins writes this concerning Hannah Hale and the village Laloakalka, commonly called the Fish Ponds, where she lived: "Hannah Hale resides here. She was taken a prisoner from Georgia, when about eleven or twelve years old, and married the head man of this town, by whom she has five children. This woman spins and weaves, and has taught two of her daughters to spin; she has labored under many difficulties; yet by her industry has acquired some property. She has one negro boy, a horse or two, sixty cattle, and some hogs; she received the friendly attention of the agent for Indian affairs, as soon as he came in the nation. He furnished her with a wheel, loom, and cards; she has an orchard of peach and apple trees. Having made her election at the national council, in 1799, to reside in the nation, the agent appointed Hopoithle Haujo to look out for a suitable place for her, to help her to remove to it with her stock, and take care that she receives no insults from the Indians."

See the entire text of Chris Clark's piece, "Hannah Hale of Thlotlogalgua, or Laloakalka -- The FishPonds"

Born: 1765, in or near Taliaferro Co., GA.

Married: about 1777, Fish Pond village, Coosa Co., AL.

Died: about 1818, Autauga Town, Monroe Co., AL

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Hannah Hale's Timeline

1765
1765
Taliaferro, GA, USA
1777
1777
Age 12
Fish Pond village, Coosa, Alabama, United States
1785
1785
Age 20
Fish Pond Village, Coosa, Alabama, USA
1787
1787
Age 22
Fish Pond, Coosa, Alabama, USA
1788
1788
Age 23
Taliaferro, GA, USA
1790
1790
Age 25
Fish Pond Village, Coosa, Alabama, USA
1818
1818
Age 53
Autauga Town, Monroe , Alabama, United States
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Taliaferro, GA, USA