Hannah Mariah Manning (Porritt) (1868 - 1955)

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Birthplace: Oxford, ID, USA
Death: Died
Managed by: Leslie Ann
Last Updated:
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About Hannah Mariah Manning (Porritt)

I found this history written by Hannah her self years ago at the web address http://lofthouse.com/history/Porritt-H.html , but it is no longer available.

I was born in Oxford Idaho, August 9, 1868. My parents, Nathaniel Porritt, and Sarah Ann Foster Porritt were among the first eight families there. They were called by Brigham Young to settle at Clifton, Idaho, but the Indians were so bad they settled at Oxford.

I was the first baby born out side the fort where the families had settled for protection, the house had a dirt floor, and a dirt roof; was my home, and when it rained the water came right on in, and we had to go over to the bishop's Dicksons, and carry our bedding to keep dry when it rained. My father was in the Edward Martin handcart company, and walked with his mother across the plains. His mother was Margaret McCann; her first husband preached the gospel in England, but he took sick and died, so the family came on. Aunt Jane froze to death in a severe storm on the hills. When I was six, I helped fight the grasshoppers from the wheat, and when I was nine, I helped mother care for her own new baby, and her sister's baby because they were ill. She nursed two at a time. She also took care of the neighbor's baby. We had twelve cows to take care of, while father worked on the Logan Temple. My own father and mother had separated earlier during a quarrel, she burnt a precious book which he was reading. This book contained a lot of history, family history. She was not as educated as he was, and did not know it's worth.

I helped make cheese, and walked many miles to pick sarvice berries to help out with family meals. Many times I have set the table, when the Indians would come in and eat whether we starved or not. I never knew what it was to have a pare of shoes till I was twelve. I wore Indian moccasins more than once. I have ridden in most every kind of conveyance from ox team, covered wagon, running gears, street cars, all except the air plane.

About 1915, eight or nine women cooked for a hundred men that were trying to get water for the town of Clifton, which Brigham Young had laid out. Louise Lee, mother of Harold B. Lee was one of these women. God caused a drought to come, and there wasn't any water except that which came from the town site.

I was married to Thomas E. Smedley, at Dingel Del, Bear Lake county, Idaho, Sept 1, 1887. I was baptized for my health in the Logan Temple, June 16, 1891...My husband died at Clifton Idaho, Jan 11, 1902 and was buried there.

I was a relief society teacher, and had to drive ten miles with a horse and buggy to do our teaching. My companion was Ida Porter, and she had two children we had to take with us. The last time we went, we went to a place we had never visited before, as we drove in a young man came out and said God has answered our prayers. His wife was very sick in child labor. We stayed two hours and combed her hair, and fixed her something to eat. She hadn't seen a woman all summer. Her husband said we had saved her life.

I took typhoid fever, and after my husband died, I went to Fish-Haven, and stayed with my Aunt who was sick with cancer. I was sick all year, and have nursed the sick all my life.

At one time the Clifton ward went dead and broke. Then they put in a Bishop by the name of James Davis. he came to me and ask my advice. I told him that I would give a social that would shake the ward to it's foundation. So that is what we did. We invited every man, woman, and child in the ward, and they came and it was a success.

I was married to Almon Manning of Preston, Idaho, 9 May, 1904. He was the son of Freeman Manning and Cathrine Watkins Manning. He had been previously married to Margaret Belinda Russell. She died at childbirth, and left a baby girl, Sarah Catherine, who died a month before she was four years old. My husband had been a widower for fourteen years.

I was sick a lot after we were married until after our first child was born on the 7th of November 1907. His name is Almon Clyde. I had prayed for this joy, and I knew that I would have a son in my arms when I was forty. I told my mother and many others that I would have a son, and they all thought I was foolish. I had to go to the LDS hospital and have five operations, and had to remain there for four weeks, and was there on decoration day in the year 1912. Clyde was sick with typhoid fever before his eigth birthday, so he could not be baptized. he was unconcious for seven weeks. When he came to, the first thing he did was to put his arms around me, and said if I'd have died I could not have been baptized and been a little Mormon boy. It was by the help of the Lord that he got well. I even prayed and told the Lord to take him if it was his will, he was so sick. When I had my patriarchal blessing, I was told that if I would teach my child the gospel, I would live a long life.

We came to Jerome in 1917, and belonged to the Hazelton ward, and homesteaded there and had to haul our water two miles for the stock as well as for ourselves. We moved to Paul in 1919, and I was sick in bed about one year after that. We had one hundred and sixty acres, and still have forty of that.

Clyde graduated from the Paul High School in 1927... We bought us some lots and built us a home in Heyburn in 1928. We came the first of Feb 1928. My husband farmed most of his life and was in poor health after we came to Heyburn. He had a stroke and died the last Wednesday of October... 1936 at Heyburn Idaho.

I have lived alone most of the time since he died. I have helped the sick all my life, and now my friends are good to me.

I have done lots of genealogical work for my father, and his three children, his second wife, and four children, and done some work on the McCann line. Five on the Foster line, and two on the Gibbs, and four others sealings.

My folks came from over the sean, and it has taken a long time, but, I have finished my Father's work. I have been working with my Father's brother Thomas Parritt family and am not alone in this work. In 1948 I received a check for $10.00 for my birthday, and took a trip to Salt Lake City, my second in many years. I was in the hospital from 16-30 December. Elder Harrold B. Lee and L. McDermott administered to me, and Elder Lee gave a beautiful prayer, I recovered, and was able to visit my relatives, some I had not seen in over forty years. I had a wonderful time, and got to attend a conference, and see this is the place monument, which touched me deeply.

I also visited relatives in Brigham City, Tremonton, Lewiston, and Pocatello. My cousin Sarah J. Marler came home with me for a visit.

Clyde has been second counselor in the bishopric in Elgin Oregon. He has had a serious operation, and is in poor health now. I am also in poor health, with heart trouble, and other things, but am still willing to do what I can to help in genealogical work. Our reunion for the Porritt's will be held in July at Pocatello Idaho.

I am very proud that I have done as much of my father's work as I have. I will be eighty four 9 Aug, 1952.

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Hannah Manning's Timeline

1868
August 9, 1868
Oxford, ID, USA
1887
September 1, 1887
Age 19
Dingel Del, Bear Lake, Idaho
1904
May 9, 1904
Age 35
Idaho
1907
November 5, 1907
Age 39
Clifton, Franklin, Idaho, USA
1955
1955
Age 86
1955
Age 86
Heyburn, Minadoka, Idaho