Heinrich - von Bayern, I (919 - 955) MP

‹ Back to von Bayern surname

Is your surname von Bayern?

Research the von Bayern family

Heinrich I, Herzog von Bayern's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Nicknames: "Duke Henry I of /Bavaria/", "(Note that his son is Henry II "The Quarrelsome")", "Henry I duke of Bavaria"
Birthplace: Of, , Nordgau Region, Medieval States
Death: Died in Ratisbon/Regensburg, (Present Oberpfalz), Bayern, Deutschland
Occupation: Duc de Lorraine, Herzog von Lotharingen, Duke of Lotharingia, Hertig av Lothringen (940), Duc de Bavière, Hertig av Bayern, Herzog von Bayern, Duke of Bavaria (940-955)
Managed by: Victar (on hiatus)
Last Updated:

About Heinrich - von Bayern, I

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Germany (covering his birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/GERMANY,%20Kings.htm#HeinrichIBavariadied955

Chapter 3. KINGS of GERMANY 918-1024, SAXON DYNASTY (LIUDOLFINGER)


HEINRICH I 919-936, HEINRICH II 1002-1024

HEINRICH, son of OTTO "dem Erlauchten" Graf [im Südthüringau] & his wife Hedwig [Babenberg] ([876]-Memleben[135] 2 Jul 936, bur Quedlinburg Stiftskirche).

Thietmar records that Heinrich was "born of the noble lineage of Otto and Hadwig"[136]. According to the Annalista Saxo, he was son of the unnamed sister of Adalbert [Babenberg], with whom he and his brothers fought against the Konradiner family, his complete parentage being recorded in a later passage[137].

He was elected HEINRICH I "der Vogelsteller/the Fowler" King of Germany at Fritzlar 6 May 919, but refused unction offered by Heriger Archbishop of Mainz[138].

King Heinrich re-established Saxon domination over the Slavs after successful campaigns against the Hevelli in 928 and against the Daleminzi and Bohemians in 929[139]. He founded Meissen in [928/29][140]. He defeated "Knud I" King of Denmark[141]. He defeated the Magyars at the battle of Riade near Merseburg in 933, their first major setback in their raids on western Europe[142].

The necrology of Fulda records the death "936 Kal Iul" of "Heinrih rex"[143]. Thietmar records the death of King Heinrich 2 Jul 936 at Memleben "in the…sixtieth year of his life" and his burial at Quedlinburg "which he himself had constructed from the ground up"[144]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "2 Jul" of "Heinricus rex pater magni oddonis"[145].

m firstly (906, divorced 909) as her second husband, HATHEBURG, widow of ---, daughter of EBERWIN & his wife ---.

Thietmar names Hatheburg as daughter of "lord Erwin", specifying that she was widowed (without naming her first husband), when recording her marriage to Heinrich[146]. Widukind records the mother of "Thancmari" as "filia materteræ Sigifridi"[147].

She had become a nun after the death of her first husband, which presumably provided the reason for "the outrage perpetrated through this marriage" and the basis for the couple's separation although it is not explicitly expressed as such by Thietmar[148].

m secondly (Wallhausen 909) MATHILDE, daughter of Graf THEODERICH [Immedinger] & his wife Reginlind --- ([896]-Quedlinburg 14 Mar 968, bur Quedlinburg Stiftskirche).

Widukind names "Mahthilda" as wife of King Heinrich, also naming her father and three brothers[149]. Thietmar names Mathilde as daughter of "Dietrich and Reinhild" when recording her marriage to Heinrich, specifying the was "a descendant of the lineage of King Widukind"[150]. Her alleged descent from Widukind is also referred to in the Vita Mahthildis[151].

Quedlinburg was bestowed on Mathilde as part of her dower 16 Sep 929[152]. She established the convent there 30 days after the death of her husband[153].

She played an active part in encouraging the rebellion of her son Heinrich in 939 and was included in the reconciliation of 941[154].

Lay Abbess of Nivelles.

Thietmar records the death of Queen Mathilde on 14 Mar, without specifying the year[155]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "968 2 Id Mar" of "Mahthild regina"[156].

King Heinrich & his first wife had one child:

1. THANKMAR ([907/09]-murdered Eresburg 28 Jul 938).

Widukind names "Thancmari" as son of King Heinrich, when recording his rebellion against King Otto, and in a later passage names his mother[157]. Thietmar records the birth of "Tammo"[158].

He was considered illegitimate on the basis that his mother had taken the veil before her second marriage, which was therefore invalid[159].

Thietmar records the rebellion of "Tammo son of the king and Liudgard", and that he claimed the inheritance of Siegfried Graf [von Merseburg], Pfalzgraf von Sachsen (who was his mother's first cousin). He was besieged in Eresburg, forced into the church of St Peter where he was killed 28 Jul by Maginzo before the altar, his murderer being punished with a cruel death by the king "later, in the second year of his reign"[160].

The necrology of Merseburg records the death "28 Jul" of "Thancmar frater magni Oddonis"[161].

King Heinrich & his second wife had five children:

The number and names of these children appear definitive (apart from any who died in infancy) as shown by a list of names in the Libri Confraternitatum Sancti Galli which sets out (in order) "Heinrich, Mathilt, Otto, Heinrich, Prun, Kerbrich, Adawi, Kysilbref", no doubt referring to King Heinrich, his wife, children and son-in-law[162]. The list is undated but was presumably written during the period [929/36] as King Heinrich's other son-in-law Hugues Duc des Francs (married 937) is not included.

2. OTTO (23 Nov 912-Memleben 7 May 973, bur Magdeburg cathedral).

Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[163].

Associate King of Germany, with his father, in 930.

He was elected OTTO I "der Große" King of Germany 7 Aug 936, installed at Aachen.

3. GERBERGA (Nordhausen [913/14]-Reims 5 May 984, bur Abbaye de Reims).

Liutprand states that the wife of "Gislebertum Lotharingorum ducem" was "regis sororem"[164]. Flodoard names her "Gerbergam" when recording her second marriage[165].

Her first husband had been a rival of King Heinrich I and maybe planned to establish himself as independent ruler in Lotharingia in 920[166]. As the marriage coincided with Giselbert being created dux, it was presumably arranged to confirm Giselbert's submission to King Heinrich. King Louis married Gerberga without the permission of her brother Otto I King of Germany, probably to increase his hold on Lotharingia (ruled by her first husband).

Gerberga was active in the defence of Laon in 941 and of Reims in 946, accompanied her husband on expeditions to Aquitaine in 944 and Burgundy in 949, and was active during his period of imprisonment in 945/46[167].

An educated person, she commissioned from Adso of Moutier-en-Der the De ortu et tempore antichristi[168].

Her second husband gave her the abbey of Notre-Dame de Laon in 951, taken from his mother on her second marriage. Abbess of Notre Dame de Soissons in 959[169].

m firstly ([928/29]) GISELBERT Graf [von Maasgau], son of REGINAR [I] "Langhals" Graaf [van Maasgau] Comte de Hainaut & his wife Alberada --- (-drowned in the River Rhine Oct 929). He was created dux in 928 by Heinrich I King of Germany, which effectively created him GISELBERT Duke of Lotharingia.

m secondly (end 939) LOUIS IV "d'Outremer" King of the West Franks, son of CHARLES III "le Simple" King of the West Franks & his second wife Eadgifu [Ogive] of England ([10 Sep 920/10 Sep 921]-Reims Oct 954, bur Reims St Remy).

---

4. HEINRICH ([Dec 919/22 Apr 922]-Regensburg 1 Nov 955, bur Regensburg St Emmeran).

Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[170]. "Henrici ducis, fratris primi Ottonis" is named in the Annalista Saxo[171].

"Henricus…rex" granted property to Paderborn cathedral by charter dated 9 May 935 which names "Heinrici æquivoci ac filii nostri et Hadeuui filiæ nostræ" by charter dated 9 May 935[172].

He was captured by Eberhard Duke of Franconia in 938 and "held in chains". He rebelled against his brother King Otto in 939 and took part in a campaign of pillaging along the Rhine, joined by Eberhard ex-Duke of Franconia and Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia [Hainaut][173]. They were defeated at Birten and Andernach[174].

After Duke Giselbert was drowned, Heinrich was installed as HEINRICH Duke of Lotharingia in [940], but was unable to establish himself there and soon returned to Saxony[175].

He was installed as HEINRICH I Duke of Bavaria in 947 by his older brother[176]. He was expelled from Regensburg by his nephew Liudolf Duke of Swabia, during the course of the latter's rebellion against his father, but restored by his brother King Otto in [955][177].

Regino records the death of "Heinricus frater regis" in 955[178]. The necrology of Fulda records the death "955 Kal Nov" of "Heinrichus dux"[179]. The necrology of Merseburg records the death "1 Nov" of "Heinricus dux avus imperatoris Heinrici"[180]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "Kal Nov" of "Heinricus dux Baioaria hic sepultus"[181].

(Children includes HEINRICH II "der Zänker" or "The Quarrelsome", Duke of Bavaria.)

---

5. HEDWIG ([922]-9 Jan [958 or after 965]).

Rodulfus Glaber names "sororem [primis Ottonis] Haduidem" as wife of "Hugo dux Francorum cognomento Magnus"[183].

"Henricus…rex" granted property to Paderborn cathedral by charter dated 9 May 935 which names "Heinrici æquivoci ac filii nostri et Hadeuui filiæ nostræ" by charter dated 9 May 935[184]. "Hugues abbé de Saint-Martin" donated "son alleu de Lachy…dans le comté de Meaux", inherited from "comte Aledramnus", to Tours Saint-Martin by charter dated 14 Sep 937 which names "sa femme Havis"[185]. Flodoard refers to "sororem Othonis regis Transfhenensis, filiam Heinrici" as the wife of "Hugo princeps, filius Roberti", without naming her, recording the marriage in 938[186].

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "V Id Jan" of "Hadhuidis comitissa"[187].

m ([9 May/14 Sep] 937) as his third wife, HUGUES "le Grand" Duc des Francs, son of ROBERT I King of France & his second wife Béatrix de Vermandois ([898]-Dourdan, Essonne Jun 956, bur Saint-Denis).

6. BRUNO (May 925-Reims 11 Oct 965, bur Köln St Pantaleon).

Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[188]. "Brun archiepiscopus Agrippinæ civitatis" is named "frater imperatoris", when recording his death in 965[189]. Chancellor of Germany 940-953.

"Otto…rex" granted property to the church of Cambrai at the request of "germani nostri Brunonis et Cuonradi ducis atque Herimanni ducis" by charter dated 30 Apr 948[190].

Abbot of Lorsch 948/50.

Archbishop of Köln 953.

In 953, he was installed as BRUNO Duke of Lotharingia by his brother King Otto[191].

According to Thietmar of Merseburg, Archbishop Bruno plotted against his brother, offering the crown of Germany to his brother-in-law Hugues "le Grand", but repented of his scheme and was forgiven by King Otto[192]. In 959, Bruno divided Lotharingia into Upper and Lower Lotharingia, installing comte Frederic (husband of his niece Béatrix de France) as Duke of the former[193].

Thietmar records the death of Archbishop Bruno on 11 Oct "in the thirteenth year after his ordination"[194].

References:

[135] Vita Mathildis Reginæ 8, MGH SS IV, p. 288, which calls the town "Imilebun".

[136] Thietmar 1.3, p. 68.

[137] Annalista Saxo 902 and 907.

[138] Thietmar 1.8, p. 73.

[139] Reuter (1991), pp. 143-4.

[140] Thietmar 1.16, p. 79.

[141] Thietmar 1.17, p. 80.

[142] Widukind 1.38, pp. 56-7, quoted in Thietmar, p. 79, footnote 47.

[143] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.

[144] Thietmar 1.18-19, p. 81.

[145] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.

[146] Thietmar 1.5, p. 70.

[147] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ II.4 and 9, MGH SS III, pp. 439 and 440.

[148] Thietmar 1.5 and 1.6, pp. 70 and 71.

[149] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, pp. 430-1.

[150] Thietmar 1.9, p. 74.

[151] Vita Mahthildis Reginæ Antiquior 1, MGH SS X, p. 575.

[152] Thietmar, p. 83, footnote 64.

[153] Thietmar 1.21, p. 82.

[154] Reuter (1991), p. 153.

[155] Thietmar 2.18, p. 105.

[156] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.

[157] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ II.4 and 9, MGH SS III, pp. 439 and 440.

[158] Thietmar 1.9, p. 74.

[159] Hill, B. H. (1972) Medieval Monarchy in Action: The German Empire from Henry I to Henry IV (London, George Allen and Unwin), p. 25 footnote 1.

[160] Thietmar 2.2, p. 91.

[161] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.

[162] Piper, P. (ed.) (Berlin) Libri confraternitatum Sancti Galli, Augiensis, Fabariensis (Berlin), p. 84.

[163] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430.

[164] Liudprandi Antapodosis IV.20, MGH SS III, p. 321.

[165] Flodoard 939, MGH SS III, p. 386.

[166] Reuter (1991), p. 140.

[167] McKitterick, R. (1983) Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians 751-987 (Longman, London and New York), p. 318.

[168] McKitterick (1983), p. 278.

[169] Settipani (1993), p. 330.

[170] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430.

[171] Annalista Saxo 975.

[172] D H I 37, p. 71.

[173] Thietmar 2.34, p. 117.

[174] Reuter (1991), p. 152.

[175] Reuter (1991), p. 152.

[176] Thietmar 1.21, p. 83.

[177] Thietmar 2.6 to 2.8, pp. 96-7.

[178] Reginonis Chronicon 955, MGH SS I, p. 623.

[179] Annales Necrologici Fuldenses, MGH SS XIII, p. 123.

[180] Althoff, G. (ed.) (1983) Die Totenbücher von Merseburg, Magdeburg und Lüneburg (Hannover), Merseburg.

[181] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.

[183] France, J., Bulst, N. and Reynolds, P. (eds. and trans.) (1989) Rodulfi Glabri Historiarum Libri Quinque, Rodulfus Glaber Opera (Oxford) I.8, p. 19.

[184] D H I 37, p. 71.

[185] Mabille, E. (ed.) (1866) La pancarte notre de Saint-Martin de Tours brulée en 1793 (Paris, Tours) ("Tours Saint-Martin") LVIII, p. 95.

[186] Flodoard 938, MGH SS III, p. 385.

[187] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.

[188] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430.

[189] Annales Hildesheimenses 965, MGH SS III, p.60.

[190] D O I 100, p. 182.

[191] Thietmar 2.23, p. 108.

[192] Thietmar 2.23, p. 109.

[193] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Presses Universitaires de Nancy), p. 10.

[194] Thietmar 2.23, p. 109.

-----------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Bavaria:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BAVARIA.htm#HeinrichIDukedied955

---

HEINRICH ([Dec 919/22 Apr 922]-Regensburg 1 Nov 955, bur Regensburg St Emmeran).

Widukind names (in order) "Oddonem, Heinricum, Brunonem" as sons of King Heinrich & his second wife[213]. "Henrici ducis, fratris primi Ottonis" is named in the Annalista Saxo[214]. "Henricus…rex" granted property to Paderborn cathedral by charter dated 9 May 935 which names "Heinrici æquivoci ac filii nostri et Hadeuui filiæ nostræ" by charter dated 9 May 935[215].

He was captured by Eberhard Duke of Franconia in 938 and "held in chains". He took part in a campaign of pillaging along the Rhine in 939, together with Eberhard ex-Duke of Franconia and Giselbert Duke of Lotharingia [Hainaut][216]. After the latter was drowned, Heinrich was installed as HEINRICH Duke of Lotharingia in [940].

He was installed as HEINRICH I Duke of Bavaria in 947 by his older brother[217]. He was expelled from Regensburg by his nephew Liudolf Duke of Swabia, during the course of the latter's rebellion against his father, but restored by his brother King Otto in [955][218].

The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "Kal Nov" of "Heinricus dux Baioaria hic sepultus"[219].

---

m ([937/40]) JUDITH of Bavaria, daughter of ARNULF Duke of Bavaria [Liutpoldinger] & his wife --- (-29 Jul after 974).

The wife of "Henrici ducis, fratris primi Ottonis" is called "filia Arnoldi ducis quondam Bawariæ", but not named, in the Annalista Saxo[220]. Widukind records the marriage of "filia ducis Arnulfi" to "dominus Heinricus"[221]. The mother of the wife of "Purchardo duce Alamannorum" was "filiam materteræ" of "Heinricus filius Purchardi comitis" who was installed as Bishop of Augsburg in 973, according to the Vita Oudalrici[222].

After the death of her husband, she was suspected of a relationship with Abraham Bishop of Freising but was exonerated by the Bishop, who sang the mass at her burial[223].

"Otto…rex" granted property "in orientali Francia in pago Tubergouue in comitatu Gerungi, Sunderenhof, Baldoluesheim" to "domna Iuditæ" [duchess of Bavaria] by charter dated 11 Feb 961[224]. "Otto…imperator augustus" granted property "salinam…Hal…in pago Salzburggeuue et in comitatu Uuillihelmi comitis" to "domnæ Iuditæ fratris nostri beatæ memoriæ Heinrici ducis viduæ" by charter dated 27 Apr 973[225].

She was imprisoned when her son rebelled in [974/75], and obliged to enter the convent of Niedermünster at Regensburg[226].

The necrology of the Lower Monastery in Regensburg records the death "III Kal Jul" of "Ievta ducissa fundatrix inferioris monasterii"[227]. The necrology of Regensburg St Emmeran records the death "III Kal Jul" of "Judita vidualis nonna"[228].

Duke Heinrich & his wife had [five] children:

a) GERBERGA ([940]-13/14 Nov 1001).

Thietmar names Gerberga as sister of Heinrich II Duke of Bavaria, recording that she was Abbess of Gandersheim[229].

"Otto…imperator augustus" made a donation of property "Sehusa…in pago Ambergeuue et in comitatu Rotuuigi comitis" to Kloster Gandersheim by charter dated 7 Jun 974, naming "nepti nostra Gerburga eiusdem cenobii abbatissa"[230].

Abbess of Gandersheim 949, 956.

b) HEDWIG (-26 Jul 994).

The mother of the wife of "Purchardo duce Alamannorum" was "filiam materteræ" of "Heinricus filius Purchardi comitis" who was installed as Bishop of Augsburg in 973, according to the Vita Oudalrici[231]. "Otto…rex" donated land "Scaleia…in pago Brisggouue in comitatu Birhtilonis" to the church at Worms by charter dated 18 Jun 990 on the petition of "Hadeuige ducis nostræ…consanguineæ"[232].

The Annales Einsidlenses record the death in 994 of "Hadewig dux"[233]. "Otto…rex" confirmed a donation of "villis Bosinga, Messinga, Ancencimbra, Harthusa, Vrsilinga in pago Para et in comitatu Hiltibaldi comitis" to Kloster St Gregor, Petershausen by "bone memorie domine Hadewige ducis" by charter dated 4 Nov 994[234]. "Otto…rex" donated property "Nuzbach…in pago Mordenouua et in comitiatu Cuononis comitis" to Kloster Waldkirch naming "bone memorie Burghardi Alemannorum ducis…sueque contectalis Haduuuige" by charter dated 22 Dec 994[235].

m BURKHARD II Duke of Swabia, son of BURKHARD I Duke of Swabia & his wife --- (-12 Nov 973, bur Reichenau Island). Widukind names "Suavi quibus præfuit Burghardus" as husband of "filia fratris regis"[236].

c) HEINRICH (951-Gandersheim 28 Aug 995, bur Gandersheim Stiftskirche[237]).

"Heinricus Bawariorum dux…filius Henrici ducis, fratris primi Ottonis" is named in the Annalista Saxo, when recording his capture in 975[238].

He succeeded his father in 955 as HEINRICH II "der Zänker" Duke of Bavaria.

d) [BRUNO (-after 22 Jul 976).

"Otto…imperator augustus" donated property to the church of Passau by charter dated 22 Jul 976 in which he names "Bruno…nepos noster"[239]. Bruno's parentage is not known but it is possible that he was the son of Heinrich I Duke of Bavaria.]

e) [POPPO .

"Otto…imperator augustus" gave property "villam Stocheim…in pago Grapfeld in comitatu Ottonis" to the church of Würzbürg by charter dated 6 Dec 979 at the request of "nepus noster Poppo"[240]. Poppo's parentage is not known but it is possible that he was the son of Heinrich I Duke of Bavaria.]

References:

[213] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ I.31, MGH SS III, p. 430.

[214] Annalista Saxo 975.

[215] D H I 37, p. 71.

[216] Thietmar 2.34, p. 117.

[217] Thietmar 1.21, p. 83.

[218] Thietmar 2.6 to 2.8, pp. 96-7.

[219] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.

[220] Annalista Saxo 975.

[221] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ II.36, MGH SS III, p. 447.

[222] Gerhardi Vita S. Oudalrici I.28, MGH SS IV, p. 415.

[223] Thietmar 2.41, p. 122.

[224] D O I 220, p. 302.

[225] D O I 431, p. 584.

[226] Thietmar 3.5, p. 150.

[227] Necrologium Monasterii Inferioris Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 273.

[228] Necrologium Monasterii S Emmerammi Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 301.

[229] Thietmar 4.20, p. 165.

[230] D O II 36, p. 47.

[231] Gerhardi Vita S. Oudalrici 28, MGH SS IV, p. 415.

[232] D O III 63, p. 469.

[233] Annales Einsidlenses 994, MGH SS III, p. 144.

[234] D O III 152, p. 562.

[235] D O III 158, p. 569.

[236] Widukindi Res Gestæ Saxonicæ III.44, MGH SS III, p. 458.

[237] Thietmar 4.20, pp. 165-6.

[238] Annalista Saxo 975.

[239] D O II 138, p. 155.

[240] D O II 208, p. 236.

-----------------------

From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Heinrich I von Bavaria:

http://thepeerage.com/p13299.htm#i132989

Heinrich I Herzog von Bayern[1]

M, #132989, d. 955

Last Edited=25 Jan 2010

Heinrich I Herzog von Bayern is the son of Heinrich I von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor. He married Judith von Bayern.[2] He died in 955.[1]

Heinrich I Herzog von Bayern succeeded to the title of Herzog von Bayern in 947.[1]

Child of Heinrich I Herzog von Bayern

1. Heinrich II Herzog von Bayern+[3] d. 28 Aug 995

Citations

1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 126. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

2. [S1916] Tim Boyle, "re: Boyle Family," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 16 September 2006. Hereinafter cited as "re: Boyle Family."

3. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World, page 122.

--------------------

From the German Genealogical site Geneall:

http://www.geneall.net/D/per_page.php?id=275759

Heinrich I, Herzog von Bayern

+ 01.11.0955

Eltern

Vater: Heinrich I. der Vogler, König des Ostfrankenreichs * c. 0876

Mutter: Mathilde die Heilige von Rheingelhein * c. 0890

Heiraten

Judith von Bayern

Kinder

Heinrich II, Herzog von Bayern * 0951

Gisela de Bourgogne

Titel

Herzöge von Bayern

--------------------------------------------

From the German Wikipedia page on Heinrich I von Bayern:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_I._(Bayern)

Heinrich I. (* 919/922 in Nordhausen; † 1. November 955 in Pöhlde) war Herzog von Bayern.

Heinrich war der zweite Sohn des deutschen Königs Heinrich I. und seiner Gemahlin Mathilde und Bruder des ostfränkischen Königs Otto I..

938 verschwor er sich im Bunde mit Eberhard von Franken und Giselbert von Lothringen gegen seinen Bruder Otto, da er eigene Ansprüche auf den Thron erhob. Zuvor war er im Aufstand Thankmars von Eberhard gefangengenommen worden. Im Jahre 939 wurde er bei Birten geschlagen und gezwungen, das Reich zu verlassen. Er floh zu König Ludwig IV. von Frankreich, unterwarf sich aber, nachdem dieser mit Otto Frieden geschlossen hatte.

940 erhielt Heinrich das Herzogtum Lothringen, konnte seine Herrschaft jedoch nicht behaupten, weshalb es ihm wieder aberkannt wurde. Ostern 941 versuchte er, Otto in der Königspfalz in Quedlinburg zu ermorden. Der Anschlag wurde entdeckt, Heinrich in Ingelheim gefangengehalten und zu Weihnachten 941 in Frankfurt am Main nach reuevoller Buße begnadigt.

Im Jahre 948 wurde er mit dem Herzogtum Bayern (seine Gemahlin Judith war eine bayrische Fürstin) belehnt. Er konnte sich in den Ungarnkriegen behaupten. Als Brautwerber seines Bruders geleitete er die Königin Adelheid im Jahr 951 nach Pavia. 952 vergrößerte er sein Herzogtum um die Marken Verona und Aquileja. Einen Aufstand Liudolfs und Konrads von Lothringen konnte er blutig unterdrücken. Er starb am 1. November 955 im Kloster Pöhlde.

Er wurde im Niedermünster in Regensburg beigesetzt, wo auch seine Frau Judith begraben ist.

Der Mensch Heinrich ist relativ unbekannt. Widukind von Corvey zeichnet ein, aus seiner Sicht, wohl negatives Bild, was aber mit einer Abneigung gegenüber Heinrich zu tun haben mag.

Heinrich I. war verheiratet mit Judith von Bayern. Mit ihr hatte er die drei Kinder Hadwig (ca. 939–994), Gerberga (ca. 940–1001) die Äbtissin von Gandersheim und wurde und Heinrich II. (951–995).

Quellen

Hrotswith: Hrotsvithae Opera, herausgegeben von Helen Homeyer, München u.a. 1970.

Widukind von Corvey: Die Sachsengeschichte des Widukind von Corvey, in: Quellen zur Geschichte der sächsischen Kaiserzeit, übersetzt von Albert Bauer, Reinhold Rau (Freiherr vom Stein-Gedächtnisausgabe 8), Darmstadt 1971, S. 1–183.

Literatur

Sigmund Ritter von Riezler: Heinrich I. (Herzog von Bayern). In: Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (ADB). Band 11. Duncker & Humblot, Leipzig 1880, S. 454–457.

Weblinks

genealogie-mittelalter.de

Herzog von Bayern 948-955

Vorgänger Amt Berthold

Nachfolger Heinrich II.

In English:

Heinrich I (b. 919/922 in Nordhausen, d. 1 November 955 in Pohlde) was a Duke of Bavaria.

Heinrich was the second son of the German King Henry I and his wife Mathilde, and brother to East Franconian King Otto I.

In 938, he conspired with Eberhard von Franconia and Gilbert, duc de Lorraine, against his brother Otto while raising his own claims to the throne. Previously, he had revolted against Thankmar, and was taken prisoner then by Eberhard.

In 939, he was beaten at Birten, and forced to leave the Kingdom. He fled to King Louis IV of France and submitted himself, but only after he signed a peace treaty with Otto.

In 940, Heinrich was given the Duchy of Lorraine, but for some unknown reason, it was removed from him. On Easter 941, he tried to murder Otto in the Royal Palace at Quedlinburg. When the attack was discovered, Heinrich was imprisoned at Ingelheim, and on Christmas 941, he was pardoned in Frankfurt-am-Main after a rueful repentance.

In 948, he was awarded the Duchy of Bavaria (his wife Judith was a Bavarian princess). He may have taken part in the wars against Hungary. As a courtier of his brother, he escorted Queen Adelaide in 951 to Pavia. In 952, he increased his domain to include Verona and Aquileia.

When Liudolf and Conrad of Lorraine rebelled, he carried out a bloody suppression campaign. He died on 1 November 956 at the monastery in Pohlde.

He was buried in the Niedermunster Cathedral in Regensburg, alongside his wife Judith.

The character of Heinrich is relatively unknown. Widukind of Corvey described him in a most negative light, but this may have been because of his dislike with the duke.

Heinrich I married Judith von Bayern. They had three children: Hadwig (c.939-994); Gerberga (c.940-1001, served as Abbess of Gandersheim); and Heinrich II (951-995).

Sources:

1. Hrotswith: Hrotsvithae Opera: edited by Helen Homeyer, inter alia Munich 1970.

2. Widukind of Corvey: The History of the Saxons, within the Sources for the History of the Saxon Empire, translated by Albert Bauer, Reinhold Rau (Freiherr vom Stein memorial, Issue 8), Darmstadt 1971, p. 1-183.

Bibliography

1. Sigmund Ritter von Riezler: Heinrich I (Duke of Bavaria), in General German Biography (ADB), 11th Volume, Duncker and Humblot, Leipzig 1880, p. 454-457

--------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Henry I of Bavaria:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

Henry I (919/921 – November 1, 955) was Duke of Bavaria.

He was the second son of the German King Henry the Fowler and his wife Matilda. He attempted a revolt against his older brother Otto I in 938 in alliance with Eberhard of Franconia and Giselbert of Lorraine, believing he had a claim on the throne. In 939 he was defeated at Birten and forced to leave Germany. He fled to the court of Louis IV of France, but returned after he and Otto were reconciled, and awarded the Duchy of Lorraine.

However, he could not assert his authority in Lorraine, and as a result he was stripped of his position. He plotted to assassinate Otto in Easter 941 in Quedlinburg, but was discovered and put in captivity in Ingelheim, being released after doing penance at Christmas of that year. In 948 he acquired the Dukedom of Bavaria through his marriage to the Bavarian noblewoman Judith. He first defended, and then enlarged his Duchy in wars with Hungary, and through the acquisition of Friuli in Italy. As matchmaker for his brother he brought Queen Adelaide to Pavia in 951. In 953–954 he put down a revolt by Liudolf, Duke of Swabia and Conrad of Lorraine, and died in 955 in Pöhlde Abbey. His son was Henry II, Duke of Bavaria.

He was laid to rest in the Niedermünster in Regensburg, where his wife Judith is also buried.

Henry I, Duke of Bavaria

House of Saxony (Liudolfing)

Born: 919

Died: 1 November 955

Preceded by Gilbert of Lorraine

Duke of Lotharingia 939 – 940

Succeeded by Otto

Preceded by Berthold

Duke of Bavaria 948–955

Succeeded by Henry II -------------------- Henry I (919/921 – November 1, 955) was Duke of Bavaria.

He was the second son of the German King Henry the Fowler and his wife Matilda. He attempted a revolt against his older brother Otto I in 938 in alliance with Eberhard of Franconia and Giselbert of Lorraine, believing he had a claim on the throne. In 939 he was defeated at Birten and forced to leave Germany. He fled to the court of Louis IV of France, but returned after he and Otto were reconciled, and awarded the Duchy of Lorraine.

However, he could not assert his authority in Lorraine, and as a result he was stripped of his position. He plotted to assassinate Otto in Easter 941 in Quedlinburg, but was discovered and put in captivity in Ingelheim, being released after doing penance at Christmas of that year. In 948 he acquired the Dukedom of Bavaria through his marriage to the Bavarian noblewoman Judith. He first defended, and then enlarged his Duchy in wars with Hungary, and through the acquisition of Friuli in Italy. As matchmaker for his brother he brought Queen Adelaide to Pavia in 951. In 953–954 he put down a revolt by Liudolf, Duke of Swabia and Conrad of Lorraine, and died in 955 in Pöhlde Abbey. His son was Henry II, Duke of Bavaria.

He was laid to rest in the Niedermünster in Regensburg, where his wife Judith is also buried.

-------------------- Henry I (919/921 – November 1, 955) was Duke of Bavaria.

He was the second son of the German King Henry the Fowler and his wife Matilda. He attempted a revolt against his older brother Otto I in 938 in alliance with Eberhard of Franconia and Giselbert of Lorraine, believing he had a claim on the throne. In 939 he was defeated at Birten and forced to leave Germany. He fled to the court of Louis IV of France, but returned after he and Otto were reconciled, and awarded the Duchy of Lorraine.

However, he could not assert his authority in Lorraine, and as a result he was stripped of his position. He plotted to assassinate Otto in Easter 941 in Quedlinburg, but was discovered and put in captivity in Ingelheim, being released after doing penance at Christmas of that year. In 948 he acquired the Dukedom of Bavaria through his marriage to the Bavarian noblewoman Judith. He first defended, and then enlarged his Duchy in wars with Hungary, and through the acquisition of Friuli in Italy. As matchmaker for his brother he brought Queen Adelaide to Pavia in 951. In 953–954 he put down a revolt by Liudolf, Duke of Swabia and Conrad of Lorraine, and died in 955 in Pöhlde Abbey. His son was Henry II, Duke of Bavaria.

He was laid to rest in the Niedermünster in Regensburg, where his wife Judith is also buried. -------------------- http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_I._(Bayern)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/I._Henrik_bajor_herceg

view all 16

Heinrich I, Herzog von Bayern's Timeline

919
December 919
Of, , Nordgau Region, Medieval States
938
938
Age 18
Herzogtum Bayern, Ostenfrankenreich (Present Germany)
940
940
Age 20
Bavaria, Germany
940
Age 20
Bavaria, Germany
951
951
Age 31
951
Age 31
Sachsen, Germany
952
952
Age 32
Verdun (Alsace-Lorraine)
955
November 1, 955
Age 35
Ratisbon/Regensburg, (Present Oberpfalz), Bayern, Deutschland
975
975
Age 35
Saxony
1995
January 12, 1995
Age 35