Heinrich II "Jasomirgott" von Babenberg (Österreich), Herzog (1107 - 1177) MP

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Nicknames: "Jasomirgott"
Birthplace: Klosterneuburg, (Present Niederösterreich), Herzogtum Österreich, Heiliges Römisches Reich
Death: Died in Wien (Vienna), Herzogtum Österreich, Heiliges Römisches Reich
Cause of death: Fell from his horse
Occupation: Greve av Østerike, Pfalzgreve vid Rhen 1140-1141, Markgreve i Österike 1141-1156, Hertig av Bayern 1143-1156 och Hertig av Österike 1156-1177, Markgreve, Markgreve av Østerrike 1141-1156. Hertug av Østerrike 1156-1177
Managed by: Henrik Nissen Sætness
Last Updated:

About Heinrich II "Jasomirgott" von Babenberg (Österreich), Herzog

Ben M. Angel's summary:

Relationships:

Parents:

  • Leopold III "der Heilige", "der Milde" oder "der Fromme" von Babenburg (1080/1086 - 1136) Markgraf Markgraf der bairischen Marcha orientalis oder Ostarrichi (1095 - 1136)
  • Agnes von Waiblingen (1072 - 1143) (name from German Wikipedia)

Older half-sibling:

  • 1. Adalbert (1107 - 1138) Markgraf von Ostarrichi (1119 - 1138) m. firstly Adelheid in 1128/29 (d. before 1132 in childbirth, Princess of Poland according to German Wikipedia), m. secondly (before 1132) Hedwig / Sophie Prinzessin von Ungarn (Hungary).

Siblings:

  • 2. Leopold IV (c1108 - 1141) Markgraf von Ostarrichi (1138 - 1141) and Herzog von Bayern (1139 - 1141), m. Maria von Böhmen (d. c1160, House of the Árpáden)
  • 4. Bertha von Ostarrichi (d. 1150), m. Heinrich III, Burggraf von Regensburg
  • 5. Agnes von Ostarrichi (1108/1113 - 1160/1163) m. Wladyslaw II "Wygniec (the Exile)", Prince of Krakow and Silesia (1138 - 1158)
  • 6. Otto (1112 - 1158), Bischof von Freising (1138 - 1158)
  • 7. Konrad (1116 - 1168), Bischof von Passau (1148 - 1164), Erzbischof von Salzburg (1164 - 1168)
  • 8. Elisabeth von Ostarrichi (d. 1143) m. Hermann II Graf von Winzenburg, Markgraf von Meissen, Landgraf von Thuringen (d. 1152)
  • 9. Jutta von Ostarrichi (d. after 1178) m. in 1133 Guglielmo V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato.
  • 10. Ernst von Ostarrichi (c1118 - 1137), died young
  • 11. Gertrud von Ostarrichi (1120 - 1150), m. in 1140 Vladislav II Herzog von Böhmen
  • 12. Uta von Ostarrichi (d. 1170), m. Liutold, Graf von Plain
  • Seven others that died as children.

Spouses and children:

Wife 1: Gertrud von Süpplingenburg (widow of Heinrich X "der Stolze" Herzog von Sachsen und Bayern, House of Welf)

  • Child 1: Richardis/Rickardis von Ostarrichi/Österreich (female, 1143 - 1200) m. Heinrich V, Landgraf von Stefling

Wife 2. Theodora Komnene (Greek birthname) or Gertrud (Catholic name adopted after marriage)

  • Child 2: Agnes von Ostarrichi/Österreich (1154 - 1182) m. firstly in 1168 Istvan III, King of Hungary (d. 1172), m. secondly after 1172 Hermann II Duke of Carinthia (d. 1181)
  • Child 3: Leopold V (1157 - 1194), Herzog von Österreich (1177 - 1194)
  • Child 4: Heinrich "der Ältere" (1158 - 1223), Herzog von Mödling (1177 - 1223) m. Richza von Böhmen.

Basic information and justifications:

Birth: c1109 - Klosterneuburg. German Wikipedia suggests 1107, but the predecessor suggested by FMG was born in 1108. Melk had served as the seat of the Margravate under the Babenburgs for some time. In 1089, the family castle was given over to the Cistercians. Kahlenburg then became the family residence. At some point, Heinrich's mother, Agnes, is said to have lost a veil in a strong wind there, and it took some time before the veil would be found again. When it was found, an apparition of the Virgin Mary told Heinrich's father to establish a monastery there in 1108 (after which the place took its present name).

Weddings:

  • To Gertrud von Süpplingenburg, on 1 May 1142, presumably in Klosterneuburg. The family home remained at the monastic seat through 1145, two years after her death in childbirth, when it was moved to Wien.
  • To Theodora Komnene / Gertrud in 1148, presumably in Wien.

Death: 13 January 1177 in Wien, died from falling off a horse.

Burial: Schottenkloster (Scots Monastery, present Schottenstift) in Wien.

Occupation: Pfalzgraf von Lothringen (1140 - 1141), Markgraf von Ostarrichi (1141 - 8 September 1156), Herzog von Bayern (as Heinrich XI, 1143 - 8 September 1156), candidate for the throne of the Holy Roman Empire (1152), founder of the Schottenkloster (1155), first Herzog von Österreich (8 September 1156 - 13 January 1177)

Alternate names: Heinrich von Babenburg (before 1141); Heinrich XI von Bayern (1141 - 1156); Heinrich II von Österreich (1156 - 1177)

Note: The name of his family's territory was called Ostarrichi (or "Eastern Realm") from at the latest 996 to 1156. Before this, the Mark was known by the Latin name of Marchia orientalis (Ostmark would be a later invention - an attempt to Germanize this earlier name). The territory would become known as the Herzogtum Österreich after in 1156 additional land is added to it by Emperor Frederick Barbarossa to compensate Heinrich for the loss of Bavaria, given over to the House of Welf to satisfy a debt that the Emperor owed them. The name Austria would be first used by his son Konrad III in a letter to the monks of Klosterneuburg - it resulted from a Latinization of the German Ostar, or "Austra" - thus, Austria.

---------------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on Austria:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AUSTRIA.htm#HeinrichIIdied1177A

LEOPOLD III 1095-1136, LEOPOLD IV 1136-1141 (covering his birth family):


LIUTPOLD von Babenberg, son of LIUTPOLD II Markgraf of Austria & his wife Ida von Ratelberg ([1080/86]-15 Nov 1136, bur Stift Klosterneuburg).

The Auctarium Vindobonense records in 1096 that "Liutpoldus successit dictus pius, sextus marchio" but does not specify his relationship with his predecessor[140]. The primary source which confirms his parentage has not yet been identified.

The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records that "Liupoldus marchio Austrie accinctus est gladio" in 1104[141], an event recorded in 1099 in the Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium[142]. It is assumed that this knighting ceremony was performed around the age of 18, which means that Liutpold was born in the range [1080/86]. This appears corroborated by the same ceremony being recorded for Liutpold's oldest son Adalbert in 1125 (see below).

He succeeded his father in 1095 as LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria. He founded the Cistercian monastery of Heiligenkreuz in 1133.

The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death "1136 XVII Kal Dec" of "Liupoldus marchio Austriæ"[143]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "XVII Kal Dec" of "Liupoldus marchio"[144]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XVII Kal Dec 1136" of "Liupoldus marchio fundator huius templi"[145]. He was killed while hunting.

Canonised 2 Feb 1485[146].

m firstly --- von Perg, daughter of WALCHUN von Perg & his wife --- (-before 1105). This first marriage is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln[147], but the primary source on which it is based has not yet been identified.

m secondly ([early] 1106) AGNES of Germany, widow of FRIEDRICH von Staufen Duke of Swabia, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH IV & his first wife Berthe de Savoie ([Summer 1072/early 1073]-28 Sep 1143, bur Klosterneuburg).

The Gesta Friderici of Otto of Freising records the marriage of "filiam unicam" of King Heinrich IV and "Fridericus dux Suevorum", naming her Agnes in a later passage[148]. In a subsequent passage, the Gesta records the second marriage of Agnes to "Leopaldo Orientali marchioni"[149]. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the marriage of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that the couple had seven children who died in infancy and eleven who survived into adulthood, six sons and five daughters[150]. The marriage presumably took place early in the year if it is correct, as stated by Haverkamp, that it was arranged by Agnes's brother, the future Emperor Heinrich V, to obtain her future husband's support for his rebellion against their father[151]. The Auctarium Mellicense records that Agnes, wife of "Leopoldus marchio", gave birth to 18 children[152].

The Annales Magdeburgenses record the death in 1143 of "Agnes marchionissa mater Cuonradi regis"[153]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa"[154]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Oct" of "Agnes marchionissa fundatrix h e"[155].

Markgraf Leopold III & his [first/second] wife had one child:

1. ADALBERT ([1107]-8/9 Nov [1138], bur Klosterneuburg).

  • According to Europäische Stammtafeln[156], Adalbert was Markgraf Leopold's son by his first marriage, although the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified. On the other hand, the Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Adalbertus primogenitus", implies (although does not specifically state) that he was the son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifies that he was "advocatus Niwenburgensis ecclesiæ" and was buried "in claustro Niwenburgensi" with his parents[157]. Markgraf 1119.
  • The Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium records that "Adelbertus filius Leupoldi marchionis Austrie accingitur gladio cum 120 consertiis" in 1125[158]. Assuming, as postulated above in the case of his father, that this knighting ceremony took place around the age of eighteen, this would place Adalbert's birth date in [1107], after his father's second marriage.
  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1136 of "Adelbertus filius pii marchionis", recorded in the same paragraph after the death of his father but also after the statement that his brother Leopold succeeded their father[159], which confuses the conclusion about the order in which the three of them died. The necrology of Melk records the death "VI Id Nov" of "Adalbert fil Liutpaldi marchionis"[160]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Id Nov" of "Albertus marchio fil fundator S Crucis" and his burial "in Neuenbuerch"[161]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Id Nov" of "Adelbertus Liupoldi marchionis fil advocatus"[162].
  • m firstly ([1128/29]) ADELHEID, daughter of --- (-before 1132). An undated charter confirms, among many donations, the earlier donation by "Adelbertus marchionis Lopoldi filius" of property "villa…Adelrichestorf" to Kloster Neuburg for the soul of "uxoris sue Adelhait"[163].
  • m secondly (before 1132) HEDWIG of Hungary, daughter of ÁLMOS Prince of Hungary & his wife Predslava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev. The Chronicle of Otto of Freising refers to the wife of "Alberto Leopaldo marchionis filio" as sister of King Bela but does not name her[164]. She is named Hedwig in Europäische Stammtafeln[165], but the primary source on which this is based has not yet been identified.

Markgraf Leopold & his second wife had eighteen children:

2. LEOPOLD (-Niederalteich 18 Oct 1141, bur Heiligenkreuz).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Liupoldus" as third son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that he was made Duke of Bavaria and was buried "apud Sanctam Crucem"[166]. The Continuatio states that Leopold was younger than his brother Heinrich, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.
  • He succeeded his grandfather in 1136 as LEOPOLD IV Markgraf of Austria. His uterine half-brother Konrad III King of Germany invested him as LEOPOLD Duke of Bavaria in 1139 after depriving Heinrich "der Stolze" [Welf] of the duchy.
  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis for 1142 records the death of "Liupoldus dux et marchio filius Liupoldi marchionis", specifying that his brother Heinrich succeeded him[167]. The Auctarium Sancrucense specify that he was the founder of "Sancte Crucis" and that he was buried there[168]. The necrology of Nonnberg records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Liupoldus dux"[169]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Leupoldus dux Bawarie et marchio Austrie fil fundatoris S Crucis" and his burial "in S Cruce"[170]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XV Kal Nov" of "Liupoldus Liupoldi marchionis fil, dux Bowarie" and his donation[171]. The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XV Kal Nov 1141" of "dux et marchio Leopaldus…quintus fil s Leopoldi fundatoris" and his burial "in capitulo montii no"[172].
  • m (Sep 1138) as her first husband, MARIA of Bohemia, daughter of SOBĚSLAV I UDALRICH Duke of the Bohemians & his wife Adelaida of Hungary. The Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the marriage in 1138 of "dux Sobezlaus filiam suam Mariam" with "filio Leupoldi orientalis marchionis" specifying that it was celebrated in "Moravia in Olomucensi parte"[173]. The primary source which names her husband has not yet been identified. However, it appears that Leopold is the only son to whom the text can refer. She married secondly Hermann III Markgraf von Baden and Verona. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified.

---

3. HEINRICH (-13 Jan 1177, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).

The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Heinricus" as second son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[174]. The Continuatio states that Heinrich was older than his brother Leopold, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.

He succeeded his brother in 1141 as HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Markgraf of Austria.

---

4. BERTA (-9 Apr [1150], bur St Emmeran).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Perhta" first daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Heinricus purcravius Ratisponensis"[175]. The Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ record the marriage of "purcravius" and "sororem ducis Heinrici [de Austria]"[176]. "Ratisbonensis Comes Heinricus et uxor eius Pertha" donated property to St Nikolas by charter dated to [1145][177].
  • The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta filia Liupoldi marchionis Austrie"[178]. The necrology of the Obermünster, Regensburg records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta com"[179]. The necrology of Admunt records the death "V Id Apr" of "Berhta com"[180].
  • m HEINRICH [III] Burggraf von Regensburg, son of OTTO [I] Burggraf von Regensburg & his wife Adelheid von Plötzkau (-27 Nov [1174], bur St Emmeran).

5. AGNES ([1108/1113]-Altenburg/Thür 24/25 Jan or 26 Sep [1160/63], bur Kloster Pforte/Saale).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Agnes" as second daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Poleslaus dux de Polan"[181], although there appears to be no "Bolesław" at the time to whom this could refer. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Agnetam" as "Leopoldis marchio et Henricus…sororem germanam" and wife of "dux Vergescelaus de Polonia"[182]. Her origin is further confirmed by a charter dated Jan 1150 in which Cardinal-deacon Guido informs Konrad III King of Germany of the steps he took against "ducis Poloniæ et coniugis eius sororis vestræ…ducis W"[183].
  • The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "VIII Kal Feb" of "Agnes ducissa Polonie filia marchionis"[184]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "VI Kal Oct" of "Agnes ux Wlaslai ducis Zlezorum filia fundatoris S Crucis"[185].
  • m ([1120/25]) WŁADYSŁAW of Poland, son of BOLESŁAW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his first wife Zbislava Sviatopolkovna of Kiev (1105-30 May 1159). He succeeded in 1138 as WŁADYSŁAW II "Wygnaniec/the Exile" Prince of Krakow and Silesia.

6. OTTO (1112-Morimond 22 Sep 1158, bur Morimond).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Otto" as fifth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[186].
  • Provost at Klosterneuburg in [1126].
  • He studied in France under Hugues de Saint-Victor. In 1133, he became a monk with the Cistercian Order at Morimond, diocese of Langres.
  • Abbot of Morimond.
  • He was elected Bishop of Freising in 1138.
  • He took part in the Second Crusade in 1147.
  • He wrote the work of historical theology Chronica sive Historia de duabus civitatibus between 1143 and 1146. Between 1157 and 1158, he wrote the first two books of the Gesta Friderici, dealing with the history of the kings of Germany since Heinrich IV[187].
  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1158 of "Otto Frisingensis episcopus, Liupoldi pii marchionis filius"[188]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "X Kal Sep" of "Otto Liupoldi marchionis Austrie fil, Frisingensis eps"[189].

7. KONRAD (1116-Admont 28 Sep 1168, bur Admont).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Chunradus" as sixth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[190]. The Annales Mellicenses record the installation in 1164 of "Pataviensis episcopus Chunradus, frater Chunradi imperatoris" as Archbishop of Salzburg and his death in 1168[191].
  • Canon at Köln cathedral 1139.
  • Provost at Utrecht cathedral 1142, at Hildesheim cathedral 1143.
  • Bishop of Passau 1148-1164.
  • Archbishop of Salzburg and Primate of Germany 1164.
  • The necrology of Salzburg St Rudpert records the death "IV Kal Oct" of "Chonradus Iuuauensis archiep patruus Friderici imperatoris"[192]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Kal Oct 1168" of "Chunradus Liupoldi marchionis fil, Saltzburgensis archieps"[193].

8. ELISABETH (-20 May 1143).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Elisabeth" as fourth daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Hermannus…lancravius de Saxonia"[194].
  • The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Jun" of "Elizabet filia marchionis"[195].
  • m (1142) as his first wife, HERMANN [II] Graf von Winzenburg, son of HERMANN [I] Graf von Windberg, Ratelberg und Winzenburg, Markgraf von Sachsen [Formbach] & his second wife Hedwig --- (-murdered Winzenburg 29 Jan 1152).

9. JUDITH (-after 1178).

  • The wife of Marchese Guglielmo is recorded by William of Tyre as sister of Konrad III King of Germany[196]. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Iuta" as fifth daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "marchio de monte Phetran Regengerus"[197], although this appears chronologically impossible and should presumably refer to Marchese Guglielmo. The Cronica Alberti de Bezanis refers to the wife of "Gulielmus marchio Montisferati" as "sororem domini Conradi regis Romanorum et domini Frederici ducis Suevorum"[198]. "Guilelmus marchio filius quondam Rainerii…marchionis et Julita jugalis filia quondam marchionis Leopoldi de Austria" donated property to the monastery of Grassano by charter dated [15/16] Mar 1156[199].
  • m (before 28 Mar 1133) GUGLIELMO di Monferrato, son of RANIERI III Marchese di Monferrato & his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne-Comté (1110-1191). He succeeded his father in [1137] as GUGLIELMO V "il Vecchio" Marchese di Monferrato.

10. ERNST ([1118]-23 Jan 1137, bur Heiligenkreuz).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Ensto" as fourth son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that he was buried "apud Sancto Crucem"[200]. His description as "fourth son" is inconsistent with his estimated birth date, calculated from the age specified in the entry for his death in the necrology of Heiligenkreuz (see below), which is consistent with his being described as "adolescent" when he died.
  • The necrology of Melk records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernust fil Liupaldi marchionis"[201]. The necrology of Lilienfeld records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernestus marchio fil fundatoris S Crucis"[202]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "X Kal Feb" of "Ernestus fil marchionis Austrie Liupoldi"[203]. The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "X Kal Feb 1137" of "adolescens Ernestus s Leopoldi fundatoris fil quarto genitus 18 annos vixit" and his burial "in capitulo no"[204].

11. GERTRUD (1120-4 Aug 1150).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Gerdrudis" as third daughter of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam", specifying that she married "Lazlau duci Boemiæ"[205].
  • She founded Kloster Doxan in 1143[206].
  • The Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ records the death in 1150 of "Gertrudis ducissa Boemiæ"[207]. The Annales Palidenses record the death in 1150 of "Agnes soror Conradi regis uxor Bohemia ducis"[208], "Agnes" being an error for "Gertrud". The necrology of Windberg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[209]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Non Aug" of "Gerdrudis ducissa Boemie"[210].
  • m (1140) as his first wife, VLADISLAV II Duke of Bohemia, son of VLADISLAV I Duke of Bohemia & his wife Richinza [Richsa] von Berg (-18 Jan 1174, bur Strahow). He was crowned King of Bohemia at Regensburg 18 Jan 1158.

12. [UTA (-22 Nov before 1170, bur Stift Göttweig).

  • Wegener states that Uta, wife of Graf Liutold [I], was the daughter of Leopold III Markgraf of Austria, basing this on the transmission of the names Liutpold and Berta into the family of the Grafen von Plain. It is, however, inconsistent with the Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis stating that Markgraf Leopold and his second wife had five daughters[211].
  • m [as his second wife,] LIUTOLD Graf von Plain, son of WERIGAND Graf von Plain & his wife --- (-22/23 Jan 1164). The Salzburg Annals record the death in 1164 of "Liutoldus de Plein comes"[212].]

13. [7 children died young. The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis specifies that Markgraf Leopold & his second wife had seven children who died in infancy[213]. Considering the number of children attributed to Agnes by her first husband, it is unlikely that this number can be correct as it would mean that she had approaching thirty children altogether.]

B. DUKES of AUSTRIA 1156-1246 (BABENBERG)

HEINRICH II 1156-1177 (covering his marriage):


HEINRICH von Babenberg, son of LEOPOLD III "der Heilige" Markgraf of Austria & his second wife Agnes of Germany [Staufen] (-Vienna 13 Jan 1177, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).

The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis names "Heinricus" as second son of "Liupoldus marchio Austrie" and "Agnetem imperatoris Heinrici IV filiam"[214]. The Continuatio states that Heinrich was older than his brother Leopold, although if this is correct it is unclear why Leopold not Heinrich should have succeeded first as Markgraf.

"…Heinricus marchionis Luibaldi filius…" witnessed the charter dated 1132, after 13 Sep, under which Adalbert Archbishop of Mainz donated property "in pago…Weitereibia…in comitatu Sigefridi comitis de Nuringes" to Mainz cathedral[215].

He was appointed HEINRICH Pfalzgraf von Lothringen in 1140 to replace Otto von Salm Graf von Reineck.

He resigned as Pfalzgraf in 1141 when he succeeded his brother in 1141 as HEINRICH II "Jasomirgott" Markgraf of Austria.

His uterine half-brother Konrad III King of Germany installed him as HEINRICH XI Duke of Bavaria in 1143, after retaining the duchy in his own hands for more than a year after Heinrich's death[216]. After Duke Heinrich's first wife died, the Welf family renewed its claim to the duchy of Bavaria.

Markgraf Heinrich was a candidate for the imperial throne in 1152.

He founded Schottenkloster at Vienna in 1155: the Auctarium Sancrucense specify that he was the founder of "Scotorum"[217].

He was deprived of Bavaria in 1156 by Friedrich I "Barbarossa" King of Germany, who granted the duchy to the Welf Duke Heinrich "der Löwe" in order to settle the German kings' longstanding dispute with the Welf family[218]. By way of compensation, Heinrich II was invested, jointly with his wife, at Regensburg 8 Sep 1156 with the march of Austria which was elevated to the status of duchy, Heinrich thereby becoming Duke of Austria[219].

The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the death in 1177 in Vienna of "Heinricus dux Austriæ" and his burial "in monasterio Scotorum"[220]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "Id Jan" of "Heinricus dux Austrie"[221]. The necrology of Seccovi records the death "Id Jan" of "Hainricus dux Austrie"[222]. The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "Id Jan 1177" of "Henricus dux Austriæ fil fundatoris"[223]. He died after falling from his horse.

m firstly (1 May 1142) as her second husband, GERTRUD von Süpplingenburg, widow of HEINRICH X "der Stolze" Duke of Saxony and Bavaria [Welf], daughter of Emperor LOTHAR III King of Germany, Graf von Süpplingenburg & his wife Richenza von Northeim (18 Apr 1115-18 or 20 Apr 1143, bur Klosterneuburg).

The Annalista Saxo names "filiam suam [=Lothar] Gertrudem", when recording her marriage in 1127 to "Bawaie duci Heinrico, ducis Heinrici et Wulfilde Magni ducis filio"[224]. The Annales Mellicenses record the marriage in 1142 of "Marchio Heinricus" and "Gerdrudam, filiam Lotharii imperatoris"[225]. This marriage was agreed as part of the temporary settlement of the dispute between Konrad III King of Germany and the Welf family agreed in 1142[226].

The necrology of Melk records the death "XII Kal May" of "Gerdrut ducissa"[227]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XII Kal May" of "Gerdrudis ducisse Heinrici ducis Austrie ux"[228]. She died in childbirth.

m secondly (betrothed early 1148, [Sep] 1148) THEODORA Komnene, daughter of ANDRONIKOS Komnenos, sébastocrator & his wife Eirene [Aineiadissa] (-2 Jan 1184, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).

Niketas Choniates names "Alexius, Andronicus et…Isaacius" as the three brothers of Emperor Manuel, stating that Andronikos left daughters "Mariam, Theodoram et Eudociam"[229]. The Annales Mellicenses in 1149 record the marriage of "dux Heinricus, filius Liupaldi marchionis" and "filiam…fratris regis Grecorum Theodora"[230]. It is likely that Theodora, daughter of Andronikos, married Markgraf Heinrich as Andronikos's brother Isaakios is recorded with a daughter named Theodora and his brother Alexios is only recorded as having one child.

The marriage was arranged by Konrad III King of Germany, her husband's half-brother, while he was staying with Emperor Manuel I recuperating from ill-health. The marriage took place during a second visit after King Konrad had left Palestine and was on his way home to Germany[231].

She was invested jointly with her husband with the march of Austria in 1156[232]. She adopted the name GERTRUD in Austria.

The Annales Mellicenses in 1185 record the death of "Theodora que et Gerdrudis ducissa"[233]. The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera records the death "1184 IV Non Ian" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie"[234]. The necrology of Seccovi records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Theodora ducissa Austrie"[235]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "IV Non Jan" of "Theodora ux Heinrici ducis"[236].

Duke Heinrich & his first wife had one child:

1. RICHARDIS (1143 before 18 Apr-24/25 Feb 1200, bur Klosterneuburg, later transferred to Heiligenkreuz).

  • The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Wegener refers to a source dated [1185] which names "Rickardis" as wife of "Heinricus comes provincialis" but does not give her origin[237].
  • The necrology of Vorau records the death "VI Kal Mar" of "Rickardis lantgravia"[238]. The necrology of Salzburg Cathedral records the death "V Kal Mar" of "Reichgardis lantgravia"[239].
  • m HEINRICH [V] Landgraf von Stefling, son of OTTO [II] Burggraf von Regensburg, Landgraf von Stefling & his wife Adelheid von Wittelsbach (-1 May, after 1190).

Duke Heinrich & his second wife had three children:

2. AGNES ([1154]-13 Jan 1182, bur Vienna Schottenkloster).

  • A manuscript Genealogia marchionum Austrie, written [1181/92], names "Liupoldum et Hainricum filios et filiam Agnetem" as the children of "Hainricus dux ex coniuge Theodora Greca", adding that Agnes married firstly "Stephano regi Ungarorum" and secondly "Herimanno duci Karinthie"[240].
  • The Continuatio Admuntensis for 1166 records the marriage of "filia Heinrici ducis Austria" and "Stephano regi Ungariæ"[241]. She returned to Vienna with her father, who arrived at the Hungarian court at Esztergom, en route to Palestine, the day after her first husband died[242]. "Domine Agnetis ducisse…cum filio suo Wdalrico adhuc infantulo" donated property to Kloster St Paul, as planned by "mariti sui domini…Hermanni", by charter dated Dec 1181[243].
  • m firstly (1168) ISTVÁN III King of Hungary, son of GÉZA II King of Hungary & his wife Ievfrosina Mstislavna of Kiev (1147-murdered 4 Mar 1172).
  • m secondly (after 1172) HERMANN II Duke of Carinthia, son of ULRICH I Duke of Carinthia & his wife Judith von Baden (-4 Oct 1181).

3. LEOPOLD (1157-Graz 31 Dec 1194, bur Heiligenkreuz).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the birth in 1157 of "Heinrico duci Austriæ filius…Liupoldus"[244]. The Annales Mellicenses name "Liupoldus et frater eius Heinricus, filii ducis Heinrici de Austria", recording that they "gladium acceperunt" in 1174[245].
  • He succeeded his father in 1177 as LEOPOLD V Duke of Austria.

4. HEINRICH "der Ältere" (1158-31 Aug 1223, bur Heiligenkreuz).

  • The Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis records the birth in 1158 of "Heinricus frater Liupoldi…filius Heinrici ducis Austriæ"[246]. The Annales Mellicenses name "Liupoldus et frater eius Heinricus, filii ducis Heinrici de Austria", recording that they "gladium acceperunt" in 1174[247].
  • Herzog von Mödling.
  • Vogt of St Emmeran 1179/1182.
  • The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "II Kal Sep 1223" of "Heinricus…tertius dux Medlicensis nepos s Leopoldi" and his burial "in capitulo montii no"[248].
  • m (Eger 1179) RICHZA of Bohemia, daughter of WLADISLAW II King of Bohemia & his second wife Jutta of Thuringia (-19 Apr 1182, bur Klosterneuburg). The Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera in 1177 records the marriage of "Heinricus frater [Liupoldus]" and "Richzam filiam Wazlay regis Boemorum", and the death in 1182 of "Richza, uxor Heinrici ducis"[249]. The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "VII Id Jan" of "Reiza regis Boemiæ filia, Henrici tertii ducis Mellicensis ux" and her burial with her husband "in capitulo no"[250]. The necrology of St Andreas records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Richza ducissa"[251]. The Auctarium Sancrucense records that "Reiza uxore sua [=Heinricus dux de Medlico]" was buried in "Sancte Crucis" with her husband[252]. The necrology of Kloster Neuburg records the death "XIII Kal Mai" of "Reihtza filia regis Boemie" and her donation of "Roreinwisen"[253]. Duke Heinrich & his wife had one child, Heinrich "der Jüngere", Herzog von Mödling, d. 22 May 1236, buried Heiligenkreuz.

References:

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  • [141] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1104, MGH SS IX, p. 609.
  • [142] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1099, MGH SS, p. 725.
  • [143] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1136, MGH SS IX, p. 613.
  • [144] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.
  • [145] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [146] ES I.1 84.
  • [147] ES I.1 84.
  • [148] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I. 8 and 9, MGH SS XX, pp. 357 and 358.
  • [149] Gesta Friderici Imperatoris Ottonis Frisingensis I.10, MGH SS XX, p. 358.
  • [150] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [151] Haverkamp (1988), p. 125.
  • [152] Auctarium Mellicense 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 536.
  • [153] Annales Magdeburgenses 1143 6, MGH SS XVI, p. 187.
  • [154] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.
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  • [156] ES I.1 84.
  • [157] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [158] Continuatio Prædictorum Vindobonensium 1125, MGH SS, p. 725.
  • [159] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1136, MGH SS IX, p. 613.
  • [160] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522.
  • [161] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.
  • [162] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [163] Fischer, M. (ed.) (1851) Codex Traditionem Ecclesiæ Collegiatæ Claustroneoburgensis, Donationes 1108-1260 (Fontes Rerum Austriacarum, Zweite Abteilung Diplomataria et Acta, IV Band) (Wien) (“Kloster Neuburg”) I (40), p. 10.
  • [164] Chronicon Ottonis Frisingensis VII. 21, MGH SS XX, p. 259.
  • [165] ES II 154.
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  • [167] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 614.
  • [168] Auctarium Sancrucense 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 732.
  • [169] Monumenta Necrologica Monasterii S Erentrudis Nonnbergensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 61.
  • [170] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.
  • [171] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [172] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.
  • [173] Canonici Wissegradensis Continuatio Cosmæ MGH SS IX, p. 144, the date "Sep 29" being inserted in the margin by the editor.
  • [174] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [175] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, pp. 611-12.
  • [176] Notæ Genealogicæ Bavaricæ, MGH SS XXIV, p. 76.
  • [177] Monumenta San-Nicolaitana, Codex Traditionem XXIV, Monumenta Boica Vol. IV, p. 235.
  • [178] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [179] Necrologium Monasterii Superioris Ratisbonensis, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 334.
  • [180] Necrologium Admuntense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 287.
  • [181] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
  • [182] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1141, MGH SS XXIII, p. 834.
  • [183] Schlesisches Urkundenbuch I 971-1230, 20, p. 15.
  • [184] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [185] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.
  • [186] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [187] Fuhrmann (1995), pp. 136-7.
  • [188] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1158, MGH SS IX, p. 615.
  • [189] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [190] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 611.
  • [191] Annales Mellicenses 1164 and 1168, MGH SS IX, p. 504.
  • [192] Monumenta Necrologica S Rudperti Salisburgensis, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 91.
  • [193] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [194] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
  • [195] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [196] RHC, Historiens occidentaux II, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), Continuator (“WTC”) XXI.XIII, p. 1026.
  • [197] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
  • [198] Cronica Alberti de Bezanis, MGH SS rerum Germanicarum in usum Scholarum II (Hannover, 1908), pp. 41-2.
  • [199] Hoffman, G. (ed.) (1731) Nova scriptorum ac monumentorum collectio, Tome I, Sam. Guichenoni Bibliothecam Sebusianam et Paridis de Crassis diarium cur. rom (Leipzig) ("Bibliotheca Sebusiana"), Centuria I, XCIV, p. 170.
  • [200] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [201] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522.
  • [202] Necrologium Monasterii Campi Liliorum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 368.
  • [203] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [204] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.
  • [205] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 612.
  • [206] ES I.2 177.
  • [207] Monachi Sazavensis Continuatio Cosmæ 1150, MGH SS IX, p. 160.
  • [208] Annales Palidenses 13, 1150, MGH SS XVI, p. 85.
  • [209] Necrologium Windbergense, Regensburg Necrologies, p. 383.
  • [210] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [211] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [212] Annales Sancti Rudberti Salisburgenses 1164, MGH SS IX, p. 776.
  • [213] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [214] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis I 1106, MGH SS IX, p. 610.
  • [215] Menzel, K. & Sauer, W. (eds.) (1885) Codex diplomaticus Nassoicus, Band I, Part 1 (Wiesbaden), 188, p. 128.
  • [216] Haverkamp (1988), p. 142.
  • [217] Auctarium Sancrucense 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 732.
  • [218] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 140.
  • [219] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150.
  • [220] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1177, MGH SS IX, p. 617.
  • [221] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [222] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 403.
  • [223] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.
  • [224] Annalista Saxo 1127.
  • [225] Annales Mellicenses 1142, MGH SS IX, p. 503.
  • [226] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 127.
  • [227] Necrologium Mellicense Antiquissimum, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 522.
  • [228] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [229] Niketas Choniates, Liber III Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 2, p. 135.
  • [230] Annales Mellicenses 1149, MGH SS IX, p. 504.
  • [231] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 2, p. 270.
  • [232] Fuhrmann (1995), p. 150.
  • [233] Annales Mellicenses 1185, MGH SS IX, p. 505.
  • [234] Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera 1184, MGH SS IX, p. 542.
  • [235] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies (Regio Styriaca), p. 403.
  • [236] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.
  • [237] OO UB 1, p. 366, cited in Wegener (1965/67), p. 169.
  • [238] Monumenta Necrologica Voroviensia, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 436.
  • [239] Necrologium Seccoviense, Salzburg Necrologies, p. 403.
  • [240] Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904), 1164, p. 436.
  • [241] Continuatio Admuntensis 1166, MGH SS IX, p. 583.
  • [242] Jordan, K., trans. Falla, P. S. (1986) Henry the Lion: a Biography (Clarendon Press, Oxford), p. 151.
  • [243] Kärntner Geschichtsquellen (1904), 1282, p. 482.
  • [244] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1157, MGH SS IX, p. 615.
  • [245] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504.
  • [246] Continuatio Claustroneoburgensis II Codex B, 1158, MGH SS IX, p. 615.
  • [247] Annales Mellicenses 1174, MGH SS IX, p. 504.
  • [248] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.
  • [249] Continuatio Zwetlensis Altera 1177 and 1182, MGH SS IX, pp. 541 and 542.
  • [250] Necrologium Monasterii S Crucis Recentius, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 112.
  • [251] Necrologiæ Canoniæ ad Sanctum Andream, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 347.
  • [252] Auctarium Sancrucense 1223, MGH SS IX, p. 732.
  • [253] Monumenta Necrologica Claustroneoburgensis, Passau Necrologies (II), p. 3.

------------------------------------------

From Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Heinrich II Jasomirgott von Osterreich (Source / Forrás):

http://www.thepeerage.com/p11405.htm#i114044

Heinrich II Jasomirgott Herzog von Österreich ▼1

M, #114044, b. 1114, d. 1177

Last Edited=16 Jul 2005

Heinrich II Jasomirgott Herzog von Österreich was born in 1114. ▼1 He was the son of Leopold III 'the Saint' Markgraf von Österreich and Agnes Salian. ▼1

He married, firstly, Gertrude von Sachsen, daughter of Lothair II von Sachsen, Holy Roman Emperor and Richenza von Sachsen, on 1 May 1142.

He married, secondly, Theodora Comnene, daughter of Andronikos Comnenos, in 1149. ▼1

He died in 1177. ▼1

Heinrich II Jasomirgott Herzog von Österreich succeeded to the title of Markgraf von Österreich in 1141. ▼1 He succeeded to the title of Herzog von Bayern in 1143. ▼2 He was deposed as Duke of Bavaria in 1156. ▼2 He was created Herzog von Österreich in 1156. ▼1

Children of Heinrich II Jasomirgott Herzog von Österreich and Theodora Comnene

-1. Agnes Babenberg ▼1 b. 1154, d. 1182

-2. Leopold V Herzog von Österreich+ ▼1 b. 1157, d. 1194

-3. Heinrich Babenberg, Duke of Mödling+ ▼1 b. 1158, d. 1233

Citations

1. [S16] Jirí Louda and Michael MacLagan, Lines of Succession: Heraldry of the Royal Families of Europe, 2nd edition (London, U.K.: Little, Brown and Company, 1999), table 77. Hereinafter cited as Lines of Succession.

2. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 127. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

--------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Henry II, Duke of Austria

Heinrich (Henry) II, (1107 – January 13, 1177), Count Palatine of the Rhine, 1140-1141, Margrave of Austria from 1141 to 1156 and, as Heinrich (Henry) XI, also Duke of Bavaria from 1141 to 1156, Duke of Austria, 1156-1177, was a prince of the Babenberg dynasty.

As the son of Markgrave Leopold III, he first became Count Palatine of the Rhine until being appointed Duke of Bavaria and Margrave of Austria when his brother Leopold IV unexpectedly died.

In the course of the dispute between the Welfen and Staufen dynasties in the Holy Roman Empire, the duchy of Bavaria had been taken away from the Welf Henry the Proud by the emperor and given to the Babenberg dynasty. The new Emperor Friedrich I tried to reach a compromise with the Welfs and endowed the son of Henry the Proud, Henry the Lion, with Bavaria in 1156. A replacement had to be found for the Babenberg family, namely the Privilegium Minus, by which Austria was elevated to a duchy and gained complete independence from Bavaria.

Other than his father, who resided in Klosterneuburg for most of the time, Henry moved his residence to Vienna in 1145. Only by this act could the modern Austrian capital surpass cities such as Krems, Melk or Klosterneuburg. Since then, it has remained the capital of the country. Also in 1147, St. Stephen's Cathedral was completed, which became a visible landmark of the city, showing its prominence. In 1155, Henry founded the Schottenstift monastery in Vienna, in the courtyard of which a statue of him stands to this day.

Until 1143, he was married to Gertrude of Süpplingenburg, the daughter of Emperor Lothar II. In 1148 he married Theodora Comnena, a niece of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I. Both marriages strongly show the importance of the House of Babenberg in Central Europe in that period.

Henry's brother was the important chronicler Otto of Freising. His sister Judith was the wife of William V of Montferrat.

Henry's nickname, Jasomirgott, was first documented during the 13th century in the form of Jochsamergott, the meaning of which is unclear. According to one theory, it is derived from an Arab word bearing a connection to the Second Crusade where Henry participated in 1146. According to a popular etymology, it is derived from the formula "Ja so mir Gott helfe" (meaning: "Yes, God willing").

Henry II, Duke of Austria, House of Babenberg

Born: 1107 Died: 1177

Duke of Bavaria 1141–1156

  • Preceded by Leopold IV
  • Succeeded by Henry XII

Margrave, then Duke of Austria 1141–1177

  • Preceded by Leopold IV
  • Succeeded by Leopold V

Count Palatine of the Rhine 1140–1141

  • Preceded by William of Ballerstedt
  • Succeeded by Herman III of Stahleck

--------------------

Norwegian text, appears unattributed:

Markgreve av Østerrike 1141-1156.

Hertug av Østerrike 1156-1177.

Heinrich ble også hertug av Bayern, men måtte senere avstå dette til Henrik Löwe. Til gjengjeld fikk han avstått til seg det nåværende Øvre Østerrike og begge sine land forenet til Hertugdømmet Østerrike, utskilt fra den tidligere avhengighet av Bayern.

Han forla sitt fyrstesete til Wien og påbegynte bygningen av Stefanskirken.

I 1147 deltok han i det annet store korstog.

Han var første gang gift 01.05.1142 med Gjertrud, datter til keiser Lothar III. Hun døde 18.04.1143.

Heinrich døde da han falt av hesten i 1177.

Tekst: Tore Nygaard

Kilder:

Erich Brandenburg: Die Nachkommen Karls des Grossen, Leipzig 1935. Allgemeine deutsche Biographie. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 1128. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 23, 31. -------------------- Heinrich (Henry) II, (1107 – 13 January 1177), Count Palatine of the Rhine, 1140-1141, Margrave of Austria from 1141 to 1156 and, as Heinrich (Henry) XI, also Duke of Bavaria from 1141 to 1156, Duke of Austria, 1156-1177, was a prince of the Babenberg dynasty.


As the son of Markgrave Leopold III, he first became Count Palatine of the Rhine until being appointed Duke of Bavaria and Margrave of Austria when his brother Leopold IV unexpectedly died.

In the course of the dispute between the Welfen and Staufen dynasties in the Holy Roman Empire, the duchy of Bavaria had been taken away from the Welf Henry the Proud by the emperor and given to the Babenberg dynasty. The new Emperor Friedrich I tried to reach a compromise with the Welfs and endowed the son of Henry the Proud, Henry the Lion, with Bavaria in 1156. A replacement had to be found for the Babenberg family, namely the Privilegium Minus, by which Austria was elevated to a duchy and gained complete independence from Bavaria.


Other than his father, who resided in Klosterneuburg for most of the time, Henry moved his residence to Vienna in 1145. Only by this act could the modern Austrian capital surpass cities such as Krems, Melk or Klosterneuburg. Since then, it has remained the capital of the country. Also in 1147, St. Stephen's Cathedral was completed, which became a visible landmark of the city, showing its prominence. In 1155, Henry founded the Schottenstift monastery in Vienna, in the courtyard of which a statue of him stands to this day.

Until 1143, he was married to Gertrude of Süpplingenburg, the daughter of Emperor Lothar II. In 1148 he married Theodora Comnena, a niece of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I. Both marriages strongly show the importance of the House of Babenberg in Central Europe in that period.

Henry's brother was the important chronicler Otto of Freising. His sister Judith was the wife of William V of Montferrat.

Henry's nickname, Jasomirgott, was first documented during the 13th century in the form of Jochsamergott, the meaning of which is unclear. According to one theory, it is derived from an Arab word bearing a connection to the Second Crusade where Henry participated in 1146. According to a popular etymology, it is derived from the formula Ja so mir Gott helfe (meaning: "Yes, God willing").

view all 12

Heinrich II "Jasomirgott" von Babenberg (Österreich), Herzog's Timeline

1107
1107
Klosterneuburg, (Present Niederösterreich), Herzogtum Österreich, Heiliges Römisches Reich
1149
1149
Age 42
Wien (Vienna), Herzogtum Österreich, Heiliges Römisches Reich
1154
1154
Age 47
1156
1156
- 1177
Age 49
Austria - 1st duke
1157
1157
Age 50
1157
Age 50
Austria
1158
1158
Age 51
1177
January 13, 1177
Age 70
Wien (Vienna), Herzogtum Österreich, Heiliges Römisches Reich
????
????