Henri I, roi de France

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Henri de France, roi de France

Also Known As: "King Henri I of France", "Henry I Capet", "King of France", "Hugh", "Capet"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Muelan, Paris, Orleannais, West Francia (now Ile-de-France, France)
Death: Died in Vitry-aux-Loges, Centre, France
Place of Burial: Basilique Saint-Denis, Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Robert II le Pieux, roi des Francs and Constance d'Arles, reine consort de France
Husband of <private> of France; Mathilde de Frise, reine consort de France and Anne de Kiev reine consort de France
Fiancé of Mathilde de Germanie
Father of Hugues Magnus, comte de Vermandois; Philipee de France, I; Infant Capet; Emma Capet de France, Princesse; Philippe I, roi de France and 1 other
Brother of NN ?2x mistresses of Richard III (mothers of Nicolas and Alix) de Normandie, concubine; Hedwige de France, comtesse d'Auxerre; Hugues, roi associé de France; Adèle de France; Robert I le Vieux, duc de Bourgogne and 5 others
Half brother of Adele

Occupation: King of France (1031-1060), Roi de France (1031-1060), King of France, King of the Franks, King f France, Kung av Frankrike 1031 - 1060
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Henri I, roi de France

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France

Henry I (4 May 1008 – 4 August 1060) was the King of the Franks from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

Reign

A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972–1031) and Constance of Arles (986–1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016.

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen.

A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor—all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev, ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet.

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(from wikipedia.fr) Il est fiancé en 1033 à Mahaut (Mathilda, v.1027 - 1034), fille en bas-âge de l'empereur Conrad II le Salique, mais celle-ci trouve la mort à l'âge de sept ans.

En 1034, il épouse en premières noces Mathilde de Frise, (v. 1025/1026 - 1044), fille de Luidolf de Frise. Le 19 mai 1051 à Reims, il épouse en secondes noces Anne de Kiev, fille de Iaroslav le Sage, grand-prince de Kiev, et de Ingigerd de Suède.

Ensemble ils eurent:

   * Philippe Ier (1052-1108)
   * Robert (1054-1063)
   * Emma (1055-1109)
   * Hugues (1057-1102), comte de Vermandois, époux d'Adélaïde de Vermandois.

Leur fils aîné, associé au trône en 1059, succède à son père sous le nom de Philippe Ier.

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering his birth family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#HenriIdied1060A

ROBERT de France, son of HUGUES Capet King of France & his wife Adelais [de Poitou] (Orléans ([27 Mar] 972-Château de Melun 20 Jul 1031, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Robertum regem et filiam Hadevidem…comitissam Hainonensium" as the children of King Hugues[148].

He was invested as associate-king with his father 25 Dec 987, consecrated 1 Apr 988 at the cathedral of Sainte-Croix in Orléans[149]. He succeeded his father in 996 as ROBERT II "le Pieux"[150] King of France.

He claimed the duchy of Burgundy on the death of his paternal uncle Duke Henri in 1002, but took 12 years to complete its conquest in the face of opposition from Otto-Guillaume Comte de Mâcon[151].

After the death of Emperor Heinrich II King of Germany in 1024, King Robert supported the rebels (led by Frédéric II Duke of Upper Lotharingia) opposed to King Konrad II but he refused the crown of Italy which they offered it to him. Robert nevertheless sent troops to attack Metz, but was repulsed[152].

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1031 of "rex Francorum Robertus"[153]. Rodolfus Glaber records the death of King Robert at Melun in July and his place of burial[154]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus rex"[155]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XIII Kal Aug" of "Rotbertus…Francorum rex"[156].

m firstly (988, before 1 Apr, repudiated [991/92]) as her second husband, ROZALA [Suzanne] di Ivrea, widow of ARNOUL II “le Jeune” Count of Flanders, daughter of BERENGARIO II ex-King of Italy [Ivrea] & his wife Willa of Tuscany-Arles ([950/960]-13 Dec 1003 or 7 Feb 1004, bur Gent, church of the Abbey de Saint-Pierre du Mont-Blandin).

Regino records that two of the daughters (unnamed) of ex-King Berengario were brought up in the imperial palace by the empress after being brought to Germany[157]. One of these two daughters was presumably Rozala, bearing in mind that the emperor arranged her marriage.

The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names "filiam Berengeri regis Langobardorum, Ruzelam quæ et Susanna" as wife of Comte Arnoul[158]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores record the marriage [undated between 950 and 968] of "Arnulfus iunior" and "filiam Beregeri regis Susannam"[159]. Her marriage was presumably arranged by Emperor Otto to increase his influence in Flanders at a time when Lothaire IV King of the West Franks was asserting his own control over the county.

According to Nicholas, Count Arnoul II married Rozala di Ivrea when he reached the age of majority in 976[160], but the source on which this is based has not been located. "Baldwinus marchysus cum matre sua Susanna" donated "villam Aflingehem…jacentem in pago Tornacinse" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, after the death of "Arnulfi marchysi", by charter dated 1 Apr 988, signed by "…Waldberto advocato, Theoderico comite, Arnulfo comite, Artoldo comite, Baldwino comite, item Arnulfo comite…"[161]. The Vita Sancti Bertulfi names "Rozala filia…Berengarii Regis Italiæ", specifying that "post mortem Arnulfi [Balduini filius] principis, Roberto Regi Francorum nupsit et Susanna dicta"[162]. Kerrebrouck, presumably basing his supposition on this passage from the Vita Sancti Bertulfi, says that she adopted the name Suzanne on her second marriage[163], but the sources quoted above show that she was referred to by this name earlier.

Hugues "Capet" King of France arranged her second marriage to his son and heir, apparently as a reward for Flemish help when he seized power in 987[164]. She was given Montreuil-sur-Mer by the county of Flanders as her dowry on her second marriage.

Richer records that King Robert repudiated his wife "Susannam…genere Italicam eo quod anus esset" but refused to allow her to retake her castle at Montreuil, whereupon she constructed another nearby[165]. She returned to Flanders after she was repudiated by her second husband, and became one of the principal advisers of her son Count Baldwin IV. France retained Montreuil-sur-Mer.

"Susanna regina cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…Atingehem…et in Testereph" to Saint-Pierre de Gand, for the soul of "filie sue Mathildis", by charter dated 26 Jun 995[166]. "Susanna regina…cum filio suo Baldwino" donated "alodem suum…in pago Flandrensi…in Holtawa…in Fresnere…in Clemeskirca…in Jatbeka…in Sclefteta…" to Saint-Pierre de Gand by charter dated 1 Jun 1003[167]. The Annales Elnonenses Minores records the death in 1003 of "Susanna regina"[168]. The Memorial of "regina Susanna" records her death "VII Feb"[169].

m secondly ([late 996/early 997], divorced Sep 1001) BERTHE of Burgundy, widow of EUDES I Comte de Blois et de Chartres, daughter of CONRAD I “le Pacifique” King of Burgundy [Welf] & his wife Mathilde de France [Carolingian] ([964/965]-16 Jan after 1010).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names "Berta filia Conradi regis Burgundiæ" as wife of "Odone comite Carnotensium"[170]. This origin is corroborated by Rodulfus Glauber who names "Odo natus ex filia Chuonradi regis Austrasiorum, Berta nomine"[171]. Richer records that King Robert married "Berta Odonis uxor"[172].

Pope Gregory V called on King Robert to repudiate his wife in 998 on grounds of consanguinity. The request was repeated in 1001 by the court of Rome. Robert at first refused and the kingdom of France was excommunicated[173].

"Bertæ reginæ, Odonis comitis filii eius…" subscribed the charter dated 1004 under which "Gislebertus prepositus" recorded a donation[174].

The king, in reaction to the 1108 assassination of his favourite Hugues de Beauvais who had served Queen Berthe, visited Rome in 1008 in an unsuccessful attempt to divorce his third wife in order to take back Berthe[175].

"Odonis comitis, Ermengardis uxoris eius, Bertæ reginæ…" subscribed the charter dated after 1005 under which "comitem Odonem" donated property "in comitatu Dunensi…Boscus Medius" to "Sancti Petri"[176].

The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "XVII Kal Feb" of "Berta mater Odonis comitis"[177].

m thirdly (after Sep 1001 before 25 Aug 1003) CONSTANCE d'Arles, daughter of GUILLAUME II “le Libérateur” Comte d’Arles [Provence] et Marquis & his wife Adelais [Blanche] d’Anjou ([987/89]-Château de Melun 22 or 25 Jul 1032, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names "Constantiam, filiam Guillelmi comitis Arelatensis, natam de Blanca sorore Gaufridi comitis Andegavensis" as wife of King Robert[178]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines also names "Constantia filia fuit Blanche comitisse Arelatensis" as wife of "Robertus rex"[179]. The Chronicon Hugonis names "Constantiam" as wife of "Robertus", specifying that she was "cognatam Hugonis Autisiodorensis episcopi comitis Cabilonensis"[180]. This is presumably based on Rodulfus Glaber who states incorrectly that "Constantiam…filiam…prioris Willemi Aquitanie ducis" was wife of King Robert II, specifying that she was "cognatam" of Hugues Comte de Chalon Bishop of Auxerre[181]. The only relationship so far identified between the two is that Constance's maternal uncle, Geoffroy I Comte d'Anjou, was the second husband of the mother of Comte Hugues.

Rodulfus Glauber dates her marriage to "about the year 1000"[182].

The king attempted to separate from Constance in 1008 in order to take back his second wife, according to Rodulfus Glaber through the influence of "Hugo dictus Beluacensis"[183], but he restored Constance's royal prerogatives end-1009[184].

She opposed her husband's proposal to crown their second son Henri as associate king in 1026, supporting the candidature of her third son Robert[185]. She organised two revolts against King Robert, and another against her son King Henri I after his accession in 1031[186].

Rodolfus Glaber records the death of Queen Constance in the same city as her husband [Melun] and in the same month [July] in the following year, as well as her place of burial[187]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "XI Kal Aug" of "regina Constancia"[188]. The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "VIII Kal Aug" of "Constancia regina"[189].

King Robert & his third wife had [seven] children:

1. [CONSTANCE de France.

There is no proof that Constance, wife of Manassès de Dammartin, was the daughter of King Robert II, the affiliation being proposed for onomastic reasons only[190]. It is, however, supported by the presence of the king and queen at a donation by Comte Manassès in 1031[191].

Rodolfus Glaber records that King Robert had two daughters by his wife Constance[192], presumably referring to Hedwige and Adela. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[193], the wife of Manassès was "Constance [de Dammartin]", presumably on the theory that she brought her husband the county of Dammartin.

m ([1023 or before]) MANASSES Comte de Dammartin-en-Goële, son of HILDUIN II de Montdidier Seigneur de Ramérupt & his wife --- (-killed in battle Ornel, near Etain, Bar-le-Duc 15 Nov or 15 Dec 1037).]

2. HEDWIGE [Avoie] de France ([1003]-5 Jun after 1063).

Rodolfus Glaber records that "Rainaldus…Landrici comitis filius" married a daughter of King Robert[194]. The Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis names "Adelaidem…Rainaldi comitis Nivernensis uxorem" as the daughter of King Robert and his wife Constance[195]. The Historia Nivernensium Comitum records that the wife of "Renaldum" was "sorori Regis Roberti, filii Hugonis Capitonis"[196]. The Annales Vizeliacenses also specifies that Renaud's wife was the sister not daughter of King Robert II[197]. However, this is chronologically unlikely given that King Robert and his known sisters were born in the 970s, more than 20 years before the earliest possible date of birth of Comte Renaud.

Her marriage was agreed by her father as part of his alliance with Landry Comte de Nevers after capturing Auxerre, which the king gave to his daughter as dowry[198]. "Rainaldus comes Nivernensis" donated property "Belmontis" to Cluny, for the souls of "…uxoris mee Advise…" by charter dated to [1028/40][199].

She founded the abbeys of Crisenon and Issenon.

m (1006, soon after 25 Jan 1016) RENAUD de Nevers, son of LANDRY Comte de Nevers & his wife Mathilde de Bourgogne-Comté (-killed in battle Sainte-Vertu, Yonne 29 May 1040, bur Auxerre, Saint-Germain).

He succeeded his father in 1028 as RENAUD I Comte de Nevers.

He was killed in battle against Robert I Duke of Burgundy, his brother-in-law.

3. HUGUES de France (1007-28 Aug 1025, bur Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[200].

He was consecrated associate-king 9 Jun 1017, at Compiègne, church of the Abbaye de Saint-Corneille, when he was "barely 10 years old" according to Rodolfus Glaber[201].

He rebelled against his father claiming the full authority of his position as associate-king, but later submitted[202].

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex Francorum"[203]. The necrology of Argenteuil Priory records the death "V Kal Sep" of "Hugo iuvenis rex"[204]. Rodolfus Glaber records his place of burial[205].

---

4. HENRI de France ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[206].

He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France.

---

5. ROBERT de France ([1011/12]-church of Fleury-sur-Ouche, Côte d’Or 18 Mar 1076, bur Saint-Seine-l'Abbaye, Côte d’Or).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[207].

Rodulfus Glauber names "Heinricus rex…germanium suum Rotbertum" when recording the latter's installation as duke of Burgundy by his brother[208]. His mother supported him as candidate to be consecrated associate king in 1027, in place of his older brother Henri who was supported by their father.

His father named him heir to the duchy of Burgundy in 1030. He was installed as ROBERT I "le Vieux" Duke of Burgundy in 1032 by his brother King Henri I.

6. EUDES de France ([1013]-Germigny-des-Prés, near Sully, Loiret 15 May [1057/59]).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[209].

He allied himself with Eudes II Comte de Blois in the war against his brother Henri I King of France 1034-1041. He was defeated and imprisoned at Orléans.

After his release, he fought for the king in Normandy, but was defeated in 1054 at Mortemer. Orderic Vitalis records the war between the Normans and "Henricum regem" in 1054 when "Odonem fratrem suum" was defeated by "Roberti Aucensis comiitis et Rogerii de Mortuomari" who led the Norman forces "apud Mortuum-mare"[210].

He owned land near Bellême[211].

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Id Mai" of "Odo Roberti regis filius"[212].

7. ADELA de France (-Messines 8 Jan 1079, bur Messines, Benedictine monastery).

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "soror…regis Henrici Adela" as wife of "Balduino Insulano"[213]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Alam comitissam Flandrensem" as the daughter of King Robert[214]. She is named as daughter of King Robert in a manuscript whose attribution to Orderic Vitalis is disputed, which also refers to her marriage[215].

Kerrebrouck mentions her betrothal to Duke Richard "très jeune" but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[216].

"Richardus Nortmannorum dux" agreed grants of property to "Adela" on the occasion of their marriage by charter dated Jan 1026, which does not specify her parentage[217]. Her father gave her the seigneurie of Corbie as her dowry.

Ctss de Contenance.

She founded the Benedictine monastery at Messines near Ypres.

The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "VI Id Jan" of "Adelaidis comitissa"[218].

Betrothed (Jan 1027) to RICHARD III Duke of Normandy, son of RICHARD I Duke of Normandy & his first wife Judith de Bretagne ([1001]-6 Aug 1027).

m (Amiens 1028) BAUDOUIN de Flandre, son of BAUDOUIN IV "le Barbu/Pulchrae Barbae" Count of Flanders & his first wife Ogive de Luxembourg ([1012/13]-Lille 1 Sep 1067, bur Lille, Saint-Pierre).

He succeeded his father in 1035 as BAUDOUIN V “le Pieux/Insulanus” Count of Flanders.

He was regent of France for his nephew Philippe I King of France 1060-1066/67.

References:

[148] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.

[149] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 55.

[150] This nickname was applied to the king from the early years of his reign, see Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 59 footnote 2.

[151] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 55.

[152] Poull, G. (1994) La Maison souveraine et ducale de Bar (Nancy), pp. 21-2.

[153] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1031, MGH SS XXIII, p. 783.

[154] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159.

[155] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 16.

[156] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.

[157] Reginonis Chronicon 965, MGH SS I, p. 627.

[158] Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana MGH SS IX, p. 306.

[159] Annales Elnonenses Minores [950-968], MGH SS V, p. 19.

[160] Nicholas, D. (1992) Medieval Flanders (Longman), p. 44.

[161] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 96, p. 92.

[162] Vita Sancti Bertulfi Abbatis Renticensis, RCGF 10, p. 365.

[163] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 60 footnote 32.

[164] Nicholas (1992), p. 45.

[165] Guadet, J. (ed.) (1845) Richeri Historiarum (Paris) IV.LXXXVII, p. 270.

[166] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 102, p. 96.

[167] Liber traditionum sancti Petri Blandiniensis, 107, p. 101.

[168] Annales Elnonenses Minores 1003, MGH SS V, p. 19.

[169] MGH Poetæ Latini medii ævi, V.1, Die Ottonenzeit, Grabschriften, p. 299.

[170] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 387.

[171] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.

[172] Richer IV, supplementary notes following CVII, p. 308.

[173] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 62 footnote 42.

[174] Lecesne, H. (ed.) (1874) Cartulaire de Marmoutier pour le Dunois III, p. 4.

[175] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 242 footnote 8.

[176] Guérard, M. (ed.) (1840) Cartulaire de l'abbaye de Saint-Père de Chartres (Paris) ("Chartres Saint-Père"), I, Liber Quintus, Cap. V, p. 96.

[177] Obituaires de Sens Tome II, Eglise cathédrale de Chartres, Nécrologe du xi siècle, p. 5.

[178] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[179] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1013, MGH SS XXIII, p. 780.

[180] Chronicon Hugonis, monachi Virdunensis et divionensis abbatis Flaviniacensis I 996, MGH SS VIII, p. 368.

[181] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[182] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.40, p. 165.

[183] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[184] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 57.

[185] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.34, p. 157.

[186] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 56 and 57.

[187] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.36, p. 159.

[188] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 267.

[189] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.

[190] Depoin, J. (1912) Recueil des chartes et documents de Saint-Martin-des-Champs, monastère parisien, Vol. 1 (Paris), no. 6, pp. 15-16, expanded by Mathieu, J. N. (1996) 'Recherches sur les premiers Comtes de Dammartin', Mémoires publiés par la Fédération des sociétés historiques et archéologiques de Paris et de l'Ile-de-France, t. 47 (1996), pp. 7-60, 15-16, both cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63.

[191] Cartulaire de Notre-Dame de Chartres d'après les cartularies et les titres originaux, ed. Lépinois, E. de and Merlet, L. (Chartres, 1862-1865), no. XIII, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 63 footnote 57.

[192] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.7, p. 107.

[193] ES III 676.

[194] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.26, p. 213.

[195] Chronici Hugonis Floriacensis, RHGF X, p. 222.

[196] Origine et Historia Brevi Nivernensium Comitum, RHGF X, p. 258.

[197] Bouchard (1987), pp. 343-4, the author highlighting the "unreliable genealogies" of Raoul Glaber and preferring the Annales Vizeliacenses as a reliable source.

[198] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[199] Cluny Tome IV, 2811, p. 13.

[200] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[201] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.32, p. 151.

[202] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[203] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 270.

[204] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Prieuré d'Argenteuil, p. 348.

[205] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.33, p. 157.

[206] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[207] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[208] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum III.9, MGH SS VII, p. 64.

[209] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[210] Le Prévost, A. (1840) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. I, Liber I, p. 184, and Vol. III, Liber VII, p. 160.

[211] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[212] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 317.

[213] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.

[214] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 2, MGH SS XIII, p. 252.

[215] Chibnall, M. (ed. and trans.) The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV (Oxford Medieval Texts, 1969-80), Appendix I, p. 350.

[216] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 58.

[217] Spicilegium Tome III, p. 390.

[218] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 307.

----------------------------------

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings (covering his married family):

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#HuguesIVermandoisdied1102A

HENRI de France, son of ROBERT II "le Pieux" King of France & his third wife Constance d'Arles [Provence] ([end 1009/May 1010]-Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret 4 Aug 1060, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Hugonem qui cognominatus est Magnus, Henricum, Robertum, Odonem" as the four sons of King Robert and Constance[219].

His father installed him as Duke of Burgundy 25 Jan 1016 after completing his conquest of the duchy[220].

He was consecrated associate-king 14 May 1027, at Notre-Dame, Reims, despite the opposition of his mother. He rebelled against his father, together with his brother Robert, 1029-1031, and captured Dreux, Beaune and Avallon[221].

He succeeded his father in 1031 as HENRI I King of France, at which time the duchy of Burgundy was given to his younger brother Robert. In light of his mother’s continuing opposition to his succession, he was obliged to take refuge briefly in Normandy in 1033. He regained control with the help of Robert II Duke of Normandy.

The Annales Nivernenses record the death "1060 II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex, Rotberti regis filius"[222]. The necrology of the Eglise Cathédrale de Paris records the death "IV Non Aug" of "Henrici regis Francorum"[223]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Non Aug" of "Henricus rex"[224]. The necrology of Auxerre cathedral records the death 4 Aug of "Henricus rex Franciæ"[225].

Betrothed (May 1033) to MATHILDE of Germany, daughter of Emperor KONRAD II King of Germany & his wife Gisela of Swabia ([Oosterbecke] 1027[226]-Worms 1034, bur Worms Cathedral).

Wipo names "filia imperatoris Chuonradi et Giselæ, Mahthilda" when recording her death and burial at Worms in 1034, specifying that she was betrothed to "Heinrico regi Francorum"[227]. Her marriage was arranged to confirm a peace compact agreed between King Henri and Emperor Konrad at Deville in May 1033[228].

Her absence from the list of deceased relatives in the donation of "Chuonradus…Romanorum imperator augustus" to the church of Worms by charter dated 30 Jan 1034 suggests that Mathilde died after that date, while her absence from the list of the children of Emperor Konrad named in the same charter is explicable on the basis of her youth[229].

m firstly (1034) MATHILDE, daughter of --- ([1025/26]-Paris 1044, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

Rodolfus Glaber records that King Henri married "Mathildem…de regno eius ex Germanie nobilioribus"[230]. Her precise origin is not known.

A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young and that King Henri's wife died soon after[231]. The Historia of Monk Aimon records that King Henri married "neptem Henrici Alamaniæ Imperatoris" in 1034[232].

Szabolcs de Vajay[233] suggests that she was Mathilde, daughter of Liudolf Markgraf von Friesland [Braunschweig] & his wife Gertrud von Egisheim, her supposed father being the uterine half-brother of Emperor Heinrich III.

The Historia Francica records the death in 1044 of "Mahildis Regina"[234]. The Miracula Sancti Bernardi records the death in Paris in 1044 of "Mahildis regina…ex Cæsarum progenie", and her burial "monasterio Sancti Dionysii"[235].

m secondly (Reims 19 May 1051) as her first husband, ANNA Iaroslavna, daughter of IAROSLAV I Vladimirovich "Mudriy/the Wise" Grand Prince of Kiev & his second wife Ingigerd Olafsdottir of Sweden (1036-5 Sep ([1075/78], bur Abbaye Villiers near La-Ferté-Alais).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam regis Russorum Annam" with King Henri[236]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum" as wife of King Henri[237].

She was consecrated Queen Consort at Reims on her wedding day.

She caused a scandal by marrying secondly ([1061]) as his third wife, Raoul III “le Grand” Comte de Valois, and was forced to leave the court, although she returned after his death in 1074[238]. The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "Anna, Henrici relicta" and "Rodulfo comitis"[239].

King Henri I & his first wife had one child:

1. daughter ([1040]-1044 or before).

A manuscript entitled "Excerptum Historicum" records the marriage of "rex Henricus" and "neptem Henrici Alamannorum Imperatoris", commenting that the couple had a daughter who died young[240].

She died before her mother, under 5 years old[241].

King Henry I & his second wife had four children:

2. PHILIPPE de France (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye Saint Benoît-sur-Loire).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[242].

He was consecrated Associate-King 23 May 1059, Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France.


3. EMMA de France (1054-).

The Historia Francorum names "Emmamque filiam" in addition to the three sons of King Henri and Anna[243].

4. ROBERT de France (before Jun 1054-[1063]).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri & Anna, specifying that "Rotbertus inmatura morte decessit"[244]. This is confirmed by the Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines which names (in order) "Philippum, Robertum et Hugonam" as the three sons of King Henri, specifying that "Robertus iuvenis mortuus est"[245].

5. HUGUES de France (1057-Tarsus 18 Oct 1102, bur Tarsus, church of St Paul).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[246]. William of Tyre records "dominus Hugo Magnus" as brother of Philippe I King of France[247].

Comte de Vermandois et de Valois by right of his wife. Leader of the French contingent in the First Crusade Aug 1096. Albert of Aix records that "Hugonem Magnum fratrem regis Franciæ, Drogonem et Clareboldum" were held in chains in prison by the emperor at Constantinople but were released after the intervention of "Baldewinus Hainaucorum comes et Heinricus de Ascha" who were sent as envoys by Godefroi de Bouillon[248].

He returned to France after the victory of Antioch 1098 to raise another army.

The Alexeiad names "a certain Hugh, brother of the king of France" when recording that he "sent an absurd message to the emperor proposing that he should be given a magnificent reception" after arriving in Constantinople[249].

He set out again Mar 1101, but died from wounds received fighting the Greeks at Tarsus in Cilicia.

m (after 1067) as her first husband, ADELAIS Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy, daughter and heiress of HERIBERT IV Comte de Vermandois [Carolingian] & his wife Alix Ctss de Crépy ([1062]-28 Sep [1120/24]).

The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Odonem et Adelam sororem" as the two children of "comes Herbertus", specifying that the husband of Adela was "Hugoni le Magne", referring to her second husband "comes de Claromonte" and specifying that her daughter by the latter married Charles Count of Flanders[250]. The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names "Adelidem comitissam Viromandensium, defuncto priore viro, scilicet Hugone Magno" as wife of "comes Rainaldus [de Claromonte]"[251].

She succeeded her father in [1080] as Ctss de Vermandois, de Valois et de Crépy.

She married secondly (1103) as his first wife, Renaud de Clermont [en-Beauvaisis].

References:

[219] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 9, MGH SS IX, p. 385, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[220] Kerrebrouck, P. Van (2000) Les Capétiens 987-1328 (Villeneuve d'Asq), p. 55.

[221] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[222] Annales Nivernenses 1060, MGH SS XIII, p. 90.

[223] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Eglise Cathédrale de Paris, p. 163.

[224] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 323.

[225] Histoire d'Auxerre, Tome IV, p. 16.

[226] Szabolcs de Vajay 'Mathilde, Reine de France inconnue', Journal des Savants (Oct-Dec 1971), pp. 241-60, 244 footnote 17.

[227] Wiponis, Vita Chuonradi II Imperatoris 32, MGH SS XI, p. 271.

[228] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 65.

[229] D K II 204, p. 275.

[230] Rodulfi Glabri, Historiarum IV.23, p. 211.

[231] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157.

[232] Ex continuatione Historiæ Aimoni Monachi Floriacensis, RHGF XI, p. 276.

[233] Vajay 'Mathilde', pp. 248-54.

[234] Ex Historiæ Francicæ Fragmento, RHGF XI, p. 161.

[235] Miracula Sancti Benedicti, auctore Andreæ monachi Floriacensis quartus, Liber VII, III, p. 252.

[236] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388.

[237] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[238] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 66.

[239] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[240] Excerptum Historicum, RHGF XI, p. 157.

[241] Bautier, R.-H. 'Anne de Kiev, reine de France, et la politique royale au XIe siècle. Etude critique de la documentation', Aspects des relations intellectuelles entre la France et la Russie, Revue des etudes slaves (Paris, 1985) t. 57, pp. 539-64, citing Certain, E. de (ed.) (1858) André de Fleury Miracula sancti Benedicti, VII, ch III, p. 252, cited in Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70 footnote 46. .

[242] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[243] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 388, additional manuscript quoted in footnote ***.

[244] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[245] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1060, MGH SS XXIII, p. 792.

[246] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[247] RHC, Historiens occidentaux I, Historia Rerum in partibus transmarinis gestarum ("L'estoire de Eracles Empereur et la conqueste de la terre d'Outremer"), (“WT”) I. XVII, p. 45.

[248] RHC, Historiens occidentaux, Tome IV (Paris, 1879), Alberti Aquensis Historia Hierosolymitana ("Albert of Aix (RHC)"), Liber II, Cap. VII-VIII, pp. 304-5.

[249] Sewter, E. R. A. (trans.) (1969) Anna Comnena The Alexiad (Penguin Books), Book 10, p. 313.

[250] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.

[251] Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis 15, MGH SS XIII, p. 255.

--------------------

From the English Wikipedia page on Henry I of France:

English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France

Reign As co-King: 14 May 1027 – 20 July 1031;

As Senior King: 20 July 1031 – 4 August 1060

Coronation 14 May 1027, Cathedral of Reims

Titles Duke of Burgundy (1016 – 1032)

Born 4 May 1008(1008-05-04), Reims, France

Died 4 August 1060 (aged 52), Vitry-aux-Loges, France

Buried Saint Denis Basilica, Paris, France

Predecessor Robert II

Successor Philip I

Consort

Matilda of Frisia (d.1044)

Anne of Kiev (between 1024 and 1032 – 1075)

Issue

Philip I (1052 – 1108)

Hugh the Great, Count of Vermandois (1053 – 1101)

Royal House House of Capet

Father Robert II (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031)

Mother Constance of Arles (973 - July 25, 1034)

Henry I (4 May 1008 – 4 August 1060) was King of France from 1031 to his death.

The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

Reign

A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972–1031) and Constance of Arles (986–1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016.

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen.

A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor—all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us.

The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev, ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet.

Ancestors:

Henry's ancestors in three generations Henry I of France Father: Robert II of France

Paternal Grandfather: Hugh Capet

Paternal Great-grandfather: Hugh the Great

Paternal Great-grandmother: Hedwige of Saxony

Paternal Grandmother: Adelaide of Aquitaine

Paternal Great-grandfather: William III of Aquitaine

Paternal Great-grandmother: Gerloc

Mother: Constance of Arles

Maternal Grandfather: William I of Provence

Maternal Great-grandfather: Boso II of Arles

Maternal Great-grandmother: Constance

Maternal Grandmother: Adelaide of Anjou

Maternal Great-grandfather: Fulk II of Anjou

Maternal Great-grandmother: Gerberga of Maine

Marriages and family:

Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024–39), but she died prematurely in 1034.

Henry I then married Matilda, daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044, following a Caesarean section.

Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on 19 May 1051. They had four children:

1.Philip I ( 23 May 1052 – 30 July 1108)

2.Emma (1054–?)

3.Robert (c. 1055–c. 1060)

4.Hugh the Great (1057–1102)

Sources

Vajay, S. Mathilde, reine de France inconnue (Journal des savants), 1971

References

1.^ Charles Cawley. "Boson II of Arles". Medieval Lands. Fondation for Medieval Genealogy. http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#BosonIIArlesdied965B. Retrieved 2 August 2010.

2.^ Settipani, Christian (2000). "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés [Viscounts of Chateaudun and their relatives]" (in French). Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (Oxford: Prosopographica et genealogica): pp. 247-261. ISBN 1-900934-01-9. http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9f%C3%A9rence:Onomastique_et_Parent%C3%A9_dans_l%27Occident_m%C3%A9di%C3%A9val.

3.^ Christian Settipani, "Les comtes d'Anjou et leur alliances aux Xe et XIe siècles", in K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ed., Family Trees and the Roots of Politics (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1997): 211-267.

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(En Francais) French Wikipedia page on Henri I de France:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Ier_de_France

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Geneall:

http://www.geneall.net/F/per_page.php?id=15

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From the Francogene page on Henri I de France:

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/010/010404.php

The family of Henri Ier de FRANCE and Anne de KIEV ou de RUSSIE

[10404] FRANCE (de), Henri Ier (Robert II le Pieux & Constance de PROVENCE [10405]), roi de France, born about 1005, died 1060-08-04 Vitry-aux-Loges (Loiret : 450346), France, buried Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis : 930066), France

married 1051-05-19 Reims (Marne : 510454), France

KIEV ou de RUSSIE (de), Anne (..)

1) Philippe Ier, roi de France, born 1053, died 1108-07-29 Melun (Seine-et-Marne : 770288), France, buried Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire (Loiret : 450270), France, married .. (France) 1071 or 1073 Berthe de HOLLANDE

Bibliographie : Histoire de la maison royale de France (Père Anselme); Mémoires (Société généalogique canadienne-française)

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Unattributed ancestral profile page (no sources):

ID: I808

Name: Henry (Henri) I King of France

Sex: M

Birth: 10 MAY 1005 in Bourgogne, France 23.04.1008

Death: 4 AUG 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France 29 Aug 1060?

Burial: St. Denis

Note: Henry I (of France) (circa 1008-60), king of France (1031-60), son of King Robert II and grandson of Hugh Capet, founder of the Capetian dynasty.

From the beginning of his reign he was occupied with putting down rebellions led by members of his family and other French nobles. Between 1035 and 1047 he assisted his nephew William, duke of Normandy - later William the Conqueror, king of England - in establishing William's authority over rebellious Norman nobles. Henry later grew jealous of William's power and waged unsuccessful war against him in 1054 and 1058. Henry was succeeded by his son Philip I.

--Other Fields

Ref Number: +

Change Date: 12 FEB 1999

Father: Robert II (the Pious) King of France

b: 27 MAR 0970 in Orleans, Loriet, Orleanais, France (27 Mar 0970 [2])

Mother: Constance DE TOULOUSE

b: ABT 0986 in Toulouse, France b. 974, Of Arles, De Toulouse

Marriage 1 Matilda

Marriage 2 Matilda VON FRIESLAND

Married: 1043

Marriage 3 Anne (Anna) of Kiev JAROSLAVNA

b: 1036 in Abt 1023 of Kiev, Ukraine 1024

Married: 29 JAN 1044 in 19 May 1051 Jan 20, 1044

Children

1. Philip (Philippe ) I King of France b: 1052/1053 in France

2. Emma b: 1054

3. Robert b: 1055

4. Hugh (Hugues) Magnus Duke of France & b: 1057 in France

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Nascimento: ou "end 1009/May 1010" (local incerto).

Morte: Palais de Vitry-aux-Loges, forêt d’Orléans, Loiret".

Sepultado: "église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis".

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Unattributed Portuguese Biography of Henry I of France:

O reinado de Henrique I, assim como o de seus antecessores, foi marcado por uma longa sequência de batalhas pela conquista de terras. Inicialmente aliou-se ao seu irmão Roberto, com o apoio da sua mãe, numa revolta contra seu pai em 1025.

Mas ao subir efectivamente ao trono teve de fazer frente à hostilidade da sua mãe e dos grandes vassalos que pretendiam coroar o seu irmão Roberto. Henrique obteve o apoio do Sacro Imperador Romano Conrado II da Germânia e principalmente o de Roberto I da Normandia, e para obter a paz teve de ceder o ducado da Borgonha como apanágio ao seu irmão.

Henrique encontrou-se três vezes em Ivois com Henrique III da Germânia, o sucessor de Conrado II. No início de 1043 discutiram o casamento do imperador com Inês de Poitou, filha de Guilherme V, Duque da Aquitânia. Reuniram-se mais uma vez em Outubro de 1048, e finalmente em Maio de 1056, desta vez para resolver uma disputa sobre a Lorena. O debate sobre este ducado tornou-se tão hostil que o rei da França desafiou o imperador germânico para um duelo. O segundo fugiu da região durante a noite, mas mesmo assim Henrique não conseguiu ficar na posse da Lorena.

Tutor de Guilherme I de Inglaterra, futuro duque da Normandia, apoiou-o inicialmente contra os seus vassalos, principalmente na batalha de Val-ès-Dunes em 1047, perto de Caen. Depois entraram em conflito. Quando o Conquistador, primo do rei inglês Eduardo o Confessor, casou-se com Matilde, filha de Balduíno V, conde da Flandres, Henrique temeu o seu poder crescente. Tentou conquistar-lhe a Normandia na batalha de Mortemer em 1054, e de novo em 1057 em Varaville, sem sucesso.

Durante o seu reinado, Henrique I perdeu a Borgonha e apenas conquistou Sens. Os domínios reais atingiram a extensão mínima territorial em toda a história da França, pelo que este rei é visto como o epíteto da fraqueza da dinastia Capetiana inicial, contra um poder feudal no seu auge. Foi durante este período difícil que os bispos franceses proclamaram a Paz de Deus e a Trégua de Deus, para controlar a violência feudal pelo meio de sanções religiosas.

Henrique morreu em 4 de Agosto de 1060 em Vitry-en-Brie, e foi sepultado na Basílica de Saint-Denis. Foi sucedido pelo seu filho Filipe I de França aos 7 anos de idade, sob a regência de Ana de Kiev.

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Darryl Lundy's Peerage page on Henri I of France:

http://www.thepeerage.com/p10310.htm#i103097

Henri I, Roi de France [1]

M, #103097, b. April 1008, d. 4 August 1060

Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

Henri I, Roi de France was born in April 1008. He was the son of Robert II, Roi de France and Constance d'Arles.[1],[2]

He married Anne of Kiev, daughter of Jarislaus I, Grand Duke of Kiev and Ingegarde of Sweden, on 29 January 1044.[2]

He died on 4 August 1060 at age 52 at Vitry-en-Brie, France.[2] He was buried at Saint-Denis, Île-de-France, France.

Henri I, Roi de France was a member of the House of Capet.[1] He succeeded to the title of Roi Henri I de France in 1031.[1]

Children of Henri I, Roi de France and Anne of Kiev

1. Philippe I, Roi de France+

b. c 1052, d. 29 Jul 1108

2. Hugh de Crépi, Comte de Vermandois et de Valois+[3]

b. 1057, d. 18 Oct 1102

Citations

1. [S38] John Morby, Dynasties of the World: a chronological and genealogical handbook (Oxford, Oxfordshire, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 1989), page 77. Hereinafter cited as Dynasties of the World.

2. [S45] Marcellus Donald R. von Redlich, Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, volume I (1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2002), page 63. Hereinafter cited as Pedigrees of Emperor Charlemagne, I.

3. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/2, page 829. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

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BIOGRAPHY: b. c. 1008

d. Aug. 2, 1060, Vitry-aux-Loges, France

king of France from 1026 to 1060 whose reign was marked by struggles against rebellious vassals.

The son of Robert II the Pious and grandson of Hugh Capet, founder of the Capetian dynasty, Henry was anointed king at Reims (1026) in his father's lifetime, following the death of his elder brother Hugh. His mother, Constance, however, favoured his younger brother Robert for the throne, and civil war broke out on King Robert II's death (1031). The younger Robert was given Burgundy in 1032, after Henry had sought refuge with Robert, Duke of Normandy. From 1033 to 1043 Henry struggled with his feudatories, notably Eudes of Blois and his brother Robert. In 1055, as the result of an agreement made by Robert II, the county of Sens came to the crown as the sole territorial gain of Henry's reign.

Henry helped William (the future William I of England), Robert's successor as duke of Normandy, to quell his rebellious vassals at the Battle of Val-aux-Dunes (or Val-ès-Dunes; 1047), but he was thereafter usually at war with him--a notable defeat for the king being that at Varaville (1058). Henry tried to resist papal interference but could not prevent Pope Leo IX from holding a council at Reims (1049). Philip, elder son of Henry's marriage to a Russian princess, was crowned in 1059.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

---

History: Henry I (of France) (circa 1008-1060), king of France (1031-1060), son of King Robert II and grandson of Hugh Capet, founder of the Capetian dynasty. From the beginning of his reign he was occupied with putting down rebellions led by members of his family and other French nobles. Between 1035 and 1047 he assisted his nephew William, duke of Normandy, later William the Conqueror, king of England, in establishing William's authority over rebellious Norman nobles. Henry later grew jealous of William's power and waged unsuccessful war against him in 1054 and 1058. Henry was succeeded by his son Philip I.

History: Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Even in his 50's he appeared to be going senile. He went to a doctor in Chartres & obtained a potion to restore his health. Apparently he disobeyed the instructions as he was dead the next day.

Sources:

Comptons Interactive Encyclopedia

The book, 'The Oxford History of Medieval Europe'

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'

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Ben M. Angel on the death of Henri I:

The suggestion of Henri I's death by elixir is rather difficult to pin down. The most reputable and complete source for it appears to be secondary (Debrett's Kings and Queens of Europe):

"Henry I's reign saw the burning of Paris and a famine of seven year's duration. The King appears to have been something of a nonentity and is chiefly remembered for the novelty of his second marriage. His first wife, Matilda, niece of the Emperor Conrad II, bore one daughter who died young and died herself very soon after. Henry, anxious to avoid a marriage within the prohibited degrees of kindred and affinity, determined to find his next bride from far afield and in 1051 married Anne, daughter of Yaroslav I, Great Prince of Kiev, who duly bore him three sons. The eldest, Philip, was crowned as associate King at the age of 7 in May 1059. Although only 52, Henry apparently suffered from premature senility, being described as "old and wretched". He obtained a potion which he hoped would restore his health and prolong his life from a doctor in Chartres, but apparently disobeyed the instructions to take it without water and died the next day. Philip succeeded at the age of 8. Queen Anne refused the regency. She was soon after abducted by Count Raoul de Crepy and eventually became his second wife."

The first and foremost problem with this is, of course, the lack of a primary source for the assertion of his death by self-poisoning. His physician, Jean Cormier, did indeed come from Chartres - he apparently paid for a porch off the south transept of the Chartres Cathedral before 1060, page 15 of "The City of Chartres: Its Cathedral and Churches by H.J.L.J. Masse:

http://www.archive.org/stream/cityofchartresit00massuoft#page/15/mode/1up/search/Cormier

There is at least one identifiable glaring mistake in the research by Debrett, as Queen Anne did not refuse the regency. She was in fact the first French Queen to serve in such a role, albeit as co-regent with the young Philippe's uncle, Baudouin V, Comte de Flandres. She remained in that role for a year before her affair with Raoul began with an arranged "abduction" (accompanied later by scandal when she married him as her second husband).

The Medlands project shows no information on Henri's death, indicating a likely lack of primary sources for the supposition of his death by elixir. Until a primary source is found, the cause of his death should remain blank.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France -------------------- see- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France -------------------- Henry I (4 May 1008 – 4 August 1060) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

Reign

A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972–1031) and Constance of Arles (986–1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016.

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen.

A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor—all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev, ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet. -------------------- Henry I (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060) was King of France from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy. Reign A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972-1031) and Constance of Arles (986-1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death. The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016. In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen. A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle. Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor-all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine. King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev, ruled as regent. He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet. Marriages and family Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of the Emperor Conrad II (1024-39), but she died prematurely in 1034. Henry I then married Matilda, daughter of Liudolf, Margrave of Frisia, but she died in 1044, following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry I married Anne of Kiev on 19 May 1051. -------------------- From Wikipedia

Reign

A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972–1031) and Constance of Arles (986–1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016.

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen.

A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor—all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry I's Queen, Anne of Kiev, ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert Capet. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_France -------------------- Henry I (4 May 1008 – 4 August 1060) was the King of the Franks from 1031 to his death. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy. -------------------- A member of the House of Capet, Henry was born in Reims, the son of King Robert II (972–1031) and Constance of Arles (986–1034). He was crowned King of France at the Cathedral in Reims on 14 May 1027, in the Capetian tradition, while his father still lived. He had little influence and power until he became sole ruler on his father's death.

The reign of Henry I, like those of his predecessors, was marked by territorial struggles. Initially, he joined his brother Robert, with the support of their mother, in a revolt against his father (1025). His mother, however, supported Robert as heir to the old king, on whose death Henry was left to deal with his rebel sibling. In 1032, he placated his brother by giving him the duchy of Burgundy which his father had given him in 1016.

In an early strategic move, Henry came to the rescue of his very young nephew-in-law, the newly appointed Duke William of Normandy (who would go on to become William the Conqueror), to suppress a revolt by William's vassals. In 1047, Henry secured the dukedom for William in their decisive victory over the vassals at the Battle of Val-ès-Dunes near Caen.

A few years later, when William married Matilda, the daughter of the count of Flanders, Henry feared William's potential power. In 1054, and again in 1057, Henry went to war to try to conquer Normandy from William, but on both occasions he was defeated. Despite his efforts, Henry I's twenty-nine-year reign saw feudal power in France reach its pinnacle.

Henry had three meetings with Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor—all at Ivois. In early 1043, he met him to discuss the marriage of the emperor with Agnes of Poitou, the daughter of Henry's vassal. In October 1048, the two Henries met again, but the subject of this meeting eludes us. The final meeting took place in May 1056. It concerned disputes over Lorraine. The debate over the duchy became so heated that the king of France challenged his German counterpart to single combat. The emperor, however, was not so much a warrior and he fled in the night; despite this, Henry did not get Lorraine.

King Henry I died on 4 August 1060 in Vitry-en-Brie, France, and was interred in Basilica of St Denis. He was succeeded by his son, Philip I of France, who was 7 at the time of his death; for six years Henry's queen Anne of Kiev ruled as regent.

He was also Duke of Burgundy from 1016 to 1032, when he abdicated the duchy to his brother Robert.

Marriages[edit]

Henry I was betrothed to Matilda, the daughter of Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, but she died prematurely in 1034. Henry then married Matilda of Frisia, but she died in 1044, following a Caesarean section. Casting further afield in search of a third wife, Henry married Anne of Kiev on 19 May 1051. They had four children: 1.Philip I (23 May 1052 – 30 July 1108) 2.Emma (born 1054, date of death unknown) 3.Robert (c. 1055 – c. 1060) 4.Hugh "the Great" of Vermandois (1057–1102)

Ancestry[edit]

[show]Ancestors of Henry I of France


















 






 










 






 













 






 










 






 
















 






 










 






 













 






 










 






 



















 






 













 













 






 










 






 
















 






 










 






 













 






 










 






Sources[edit] Vajay, S. Mathilde, reine de France inconnue (Journal des savants), 1971

References[edit]

1.Jump up ^ Charles Cawley. "Boson II of Arles". Medieval Lands. Fondation for Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved 2 August 2010. 2.Jump up ^ Settipani, Christian (2000). "Les vicomtes de Châteaudun et leurs alliés" [Viscounts of Chateaudun and their relatives]. Onomastique et Parenté dans l'Occident médiéval (in French) (Oxford: Prosopographica et genealogica). pp. 247–261. ISBN 1-900934-01-9. 3.Jump up ^ Christian Settipani, "Les comtes d'Anjou et leur alliances aux Xe et XIe siècles", in K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, ed., Family Trees and the Roots of Politics (Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1997): 211–267.

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Henri I, roi de France's Timeline

1009
1009
Muelan, Paris, Orleannais, West Francia (now Ile-de-France, France)
1016
January 25, 1016
- 1031
Age 7
Burgundy, France
1027
May 14, 1027
- July 20, 1031
Age 18
France
1030
1030
Age 21
France
1031
July 20, 1031
- August 4, 1060
Age 22
France
1033
1033
Age 24
1035
1035
Age 26
Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1040
1040
Age 31
1043
1043
Age 34
Friesland, Niedersachsen, Germany
1051
May 19, 1051
Age 42
Rheims, Champagne-Ardenne, France